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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00066
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00066
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Supplement: Senate debates for 6th July, 1968
        Page A 147
        Page A 148
        Page A 149
        Page A 150
        Page A 151
        Page A 152
        Page A 153
        Page A 154
        Page A 155
    Supplement: Senate debates for 13th July, 1968
        Page A 156
        Page A 157
        Page A 158
        Page A 159
        Page A 160
        Page A 161
        Page A 162
        Page A 163
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 6; S.I. 12: Wireless telegraphy (amendment) regulations, 1969
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
    Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 6; S.I. 13: Directions given by the commissioner of police with the approval of the minister of home affairs re Barbados Rally Club
        Page B 4
Full Text











NO. 9


~tfflc~iaI


afiatU


PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 30TH JANUARY, 1969
- ---~--~-1


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Gazette Notices
Applications for Liquor Licences at District "C":
George Jones, Eulalie Mason,
Richard F. Mc.Adoo..............................
Executorial: Elsie May Springer......................
Patents: "Freeze Concentration of Coffee Extract"
"Improvements in and relating to Electrical
Cables" ................... ......................
"Improvements in or relating to Cutter Bits
and Methods of Anchoring"......................
Probate Advertisements dated 24th January, 1969
Resignations: Mrs.Velda Alleyne, Clerical Officer;
Miss Monica Lord, Clerical Officer;
Curtis Vincent Small, Staff Nurse, Queen
Elizabeth Hospital...........................


Senate Debates for 6th and 13th July, 1968.


S.I. 1969 No. 12:

S.I. 1969 No. 13:


92, 93
93
92


92


92
95, 96




91


Legal Supplement
Wireless Telegraphy (Amendment) Regula-
tions, 1969.
Directions given by the Commissioner of
Police with the approval of the Minister
of Home Affairs re Barbados Rally Club.


NOTICE NO. 95

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Resignations

Curtis Vincent Small, Staff Nurse, Queen
Elizabeth Hospital, has resigned from the
Public Service with effect from 29th Novem-
ber, 1968.

(M.P. P. 9076)

Miss Monica Lord, Clerical Officer,
Ministry of Health, to resign from the Public
Service with effect from 13th February, 1969.

(M.P. P. 8148)

Mrs Velda Alleyne, Clerical Officer,
General Post Office, has resigned from the
Public Service with effect from 3rd Decem-
ber, 1968.

(M.P. P. 8603)

Mrs. Monica Y. Alleyne, Clerical Offi-
cer, resigns from the Public Service with ef-
fect from 1st February, 1969.

(M.P. P. 8265)


X
3 ;g, 2?9
^. ~)z


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OFF Aanuarv 30


NOTICE NO. 96

PUBLIC NOTICE

(Patents Act, 1903-7, Sec. 10)

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDSAY
ERCELL RYEBURN GILL of No. 17 High
Street, Bridgetown, Barbados lodged in this
Office an application and Complete specifica-
tion for a patent under the Patent Act 1903
(1903-7), for an invention for "IMPROVE-
MENTS IN AND RELATING TO ELECTRI-
CAL CABLES."

The said Specification has been accepted
and is open to public inspection at this Office.

G. A. A. MAYNARD
Registrar (Ag.)


NOTICE NO. 78 (second publication)


PUBLIC NOTICE

(Patents Act, 1903-7, Sec. 10)


NOTICE is hereby given that STRUC-
TURERS SCIENTIFIC AND INTERNATION-
AL CORPORATION of 630 Fifth Avenue, New
York City, New York in the United States of
America lodged in this Office an application
and Complete specification for a patent under
the Patent Act 1903 (1903-7), for an invention
for "FREEZE CONCENTRATION OF COF-
FEE EXTRACT."

The said Specification has been accepted
and is open to public inspection at this Office.

G. A. A. MAYNARD


Registrar (Ag.)


NOTICE NO. 97

PUBLIC .NOTICE

(Patents Act, 1903-7, Sec. 10)

NOTICE is hereby given that HAMISH
GREIG McCLURG of Lucas Street, in the
City of Bridgetown, in the Island of Barbados
lodged in this Office'an application and com-
plete specification for a patent under the
Patent Act 1903 (1903-7), for an invention for
"IMPROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO
CUTTER BITS AND METHODS OF ANCHOR-
ING."
The said Specification has been accepted
and is open to public inspection at this Office.
G. A. A. MAYNARD
Registrar (Ag.)
NOTICE NO. 98

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE

(Act 1957-40)


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:
PREMISES:


RICHARD F. Mc.ADOO
Manager
"Stonehaven"
Stone and galvanize
building of ten bed-
rooms situate at
Crane, St. Philip.


Dated this 23rd day of January 1969.

Signed: RICHARD F. Mc.ADOO
Applicant.
This Application for a Hotel Licence will
be considered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Magistrate's Court Dist. "C" on Friday
the 7th day of February 1969 at 9 o'clock a.m.

W. C. MARSHALL
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


y raunaJ 30 1969










PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that applications have been made
for the following Grants of Probate and Administration namely :-

PROBATE of the Will dated the 29th day of January, 1962, of MARCUS HOWELL DRAYTON
late of Workman's Village in the parish of Saint George in this Island who died on
the 22nd day of April, 1966, by BERTINA CONNELL and MURIEL EUDENE
FREDERICK, the Executrices named in the Will of the said deceased.
PROBATE of the Will dated the 1st day of April, 1961 of LEILA LYNCH late of "Colleen",
Worthing in the parish of Christ Church in this Island who died on the 9th day of
July, 1966, by MILLICENT LYNCH one of the Executrices named in the Will of the
said deceased.

PROBATE of the Willdated the 31st dayof July, 1967 of JOSEPH CLAYTON SKEETE late
of Clevedale Road in Black Rock in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who
died on the 26th day of October, 1968, by OLGA VIRGINIA LONG one of the Execu-
tors named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the' 6th day of May, 1966 of VIOLET JOHNSON, late of
"Lynn", 6th Avenue, Belleville, in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island, who
died on the 4th day of March, 1968, by HENRY BRIGGS LASHLEY and HENRY
ALBERT LASHLEY, the Executors named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 2nd day of September, 1959 of FREDERICK BEST late of
464 Green Avenue, Brooklyn, New York in the United States of America on the 27th
day of January, 1968, by VASHTI LIVERPOOL, the sole Executrix named in the Will
of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of MARTIN LLEWLLYN PHILLIPS late of
Bel Air in the parish of Saint George in this Island who died on the 4th day of May,
1968, by EDNA PHILLIPS, widow of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of GEORGE WILKIE late ofBrittons Hill
in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died on the 25th day of February,
1968, by EVELYN WILKIE, mother of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of THOMAS ALONZA BELFIELD BARNES
late of Mayers Road, My Lords Hillin the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who
died on or about the 7th day of February, 1968, by ALLAN ST.CLAIR WATSON, one
of the constituted Attorneys on record in this Island of VIDA OMETA BARNES,
widow of the said deceased.


January 30, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE











PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS Cont'd

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of JAMES NATHANIEL CRICHLOW, late
of Greens in the parish of Saint George in this Island who died on the 18th day of
July, 1957, by LAWRENCE ARTHUR GREEN, the Attorney on record of COLBERT
ARNOLD CRICHLOW, eldest son and heir-at-law of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of CHRISTABELL VIRGIN BUTCHER late
of Dayrells Road in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died on the
1st day of May, 1968, by EUSTACE ST.CLAIR BUTCHER, widower of the said
deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION CUM TESTAMENTO ANNEXO to the Estate of JOSEPH
ARTHUR GREEN late of Bush Hall in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who
died on the 25th day of November, 1966, by ALICIA TAYLOR and WINIFRED
GOODRIDGE one of the beneficiaries named in the Will and mother respectively of
the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of LAURA ADINA BARNES late of
Barbarees Hill in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island, who died on the 28th
day of August, 1968, by OLIVER WINSTON DeCOURCEY BARNES husband of the
said deceased.
LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of WILMA SARAH SMITH late of Sunset
Lodge Hotel in the parish of Saint Peter in this Island who died on the 21st day of
SApril, 1966, by NEIL BENEDICT GEORGE FIT7WILLIAM, the Attorney of one
of the sons and next of kin of the said deceaed.

UNLESS CAVEAT is lodged within fourteen day from the date of this Advertisement
with the Registrar of the Supreme Court through whom the abovenamed applications have
been made Probate and Administration will be granted accordingly.

Dated this 24th day of January, 1969.


G. A. A. MAYNARD
Registrar (Ag.).
















Government Printing Office.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


January 30, 1969











PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that applications have been made
for the following Grants of Probate and Administration namely :-

PROBATE of the Will dated the 29th day of January, 1962, of MARCUS HOWELL DRAYTON
late of Workman's Village in the parish of Saint George in this Island who died on
the 22nd day of April, 1966, by BERTINA CONNELL and MURIEL EUDENE
FREDERICK, the Executrices named in the Will of the said deceased.
PROBATE of the Will dated the 1st day of April, 1961 of LEILA LYNCH late of "Colleen",
Worthing in the parish of Christ Church in this Island who died on the 9th day of
July, 1966, by MILLICENT LYNCH one of the Executrices named in the Will of the
said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 31st dayof July, 1967 of JOSEPH CLAYTON SKEETE late
of Clevedale Road in Black Rock in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who
died on the 26th day of October, 1968, by OLGA VIRGINIA LONG one of the Execu-
tors named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the' 6th day of May, 1966 of VIOLET JOHNSON, late of
"Lynn", 6th Avenue, Belleville, inthe parish of Saint Michael in this Island, who
died on the 4th day of March, 1968, by HENRY BRIGGS LASHLEY and HENRY
ALBERT LASHLEY, the Executors named in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 2nd day of September, 1959 of FREDERICK BEST late of
464 Green Avenue, Brooklyn, New York in the United States of America on the 27th
day of January, 1968, by VASHTI LIVERPOOL, the sole Executrix named in the Will
of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of MARTIN LLEWLLYN PHILLIPS late of
Bel Air in the parish of Saint George in this Island who died on the 4th day of May,
1968, by EDNA PHILLIPS, widow of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of GEORGE WILKIE late of Brittons Hill
in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died on the 25th day of February,
1968, by EVELYN WILKIE, mother of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of THOMAS ALONZA BELFIELD BARNES
late ofMayers Road, My Lords Hillin the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who
died on or about the 7th day of February, 1968, by ALLAN STCLAIR WATSON, one
of the constituted Attorneys on record in this Island of VIDA OMETA BARNES,
widow of the said deceased.


January 30, 1969


OFFICIAL GAZETTE











PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS Cnt'd

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of JAMES NATHANIEL CRICHLOW, late
of Greens in the parish of Saint George in this Island who died on the 18th day of
July, 1957, by LAWRENCE ARTHUR GREEN, the Attorney on record of COLBERT
ARNOLD CRICHLOW, eldest son and heir-at-law of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of CHRISTABELL VIRGIN BUTCHER late
of Dayrells Road in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died on the
1st day of May, 1968, by EUSTACE ST.CLAIR BUTCHER, widower of the said
deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION CUM TESTAMENTO ANNEXO to the Estate of JOSEPH
ARTHUR GREEN late of Bush Hall in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island who
died on the 25th day of November, 1966, by ALICIA TAYLOR and WINIFRED
GOODRIDGE one of the beneficiaries named in the Will and mother respectively of
the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of LAURA ADINA BARNES late of
Barbarees Hill in the parish of Saint Michael in this Island, who died on the 28th
day of August, 1968, by OLIVER WINSTON DeCOURCEY BARNES husband of the
said deceased.
LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of WILMA SARAH SMITH late of Sunset
Lodge Hotel in the parish of Saint Peter in this Island who died on the 21st day of
April, 1966, by NEIL BENEDICT GEORGE FIT7WILLIAM, the Attorney of one
of the sons and next of kin of the said deceased.

UNLESS CAVEAT is lodged within fourteen day from the date of this Advertisement
with the Registrar of the Supreme Court through whom the abovenamed applications have
been made Probate and Administration will be granted accordingly.


Dated this 24th day of January, 1969.


G. A. A. MAYNARD
Registrar (Ag.)


Government Printing Office.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


January 30, 1969










THE


SENATE


DEBATES


(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


THE SENATE

Thursday, July 6, 1967
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public.
Buildings, at 4 o'clock p.m, today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E. S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.,
(President); His Honour Senator C. ASQUITH
PHILLIPS, B. A. (Deputy President), Senator the Hon -
ourable H. A. VAUGHAN, O.B.E., Q.C., (Minister of
State and Leader of the Senate), Senator C. L.
BRATHWAITE, Senator F. C. H. CAREW, Senator E.
LISLE WARD, Senator H. F. ALKINS, SenatorW. W.
BLACKMAN, M.B.E., Senator D. A. WILES, C.M.G.,
O.B.E., Senator S. A. BLANCHETTE, Senator S. V.
ASHBY, Senator Dr. R. B. CADDLE, B.Sc.,M.B.B.S.,
Senator F. L. WALCOTT, O.B.E., Senator ERMA V.
ROCK, Senator R. G. MAPP.

ABSENT

Senator the Honourable P. M. GREAVES Q.C.,
(Minister of Home Affairs), Senator the Honourable
F. G. SMITH, B.A., (Attorney General), Senator H.
Odessa GITTENS, M.R.S.H. (Parliamentary Secre-
tary), Senator C. G. JOHNSON, Senator N. A.
BARROW, B.A., Senator P. G. MORGAN (On leave).

Prayers were said.

EXCUSES FOR ABSENCE

The Clerk informed the Senate that he had been
asked to offer excuses for the absence of Senator
the Honourable P. M..Greaves, Senator the Honoura-
ble F. G. Smith, Senator H. Odessa Gittens and
Senator N. A. Barrow from the day's meeting.

PAPERS

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan, Minister
of State, laid the following Papers:-

(i) Statement of Revenue and Expenditure
of the Barbados Savings Bank for the
year ended 31st December, 1965.

(ii) Report on the Training Scheme Fund for
1966-67.


(iii) The Customs Duties
2) Order, 1967.


(Amendment) (No.


(iv) The Consumption Tax Order, 1967.

(v) The Merchandise Marks (Amendment)
Rules, 1967.

APPOINTMENT OF DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, Before the items on the Order Pa-
per are begun, I think that we should take this oppor-
tunity to appoint a Deputy President for this day's
sitting. I move that Senator C. L. Brathwaite be
appointed Deputy President for this day's sitting.

Senator E. Lisle Ward seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SENATOR C. L. BRATHWAITE: I thank sena-
tors for appointing me.

RESOLUTION TO APPROVE LEASE TO TOWN AND
COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES (BARBADOS) LTD.

The President called the first Order A Reso-
lution to approve the lease to Town and Commercial
Properties (Barbados) Ltd., of a parcel of land
situate at Engineer's Pier, Aquatic Gap, in the parish
of Saint Michael.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, There is little needformeto add
anything by way of introduction of this Resolution to
what is contained in the Schedule. I may say,
however, that it is proposed by the company to which
this lease is to be given to erect a 120 -bedroom hotel.

With respect to the terms, I would suggest that
Senators should bear in mind that over and above the
stated sums which, according to the Addendum the
Government is receiving, the amounts for materials
bought, and that they should also take into account the
wages which will be paid toemployeesofthehotel
during the time that it is functioning under private
ownership and the number of people who will either
directly or indirectly derive a living from the dis-
bursements of the hotel.











At the end of the lease the land in which the
hotel is situated will automatically revert to the
Government. To put it another way, these figures
should be regarded as standing alone, but as part and
parcel of a wide agreement between the Government
and the lessees.

I move, sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, When
I first saw this Resolution I thought it very nice of
the Government to encourage what might be com-
petition with the Hilton Hotel right across from it.
Certainly, Sir,the most worrying thing about this
Resolution is the rent which the Government is
charging for this piece of land. One wonders on what
basis they arrived at the rent.

It seems to me preposterous for the Government
to fix rent at $2,500 a year etc. for 99 years. Anyone
of us who can see into the future to that extent is
certainly not of this world. I cannot see the wisdom
of the Government looking forward that far. There
may be a war \and there may be radical steps by
another Government to stabilise the price of land in
this island, especially sea coast land which foreign
sources are only too glad to buy up.

If it was a method stabilising prices I could
understand it. If there is anything that is needed in
Barbados today it is the stabilising of these rapidly
rising prices which local people cannot affordto pay.
It seems that in the next 25 years only the Govern-
ment and foreign concerns will be owning the lands on
our sea coast. It is difficult to stabilise prices
generally by a lone action of this sort in relation to
the piece of land that we are discussing.

The Minister did not give us a clue of the value
which the Government is placing on the land. If they
were selling it by the square foot howmuchwould
they charge? In the Other Place the Minister put it
at $10 a square foot. $220,738 is the valuation of this
piece of land. This Government is borrowing money
at least 6 1/2 per cent outside. Let us see what is
6 per cent for 25 years.

Let us say as the Minister of State has told us
that they are benefitting from wages, taxation etc.
In any case the tax exemptions will benefit the
company. Even at the minium, 6 per cent interest
will work out at over $13,000 a year which is a
considerable way above $2,500 a year for the first
25 years.

When we discussed the Hotel Bill the other day
I made the comment that we were treating foreign
investors more generously than local investors. Now
we find a very generous offer being made to what I
understand is a foreign concern.

I am glad that a plan has been produced. I
understand that the company has hotels all over the


world. A rent of $9,000 or $10,000 over this amount
would not keep them from coming to the island. I am
not saying that you should try to runpeople out of the
industry with fantastic prices, but I want to see you
charge at least a reasonable price in viewof what the
Government is paying in interest on loans.

Only last week we had a complaint that the Gov-
ernment is considered a milch cow. We must take
these things into consideration and I say that this rent
is unreasonably low. Someone may get up andsay
one thing and another person may say another; but
there is standard business procedure.

I am not drawing figures out of a hat. If the
Government says that the valuation is $10 a square
foot, even half of that would be more than $2,500 a
year as the Government is asking. Fixing the value
of this land for the next twenty five years and the
next fifty years is fantastic and preposterous. Surely
we need not do this. Prices can be agreed on when
the lase falls to be renewed again.

Even if I stand alone I cannot accept the fantas-
tically low figure that the Government is charging
this foreign concern. This is yet another of these
foreign concerns that can pay money and which are
coming into this island and buying all the sea coast
land.

It may be thrown at me that this is nothing new;
but at some stage you have got to put a halttothe
trend. This is not a guarantee that the Government
will stabilise the price of land to the extent that local
people can buy land on the sea coast. This is simply
a matter of renting a piece of land which we know is
a very good area. In my view the Government is
losing a golden opportunity of realising something
more for land which they themselves value at
$10.00 a square foot.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, -
Senator Mapp in dealing with this matter said that it
was a rental matter. Senator Mapp does not always
speak in one way. You are not renting land in this
context; you are speaking in terms of economic
development. There are some people in public life
who do not seem to believe in reading and knowing
what is going on in the world.

The U.K. did not talk about foreigners coming
into Britain; but they encourage foreign investment.
There are the countries of Europe with a high per
capital income. Find out how much money is being
invested in Denmark and other countries in Europe.
Find out how much capital there is that is not in-
digenous capital. They do that because they have found
that if you encourage investment capital from out-
side it raises your gross product. It raises your
standard of living.

In this case you are not rentinglandas land. The
Aquatic Club was there for many years. This is not
a new creation. Senator Mapp was a member of Gov-
e rnment for a considerable period. They never passed


_











any law restricting the sale of beach land. That Gov-
ernment did not tryto acquire beachland at Heywood's
Plantation and develop it in the interest of Barbados.
They permitted it to be sold to Canadians. Golden
Shores was brought from the owners and that was
beachland, more beachland than we are talking about
now. He was a Minister of Government, and he did
not say we will take over some of this land and de-
velop it in the interest of Barbadians instead of letting
foreigners take it over. Sandy Lane was sold and
Sandy Lane Hotel was constructed.

Now this Government has made it clear that its
policy is one of development. The rental value of the
lease is an encouragement. Barbados is not the only
place where people want to invest money. If Barba-
dians feels that there is a lot of money just waiting
to come in here and therefore you can put up prices
you are wrong.

Take the field at Preswick that was once an air-
field. With the coming of jet aircraft it was signed
over to the Scottish Government and that Government
found itself with plenty land. They asked people to
come there and use it for development purposes. And
Scotland has no comparison with Barbados. Barbados
with a heavy population and the necessity to look for
exports has to project an image, not a selfish one in
the context that you have an area from which you have
got to keep out foreigners.

If you withdraw the British from our economy
we will starve. They only have to stop buying our
sugar. This question of bringing in foreign invest-
ments depends on the manner in which you do it. You
must ask yourself if you need any more development
along particular lines. If so, let us have it done. If
the capital is in Barbados you do not need to en-
courage any to come in. But go and ask the banks how
many people have to borrow to keep their business
in Barbados running.

This is not a question of taking away beachland.
It is something that is part of our economy. If you
were going to give someone larger concessions than
the present sugar people to bring sugar from
Australia or South Africa you could say lookwhat you
are doing.

In the hotel business let us be quite frank and see
that investment capital among Barbadians is com-
paratively low. Investors have not gone into it because
it is something new. They prefer to invest in what
they know about. The hotel business is relatively
risk capital.


Senator Mapp is talking like if you are dealing
with an individual. Anything that an individual plans
he wouldlike to see fulfilled in his life span; but a Gov-
ernment cannot operate on that basis. Government
goes on in perpetuity. When he talks about 99 years
he is thinking as an individual. He is mixing up a
financial matter with an economic development
matter. The two things are completely different.


He is forgetting that in a lease of this nature you
are not leasing it to the company to do as it likes,
but with a specific object. If that object falls through
you have the right to make some other determination.
Economic and financial matter are so closely allied
that you can mix them up when you deal with matters
of this nature.

Of course you could get more for this land, bit
the Government is leasing it not on the basis of the
value you can get as rental, but what it means to
Barbados in the encouragement of its development
potential.

When we think of the number of things we have
to do in this island look at all the old houses you
have to talk in terms of 99 and 100 years unless you
burn them all down overnight. Housing not goingto be
a thing of 40, 50 or 60 years. We have to think in
terms of an independent country.

If you are inviting people to invest money do not
act as if you were afraid to let them invest money.
Barbados is not London or New York. It is not the
richest country in the world. Most of the businesses
operating in this country are operating on capital
from outside. Do not fly a political kite that every-
thing which the Government does must be opposed.

Even the big nations are inviting outside capital.
The State Governments within the U. S. A. have set up
programmes to encourage investment by people from
other wealthy areas. In Great Britain there are dis-
tressed areas. I repeat that, without losing your
independence and your dignity, you must encourage
outside investors.

Remember how that same plot of land was rented
before when it did not have the same economic value
to this country as this project will. Why not take the
Garrison Savannah and rent it for horse races at the
economic value of the land? You might not have
horse races at all; but you feel that horse racing
means something to the community life because it
is made up of many facts. It is what it means to the
island in the net result. I do not see why this pro-
ject is something that has to be -viewed with sus-
picion as if you were giving away valuable property
to foreigners.

SENATOR S.V. ASHBY: Mr. President, -- I
would like first of all to draw to the attention of the
senator who wishes to oppose this Resolution that
the development of this site will be something in the
region of $3 million. I do not think that the company
would put that amount into the project unless they had
security for at least 100 years.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: On a point of order -
No one was opposing the lease in principle. All that
I was talking about is the rent being charged.

SENATOR S. V. ASHBY: I understand that he
spoke about the arrangements being for too long a
term. There are three Governments those of Grenada











St. Lucia and Antigua who have given 99 year.
leases on eachland for hotel development.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I was not quarelling
about the lease itself. I said that you could not for-
see what\vlues would be like in 25 or 50 years.

SENATOR S. V. ASHBY: I am saying exactly
the same thing. On the other hand, I must support
Senator Walcott This is a question of development
and we are heading into competition from other is -
lands. At the end of the 99 years the land will still
belong to the Government. This Resolution shows
farsightedness on the part of the Government.

SENATOR THE HON. H. A. VAUGHAN: Listen-
ing to Senator Mapp, one would say at first blush that
he did not understand the nature of this operation. But
that would be unfair to him. I cannot believe that a
person who has been a member of Parliament for
many years and who has held a responsible position
could be so grossly ignorant of the nature of this
operation. Let us say that he has got his lines cross-
ed, and let me try to simplify the matter.

When this proposition was made to the Govern-
ment there were one of three courses open to the
Government. The Government could have sold them
this land outright, in which case there would be no
question of tailoring anything to suit their conveni-
ence. It would have been a plain business deal-- the
land is situated in a certain parish and is worth so
much a square foot. If you want it you can have it.
That would be a matter between the owner and the
would be purchaser. That proposition the Govern-
ment did not accept.

The second course would have been to buy the
adjoining land and rent both the Government's lands
and the one which it had acquired to the investors
at an economic rate without any consideration of
what they wanted the land for. It would be just a
matter of the Government being the owner and
charging them in accordance with what was the market
rental at the time. The Government did not accept
that proposition either.

The third proposition is what is before this
House that is to lease a portion of land which this
Government owns for the purpose of the sort of devel -
opment they want.

I do not want to repeat what has been said so
justly and in such detail. At once you must put out
.of your mind the question of making a deal as is
made in the marketplace every day, trying to charge
as much as you can possibly get because you are
getting rid of the land once and for all. That consid-
eration does not apply.

As Senator Walcott has said, Barbados is not the
only pebble on the investment beach. Every other place
is giving good investment terms and we have to follow
suit if we want investors at all.

One last point, Sir. Senator Mapp spoke about
stabilising land prices. The object of this is not to


stabilise the price of land. That question does not
arise. It is not a question of cuttingup land and sell-
ing it out in parcels.

He himself has made it clear, that in 99 years all
sorts of things may happen. The future will take care
of itself. No one can say with absolute clarity what
the Investment situation will be at the end of 99
years. You will try to make the best arrangement
which promises to ensure the best benefit to the Gov-
ernment bearing in mind that the land will eventually
revert to the Government.

As things are at present it seems highly probable
that the land with the buildings on it will depreciate
considerably. As I said, Senator Mapp has tried to
make a point. His lines have got crossed and we
will leave him to reconsider his mistakes and pos-
sibly learn a little more wisdom.

The question that the Resolution be coac,!ri.:d in
was put to the Senate and resolved in the affirmative
on the following division:

Ayes: Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan,
Senators C. L. Brathwaite, F. C. H. Carew, S. V.
Ashby, F. L. Walcott, Dr. R. B.Caddle, C. Asquith
Phillips, E. Lisle Ward, D. A. Wiles, H. F. Alkins,
W. W. Blackman, S. A. Blanchette and Erma V.

Rock 13.

Noes: Senator R. G. Mapp -1.

A BILL TO CONFER IMMUNITIES, POWERS. AND
PRIVILEGES ON DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR
REPRESENTATIVES

The President called the second order -A Bill
to confer immunities, powers and privileges on
diplomatic and consular representatives and repre-
sentatives of international organizations and certain
other persons, and for purposes ancillary to or con-
nected with matters aforesaid.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, There are at present on the Sta-
tute Book two Acts dealing with diplomatic privi-
leges and immunities. Both these Acts were passed
sometime before this island acheived Independence.
Experience has shown that there are unsuitable to
our present status as an Independent nation, and
what with the appointment of the national represen-
tatives of other countries to Barbados, it has become
necessary for us to revise these laws and to set
forth new and appropriate provisions in this Bill.

If Senators will turn to the schedules of the Bill
they will see what is intended. In the first schedule
they will see set out the provisions that came into
force according to a convention of 1961. Barbados ad-
hered to that convention. What we have done in the
first schedule is to reinsert the provisions of that
convention as they schedule.

This Bill has been modelled to a large extent
on Jamacian legislation. There have been modifi-
cations to suit our local circumstances.











I need only add that the privileges which it.
is intended to confer in this Bill will be conferred
only on a reciprocal basis. Members might care
to turn to Clause 10 which provides that a list of
persons who are accorded privileges under this Bill
should be compiled by the minister and published
in the Official Gazette. He may amend that list
from time to time as the circumstances warren.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr.President,-I
would just say that in accordance with the prac-
tice in Independent countries there is nothing un-
usual about this. Under Section 3 I would like to ask
suppose that the wife of a diplomat is missing
under circumstances which might call for police
investigation, can that clause be so interpreted that
the police cannot go into the home of the diplomat
and make investigations as they would do ordinarily
in the case of an ordinary person? We have to be
very careful in these things. This is something
new to us. We want to know whether in respect of
action of any sort the diplomats are exempt and
immune from certain investigations by the police.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Senator Mapp has asked a question relating to the
interpretationof a clause to this Bill. I am intro-
ducing the Bill. I am not a judge sitting and deciding
a point of international law. Diplomats enjoy
privileges which are naturally far in excess of
those enjoyed by the ordinary individual. I am
certainly not going to oblige Senator Mapp by
giving a lecture on the scope and extent of dip-
lomatic privileges and immunities. Bring a test
case and the courts will be there to interpret the
law. That is not the function of the legislature.

The question that the Bill be read a second
time was put to the Senate and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Hon. H. A.
Vaughan seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite
the Senate went into Committee on the Bill, Senator
C. L. Brathwaite in the chair.

Clauses 1 to 7 were called and passed with-
out debate.

Clause 7 was called.



SENATOR D. A. WILES: In this clause there is
the word "Gazette" it obviously means Official
Gazette.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
It is correct according to the Interpretation Act.

The question that Clause 8 stands part of the Bill
was put and agreed to.

Clause 9 was called and agreed to without debate.


Clause 10 was called.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan addressed
the Senate and drew attention to a printer's error
which had occurred in line 7 of sub-section (2) of the
clause.

The question that Clause 10, as amended by the
substitutionof the figure "8" for the figures "81"
in subsection (2), stand part of the Bill was put
to the Senate and agreed to.

Clauses 11 21 of the Bill were called and
passed without debate.

The Schedules to the Bill were called.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan moved
that the Schedules stand part of the Bill.

Senator E. Lisle Ward seconded the motion.

The question that the Schedules stand part of the
Bill was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The question that the passing of the Bill in
Committee be reported to the Senate was put and
agreed to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair
and the passing of the Bill in Committee was re-
ported accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite,
the Bill was read a third time and passed.

BILL TO AMEND THE NATIONAL INSURANCE
AND SOCIAL SECURITY ACT
The President called the third Order A Bill
to amend The National Insurance and Social Security
Act.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President this Bill seeks to do four things.
Their are set out in the Objects and Reasons. Mem-
bers may not have with them copies of the Princi-
pal Act. By referring to it there willbe seen the scope
of the amendments proposed in this Bill.
Section 11 of the Act seeks to correct a
printer's error because of which the clause does
not make sense. What was intended was that the
clause should be for all purposes. There are cer-
tain posts which will be filled by the Public Service
Commission and these offices would for all purposes
be deemed to be offices in the Public Service of the
island.

The next object is to ensure that invalidity
benefit is not dependent on the exhaustion of such
benefits. Sickness benefit as approved is one which
is paid in eight instalments out of the first thirteen
weeks immediately before one becomes ill. On the
other hand invalidity benefit which accrue when you
become permanently handicapped is based on your
having paid fifty instalments before the accident
which led to your invalidity occurred. There is no
question of paying a certain proporti6h of any number


j











of instalments for any number of weeks. In other,
words, under the provision of the Act as it stands
now, you can become entitled to draw invalidity
benefit only after your sickness benefit have been
exhausted, only after at the minimum you have paid
eight weeks installments out of thirteen instalments
immediately before you became ill.

The third amendment deals with the setting out
in greater detail the payments which will be paid
into the National Insurance Fund.As the law stands
at present the only payments which can be made
to the fund are these set out in the principal Act,
and the only payments which can be made out of the
funds are benefits. There are lots of other things
which, as will be seen from the proposed amendments
payments into the fund should be provided for. There
are also other things in repsect of which payments
should be made into the fund. These are set out in
detail.

The last amendment deals with Section 38.
Under the Act there is at present some doubt in
some places as to whether or not the Board has
any authority to appoint Inspectors. Under Section 2
"Inspector" is defined as a person who is appointed
by. the Board. Anyhow, to make the situation abun-
dantly clear it has been thought expedient to make an
amendment which gives the Board the explicit pow-
er to appoint Inspectors.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be reada second time.

Senator F. C. Carew seconded the motion.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, I
have just one minor question. In the amendment to
Section 30 I see that there shall be paid out of the
fund such sums as with the approval of the Minister
may be written off as losses. I would like to enquire what
type oflosses are anticipated. I cannot think of any-
thing at the moment.

However, Sir, my real reason for rising is this:
The National Insurance and Social Security Act is a
very complex one, andcalls for great skill in its
implementation. It is usually the customto criticise
Civil Servants for their faults or omissions. I think
that when we have a chance to do the opposite we
should exercise that opportunity.
I think, that I can say that this Act has got off
to a very smooth start, and that has been due in no
small measure to the wisdom and sound common-
sense exhibited by the Director of this scheme and
his executive staff. In all their dealings they have
shown remarkable commonsense and have always
been willing to listen to the problems involved, and
have always been most helpful in suggesting success -
ful solutions to the problems put before them.

In framing an Act of this sort it is impossible
to legislate for all types of problems that may arise.
It is impossible to foresee all the problems that will
arise. I have no doubt that from time to time various
amending Acts will be brought before us in the light
of experience.


I would like tocompliment the Director and his
staff for the excellent co-operation that they have
shown in getting the scheme off to a smooth start.
If that spirit continues I have no doubt that as various
other aspects of the Act are put into operation the
same smooth procedure will be there.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
I would like to explain to Senator Alkins what is
meant here by the writing off of losses. It is not
that money will be taken out of the fundinorderthat
sums which legally should have been paid into the
fund shall be written off as losses. It follows the
procedure in the Finance Auditing Act. It is really
a writing off of losses thereby diminishing the figure
at which the fund should stand.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. F. ALKINS:
I would like to thank the Minister.



The question that the Bill be read a second
time was put to the Senate and agreed to,

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the
Senate went into Committee on the Bill, Senator C.
Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 and 2 of the Bill were called and
passed without debate.

The Schedule to the Bill was called.


Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan moved
that the Schedule stand part of the Bill.



Senator F. C, H. Carew seconded the motion.

The question that the Schedule stand part of
the Bill was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The question that the passing of the Bill in Com-
mittee be reported to the Senate was put and agreed
to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair
and the passing of the Bill in Committee was re-
ported accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Sentor S. V. Ashby, the Bill
was read a third time and passed.

BILL TO AMEND THE MOTOR VEHICLES AND
ROAD TRAFFIC ACT

The President called the fourth Order, A Bill
to amend the Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic Act,
1937.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, As will be seen from the Objects












and Reasons this Bill proposes to provide that persons
who are disqualified from holding Driving Lincences
for offences under the Motor Vehicles and Motor Tra-
fic Act or the Third Party Risks Act should be able
to apply to the Court which made the offer for dis -
qualification for the removal of this disqualification
under certain circumstances. The circumstances are
set out in Section 2of the Bill. This provides in a new
section numbered 63A(2) to be inserted into the prin-
cipal statute that if the disqualification is for less than
a year application must be made after six months; if
it is for any period ranging from year to six years
application must be made at the end of the first
half of that period. If the disqualification is for any
period of more than six years then the application
must be made after three years. Ihope there will not
be many instances where that would apply.

I remember when I was at the Bar a certain le -
gal luminary disqualified a man from holding driv-
inglincence for 99 years. That is the sort of thing
which Senator Mapp would query.

The other amendments are consequential. These
amendments come close and are nearly word for word
with what is contained in the English Act of 1960 which
has worked well in that country and which has been
adopted in some independent countries including
Jamaica.

I move, sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator C. L. Braithwaite seconded the motion.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President; I
am concerned about this Road Traffic matter. Only to-
day I had a frightening experience with a truck while
moving cement. It was going at full speed. Although
this Bill is a humane effort it should be stated that
here in Barbados it is a common thing for vehicles
that are heavily laden to travel at speeds which will
meantragedy if they ever collide. Some of these driv-
ers are discourteous and do not want to give the right
of way. We are getting a large number of motor vehi-
cles in Barbados and there is a tendency among the
public generally to park motor cars anywhere. We
have alaw against it and while we know that the Police
Department is very hard pressed I would like to see
more vigilance.

There is another sort of thing. Because a law
says that you must park onthe left side someone will
go to the narrowest place on the other side of the road.
I think that parking on both sides should be completely
abolished. The streets are not wide enough. Also I
would like to see some of these heavily laden trucks
better lighted at night. Iwouldlike to see them lighted
both at the back and front. Another thing is I do not
know how the law applies but you see all kinds of
fancy motor cars with things jutting out from the sides.
I would like to see the Police Department being more
vigilant. I think the time has come for people to learn
that although they possess a motor car walking is not
a penalty. I feel that law abiding citizens should not be
at the mercy of those who feel that they are beyond the
law.


This is not a reflection on the Police Force. They
have their hands full. I thought that this was an appro -
priate time to draw this to the attention of the Senate
and of the public generally.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, The
Minister who introduced this Bill said that it was
copied from an Act passed in Great Britain some time
ago. I take it, therefore, that the wording of the Bill
closely follows that Act. If that is so, I am a bit per-
turbed. I take it that a person convicted for dangerous
driving and who is disqualified from holding a licence
has a right to appeal in the first instance. This Bill
seeks to give him a further right to appeal within a
limited period.

There is reference to the character of the person
and his conduct subsequent to the disqualification or-
der. Character has nothing to do with an offence of
this order. I do not like the idea of making character
and conduct the assets that a person must have sub-
sequent to th' D::der to have the Court coming down
on his side.

There are cases where a person of good charac-
ter may have gone to a party and drove a little bad-
ly that particular night. He may never have been
before the Law Courts before and he may be from
high social circles. It may happen that this person
may not be reported at all. On the other hand there
may be a case of someone who has had a clash with the
Police some years ago, a matter which is now a thing
of the past. It goes to show that we are treading on
dangerous ground where this question of character
and conduct is concerned. I am saying that the grounds
for shortening the period of disqualification should deal
with the particular circumstances.


The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put to the Senate and agreed to.


On the motion of Senator the Hon. H. A. Vaughan
seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite, the Senate went
into Committee onthe Bill, Senator A. Phillips in the
Chair.


Clause 1 of the Bill was called and agreed to.

Clause 2 was called.


SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, Onthis
question of conduct and character, I would like to point
out that a man might be convicted of dangerous driving,
and at the time his character or conduct might not
have been taken into account when he was disqualified
from holding a licence. Let us say that one with a
criminal record was disqualified from holding a li-
cence for one reasonor another. He is a social out-
cast; but that was not taken into account when he
applied for a driving licence. The Magistrate took
into account what happened at the time of the offence
against the Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic Act.
gain a man may be of praiseworthy character, but on
a particular night he was driving dangerously.


~ ~











This seems to me to be very un-Britishand very
strange in language when you take British Law into ac-
count. What conduct subsequent to the order are you
talking about? Do you mean if the person convicted
carries himself with proper deportment? Or was his
character and conduct that which he displayed when
he was at the wheel?

I am reasonable. I want to be reasonable.

I agree with the words"having regardto the na-
ture ...... and any other circumstances of the case. I
am appealing to the Senator who introduced the Bill
that if he sees at some future time that this provision
should be changed he would have the courage to do so.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H.A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. Chairman, I did not want to prevent Senator
Walcott from speaking; but I really wanted to reply to
Senator Mapp's point. I am somewhat overwhelmedby
Senator Mapp's reference about being reasonable,
although he qualified it by saying that he wanted to be
reasonable.

Sometimes, Sir, I get annoyed whenmembers on
this side take at face value what Senator Mapp says.
Perhaps sometimes you should reply to the arguments
of Senator Mapp, or at least to what passes for argu-
ments. Senator Mapp has been a Cabinet Minister -
Minister of Communications and Works. He should
know the Road Traffic Law, and that the relevant sec -
tion of the Road Traffic Act does not differ from this
Bill. The only thing not reproduced is the numbering
of the section.

Senator Mapp has seen fit to indulge in a long
diatribe about character before the episode, He should
know that character is one of those things which, by
law, must oe taken into consideration when you get a
licence. Ler -ne refresh his memory. Section 31 (1) of
the Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic Act says: "The
Commissioner of Police should not issue a driving
licence to any person unless he is satisfied that the
vision, hearing and bodily and mental fitness of the
applicant are such as to warrant the issue of a
driving licence and that the applicant is of good
character.

This Bill simply insists that when an applicant
is applying for a restoration of his licence the, same
provision about good character is taken into consid-
eration as, was considered when he applied for a
licence. It is eminently fair. Where is the harm? If
Senator Mapp wants to introduce an amendment to the
Principal Act let him do so. Do not let him make
accusations about treating with partiality people of
some superior social station.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: I prefaced my remarks
by saying that the Minister could be reasonable when
he wants to be. He has replied in very rash terms. I
have not accused the Government of discriminating
against anyone.

I said that we were told that this came from the
English Act. I am glad that that Act was as far back


as 1960. This question of character is a vague one.
I have had some experience when I was in the Other
Place of people coming to me for bail for various
offences; and afterwards I saw them driving. How
they got licences I do not know. I know someone who
was convicted at the Assizes for taking off with a
lorry laden with goods believed to have been stolen.
Then he got a driving licence. It is a joke. I am
saying that you should go into it very carefully and
do not perpetuate something that borders on the
ridiculous.


Senator Walcott has brought up examples of
people who drive recklessly today. It would seem
that some people are not doing their duty or that
these people were courteous before they got their
licence. It makes the ordinary layman suspicious.
However, Sir, I will not press my point too far. I
believe that it meets with the approval of the entire
Senate. The public is not happy about the rate of
accidents. If we want to keep death off the roads we
should be very strigent in these cases and tighten
up as much as possible. I still do not like the re-
ference to the word "character."

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. Chairman, I

would like to help Senator Mapp, if I can. He is
mixing up the issue before the event and the issue
after the event. Character in the context in which
he is talking would have greater meaning when a
person is applying for or getting a licence, and that
is already in the Act. I do not think that he can argue
that if a man has been penalised and is making an
application under this Bill that the penalty imposed
should be withdrawn, that his character and conduct
subsequent to the penalty should not be taken into
account.


Suppose a man has been convicted for reckless
driving and after that has been living recklessly. Do
you mean that a court should not take that intoac-
count? Senator Mapp says that he agrees with the
other provision about the circumstances of the case.
You cannot ignore character. Some people might
get into an accident and then, change, especially a
man who drives for a living. I think.that one of the
reasons for introducing this Bill is not so much for
private drivers, but for professional drivers. I do
not think that it has anything to do with a man in a
high position generally.


The question that Clause 2 stand part of the Bill
was put and agreed to.



Clauses 3 and 4 were called and passed without
debate.



The question that the passing of the Bill in
Committee be reported to the Senate was put and
agreed to.


i











His Honour the President resumed the Chair
and the passing of the Bill in Committee was re-
ported accordingly.
On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the
Bill was read a third time and passed.


ADJOURNMENT



On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A..
Vaughan, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the
Senate adjourned at 6.15 p.m. sine die.












THE


SEN


ATE


DEBATES


(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION OF 1966 71


THE SENATE
Thursday, July 13, 1967
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public
Buildings, at 3 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Senator E.S. ROBINSON, C.B.E.,
(President) His Honour Senator C. AsquithPHILLIPS,
B.A. (Deputy President), Senator the Honourable H.A.
VAUGHAN, O.B.E., Q.C., (Minister of State and
Leader of the Senate),Senator the Honourable P. M.
GREAVES, B.A., (Minister of Home Affairs), Sena-
tor the Honourable F. G. SMITH, Q.C., (Attorney
General), Senator C. L. BRATHWAITE, Senator
H. Odessa GITTENS, M.R.S.H. (Parliamentary Sec-
retary), Senator H. F. ALKINS, Senator F. C. H.
CAREW, Senator D. A. WILES, C. M.G., O.B.E.,
Senator S. V. ASHBY, Senator F. L. WALCOTT,
O.B.E., Senator E. Lisle WARD, Senator W. W.
BLACKMAN, M.B.E., Senator Erma V. ROCK, Sena-
tor R. G. MAPP, Senator S. A. BLANCHETTE,
Senator N. A. BARROW, B.A.

ABSENT

Senator P. G. MORGAN (ON LEAVE), Senator
C, G. JOHNSON, Senator Dr. R. B. CADDLE, B.Sc.,
M.B.B.S.

Prayers were said.

MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

The Clerk informed the Senate that the follow-
ing message had been received from the House of
Assembly:

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY
TO
THE HONOURABLE THE SENATE

The House has the honour to invite the Honour-
able the Senate to acquiesce in the terms of the fol-
lowing Resolution passed by the House at a meeting
held on 4th July, 1967.


RESOLVED that this House invite the Other
Place to appoint a Committee to meet with a Select


Committee of this House as a Joint Committee to
consider and report on a Bill entitled The Barbados
Citizenship Bill, 1967.

4th July, 1967.

J. E. THEODORE BRANCKER
Speaker.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan, Senator
the Honourable P. M. Greaves, Senator the Honour-
able F. G. Smith and Senator H. F. Alkins were duly
appointed a Committee to meet with the Select Com-
mittee of the House of Assembly to consider and re-
port on the Barbados Citizenship Bill, 1967.

PETITION

Senator C. Asquith Phillips presented aPetition
from the Council of the Barbados Institute of Pro-
fessional Accountants praying the Senate to pass a
Bill to authorise the incorporation of the Institute.

Senator Phillips informed the Senate that the
Petition was respectfully worded and asked that it
be taken as read.

His Honour directed that copies of the Petition
be printed and circulated to Members.

RESOLUTION TO SANCTION THE MERCHANDISE
MARKS (AMENDMENT) RULES, 1967

The President called the first order A Reso-
lution to Sanction the Merchandise Marks (Amend-
ment) Rules, 1967.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, This Resolution seeks to imple-
ment one of the proposals made by the Hon. Minis-
ter of Finance in the Other Place in the course
of his Budget Speech. It was there statedby him that
It was proposed to provide a new schedule to the
Merchandise Marks Act of 1949 thereby doubling
all the fees which were made payable under the
Act.
There is not much more than I can usefully
say on this Resolution, and I move that it be con-
curred in.


___










Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves seconded
the motion.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, A
lot of the Resolutions and Bills coming before us this
afternoon will be measures arising out of the Bud-
get proposals made by the Hon. Minister of Finance.
I think that it would be very helpfulto me and other
'members of the Senate if the Hon. Minister of State
would be good enough to let us know what it is ex-
pected will be raised from each of these proposals.

Apart from being an act of courtesy, I think
that it would enable us to give an intelligent appraisal
of the various measures as they come before us this
afternoon.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
I am afraid that I am not in a position to give that
detailed information to the senator who has asked
the question. I have read, not only in the newspaper
a report of the Budget Speech to which I have just
referred and if the member has a copy he will see
that the sums which it is anticipated to collect as a
result of each of these budgetary proposals are not
set out in some instances, and in others they are.

Under Customs and Excise, for instance, addi-
tional revenue is expected to be $600,000. Consumption
Tax is at an additional $300,000.With respect to trade
marks no figure is set out in the resolution which
we are now discussing. Members will realise that
when it comes to Bingo the proposal is not to in-
crease, but to lower the amount of tax paid.


As the Minister of Finance said in the Other
Place the amount which these increases are expected
to bring in is $1.5 million. That so far is the most
that I can tell Senator Alkins and other senators who
may deserve to be better informed at this moment.
If further information is desired I shall endeavour
to make it available at the earliest possible op-
portunity.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: I thank the Hon. Minis-
te r.

The question that the resolution be concurred in
was put to the Senate and agreed to.

BILL TO AMEND THE BARBADOS UNION OIL
COMPANY REFINERY (LEVY
ON PETROLEUM PRO-
DUCTS) ACT, 1965.

The President called the second order, A Bill
to amend the Barbados Uni n Oil Company Refinery
(Levy on Petroleum Products) Act, 1965.

SENATOR THE HONOURAILE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, By Section 4 of the Act which this
Bill seeks to amend duty is levied on all petroleum
products which are supplied by the refinery to those
concerned. To that procedure there are two ex-
ceptions made by Section 6 of the Bill. If members


will turn to Clause 2 of this Bill they will see set
out ndzer 6. (1) and 6. (2) the respects in which that
duty is not payable on asphalts, fuel oil sold to the
Government etc. The Bill further proposes other
exceptions which are set out in (c) and (d).

Clause 6. (2) is with respect to the refund of
duties which had been paid. Clause 3 is purely con-
sequential.

I move sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Hon. F. G. Smith seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed
to.

On the motion of Senator the Hon. H. A. Vaughan
seconded by the Senator the Hon. F. G. Smith the
Senate went into Committee on the Bill, Senator C.
Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 to 3 of the Billwere called and passed
without debate.

The question that the passing of the Bill be re-
ported to the Senate was put and agreed to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported.

BILL TO REPEAL THE PROVISIONAL COLLEC-
TION OF DUTIES AND TAX ACT, 1963.

The President called the third order, A Bill
to repeal the Provisional Collection of Duties and
Tax Act, 1963 and make other provision in place
thereof.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President The Act which this Bill seeks to
repeal provides that where there are any budgetary
proposals by the Government, these proposals shall
come into effect from the date of the introduction of
the measure in statutory form in the House of As-
sembly. This Bill would improve on that by making
such measures effective as from the date on which
they had been made public by the Hon. Minister of Finan-
ce in his budgetary proposals in the Other Place, and if
the proposals are contained in some Bill they should
come into effect on the date specified inthe Bill that
they should become operative, or if there is no such
provision they will become effective from the date
of the introduction into the Other Place of that Bill.




These provisions are contained in Clauses 3 and
4 of the Bill. It is also provided that if any such Bill
is withdrawn from the House, or not passed within
four months from the date of .introduction then the
budgetary proposals shall have no effect. Under
Clause 5 provision is made for the refund which has
been collected between the date of the introduction of the
measure and the date of the withdrawal from the
Legislature.


_ L? ~ I__ 1 ____1__1__5jYSe3____i











I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, -Ias-
sume that provision is also made for cases in which as
a result of the budgetary proposal there is a re-
duction in the rate of taxation. It seems to me that
this Bill caters only to the introduction of new taxes or
increases. In the case of decrease does that become
effective only when the relevant Bill comes up?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
The point raised by the Senator would come under
Clause 3. (1) on page 2. That deals with decreases
and increases.

The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Hon. H. A. Vaughan
seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite, the Senate
went into Committee on the Bill, Senator C. Asquith
Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 to 8 of the Billwere called and passed
without debate.

The question that the passing of the Bill in
Committee be reported to the Senate was put and
agreed to.

On motion of Senator the Hon. H. A. Vaughan,
seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew the Bill was
read a third time and passed.

BILL TO GRANT ADDITIONAL SUM OF MONEY
OUT OF CONSOLIDATED FUND

The President called the fourth order, A Bill
to grant an additional sum of money out of the Con-
solidated Fund and to appropriate the same for the
service of the Island for the year ended 31st March,
1967.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, This is the usual Bill presented to
Parliament annually setting out in a single measure
the various sums which have been voted during the
year for supporting the financial commitments of
the Government. The Bill is in the same form which
has been used since 1964.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable P. M. Greaves seconded
the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable P.M.
Greaves, the Senate went into Committee on the Bill,
Senator C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 to 4 of the Billwere called and passed
without debate.


The Schedule to the Bill was called.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan moved
that the Schedule stand part of the Bill.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

The question that the Schedule stand part of the
Bill was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The question that the passing of the Bill in Com-
mittee be reported to the Senate was put and agreed
to.

His Honour the President resumedthe Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator F. C. H. Carew, the
Bill was read a third time and passed.

BILL TO PROVIDE FOR ESTABLISHMENT
OF THE CARIBBEAN FREE TRADE
ASSOCIATION

The President called the fifth order, A Bill to
make provision for matters arising out of the es-
tablishment of the Caribbean Free Trade Association
or otherwise out of agreements relating to trade
with members of the Association.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, this Bill seeks to provide a broad
outline plan for the establishment of a Free Trade
Area among the nations of Antigua, Barbados and
Guyana. Most of the details will be dealt with by
Subsidiary Legislation Regulations and otherwise.



It might be useful, however, to go through the
Bill briefly. Clause 3 defines what the agreement is
and what it means by area origin when it applies to
goods. It also provides for the accession to or with-
drawal from the Free Trade Tariffs.Such accession
or withdrawal is provided for by an Order to be
made and published by the Cabinet.

Clause 4 provides for exemption from or re-
duction of duty by agreement in respect of goods
based on the area origin. Under Clause 5 power is
given to the Cabinet to make regulations for deter-
mining in appropriate cases the origin and place of
consignment of goods.

Clause 6 deals with the provisions for exemp-
tion from Customs Duties and Clause 7 deals with
the verification of the area origin of exportedgoods.

Clause 8 is a penalty Clause and that deals with
making declarations before the Comptroller of Cus -
toms.

These are the main provisions of the Bill, and
as I said earlier, it provides the outline of plan, de-
tails of which come before Parliament in the form of











the various regulations which it will be necessary
to make.


I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.


Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: Mr. President, At
this stage we are prepared to support any measure
which will tend to further the cause of West Indian


integration.


While it is amusing to note that those


who prefer not to


tegration,


when


favour any


faced


forced to devise ways


tegration,


we believe that it


than nothing at all. I say that


form of political in-


the facts


of life


and means of economic


is better to have that
, even though the logic


of those on the other side is not good.

The experience of countries which tried integra-
tion at economic level has shown that there must be
political factors if we want that integration to reach


the fullest extent.


politics, and to


While


prefer to avoid discuss-


look straight at the economic


sphere, when this agreement gets off the ground and


there are


hard political facts to be faced, they will


have to face these problems that will come.

I repeat, Sir, that we are prepared to support any


measure


which


will lead to


Caribbean


integration.


We know that this particular measure was supposed


to come


into force from the 1st January


1966.


Then


it was the 1st of September and then February 1967.
'On the delay of introduction we have heard comments


by the


Attorney


General


of Guyana pointed out the


problems involved and that was the first time that we
got some information on why this Agreement has not
yet come into force.

I want to stress that we should not have to learn


from an


overseas


newspaper or through a comment


from a member of the Cabinet of another island what
the problems are.


N nxr tbhr'rr iQ nn ti-ner xrhirh t-hii c t


the area in this exercise.


formula


We need to be told what


will be worked out so that industries more


suited to us will come to us.


We do not have enough


information at this point to do what I feel Parliament


should


be able


to do,


that is


to get, some fairly


clear idea of what benefits are likely to be derived


from


CARIFTA.


When all the information is avail-


able it will help Parliament, to come to some sort


of conclusions


information


as to the value of CARIFTA.


should


That


be made available as early


possible.


IATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, -
risen today because I am sick and tired of


this Caribbean integration idea. Every now and then


people


other


get up


and talk about


Caribbean Integration.

We had a West Indian Federation. It was broken


up. There is
broken up by
to see who w<
facts of life.


copic


area


no use crying over spilt milk. It was
West Indians and everyone was trying


Is to


blame.


You have


known


microscopic parts


endum.


Take


Anguilla and do not


We have to deal with the


in the West Indies a micros-


as Anguilla


joined to


two other


who are now calling for a refer-


account
stick to


something sacrosanct in havi


what has


happened in


this idea that there is
ng a West Indian Fed-
t-' ^ .


eration that failed.

There was a Federation of Nigeria and that broke


. Other Federations have broken up.


dealing


with today


countries who


is an agreement


What we are
between three


have decided to come together.


cannot bring other people in like that. In one breath


Senator


Barrow


talks


about


economic growth.


antoher he talks about businessmen not wanting Trini-


dad to come into this agreement.


Barbados


Businessmen in


do not run the Government. Businessmen


will look to their narrow areas for making money.


They
they


will make a treaty with the devil so long as


make


economic


money.


and financial


svsltem would crnsh him


business- man's


attitude


survival and if a political
he will o :o.ains!: it. If it


," ii i1 -i- ~r--r~ ~ ~ -~-~~--~--


l ,I


' / I


SEN


b


Ql-QCTO i i 1












Let us take the European Economic Community.
France is saying no to Britain's entry. Everybody,
when they have economic stability tries to help as
much as they can. When it becomes weaker they try
to widen the area. If at the beginning they wanted
nine countries in the E. C. C. they would have got
nine. Similarly Barbados is starting with Guyana and
Antigua. The whole idea is to leave openings for
others.

If you do a little research you will read what
some people have written in less than six months. Now
they turn right over and write something opposite. It
was asked what would we gain by CARIFTA. As soon
as you introduce something that is economic and not
political you have to contend with the wiles of Senator
Barrow. It is now regarded as a sine qua non by
the opposition that they must oppose anything that
the Government introduces. If the Government re-
writes the ten commandments somebody would have
to oppose them.

These unceasing attacks are uncalled for. This
Government came into power when the Federation
was being broken up. They came into power in 1961.
Senator Barrow should go and search for the reasons
why the Federation was broken up. Do not let him fly
into the face of historical events. Let him ask who
was the Prime Minister and other members of the
Federal Parliament. None of the members on this side
were, They killed it by creating an attitude of dissen-
sion telling Jamacia that we can teach them to read
and write and saying that all a Trinidadian knows is
calypso.

You will need another generation before you can
come back and try this experiment again. We are
trying to create something productive within the
area itself, nothing to do with politics. But there
are bound to be difficulites with politics. Politics
divide people. Politicians have divided Nigeria and
they have divided Anguilla.

If the West Indies Federation failed, let us face
the fact that it failed. There is no point beating over
old ground. Look for fresh ground to play on. If
the pitch has been dug up anyone can get you out. Any
fool ban get wickets on such a pitch.

.HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: Let us come
back to the Bill now.

-SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Yes, sir, but I
get extremely angry about this talk of what are you
doing about Federation. This is a debate on making
economic matters meaningful. One should be sensi-
ble enough to see that in the West Indies the only
thing, on which they can find common ground is econo-
mic affairs.

That is so because no one else will buy Bar-
badian, Guyanese or Trinidadian sugar; andtherefore
we will have to send it to the same markets. I do
not like the idea that there is something in Barbados
preventing political integration.


Why do not the members on the other side help
Bradshaw? All that they are saying now is that he is
wrong. Anyone can say that you are wrong. Our
position is the Barbados, Antigua and Guyana can
establish this free trade area. If the other territories
want to coame in there is no reason why that cannot
be examined. But there is no reason why we should
have to be a standard bearer.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: Mr. President, -- I
would like to say that throwing mud and casting
insults do not serve any useful purpose. I think
that Senator Barrow was very moderate. All that
he did was to refer to the old Federation and say
that he would be glad to see political as well as
economic integration.

I go further and say that we should not be content
with half a loaf. Senator Walcott seems to want
to fight. I do not. We welcome any form of integration
We welcome any measure of unity, even though it
does not go as far as you would like, -- to the
political level. Senator Walcott talked about facing
the facts of life. The facts of life are that our only
hope is political and economic integration. Not only
politicians have said so. The Chief Justic of Trini-
dad in a lecture said it is coming. We cannot avoid
it.

Senator Walcott seems to be confused in his
thinking. In one breath he seems to be confusing
the idea of Trinidad staying out, and in another
breath saying let us do like DeGaulle and exclude
Trinidad.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: On a point of order
I do not know where Senator Mapp got that idea
from. I made no comment on who should' come
in or who should stay out.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: He said that Barbados
should not be the standard bearer.

SENATOR. F. L. WALCOTT: I said that ,Ba riad -
should not be the standard bearer for starting a
new political Federation.


SENATOR R. G. MAPP: He said that we should
face the facts of life. The leaders of the Caribbean
and the people are now beginning to face the facts
of life. That is why, instead of trying to keep
Trinidad out, we find all the political leaders slow-
ing coming together on the broad idea of a Caribbean
Economic Community. Some may call it by one name
and others by a different name; but when you are in
the same boat you either swim together or sink
together in the same way.

I do not think that it serves any useful purpose
to throw verbal brickbats at old politicians today.
All that we are saying is that what is happening in
Anguilla now is showing up the folly of thinking that
you can have self government in a limited space. They
are too small to handle their own affairs. It is not a


i













Federated state. It is a Unitary state completely
different from a fererated state. That is one positive
proof that the only salvation for these small terri-
tories is Federation. In other words, this associated
status that was imposed by Great Britain to help
support the latest records of Federation is nothing
but a farce.

HIS HONOUR THE PRESIDENT: I do not want
to interrupt the Senator but that is really not before
the Senate.

SENATOR R. G. MAPP: It is in a sense. The
question of a political federation has been raised. It
is a stupid thing to think that you can get away from
politics. Even in Europe today where the ECM is con-
cerned it is a matter of politics and not a matter
merely of economics. The President of France wants
to retain a certain position in relation to the rest
of the world.

As far as CARIFTA is concerned there are one
or two things that I would like to say about the Agree-
ment itself. About two months ago I rounded up one
or two people. I did so because there were some
West Indians in Canada who asked me for facts about
the Agreement. I enquired from the Premier's office
and I got the Permanent Secretary, and to my aston-
ishment I found out that there was no copy of the
Agreement. He referred me to the Minister of Trade.
I spoke to the Permanent Secretary of that Ministry
and he also was at a loss. I do not think that is good
enough. The Agreement was signed on 15th December,
1965. We have not yet seen a copy of it. Even Civil
Servants apparently do not know about this Agreement.

I do not know if it is that Guyana has taken the
initiative and has all the copies of the Agreement
over there. I do not understand what kind of one sided
business this is. Perhaps I am now being enlightened
from across the table that the Legal Departmenthad
it working on. Perhaps it lost its way in the Legal
Department. If the Permanent Secretary of the Min-
istry of Trade had told me that it was in the Legal De-
partment I would have tried there.

In an important matter of this sort we should
be given more information from time to time. There
is a lot of speculation. I want to make a point that we
think that this Agreement is too limited. The Gov-
ernment will have to take a decision sooner or later
about entering a bigger economic community. If
Britain is admitted to the ECM that will force us to
make a decision on this matter. As my colleague
said, this is better than nothing and we support this
Bill.

The question that the Bill be read a second time
was put and agreed to.




On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite, the
Senate went into Committee on the Bill, Senator
C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.


Clauses 1 to 12of the Billwere called and passed
without debate.

The Schedule to the Bill was called.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan moved
that the Schedule stand part of the Bill.

Senator F.C.H. Carew seconded the motion.

The question that the Schedule stand part of the
Bill was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The question that the passing of the Bill in Com-
mittee be reported to the Senate was put and agreed
to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite, the
Bill was read a third time and passed.

BILL TO AMEND THE BINGO DUTY ACT, 1966.

The President called the sixth order A Bill
to amend the Bingo Duty Act, 1966.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, The present tax on Bingo tickets
is five cents on every ticket the price of which is
twenty-five cents. The operators of these Bingo
games give money to charitable purposes, and I
refer to orginisations like the Lions and the Jaycees
They have represented to the Government that they
was a drop in the amount of the prizes :and a drop

in the sale of tickets due to the amount that they had
to pay in taxes.

The Government came to a decision which was
announced by the Minister of Finance. The proposal
is that the tax of five cents on a ticket up to the value
of twenty five cents and twenty cents in the dollar
or part thereof in respect of tickets the price of
which exceeds twenty cents should be reduced to
three cents and twelve cents respectively.

There is just one thing that I might say at this
stage. Earlier Senator Alkins asked about an in-
crease in taxation. This Bill seeks to authorise a
drop in taxation. I will refer him again to Clause 3
of the Provisional Collection of Duties and Tax Act.
The Bill now before us comes within the Class of
one in which the date of coming into effect of the tax
is set out in the Bill itself.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be reada second time.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion,

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: Mr. President, I
wish only to say that where Bingo is organised the
tax on Bingo is an indirect tax on the person often
a small person who buys the tickets. As the Minister


'~-~_--,----~=~==33~;~5===E











.of Finance has acknowledge it has the unfortunate
effect of reducing the amounts given to charity. I
think that in principle itis bad to tax Bingo. I also
think .that the Government should go ahead and start
a national lottery.

We have heard all sorts of accusations made
about the people who operate Bingo. I remember
once that the Jaycees were accused of certain things
about the running of Bingo. I repeat, that the time
has come when the Government should seriously
think about establishing a national lottery.

SENATOR F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. President, I
am a member of the Senate. I would exercise my
right at all time s once I am within the ambit of
the rules. Senator Mapp said earlier that Senator
Barrow was a young man in politics. You have just
heard, Mr. President, the most illogical statement that
could come even from a baby. He is talking about
the little poor man playing Bingo. Bingo is a gamble.
The Senator is reducing the question of a man gam-
bling voluntarily to the question of poverty; and in the
same breath he is asking the Government to estab-
lish a national lottery. He is forgetting the same
little man who has to pay the extra five cents needs
to get the same roads, hospital services etc. I get
tired, of this tripe about taxing the small man. He
has the same children who are going to school.
The ppor man's son is going to Harrison College
and Lodge School and is using the hospital and the
roads.

What survey has the Senator carried out to know
who is playing Bingo. If the man who is playing Bingo
is so poor where does he get his reserves to risk?
Some people like gambling and they will gamble
whether they are rich or poor. You have to know
how much money the nation and I mean the same
poor people is risking. One of these organizations
was able to give the Government $300,000. Can you
tell me that a nation which is so poor will risk $1/2
million annually?

He is saying in effect that the government should
run a national lottery, and let us abolish Bingo.
There will have to be taken into account the cost of
administration of a national lottery. The Government
will have to pay a man to run the game and even
a Permanent Secretary and the whole thing might
even come to $1000 a month. Will it be worth-while
for the government to run it when the people in
these service clubs do it without any charge?

SENATOR N. A. BARROW: I never saidanything
about the Government abolishing Bingo. I referredto
the comments made by the Minister of Finance about
the impact of the five cents tax. All that I was there-
fore saying is that if you want to get money in from
gambling establish a national lottery. I do not think
that the tax on Bingo is fair.

SENATOR F.L. WALCOTT: What ever the min-
ister said and I said have been said already. Any
nation that can gamble can be taxed on gambling.
Gamblers in Barbados are lucky, In some countries


like the U., S. A., if you go to the race course and
you win a certain amount the tax is deducted in
the race course. In Barbados if a man wins $3000
in gambling he is not taxed on it.

The question that the Bill be read a second
time was put and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite, the
Senate went into Committee on the Bill, Senator
C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 to 3 of the Bill were called and passed
without debate.

The question that the passing of the Bill in
Committee be reported to the Senate was put and
agreed to.

His Honour the President resumed the Chair and
the passing of the Bill in Committee was reported
accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator F.C. H. Carew, the
Bill was read a third time and passed.

BILL TO SETTLE RATES OF INCOME TAX, 1957

The President called the seventhOrder A Bill
to Settle the rates of Income Tax for the year 1967,
and to make provision for certain other matters in
connection with the levying of the said tax.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H.A. VAUGHAN:
Mr. President, This is the usual Bill sent down
every year to fix the rates of income tax for the
next twelve months. The rates this year show no
change from the rates of last year, and the reasons
were given by the Minister of Finance in the course
of his Budget Speech.

I do not think I needto say anything more except
that it is hoped to get an Income Tax Expertto
carry out an extensive study of the existing legis-
lation,

I move, Sir, that the Billbe read a second time.

Senator the honourable F. G. Smith seconded the
motion,

The question that the Bill be read a second
time was put and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator the Honourable F.G.
Smith, the Senate went into Committee on the Bill,
Senator C. Asquith Phillips in the Chair.

Clauses 1 and 2 of the Bill were called and
passed without debate.
The question that the passing of the Bill in
Committee be reported to the Senate was put and
agreed to,












His Honour the President resumed the Chair
and the passing of the Bill in Committee was re-
ported accordingly.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator F.C.H. Carew, the
Bill was read a third time and passed.


ADJOURNMENT




On the motion of Senator the Honourable H.A.
Vaughan, seconded by Senator F.C.H. Carew, the
Senate adjourned at 4.45 p.m. sine die.


_ __ *





Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 6
Supplement to Official Gazette No. 9 dated 30th January, 1969.



S.I. 1969 No. 12

The Wireless Telegraphy Act, 1940
(Act 1940-22)

THE WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY (AMENDMENT)
REGULATIONS, 1969
The Minister in exercise of the powers conferred
on him by section 16 of the Wireless Telegraphy Act,
1940, hereby makes the following Regulations -
1. These Regulations may be cited as the Wire-
less Telegraphy (Amendment) Regulations, 1969.
2. Regulation 8Aof the Wireless Telegraphy Regu-
lations, 1940, is hereby revoked and the following
regulations substituted therefor:-
"8A. (1) Every licence to keep, install erect
or use a Wireless Broadcast television receiver
shall be in the form set out in Schedule K, shall
be granted subject to the terms and conditions
therein set forth, and shall expire-
(a) in respect of an annual licence, one
year from the date of purchase or
acquisition of such receiver or,
where the date of purchase or ac-
quisition cannot be established, one
year from date of payment of the
previous licence fee;
(b) in respect of a licence for a period
less than one year, on the expira-
tion of the period for which the
licence was granted.
(2) There shall be paid to the Carib-
bean Broadcasting Corporation by or on behalf
of the licensee prior to the grant of every such
licence-






2 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


(a) in respect of an annual licence, the
sum of ten dollars;
(b) in respect of a licence for a period
less than one year, a sum which
bears the same proportion to the sum
of ten dollars as that period bears
to one year.
(3) Subject to the provisions of regu-
lation 10 each valid licence granted under para-
graph (1) shall be renewable:-
(a) in the case of an annual licence,
during the month following the date
of expiration;
(b) in the case of a licence for a period
less than one year, unless the use
of the wireless broadcast television
receiver by the licensee has ceased,
immediately upon the expiration there-
of.
8B. (1) Where a wireless broadcast tele-
vision receiver is sold by a person holding a
valid licence in respect thereof to any other per-
son, the person selling such wireless broadcast
television receiver shall within fourteen days
from the date of the sale notify the Caribbean
Broadcasting Corporation of the sale and shall
set out in the notification, the manufacturer,
model and serial number of that television re-
ceiver and the name and address of the purchaser
thereof.
(2) In the case of such a sale as is
mentioned in paragraph (1), where the annual
licence fee in respect of that television receiver
has been paid, the purchaser thereof shall n L,
be liable to pay any further licence fee until the
expiration of the licence in force at the time of
such sale.







STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 3


(3) Any person who-
(a) contravenes the provisions of para-
graph (1); or
(b) gives any notification under para-
graph (1) which he knows is false
in any particular required by that
paragraph to be set out therein,
shall be guilty of an offence and liable on sum-
mary conviction to a fine not exceeding fifty
dollars."
3. Schedule J to the Principal Regulations is here-
by amended by inserting immediately after the item
"Supply" under the heading "Particulars of Receiver"
the following item -
"Date of purchase or acquisition
Made by the Minister this 20th day of January, 1969.

NEVILLE W. BOXILL
Minister of Communications and Works.







4 STATUTORY INSTRUMENT


S.I. 1969 No. 13

DIRECTIONS GIVEN BY THE COMMISSIONER OF
POLICE WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE
MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS UNDER
REGULATION 58A OF THE MOTOR
VEHICLES AND ROAD TRAFFIC
REGULATIONS, 1952

In these directions "traffic" means the passage of
vehicles of every description, pedestrians and all
animals being ridden, driven or led.

1. On Saturday the 1st day of February, 1969
between the hours of 9.00 p.m. and 12.00 midnight and
on Sunday 2nd February, 1969 between the hours of
12.00 midnight and 1.00 a.m. Carrington Private Road
in the parish of St. Philip from its junction with Car-
rington's Factory Yard Road in the said parish to its
junction with Valley Field House Road and Woodbourne
Plantation Yard in the Parish of Christ Church shall
be closed to all traffic except vehicles bearing the
appropriate identification mark issued by the Barbados
Rally Club.

2. All drivers and riders of vehicles, -pedestrians
and drivers or riders of animals shall comply with
these directions and with any order given by a member
of the Royal Barbados Police Force in uniform.
Dated this 15th day of January, '1969.

W. A. FARMER
Commissioner of Police.
Approved by the Minister of Home Affairs this 23rd
day of January, 1969.

P. M. GREAVES
Minister of Home Affairs.




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