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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00032
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00032
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 573
        Page 574
        Page 575
        Page 576
        Page 577
        Page 578
        Page 579
        Page 580
        Page 581
        Page 582
        Page 583
        Page 584
        Page 585
        Page 586
        Page 587
        Page 588
    Supplement: Senate Debates for 18th March, 1965
        Page A-140
        Page A-141
        Page A-142
        Page A-143
        Page A-144
    Supplement: Senate Debates for 29th March, 1965
        Page A-145
        Page A-146
        Page A-147
        Page A-148
        Page A-149
        Page A-150
        Page A-151
        Page A-152
        Page A-153
        Page A-154
        Page A-155
        Page A-156
    Supplement: House of Assembly Debates for 13th July, 1965
        Page B-950
        Page B-951
        Page B-952
        Page B-953
        Page B-954
        Page B-955
        Page B-956
        Page B-957
        Page B-958
        Page B-959
        Page B-960
        Page B-961
        Page B-962
        Page B-963
        Page B-964
        Page B-965
    Subsidiary Legislation Supplement no. 35; L.N. 70
        Supplement No. 35 Page 1
    Subsidiary Legislation Supplement no. 35; L.N. 71
        Supplement No. 35 Page 2
Full Text









VOL. CI


h e Id


PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 9TH JUNE, 1966


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Gazette Notices
Applications for Liquor Licences Districts
"A" & "D"................................ 573, 577-579


Appointment: D. C. T. Grannum to be Assistant
Commissioner of Inland Revenue..........
Correction to notice of 26th May, 1966 re
Appointment to the Barbados National
Stadium Corporation.........................
In the Supreme Court: Alleyne vs Lovell..........
Cole vs D. Pinder and N. Pinder...........
Drakes vs Drakes; Edghill vs Blackman
Edghill vs Gibson and Brathwaite.........
Edghill vs Reid; Edwards vs Redmond
Gay vs Phillips; Hunte vs Hunte..........
Maraj vs Bayley; Maraj vs Grannum.......
McClurg vs Howell; Power vs Carter......
Power vs Harding; Power vs Porter......
Watson vs Chandler; Yearwood vs King
Licensing of Air Services: Eastern Caribbean
Airlines Ltd. has applied to operate be-
tween Barbados and St. Vincent...........
Probate Advertisement dated 3rd June, 1966
Report of Registrar of Trade Unions for the
year 1965-66..................................


588


573
587
584
580, 586
588
588, 581
583, 584
580, 585
582, 583
586, 581
582, 587


576
574

575


Senate Debates for 18th and 29th March, 1965
House of Assembly Debates for 13th July, 1965.

Legal Supplement
(L.N. 70) Customs Duties (Trophies) Order, 1966
(L.N. 71) Interpretation Act, 1949:
Delegation of Powers to the Minister re-
Ssponsible for Town and Country Planning.


ea~mos


GOVERNMENT NOTICE
Correction

The Notice published in the Official Gaz-
ette of 26th May, 1966 on page 476 entitled
"Appointment to the Barbados National
Stadium Corporation". The Seventh Member
of the Corporation "The Permanent Secretary,
Ministry and Community Development" should
read "Permanent Secretary, Ministry of
Health and Community Development."

NOTICE NO. 436
LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICE
(Act 1957 40)


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:
PREMISES:


LIVINGSTONE MAYNARD
Shopkeeper
Shop Hill, St. Thomas
Board and galvanised build-
ing at Shop Hill, St. Thomas.


Dated this 3rd day of June, 1966.

Signed: LIVINGSTONE MAYNARD
Applicant.

This Application for a Retail licence will
be considered at a Licensing Court to be held
atMagistrate's Courts Dist. "D" on Wednes-
day, the 22nd day of June, 1966 at 10 o'clock a.m.

HENSLEY H. ROBINSON
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


'A


NO. 46


1%e


o latte








574 OFFICIAL GAZETTE June 9, 1966



PROBATE ADVERTISEMENTS

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applications have been made
for the following grants of Probate and Administration namely:-


PROBATE of the Will dated the 2nd day of November, 1965 of EVANGELINE YARDE late
of Mapp Hill in the parish of St. Michael in this Island, who died on the 15th day of
February, 1966 by AARON JOSIAH YARDE, the sole Executor named in the Will of
the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 29th day of October, 1964 of RAYMOND JOHN PEARSON
late of the Royal Barbados Yacht Club, Bay Street in the parish of St. Michael in this
Island, who died on the 5th day of December, 1965 by THE ROYAL BANK TRUST
COMPANY (Barbados) LIMITED, the sole Executor named in the Will of the said
deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 11th day of November, 1962 of JULIA PRISCILLA BLUNT
late of Spooners Hill in the parish of St. Michael in this Island, who died on the 22nd
day of December, 1962 by WILBERT PARKER OSBOURNE the duly constituted At-
torney on record in this Island of MAISIE IONE ESTWICK, the sole Executrix named
in the Will of the said deceased.

PROBATE of the Will dated the 3rd day of October, 1963 of SAMUEL ORMI BISHOP late
of Quarry Road, Bush Hall in the parish of St. Michael in this Island, who died on
the 8th day of January, 1966 by ROSALINE CLARISSA WATTS, the sole Executrix
named in the Will of the said deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of JOSEPH ALPHONZA PILGRIM late of
Jacksonville, County of Duval, Florida in the United States of America, who diedon
the 16th day of November, 1965 by MARIE ARMENTHA PILGRIM widow of the said
deceased.

LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION to the Estate of EVANS THEOPHILUS BISPHAM late of
Waterhall Land, Eagle Hall in the parish of St. Michael in this Island, who died on
the 6th day of February, 1966 by EDITHA BISPHAMnext-of-kin of the said deceased.

AND UNLESS CAVEAT is lodged within fourteen days from the date of this Adver-
tisement with the Registrar of the Supreme Court through whom the abovenamed applica-
tions have been made, Probate or Administration will be granted accordingly.

Dated this 3rd day of June, 1966.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar (Ag.)








.n 9, 196OFCA AET


Report of the Registrar of Trade Unions


for the year 1965-66, in accordance with Section 33 of
the Trade Union Act, 1964-2

The Trade Unions registered under the Act on 1st April 1965 were:

(1) The Barbados Workers' Union
(2) Sugar Producers' Federation of Barbados
(3) Association of Assistant Teachers in Secondary Schools
(4) The Transport and General Workers' Union
(5) The United Taxi Owners' Association
(6) The Cable & Wireless Workers' Union
(7) Barbados Employers' Confederation
(8) Barbados Association of Local Government Officers
(9) Barbados Progressive Union of Workers
(10) The Barbados Civil Service Association

NEW REGISTRATION
Two Trade Unions were registered during the year.
The Cane Farmers' Association of Barbados applied for registration
on the 12th February, 1965 and was registered on the 8th April, 1965.
Sugar Industries Supervisors' Association applied for and was regis-
tered on the 1st March, 1966.

DISSOLUTION
The Cable & Wireless Workers' Union was dissolved on 28th March,
1965. The prescribed fee was paid, the notice registered on 6th April,
1965.

ALTERATION TO RULES
On the 14th October, 1965, the Barbados Workers' Union applied for
registration of complete alteration of rules. The alteration was registered
on the 8th February, 1966.

FINANCIAL STATEMENT

All of the Trade Unions have complied with Section 32(1) of the Act.

AUDIT
In exercise of the power conferred on the Registrar by Section 18(1)
of the Act, I appointed the Auditor General as Auditor of Trade Unions
with effect from the 6th July, 1964. During the year he furnished me with
reports on the following Trade Unions:

(1) The Barbados Workers' Union
(2) Sugar Producers' Federation of Barbados
(3) The Association of Assistant Teachers in Secondary
Schools.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of Trade Unions.
March, 1966.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


.ne 9, 1966












GOVERNMENT NOTICE


LICENSING OF AIR SERVICES


The Air Transport Licensing Authority give notice that they have received the under-
mentioned application to operate a Schedule Air Service:


1. Name and address of Applicant:



2. Places between which passengers
and goods are to be carried:

3. Places at which intermediate
landings are to be made and
the purposes for which made:




4. Times or frequency of the
service:

5. Period for which the Licence
is applied for:

6. Latest date for making repre-
sentation or objections:


Eastern Caribbean Airlines Ltd.
P.O. Box 251, Bridgetown, Barbados.



Barbados/St. Vincent.

(a) For traffic purposes: Nil


(b) Weather alternates: Grenada/St. Lucia






Fourteen (14) services weekly.



Five (5) years.



21st June, 1966.


This application will be considered by the Air Transport Licensing Authority in ac-
cordance with the provisions of the Air Navigation(Licensing of Air Services) Regulations,
1959. Any representations or objections with regard to this application must be made in
writing, stating the specific grounds on which they are based and any conditions which it
may be desired shall be attached to the licence, if granted. They should be addressed to
the Secretary, Air Transport Licensing Authority, C/o Attorney General's Chambers,
Government Headquarters, Bay Street, and a copy sent to the applicant at the same time.
Further details of the application may be obtained from the Secretary.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 9, 1966













LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICES
Act 1957


APPLICATIONS FOR THE GRANT OF LIQUOR LICENCES TO THE
MAGISTRATE DISTRICT "A"

Date of Type of
Name of Applicant Occupation Residence Situation of Premises Application Licence


Winifred Eugene Ward Proprietress


Delbert Puckett and
Hattie Puckett





Elaine Boyce




Sylvia Best





Norma Howard




Granville Millar


Restaurateur





Shopkeeper




Seamstress





Shopkeeper




Shopkeeper


Geraldine Ruby Johnsonl Shopkeeper


Martin Doorly & Co.
Ltd.


Iris Eastmond


Reginald Osmond
Pierrepont


Lyrias
Ch. Ch.


Whitehall
Court, Has-
tings,
Ch. Ch.
Tweedside
Rd., St. M.


Peterkins
Ld., IstAve.
Bank Hall,
St. Michael.
Bush Hall
Farm Road,
St. Michael.
King St.,
St. Michael.


No. 10, St.
Paul's Ave,
Bay Land,
St. Michael.
Palmetto St.,
Bridgetown,
St. Michael.
Roebuck St.,
St. Michael


Lake View,
[Constitution

Rd., St. M.


Super Mare, St. Law-
rence, Christ Church


Wall building known as
the 'Barrel of Rum' No.
27 Broad St., Bridgetown,
St. Michael.
Board and Galvanised
shop at Tweedside Rd.,
St. Michael.
One Storey wall, Board
and Galvanised Building
situate at Wellington St.,
St. Michael.
Board and Galvanised
Shop, Cave Hill,
St. Michael.
Wall building, Cr. Jor-
dans Lane and Nelson
Street, St. Michael.
Wall and galvanised
Building, St. Paul's Ave.,
Bay Land, St. Michael


Board and Shingle shop,
at the Ivy, St. Michael.


Wall building, Roebuck
Street, St. Michael.


Wood and galvanised
Building, Constitution

Road, St. Michael.


31. 5. 66







31. 5. 66




31. 5. 66





31. 5. 66




31. 5. 66




31. 5. 66




31. 5. 66




31. 5. 66


31. 5. 66







31. 5. 66


Hotel







Restaurant




Retail





Retail




Retail




Restaurant




Restaurant




Retail


Restaurant







Restaurant


These Applications for the grant of Liquor Licences will be considered at a Licensing
Court to be held at Magistrates' Courts Dist. "A" on Wednesday the 22nd day of June, 1966
at 9.30 o'clock a.m.

B. D. MORRIS
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


Merchant


Shopkeeper




Proprietor


June 9, 1966


OFFICIAL GAZETTE








OFFCIA GAET un .16


NOTICE NO. 437

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICES

(Act 1957-40)


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:
PREMISES:


ELSIE DOREEN KNIGHT
Shopkeeper
Baxters Rd., St. Michael.
Wall building, Baxters Rd.,
St. Michael.


Dated this 31st day of May 1966.

Signed: ELSIE DOREEN KNIGHT
Applicant.

This Application for a grant of Restaur-
ant liquor licence will be considered at a Li-
censing Court to be held at Magistrates' Courts
Dist. 'A' on Wednesday the 22nd day of June,
1966 at 9.30 o'clock a.m.


B. D. MORRIS
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:


PREMISES:


OTTIS O. FIELDS
Shopkeeper
Laundry Road, Country Rd.,
St. Michael.
Board and Shingle shop at
Laundry Rd., Country Rd.,
St. Michael.


Dated this 31st day of May 1966.

Signed: OTTIS FIELDS
Applicant.


This Application for a grant of a Retail
Liquor licence will be considered at a Licens -
ing Court to be held at Magistrates' Courts
Dist. 'A' on Wednesday the 22nd day of June,
1966 at 9.30 o'clock a.m.

B. D. MORRIS
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


NOTICE NO. 438


LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICES

(Act 1957-40)


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:


PREMISES:


KATHLEEN WEEKS
Shopkeeper
Eastmond Rd., Brittons Hill,
St. Michael.
Board and Shingled Shop,
Eastmond Road, St. Michael.


Dated this 31st day of May 1966.

Signed: KATHLEEN WEEKS
Applicant.

This Application for a grant of a Retail
Liquor licence will be considered at a Licens-
ing Court to be held at Magistrates' Courts
Dist. 'A' on Wednesday the 22nd day of June,
1966 at 9.30 o'clock a.m.

B. D. MORRIS
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:
PREMISES:


ERNESTA PAYNE
Shopkeeper
Cliff Cottage, St. John.
A board and Shingle shop
with Residence attached at
Cliff Cottage, St. John.


Dated this 12th day of May, 1966.


Signed: ERNESTA PAYNE
Applicant.


This Application for a Retail licence will
be considered at aLicensing Court to be held
at Magistrates' Courts Dist. 'C' on Friday the
24th day of June, 1966 at 10 o'clock a.m.


O. W. R. SPENCER
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 9, 1966









OFFICIAL GAZETTE


NOTICE NO. 439

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICES
(Act 1957-40)


APPLICANT: HAROLD GILL
OCCUPATION: Shopkeeper
ADDRESS: Arthur Seat, St. Thomas
PREMISES: Board and galvanised build-
ing at Melrose, St. Thomas.

Dated this 3rd day of June, 1966.

Signed: HAROLD GILL
Applicant.

This Application for a transfer of a re-
tail licence will be considered at a Licensing
Court to be held at Magistrate's Courts Dist.
"D" onWednesday, the 22nd day of June, 1966
at 10 o'clock a.m.


HENSLEY H. ROBINSON
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:


PREMISES:


CAMERON KEIZER
Tailor
Kew Land, Redman's Village,
St. Thomas.
Wall and galvanised building
at above address.


Dated this 3rd day of June, 1966.

Signed: CAMERON C. KEIZER
Applicant.

This Application for a Retail licence will
be considered at a Licensing Court to be held
atMagistrate's Courts Dist. "D" on Wednes-
day, the 22nd day of June, 1966 at l0o'clocka.m.


HENSLEY H. ROBINSON
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


NOTICE NO. 440

LIQUOR LICENCE NOTICES

(Act 1957-40)


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:
PREMISES:


ELOISE ELLIS
Shopkeeper
Porey Spring, St. Thomas
Stone wall building with
residence attached situated
at above address.


Dated this 3rd day of June, 1966.

Signed: ELOISE ELLIS
Applicant.

This Application for a Retail licence will
be considered at a Licensing Court to be held
atMagistrate's Courts Dist. "D" on Wednes-
day, the 22nd day of June, 1966 at 10 o'clock a.m.

HENSLEY H. ROBINSON
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


APPLICANT:
OCCUPATION:
ADDRESS:
PREMISES:


MADE ALLEYNE
Shopkeeper
Bridge Field, St. Thomas
Board and shingle building
situated at Bridge Field,
St. Thomas.


Dated this 3rd day of June, 1966.

Signed: MADE ALLEYNE
Applicant.

This Application for a Retail licence will
be considered at a Licensing Court to be held
atMagistrate's Courts Dist. "D" on Wednes-
day, the 22nd day of June, 1966 at 10 o'clock anm.


HENSLEY H. ROBINSON
Clerk to Licensing Authority.


Tune 9 6 AV


e nuJ 9 1966


d








OFFICIAL GAZETTE June 2, 1966


NOTICE NO. 441

.IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

(Civil Jurisdiction)


No. 24 of 1966


RAMNATH MARAJ:

IVY ELINA BAYLEY:


Plaintiff

Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
solditwill be set up for sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: FIRST ALL THAT certain
piece or parcel of land situate off Country
Road in the parish of St. Michael and Island
aforesaid containing by admeasurement two
thousand nine hundred and forty-four square
feet or thereabouts Abutting and bounding on
lands of Elouise Carrington on lands now or
late of H. W.Challenor et alon lands of B. E.
Alleyne and on a road ten feet wide leading to
Country Road or however else the same is
abutting and bounding Together with the dwell -
inghouse thereon.

SECOND ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at the Ivy in the parish
of St. Michael and Island aforesaid containing
by admeasurement Three thousand one hun-
dred and eighty nine square feet or there-
abouts Abutting and bounding on lands of An-
toinette Byer deceased on lands of Jos. N.
Skinner deceased on lands of William E.
Thomas andon a road in common or however
else the same is abutting and bounding To-
gether with the dwellinghouse thereon.

THIRD ALL THAT certain piece or par-
cel of land situate at Sliders Alley in the City
of Bridgetown in this Island containing by es-
timation eight hundred square feet or there-
abouts Abutting and bounding on lands of one


Drakes on lands of one Morgan on lands of
Mrs. Toppin and on Sliders Alley or however
else the same is abutting and bounding to-
gether with the appurtenances.

UPSET PRICES: $1,200.00; $2,000.00;
$200.00
Dated this 1st day of June 1966.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)





NOTICE NO. 442


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

(Civil Jurisdiction)


No. 39 of 1966


HAROLD CARLYLE DRAKES:

PRISCILLA IONE DRAKES:


Plaintiff

Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
sold it will be set up for sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain parcel
of land situate at Carlton in the parish of St.
James in this Island containing by admeasure-
ment one rood ten perches or thereabouts
Abutting on lands of Sarah Husbands deceased
Amanda Jordan, Ernest Hobbs, deceased and
on the Public Road or however else the same
may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $1,000.00

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 2, 1966








Tunie 0 106FIFAU


NOTICE NO. 443
IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

(Civil Jurisdiction)


No. 459 of 1963
ALWYN DENZIL POWER:


Plaintiff


LAWRENCE ALBERT PORTER: Defendant

The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
soldit will be setupfor sale oneachsucceed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcelof land(formerly part of a larger area
of land containing twenty-four and three-tenths
perches originally part of the lands of Bank
Hall Plantation) situate at Second Avenue,
Dash Road, Bank Hall in the parish of St. Mi-
chael and Island aforesaid containing by esti-
mation three thousandnine hundred and fifty-
three square feet or thereabouts abutting and
bounding on lands now or late of the estate of
Mary G. Payne deceased on lands now or late
of the estate of G. Forde deceased on lands
now or late of the estate of one Goodridge
(being the other portion of the said twenty-
four and three tenths perches of land afore-
mentioned) and on the public road called Sec-
ond Avenue aforesaid or however else the
same may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $2,371.80

Dated this 1st day of June, 1966.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


NOTICE NO. 444

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS
(Civil Jurisdiction)

No. 47 of 1966

LORTON EGBERT EDWARDS: Plaintiff

STANLEY GLADSTONE REDMOND:
Defendant

The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
sold it will be set up for sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land (formerly part of the Lands of
Kirton's and Rices Plantations) situate in the
parish of St. Philip and Island aforesaid con-
taining by admeasurement One Acre three and
three fourths Perches or thereabouts
(inclusive of three and three fourths perches
in the area of the Public Road hereinafter
mentioned) abutting and boundingonlands late
of L. Power but now of the estate of Henry R.
Lorde deceased on lands now or late of the
estate of Thomas Walcott deceased on lands
late of Jonathan Burke and Albert Clarke but
now of the estate of Torrence Brathwaite de-
ceased and on the Public Road or however
else the same may albtt and bound.


VALUE OF PROPERTY: $4,000.00

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


e nuJ 9 1966







OFIILGAET an ,16


NOTICE NO. 446


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS


Civil Jurisdiction


No. 40 of 1966


ALLAN ST.CLAIR WATSON:

ELOISE CAROLINE DEBORAH


Plaintiff

CHANDLER:
Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2p.m. and if not then
sold it will be setup for sale oneach succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Near the Cove in the
parish of Saint Lucy and Island aforesaid con-
tainingby admeasurement Two roods twenty-
seven perches or thereabouts Abutting and
Bounding on lands of James Armstrong on
lands of Julia Yearwood on lands of Lionel
Austin on lands of SamuelArmstrong on lands
of G. Austin on lands of the Cove Plantation
and on the Public Road or however else the
same may abut and bound together with the
dwellinghouse thereon and all and singular
other the buildings and erections erected and
built standing and being with the appurtenances.

UPSET PRICE: $2,000.00.

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


Civil Jurisdiction


No. 50 of 1966

HAMISH GREIG McCLURG:

BERESFORD HOWELL:


Plaintiff

Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
solditwill be setup for sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Gall Hill in the parish
of St. John and Island of Barbados containing
by admeasurement Sixteen thousand three
hundred and eighty-one square feet or there-
abouts (inclusive of six hundred and nineteen
square feet in a private road hereinafter men-
tioned) BUTTING AND BOUNDING to the West
on lands of one Wharton to the North on lands
of Clifton Hall Plantation to the East on lands
of Clarence Howard and to the South on a pri-
vate roador however else the same may abut
and bound.


VALUE OF PROPERTY: $1,250.00


Dated this 1st day of June 1966.



C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


NOTICE NO. 445


June 9, 1966


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


,qqqq








OFFICIAL GAZETrE


IJ-U 1I6II


NOTICE NO. 447

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

Civil Jurisdiction

No. 53 of 1966


MARINA CECILIA GAY:


Plaintiff


CHARLES ASQUITH PHILLIPS: Defendant

The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if notthen
solditwill be setupfor sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.


PROPERTY: ALL THATcertainpiece or
parcel of land situate at Hopewell in the par-
ish of Christ Church and Island of Barbados
containing by admeasurement Three Acres
Three Roods Thirty-four and sixty-four hun-
dredths Perches or thereabouts Butting and
Bounding on lands now or late of Catherine
Pilgrim on lands now or late of Ruth Morrison
on lands now or late of Olga Grannum on the
Public Road which leads to Gibbons on lands
now or late of one Lovell on lands now or late
of Clara Kirton on lands of a Place called
"Sebago" and on the public road which leads
to Sayes Court and to Ealing Grove or how-
ever else the same may butt and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $9,600.00

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


NOTICE NO. 448

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

(Civil Jrisdiction)

No. 495 of 1964


ALWYN DENZIL POWER:


Plaintiff


ALFRED AUGUSTUS NATHANIEL CARTER:
Defendant.


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if notthen
solditwill be setupfor sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.



PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Cottage in the Parish
of St. Philip and Island aforesaid containing
by admeasurement Two roods thirty-eight
perches or thereabouts Abutting and bounding
on lands now or late of A. E. Alleyne on lands
now or late of Foursquare Plantation on lands
now or late of Louise Croney and on the Pub-
lic Road or however else the same may abut
and bound.



UPSET PRICE: $2,000.00


Dated this 1st day of June 1966.




C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


Junl 7, ..








OFFICIAL GAZETTE June 9,1966


NOTICE NO. 449


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS
Civil Jurisdiction


No. 301 of 1965


KETURAH HUNTE:

OSFORD LEWIS HUNTE:


Plaintiff

Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
sold it will be set up for sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land part of the lands of Haggatt
Hall Plantation situate in the parishes of St.
Michael and St. George and Island aforesaid
containing by admeasurement one acre five
perches or thereabouts (of which area three
and a half perches forms a portion of the pri-
vate road hereinafter mentioned) Abutting and
bounding on lands of Wilfred Newton on lands
of William Clarke on lands of Hanson Planta-
tion on lands of Joseph N. Austin and on a
private road fourteen feet wide or however
else the same may abut and bound.


UPSET PRICE: 8,793.60

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


NOTICE NO. 450


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

Civil Jurisdiction

No. 676 of 1965


RICHARD DeVERE COLE:

DUDLEY ALLAN PINDER


Plaintiff


Defendants


MELVILLE PINDER

The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then

sold it will be setup for sale on each succeed-

ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Holders Plantation in
the Parish of St. James and Island aforesaid
containing by admeasurement two roods three
and one-half perches or thereabouts abutting

and bounding on lands now or late of Ossie
Chandler onlands now or late of one Maynard
onlands now orlate of one Ward on two sides
on other lands of Shaver Poultry Breeding
Farms (Barbados) Limited and on Holders
Plantation or however else the same may abut
and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $4,067.28

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 9, 1966








I .. 1iLt


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 9, 1966 OFICA GAZTT


NOTICE NO. 451

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

Civil Jurisdiction


No. 656 of 1965


RAMNATH MARAJ:

ERIC GRANNUM:


Plaintiff

Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
sold itwill be setupfor sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: FIRST ALL THAT certain
piece or parcel of land situate atQuarry Road,
Clapham in the parish of St. Michael and Is-
land aforesaid containing by admeasurement
One acre thirty-four perches or thereabouts
Abutting and Bounding on lands now or late of
Kathleen Reece on lands now or late of Clar-
ence Reece, on lands now or late of one Jack-
man and on the public road called Quarry
Road or however else the same is abutting
and bounding together with the appurtenances.

SECOND ALL THAT certain piece or par-
celof land also situate at Quarry Road, Clap-
ham in the parish of St. Michael and Island
aforesaid containing by admeasurement Two
roods fifteen perches or thereabouts Abutting
and Bounding on lands now or late of William


C. Streat on lands now or late of one Taylor
on lands now or late of one Moore and on the
public road or however else the same is abutt-
ing and bounding together with the appurten-
ances.

THIRD ALL THAT certain piece or par-
celof land situate at Streat Road, Clapham in
the parish of St. Michael and Island aforesaid
containingby admeasurement Three roods or
thereabouts Abutting and Bounding on lands of
Grannum on..A road on lands of one Thomas
and Adams and on the Public Road called
Streat Road or however else the same is
abutting and bounding together with the appur-
tenances.

FOURTH ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land also situate at Streat Road,
Clapham in the parish of St. Michael and Is-
land aforesaid containing by admeasurement
one rood or thereabouts Abutting and Bound-
ing on lands of Grannum on two sides on lands
of Harold C. Streat and on the public road or
however else the same is abutting and bound-
ing together with the appurtenances.


UPSET PRICES: $4,500.00; $2,500.00;
$2,000.00 $1,000.00.


Dated this 1st day of June 1966.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)









OFFICIAL GAZETTE June 9.1966


NOTICE NO. 452

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS
Civil Jurisdiction


No. 17 of 1966


CHARLES EDWIN EDGHILL:

EDNA BLACKMAN:


Plaintiff

Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
soldit will be setupfor sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.


PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Nr. Walmer Lodge in
the district of Black Rock in the parish of
Saint Michael in the Island of Barbados con-
taining by admeasurement ten thousand seven
hundred and six square feet or thereabouts
Abutting and bounding on lands of one Nicholls
on lands of one Roach on lands of Rosa
Blackett and on the Public Road or however
else the same may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $1,000.00

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


NOTICE NO. 453

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

Civil Jurisdiction

No. 124 of 1966


ALWYN DENZIL POWER:

ST. CLAIR HARDING:


Plaintiff

Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
sold it will be setupfor sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Fairfield Cross Road,
Tudor Bridge in the parish of St. Michael in
this Island containing by admeasurement thir-
ty perches and two thirds of a perch or there-
abouts Abutting and Bounding on lands now or
late of Clement N. Harding, on lands now or
late of the Estate of one Murray, deceased,
on lands now or late of C. Marshall and on a
Road in Common or however else the same
may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $2,400.00

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 9, 1966








June9, 966OFFCIA GAETT


NOTICE NO. 454

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

Civil Jurisdiction


No. 54 of 1966


LISLE BERESFORD ALLEYNE: Plaintiff


ATHOL LOVELL:


Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
sold it will be setupfor sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or
parcel of land situate at Enterprise in the par-
ish of Christ Church in this Island containing
by admeasurement One Acre, One Rood or
thereabouts BUTTING AND BOUNDING on
lands formerly of Francis L. Belle but now
of Eric O. Smith et ux, on lands now or late
of Allan Greenidge, on lands now or late of
Frederick Lovell and on the Public Road or
however else the same may abutt and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $10,000.00

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


NOTICE NO. 455

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

Civil Jurisdiction


No. 119 of 1965

GWENDOLYN ELISE YEARWOOD: Plaintiff


MAY ELOISE KING:


Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if notthen
sold it will be set up for sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THATcertainpiece or
parcel of land situate at Rock Hall in the par-
ish of St. Thomas and Island of Barbados
aforesaid containing by admeasurement two
roods or thereabouts abutting and bounding
on other lands of the Defendant on lands of
Dunscombe Plantation on lands now or late of
Constance A. Forde and on a Road-in-Com-
monthreefeet wide orhowever else the same
may abut and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $1,000.00
Dated this 1st day of June 1966.

C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


June 9, 1966


OFFICIAL GAZETTE









OFFICIAL GA7ETTE June 9, 1966


NOTICE NO. 456

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Appointment

D. C. T. Grannum, Senior Inspector, De-
partment of Inland Revenue, to be Assistant
Commissioner of Inland Revenue with effect
from 1st June, 1966

(M.P. 366/39/4)


NOTICE NO. 457

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

Civil Jurisdiction

No. 94 of 1965


CHARLES EDWIN EDGHILL:


JULIAN REID:


Plaintiff

Defendant


The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
sold it will be setupfor sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: ALL THATcertainpiece or
parcel of land situate at Greenidge Village
off Paynes Bay in the parish of St. James and
Island of Barbados aforesaid containing by
admeasurement eight thousand two hundred
and ninety two square feet of land or there-
abouts abutting and bounding on the North on
lands of Sandy Lane Plantation and on the
East, South and West on lands of C. W. W.
Greenidge or however else the same may
abut and bound.

UPSET PRICE: $2,487.60

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


NOTICE NO. 458

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BARBADOS

Civil Jurisdiction

No. 20 of 1966

CHARLES EDWIN EDGHILL: Plaintiff
GERMAINE ERMINA GIBSON and
ERROL OVERTON BRATHWAITE:
Defendants

The undermentioned property will be set
up for sale at the Registration Office on the
1st day of July 1966 at 2 p.m. and if not then
sold itwill be setupfor sale on each succeed-
ing Friday at 2 p.m. until sold.

PROPERTY: FIRSTLY ALL THAT cer-
tain piece or parcel of land situate at Sealy
Hall in the parish of St. Philip and Island of
Barbados aforesaid containing by admeasure-
ment five acres three roods twenty-one
perches or thereabouts Abutting and bounding
on lands of Germaine Ermina Gibson on lands
of L. Taylor on the sea and on a road of suf-
ferance AND SECONDLY ALL THAT certain
piece or parcel of land also situate at Sealy
Hall in the parish of St. Philip and Island
aforesaid containing by admeasurement five
acres three roods twenty-one perches or
thereabouts abutting and bounding on lands of
Errol Overton Brathwaite on lands of L. Tay-
lor onlands of M. Rice et alon lands of Mary
Christie and on a road of sufferance or how-
ever else the same may abut and bound To-
gether with the message or dwellinghouse
thereon and all and singular other the build-
ings and erections on the said parcel of land
erected and built standing and being with the
appurtenances.


UPSET PRICES: $5,000.00; $5,000.00

Dated this 1st day of June 1966.


C. A. ROCHEFORD
Registrar of the Supreme Court (Ag.)


Government Printing Office.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


June 9, 1966













THE





SENATE DEBATES





(Official Report)


SECOND SESSION OF 1961-66


T:!L !'-NA, I L
Thursday, 18th March, 1965.
The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public Build-
ings, at 4 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Sir Grey MASSIAH, C.B.E., M.A., M.D.,
C.M. (President); His Honour Senator C. A. PHILIPS, B.A.,
(Deputy President); Senator the Honourable H. A.
VAUGHAN, Q.C., O.B.E. (Attorney General); Senator the
Honourable E. R. L. WARD, B.A.,(Ministerwithout Port-
folio); Senator C. L. BRATHWAITE; Senator F. C. H.
CAREW; Senator L. S. CARMICHAEL; Senator D. A.GIBBS:
Senator C. G. JOHNSON; Senator C. H. WHITE; Senator
J. S. B. DEAR, Q.C., M.A.; Senator H. F. ALKINS; Senator
K. R. HUNTE, O.B.E., A.C.I.S.; Senator E. S. ROBINSON;
Senator Dr. A. W. SCOTT,M.D., B.Sc., L.R.C.P., L.R. C.S.,
L.R.F.P. & S.; Senator H. B. St. JOHN, LL.B.; Senator
E. LISLE WARD.

ABSENT

Senator D. L. BURROWES(on leave till 3rd April,
1965); Senator CYRALENE FIELDS; Senator H. ODDESSA
GITTENS, M.R.S.H. (Parliamentary Secretary); Senator
D. G. LEACOCK, B.A.

Prayers were said.

MINUTES

Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward,Ministerwith-
out Portfolio, seconded by Senator F. C.H. Carew, moved
that the Minutes of the meeting of Thursday, the 4th of
March, 1965, as printed and circulated, be taken as read
and be confirmed.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

EXCUSE FOR ABSENCE

The Clerk informed the Senate that he had been asked
to offer an excuse for the absence from the day's meeting
of Senators Odessa Gittens, Cyralene Fields and D. G.
Leacock.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE(CAPITAL)No. 60

The President called the first Order a Resolution
to place the sum of $29,507 at the disposal of the Govern-
ment to supplement the Estimates 1964-65, Part II Capi-
tal as shown in the Supplementary Estimate 1964-65, No. 60
which forms the Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, In March 1960 the then Government initiated
a mechanical cultivation scheme for small holders. It is


estimated that there are some 10,000 acres of land in the
island owned or occupied by small holders and a sum of
$74,000 was provided for the purchase of equipment and
the operation of the scheme.

In the first two years of its operation the equipment
used in the scheme cultivated 2,700 acres and since then
the service has become increasingly popular since it
eliminates the drudgery of forking, and deep ploughing has
resulted in increased yields. The scheme has never been
self supporting and the loss over the five years including
depreciation amounts to $65,706.76. Nevertheless the
Government is of opinion that it is a worthwhile service
and must be maintained and increased to provide for the
cultivation of grasslands.

It is also proposed to buy a track tractor to assist in
the cultivation of land in St. Andrew and St. Joseph which
cannot be plouged by a wheel tractor. It is essential that
preparations be made at once sothattherewill be no delay
in carrying through the programme as soon as the reaping
of the crop is concluded. The sum requested is $29,507 of
which $15,000 will be spent in the purchase of three wheel
tractors, and $1,650 for three bar point ploughs. $15,891 is
required to pay outstanding bills mainly for repairs to
equipment, and a sum of $1,645 is provided for contingencies


I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.

The question was put to th Senate and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No. 62

The President called the second Order- A Resolution
to place the sum of $5,640at the disposal of the Government
to supplement the Estimates 1964-65, Partl Current as
shown in the Supplementary Estimate 1964-65, No. 62, which
forms the Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, The notes to the supplementary Resolution
set out in detail the reasons for the various amounts re-
quested to be voted and I do not propose at this stage to add
further comment. I would only say in respect of the request
for $3,000 under Judiciary as an additional sum for the
payment of Jurors and Marshals at the Criminal Assizes,
that the Assizes have been more prolonged this year. I
cannot give any explanation for this phenomenon except,
perhaps, that lawyers are more argumentative than they
used to be.

I move that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.













On the motion of Senator K. R. Hunte seconded by
Senator H. F. Alkins the Schedule to the Resolution was
taken as read.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in was
put and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No. 63

The President called the third Order A Resolution
that the sum of $189,918 be granted from the Public
Treasury and placed at the disposal of the Government to
supplement the Estimates 1964-65, Part I, Current, as
shown in the Supplementary Estimate 1964-65, No. 63.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, This supplementary Resolution includes
items under six Heads. The three largest sums are
$149,403 under Subsidies and Grants, $29,403 under Post
Office for the carriage of Overseas Air Mailand $6,953for
cleaning, water, light and fuel at the Mental Hospital.
As you will see in Note 10 the Government in accordance
with the agreement for establishing a Television Broad-
casting system will hand over to the Corporation the re-
venue derived from import duties on television sets. As
to the second item all overseas air mail must be prepaid
under the terms of the Universal Postal Union Agreement.
With respect to the Mental Hospital an amount of $4,468
lapsed from the vote under this head for 1963-64. Vouchers
for this amount were sent to the Treasury but were not:
cashed before the end of March 1964.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Sen.tcr C, L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

On the motion of Senator E, S. Robinson seconded by
Senator C. L. Brathwaite the Schedule to the Resolution
was taken as read.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in was
put and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE (CURRENT) No. 64

The President called the fourth Order- A Resolution
that the sum of $1,635 be granted from the Public Treasury
and placed at the disposal of the Government to supplement
the Estimates 1964-65, Part I, Current, as shown in the
Supplementary Estimate, 1964-65, No. 64 which forms the
Schedule to this Resolution.

SENATOR THE Honourable E. R. L. WARD: Mr. Pres-
ident, This resolution for the sum of $1,635 is requested
to enable the government to pay ex-gratia gratuities to two
employees of the Department of Highways and Transport
who did not qualify for pensions or gratuities on their re-
tirement. In both of these cases the employees have given
more than ten years service but part of this period was
after they had passed the age of sixty years. Mr Coward
had served for 9 years and six months- six months short
of the qualifying period and Mr. Small had served for 8
years before he reached the age of sixty. In the circum-
stances the Cabinet felt that an ex-gratia payment to these
officers is justified. If they had been in offices covered by
the Pensions Act 1947 they would have been eligible for
pension in respect of their total service.

To avoid any misunderstanding I would add this. Cer-
tain officers have been refused pensions or gratuities but
in each case, as I am informed, the officers had been first
employed after they had reached the age of sixty.

I move, sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

BILL TO AMEND PETROLEUM ACT, 1882

The President called the fifth Order A Bill to
Amend the Petroleum Act, 1882.


On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator the HonourableH. A.Vaughan the Bill
was read a first time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, -- Petroleum distillates used in the fishing in-
dustry and in agriculture are not liable to the road tax.
Under the existing law this tax is payable at the time of
withdrawal from the petroleum warehouse or other ap-
proved storehouse and refunds are made in accordance
with certificates showing the purposes for which the dis-
tillates were used. It has been pointed out, however, that
fishermen would be required to pay the road tax and then
apply for refunds. The Bill therefore proposes that power
should be given to the Comptroller of Customs to permit
approved persons to withdraw petroleum distillates other
than volatile petroleum without payment of the road tax
which would be paid on a period accounting basis in re-
spect of all distillates withdrawn less any quantity shown
to the satisfaction of the Comptroller to have been with-
drawn for purposes other than as fuel for road vehicles.
Clause 2 of the Bill seeks to amend section 26 of the
Act so as to make it clear that the tax is not payable more
than once.

I move, sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.

SENATOR J. S.B. DEAR: Mr. President, I would
like to draw to attention the rather peculiarwording of the
proviso and to ask for some information as to whether a
typographical error may be involved.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE H. A.VAUGHAN: Sir,-
If the Senator looks at section 26 of the Act he will see that
it seems to impose the payment of duty on the volatile
petroleum. When it came to drafting this amendment it
was decided to put it in a more decisive voice.

The question that the Bill be read a second time was
put to the Senate and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a third time, and, on like motion, was passed.

A BILL TO IMPOSE CERTAIN DUTIES ON PETROLEUM
PRODUCTS WITHDRAWN OR SUPPLIED FROM
BUOC REFINERY

The President called the sixth Order A Bill to impose
certain duties of excise in respect of petroleum products
withdrawn or supplied from the Refinery to be operated
by the Barbados Union Oil Company Limited pursuant to the
Agreement between the Government and the said Company.

On the motion of Senator theHonourable E.R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a first time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, On October 19, 1962 the government made
an agreement with the Barbados Union Oil Company Ltd.
which was ratified by the Legislature on June 12th, 1963.
Under Article 4 H of the agreement it was agreed that an
excise duty should be paid to the government by the Com-
pany in respect of petroleum products supplied ex-refinery
which would correspond with the duty, additional duty and
package tax imposed in respect of petroleum products ex-
cept in respect of asphalt products and fuel oil supplied to
the government.

Section 3 authorises the imposition of the duties and
section 4 specifies the duties to be charged. The company
is required by Clause 5 to pay these duties to the Comp-
troller not later than 15 days after the end of each month,
Section 6 exempts asphalts and fuel oil supplied to the
government from the provisions of the Bill.

Section 7 empowers the Cabinet to make regulations
for giving effect to the Bill and section 8 imposes a penalty


1













of $1,000 or three times the duty omitted to be paid (which-
ever amount is the greater) plus the duty for failure to pay
within the prescribed time. Under the terms of the Agree-
ment the company is authorised to add these excise duties
to the ex-refinery selling price.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.

SENATOR E. LISLE WARD: Mr. President, -- Now
that we are on this matter, I would like to enquire if the
Government intends at a future date to have any particular
bureau of standards to maintain the standard of these pro-
ducts.

It has been brought to my notice that some of the pro-
ducts may not be up to the standard of the imported product.
I feel that in view of the fact that we are encouraging a cer-
tain amount of industrial development, we should have some
standards to protect the people of this island where these
products manufactured in the island are concerned.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, -- In reply to the Senator, I believe that the
answer was given by the Honourable Minister of Trade and
Industry in the Other Place. Although it is not specifically
set out in the Agreement, there is the understanding with
the Company involved that the standard of the products of
that company would be no less than those imported from a
refinery abroad. I think that I can assure the Senator that
the Government will make every effort to see that the
standard of these locally manufactured products are kept
on a high level.

SENATOR E. LISLE WARD: I thank the Honourable
Member.

SENATOR K. R. HUNTE: Mr. President, -- I would
say first of all that I believe that in Jamaica Esso Oil Com-
pany has got an Agreement similar to the one which the
BUOC is getting in Barbados. I understand thatin Jamaica
all the companies -- Shell, Texaco etc. are going to draw
their supplies of gasolene and kerosene oil from Esso, put
them in their own tanks and sell them as their own brands.
That, I understand, is likely to happen in Barbados.

If that is so, Sir, knowing the keen competition among
the various brands of gasolene, I have not doubt that these
companies will make sure that their products good enough
to be sold under their own brands. In this type of market I
do not think that we have any need to bother on that score.

One thing that I would like to say is that this industry
is a good example of the benefit that an industry can bring
to an island. I have some figures here which I have got
from a good authority. The cost of imported petroleum
products, if we had no refinery in Barbados would be
$3.4 million a year. When the refinery here starts to oper-
ate on the present Agreement, the amount of raw material
it will import will be to the value of $2.2 million, which
will leave a balance of $1.2 millionwhich we would other-
wise have spent on imported products.

Sir, with our visible adverse trade balance, every
cent that we can save on importation is of benefit to Bar-
bados. If this Company gets this Agreement with the Bar-
bados Government, this Island can save $1.2 million in
foreign exchange.

I would add that as far as petroleum products are con-
cerned various companies are always carrying out experi-
ments which are heavily financed. It sometimes happens
that one company gets a little ahead of another company in
the matter of refining their products so as to produce a
slightly better product. From my reading of the book "Oil
for 50 Years" which deals with a British Petroleum Com-
pany in Trinidad, it appears to me that no company can
maintain this lead for more than a few months because
someone sells the secret to another oil company which
puts it into operation.


I repeat, sir, that there is no reason for us to fear
receiving lower quality gasolene. On the other hand, $1. 2
million will be saved and 740 Barbadians willbe employed
at the refinery. To me it is an excellent example of an in-
dustry that will benefit our island.

The question that the Bill be read a second time was
put to the Senate and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator J. S. B. Dear seconded by
Senator H. B. St. John the clauses of the Bill were called
by their numbers instead of being read by their text.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a third time, and on like motion was passed.

BILL TO AMEND THE PACKAGE TAX ACT, 1941

The President called the seventh Order A Bill to
amend the Package Tax Act, 1941.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a first time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, Under the existing law machinery and ap-
paratus for refining oil or petroleum attracts tax under
the Package Tax Act 1941-6. The agreement between the
government and the B.U.O. C. provides that such machinery
and apparatus shall be free of all customs duties, taxes or
other charges except charges under the Barbados Harbours
Act 1960. The amendment to section 4 of the Package tax
Act has been drawn in such terms thatthe section will ap-
ply generally to any goods exempted from the operation of
the Act under the terms of an agreement entered into by
the government either before or after the passing of the Bill.

I move, sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The clauses of the Bill were read and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a third time, and on like motion was passed.

BILL TO AMEND THE BRITISH UNION OIL COMPANY
STATION ACT, 1919

The President called the eighth Order A Bill to
amend the British Union Oil Company Station Act, 1919.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E.R. L. Ward,
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a first time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President,-- The preamble to the agreement between
B.U.O.C. and the Government recites that in accordance
with the terms negotiated the agreement would become ef-
fective after execution thereof by the Company and the Gov-
ernment and repeal of the B.U.O.C. Act 1919. Clause 2 of
the Bill accordingly seeks to repeal the Act so as to make
the agreement effective.
I move, sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.
The clauses of the Bill were read and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a third time, and, on like motion, was passed.


I_













BILL TO AMEND THE CONSUMPTION TAX ACT, 1962

The President called the ninth Order -- A Bill to
amend the Consumption Tax Act, 1962.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E, R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a first time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
Prseident, -- One of the incentives granted to the B.U.O.C.
under the agreement was the imposition of a consumption
tax of not less than six cents a gallon on gasolene, kerosene,
distillates, fuel oils and asphalts entered for consumption
in the island, and this charge is applicable also to petro-
leum products purchased from the Company. In pursuance
of this agreement an Order was made under the Consump-
tion Tax Act, section 3 adding these products to the Schedule.
This Order was laid in the Senate on Feb. 25th and will
come into operation on proclamation in the Official Gazette.
The Government agreed to discharge the Company
from any liability for the payment of this tax in the case of
products purchased from the Company to the extent of six
cents per gallon though the Company would be liable to pay
any increased consumption tax imposed for the purposes
of revenue and would be authorised to add this amount to
the selling price. This Bill is intended to implement this
term of the agreement and it has been drafted in such a
manner that it is applicable not only to the present agree-
ment but to any agreement which may be entered into by
the Government with any company or individual in the
future.
I move, sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The clauses of the Bill were read and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a third time, and, on, like motion, was passed.

BILL TO AMEND THE ELECTRICITY ACT, 1936

The President called the tenth Order -- A Bill to
amend the Electricity Act, 1936.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a first time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, -- This is a short Bill designed to give a new
title to the Electrical Engineer and to provide for a uniform
use of the terms electrical installation and electrical fit-
tings and apparatus. Clause 5 repeals the existing Schedule
and substitutes a new scale of charges. The charges have
been increased for inspecting a domestic installation by
30 cents and for testing a business or industrial installation
from $2.50 to $5 in respect of an installation under one
kilowatt capacity and to $10.00 in respect of aninstallation
above one kilowatt capacity. Charges have been increased
with respect to industrial and commercial buildings be-
cause they require two inspectors and sometimes an ap-
prentice to carry out the necessary tests.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, -- I am not
opposing this Bill; but I want to refer to the Electricity
Regulations which were circulated along with the other
Papers for today's meeting. These Regulations, I submit,
have some relevance to the Bill we are discussing. I have
glanced through these Regulations and am puzzled as to
what is meant by Clause 6 of the Regulations.


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: The
Senator has drawn attention to whatwas obviously a serious
printing error. It seems that there are some errors in the
Regulations and they will be drawn to the attention of those
responsible.

The question that the Bill be read a seconJ time was
put to the Senate and agreed to.

The clauses of the Bill were read and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator theHonourable E.R. L, Ward
seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan the Bill
was read a third time and, on like motion, was passed.

BILL TO AMEND VARIOUS EXPIRING LAWS

The President called the eleventh Order A Bill to
continue various expiring laws.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward,
seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite the Bill was read a
first time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, -- This Bill seeks to continue the operation of
the Acts or sections of Acts specified in the Schedule.
When the revision of the Acts is completed some of these
provisions will cease to be annual Acts.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

SENATOR J. S. B. DEAR: Mr. President, -- There
are certain Acts in this Schedule which might as well be
made permanent Acts. The Emigration Act of 1904 is one
example. I would say the same of the Volunteer Act, 1909.

When the Anglican Church (Partial Suspension Act),
1955 was passed it was supposed to be a temporary meas-
ure until the Church was dis-established and disendowed.
Ten years have passed since then, and the Church, like
the poor is still with us as part of this Bill. The worthy
gentlemen of the Clergy are still under partial suspension.
No one is certain whether they are Anglicans, Catholics or
a combination of both, whether they should receive stipends
after the age of 60 and whether they should remain Bishops
after that age. This Bill preserves the status quo.

I would also like to ask why has the section of the Va-
grancy Act which comes up for renewal year after year not
been made permanent?


SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: I have
looked through the Vagrancy Act and I realise that it is
very important to persons like the learned Senator. I may
assure him that there is a revision of the laws In process
and where it is possible to make these laws permanent or
to repeal them, that will be done. As far as some of the
others are concerned, they involve matters of policy and
of great complexity.

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, When you
renew section 11 of the Principal Act does it mean that all
the other sections are dead?

SEANTOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Sec-
tion 11 is made to continue for one year, and it has to be
renewed annually unless it is made a permanent part of
the Act. I would add that in Britain the Army Act is still
an annual Act.

The question that the Bill be read a second time was
put to the Senate and agreed to.

The clauses of the Bill were read and agreed to.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R, L. Ward
seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite the Bill was read a
third time and, on like motion, was passed.













BILL TO AMEND THE COPYRIGHT ACT, 1915

The President called the twelfth Order A Bill to
amend the Copyright Act, 1915.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward
seconded by Seantor C. L. Brathwaite the Bill was read
a first time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, -- Now that the College of Arts and Science
has been established it is considered to be essential for
the purposes of research students that the College should
be supplied by the publishers with a copy of every book
published in the Island. Section 2 of the Copyright (Amend-
ment) Act 1956 added a new section 4 to the Act requiring
the publisher of any book published in the island to deliver
one copy to the Public Library and one to the University
College of the West Indies. This amendment adds the Col-
lege of Arts and Science to the list of Institutions to which
copies must be sent.

I move, sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The Clauses of the Bill were read and agreed to.

On the motion of the Senator the Honourable E. R. L.
Ward seconded by Senator C. L. Brathwaite the Bill was
read a third time and, on like motion, was passed.

BILL TO AUTHORISE THE BISHOP TO SELL "WILTON"

The President called the thirteenth Order, A Bill
to aithorise the Lord Bishop et al to sell the property
known as "Wilton" Black Rock, St. Michael, and to invest
the moneys obtained from such sale.

On the motion of Senator J. S. B. Dear seconded by
Senator H. B. St. John the Bill was read a first time.

SENATOR J. S. B. DEAR: Mr. President, I do not
think it is necessary to say much in moving the second
reading of this Bill, the purpose of which is set out in the
Preamble.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator H. B. St. John seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

The clauses of the Bill were read and agreed to.



On the motion of Senator J. S. B. Dear seconded by
Senator H. B. St. John the Bill was read a third time, and
on like motion, was passed.


NOTICE OF MEETINGS

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, -- I would like to give notice to members of
the Senate that it is proposed that the Senate should meet
on Monday, March 29 at 2 p.m., and if necessary, on Tues-
day March 30th, at the same hour in order that consider-
ation may be given to the Appropriation Bill, 1965, before
the end of the current financial year.


PRINTING OF DEBATES AND STANDING ORDERS OF
THE SENATE

SENATOR E. S. ROBINSON: Mr. President, -- May I
draw to your attention the fact that the Debates of this
Senate have not been reported in the Official Gazette for
at least six months now? It may well be that our deliber-
ations are not as important as those of the Other Place;
but I feel that the Debates of the Senate should be published
in the Official Gazette ina reasonable time as an official
record of what has taken place in this Chamber.

SENATOR J. S. B. DEAR: Mr. President, Arising
out of the remarks of Senator Robinson, I believe that the
Senate has a representative on the Debates Committee
whose job it is to see that the debates of both Chambers
are published promptly. I would mention, Sir, that certain
debates of the Other Place have not been published even
though subsequent debates have been published. It seems to
me that certain people do not want to have certain debates
published. Certain things were reported in the newspapers
as having been said: but I have not yet seen it in Hansard.
It was reported that someone promised to send another
member in orbit to the moon. I think that that debate has
now become known as the "Kick the Man to the Moon"
Debate. There is also a debate on Federation that has not
yet been published in the Official Gazette.

At the same time, Sir, I would like to ask what is the
present position with regard to the printing of the Standing
Orders of the Senate which were approved during last year.
When is it proposed that they will come into force?

SENATOR H. F. ALKINS: Mr. President, I am the
Senate's representative on the Debates Committee. Iwould
be glad if I could be informed as to the procedure for get-
ting a meeting called. I am afraid that I do not know. I
would be willing to get one called to get this matter of
the debates cleared up.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: With
regard to Senator Dear's questions about a missing meeting,
I am unable to throw any light on it. I do not know if the
Senator wants to assume that that has also gone into orbit.

Where the set-up in this Chamber is concerned, we
have one part time Reporter, whereas the Other Place has
three full time Reporters and three typists. Consideration
is being given to having a full time staff of Legislative Re-
porters who will attend both Chambers, take notes for 10
minutes and give them transcribed and submitted to the
Clerk so that on the following day the matter will be ready.

I know that the Government takes a serious view of the
matter and the Premier himself has called attention to the
fact that debates should be published within at least 48
hours after the conclusion of the meeting. From my own
experience in the now defunct Federal Parliament, I know
how essential it is also to have someone to edit the Report-
ers' script.

Senator Alkins asked about the procedure of getting a
meeting of the Debates Committee called. The Speaker of
the Other Place is Chairman of the Debates Committee and
the Senator can call on him to summon a meeting. Getting
the meeting summoned is another matter; but I can only
say that perhaps the remarks made here today will spur
him in some sort of direction.

ADJOURNMENT

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward
seconded by Senator F. C. Carew the Senate adjourned sine
die.














THE





SENATE DEBATES





(Official Report)


SECOND SESSION OF 1961-66


TIHE SENATE

Monday 29th March, 1965

The Senate met in the Senate Chamber, Public Build-
ings, at 2 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT

His Honour Sir GREY MASSIAH, C.B.E., M.A., M.D.,
C.M., (President); His Honour Senator C. A. PHILLIPS,
B.A. (Deputy President); Senator the Honourable H. A.
VAUGHAN Q.C., O.B.E., (Attorney General); Senator the
Honourable E. R. L. WARD, B.A., (Minister without Port-
folio); Senator C. L. BRATHWAITE; Senator F. C. H.
CAREW; Senator L. S. CARMICHAEL; Senator CYRALENE
FIELDS; Senator D. A. GIBBS; Senator H. ODDESSA
GITTENS, M.R.S.H. (Parliamentary Secretary); Senator
C. G. JOHNSON; Senator C. H. WHITE; Senator J. S. B.
DEAR, Q.C., M.A.; Senator D. G. LEACOCK, B.A.;
Senator H. F. ALKINS; Senator K. R. HUNTE, O.B.E.,
A.C.I.S.; Senator E. S. ROBINSON; Senator Dr. A. W.
SCOTT, M.D., B.Sc. L.R.C.P., L.R.C.S., L.R.F.P. & S.;
Senator H. B. St. JOHN, LL.B.; Senator E. LISLE WARD.

ABSENT

Senator D. L. BURROWES (on leave until 3rd April,
1965.)

Prayers were said.

MINUTES

Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward, Minister with-
out Portfolio, seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A.
Vaughan, moved that the Minutes of the meeting of Thurs-
day, the 18th of March, 1965 as printed and circulated, be
taken as read and be confirmed.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

DOCUMENTS

Senator the Honourable E. R. L. Ward, Minister with-
out Portfolio, laid the following Documents:-

(1) Statement showong the amounts advanced by the
Government of Barbados, and the amounts re-
ceived from Her Majesty's Government in the
United Kingdom, under the provisions of the
Colonial Development and Welfare Acts, for the
period ended on 31st December, 1964 In respect
of Schemes sanctioned by the Legislature.

(i1) The Report of the Auditor General on the Audit
of the Accounts of the Colony for the year
1962-63.


(iii) The Development Plan 1965-68.

(iv) The Eighth Annual Report of the Housing
Authority.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES (CURRENT) No. 65

The President called the first Order- A Resolution
to approve the sum of $16,368 at the disposal of the Gov-
ernment to supplement the Estimates 1964-65 Part I -
Current as shown in the Supplementary Estimates 1964-65,
No. 65 which forms the Schedule to the Resolution.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD. Mr.
President, This Resolution for $16,389 asks for various
sums under three Heads: Under Head 3 Legislature the
sum of nine dollars is required topay cost of living allow-
ance to our Chaplain and the note explains the reason for
this vote. Under Head 24 Item 75 a sum of $8818 is required
to supplement the vote for general labour.

The Government accepted the agreement made between
the Barbados Workers Union and the Sugar Producers
Association for an increase in out of crop wages for agri-
cultural workers and this has caused the vote under this
head to be exceeded. An additional sum is also required
to pay for the reaping expenses of the cane trial plots run
by the Ministry of Agriculture.

Under Item 78 a sum of $7,559 is asked for partly to
pay the increased wage rates and also for unforseen ex-
penditure in connection with the Home Agricultural Station.
For the information of members I give the figures: For
retrospective pay from 1/1/64 to 31/1/65 under item 75,
$6,031 is required and an additional sum of $1,980 to pay
the increase for the period 1/2/65 to 31/3/65 a total
of $8,011 leaving a balance of $807 to supplement reaping
expenses.

Under Head 78, $2,025.24 is for repairs to the pump
at the Home and $4,954 is for retroactive and current in-
creases in the wage bill.

I move, Sir that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMf'rE(CURRENT)No. 66

The President called the second Order- A Resolution
to place the sum of $1,360 at the disposal of the Government
to supplement the Estimates 1964-65, part 1 Current
as shown in the Supplementary Estimate 1964-65, No. 66,
which forms the Schedule to the Resolution.













SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, This Resolution asks for a grant of $1,360
to supplement the estimates under the Item Uniforms at
the Mental Hospital. As often happens, vouchers passed for
payment at the end of a financial year are not collected at
the time and payment was made for debts incurred in
1963-64 out of current year's vote. This amount is to make
good these diversions from the current vote.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

RESOLUTION TO APPROVE APPROPRIATION
FROM COLONIAL DEVELOPMENT AND
WELFARE GRANTS TOWARDS
HOSPITAL

The President called the third Order A Resolution
to approve the appropriation of $18,000 from Colonial
Development and Welfare Grants to be used towards the
financing of the construction of the New General Hospital
in the current financial year.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, The addendum to the Resolution makes it
clear why it is necessary to appropriate this amount of
$818,000. I am sure the Senate would like me to express
our gratitude to Her Majesty's Government in the United
Kingdom for the very generous grants which it has made
towards the financing of the building of the Queen Elizabeth
Hospital.

At 31/3/64 the U.K. Government had contributed
$3,312,024 for this scheme and further grants have now
been approved amounting to $1.670,246.40. This enables
expenditure already incurred to be met from the grant
instead of from loan funds.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.

SENATOR E. S. ROBINSON: Mr. President, under
this Head, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, may I be permitted to
ask the honourable Minister without Portfolio if now that
this island has one of the finest hospitals in the world, Gov-
ernment is considering altering the scale of fees for paying
patients admitted to this hospital?

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: The
answer is "yes", Sir.

SENATOR E. S. ROBINSON: I thank the honourable
member.

The question that the Resolution be concurred in was
put to the Senate and agreed to.

RESOLUTION re ABANDONMENT OF ACQUISITION
OF TRAFALGAR HOTEL

The President called the fourth Order A Resolution
to approve the publication in the OfficialGazette of a noti-
fication declaring the abandonment of the acquisition of the
property known as the Trafalgar Hotel.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, Under the Land Acquisition Amendment Act
1963 the Government may at any time before payment of
compensation abandon its acquisition of any property. On
July 10, 1964 the legislature approved the acquisition of the
property known as the Trafalgar Hotel in Palmetto Square
for providing office accommodation and road improvement.
With other buildings in the area it was considered that it
might provide a site for a new Post Office which is badly
needed. The price asked for this building appeared to be
exorbitant and it has been decided that a more suitable site


for the Post Office can be found nearer the Harbour on
lands owned by the Government.
In this case no compensation would appear to be pay-
able since the Government never took physicalpossession
and the owners have continued to receive the rents and
profits.
I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.
Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.
The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT (GENERAL) (AMENDMENT)
ORDER, 1965

The President called the fifth Order A Resolution
to approve the Civil Establishment (General) (Amendment)
Order, 1965.
SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, this Resolution asks approval for certain
amendments and additions to the Civil Establishment Order.
The Addendum sets out in detail the additional posts
created and the changes in nomenclature and terms and
conditions of service and qualifications.

I move, Sir, that the Resolution be concurred in.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 1965-6

The President called the sixth Order A Bill to
grant a sum of money out of the Public Treasury and to
appropriate the same for the service of the Island for the
year ending on the thirty-first day of March, one thousand
nine hundred and sixty-six.

On the motion of Senator the Honourable E. R. L.
Ward seconded by Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan
the Bill was read a first time.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, The Appropriation Bill for the year 1965-66
asks for a grant of $33,174,408. Hon. Senators have had
copies of the Estimates and also a list of the Amendments
made in the other Place to the estimates as printed. The
total estimated expenditure for the year is $37,061,627
which is $173,608 more than appears in the Estimates.
The estimated revenue is $35,571,988 which falls short
of the expenditure by $1,489,639. In addition the total
capital expenditure amounts to $17,310,227. In the Estimates
you will note that subsidies and grants which amounted in
1964-65 to $1,801,975 have been removed from a separate
head and now appear under the appropriate ministries.

The obvious comment is that this is a large amount
for an island so small as this. Certainly Government ex-
penditure has increased considerably over the past ten
years but in those years we have built a new Harbour, a
large number of schools, a new Hospital and effected great
improvements in our roads and public services. The signi-
ficant fact is that revenue has kept pace with expenditure
increasing from 16 and a quarter million in 1954-55 to
more than 331/2 million dollars in 1963-64 without any sub-
stantial increase in taxation. If Honourable Senators will
refer to page 111 of the Estimates they will see that the
liquid capital assets now stand at $27,197,683.57 and if we
deduct from this the sums advanced for capital projects
pending the raising of loans the amount is $14,710,126.56.
The value of government's physical assets has never been
computed but must aggregate not less than $150 million. In
effect over the years successive governments have created
a vast accumulation of property and wealth which belongs to
the citizens of this Island in perpetuity. If I may say so this
is an achievement of whichwe as a people can be justifiably
proud.

The function of the Estimates Committee is to scruti-
nize the requests of the ministries and departments of














Government and to resist as far as Is consistent with good
and efficient administration the demands for Increases. The
appetites of departments are insatiable. They are Oliver
Twists always asking for more. But they always have good
reasons and as a member of the Estimates Committee I
make the assertion that these Estimates have been very tho-
roughly pruned of all unnecessary expenditure. I therefore
recommend this Bill for your approval. I expect that there
will be criticisms of particular items of proposed expendi-
ture. But I shall not anticipate my good friends whose duty it
is to be critical. What I shallendeavourto do is to answer
those criticisms and I hope I shall convince the most unbe-
lieving Thomas among them that the expenditure proposed
in the Bill and in the next Resolution is necessary in the
interests of good government and the economic development
of the Island.

I move, Sir, that the Bill be read a second time.

Senator the Honourable H. A. Vaughan seconded the
motion.

SENATOR K. R. HUNTE: Mr. President, What I would
like to deal with mainly today Is the general unemployment
and under-employment situation in Barbados and the deteri-
orating position of employment and its effects on the reve-
nue and expenditure of the island as a whole. During my
remarks I wish to make reference to the memorandum
which has been circulated and which has already been read
by Senators. Even though I may repeat myself, I would like
to make it clear that I thinkthat the right and proper place
for me to say these things is in this Senate. The fact that
the memorandum has been circulated does not mean that
the general public has been in the fortunate position of hav-
ing the privilege of reading it.

I believe that there are a lot of people in Barbados
who do not quite understand what you mean by unemploy-
ment. I was most amused a few days ago to be telephoned
by someone in Barbados to be asked if I could send him a
garden boy, because he saw that I had made reference to
unemployment, and he could not get a garden boy. He did
not realise that there are a lot of people who do not want
to be garden boys.

The first sign of unemployment in a country is the
amount of domestic servants available. That has been very
clearly brought out by Professor Arthur Lewis in his
"Theory of Economic Growth". He said thatwhenyou find
available in a country a lot of domestic servants that is a
sign that there is unemployment and over population.
Domestic servants all over the world do not like that work;
but when there is over-population and unemployment they
are forced Into it.

In Barbados according to the Development Plan
1965-68, I notice that we have about 12 per cent of our
people in that form of service. would like to make refer-
ence every now and again to that Plan which has been on
sale and which, I presume, is a public document.

I would like at this stage to congratulate the Government
on an excellent piece of work in preparing this Plan which,
if it is carried out, will be of great benefit to Barbados as a
whole.

As I said just now, the Plan shows that there are
plenty of domestic servants available in Barbados. As I
have also said, they do not like it, and the only reason they
are in it is because they have to be in it. In the developed
countries like the U.S.A., Canada and the U.K. the people
who used to work in domestic service have found it possible
to leave it and go into factories. In these countries today
there is hardly a domestic servant to be found anywhere.

Coming back to Barbados, the average Barbadian used
to feel ashamed to admit that he had no domestic servants
even if he could not afford them. It was a status symbol to
have as many domestic servants as possible. But In this
year, 1965, I think that the average housewife in Barbados,


like her counterpart in the developed countries, is moving
away from this idea. I feel that the average housewife in
Barbados is reaching the stage where she is not ashamed,
but proud to be able to say that she is looking after her
children and her husband.

In my opinion, as the years go by, it is the housewife
who will make the decision in Barbados about domestic
servants, and not the domestic servants who will make the
decision. Maybe I am sticking my neck out; but I do feel
that housewives are beginning to feel that it is they who
should look after their husbands and their children and not
domestic servants. My forecast is that the number of do-
mestic servants in Barbados will continue on the decline.

Let us look at another group in Barbados who have
done a job for a long time the hucksters. Hucksters in
this island for generations have been buying local produce
like fowls, turkeys, limes, potatoes etc, and taking them
around and selling them to housewives all over the island.
Within recent years we have had signs of a change-over.
New supermarkets are now selling local produce and the
number of people employed in that sector will decline.

The question we will have to ask ourselves is where
will these domestics and hucksters find work? In addition
to that, we find that the biggest employer of labour the
Sugar Industry has employed less and less people as the
years have gone by. That is so because that industry must
be mechanised in order to compete in the world's sugar
market. In addition to that, the use of new weed killers is
probably reducing the number of out of crop employment
every year. There used to be about 20,000 employed in the
crop season and aboutl5,0001n the out of crop season. The -
last figures I saw were 18,000 in the crop season and about
10,000 in the out of crop season, a tremendous fall in em-
ployment.

In the Development Plan reference is made to this
question. In the problem facing Barbados and the Sugar
Industry we can and I quote "rightly say that we realise
that there must be a falling off of employment on the land.
Those are the three problems facing us."

I turn now to Emigration. The number of people who
have emigrated since 1957-63 was 18,708. In view of the
fact that the U.K. has tightened up on her emigration laws,
I think that it is reasonable to assume that within a short
time this amount will be reduced considerably. We have had
signs of that already. In 1961 the net emigration figure was
4,963 and in 19631twas 1,701. Thatis another problem with
which we are faced. We cannot get rid of our people as
easily as wewould wish. Not thatwewant to get rid of them,
but we are glad when they can leave the island and find
employment.

If you look at the census figures of 1960 you find that
11,000 people were out of work in April, that 1,963 were
either seeking work for the first time orwere trying to get
another job because they were out of work. When I take all
these into consideration, it is my belief that unless we can
do something to increase the rate of new jobs, by 1976
there will be over 30,000 unemployed people in Barbados.

I may be wrong, Sir, but I am basing my calculations
on the present rate at which new jobs are being created In
the island. Of course, in order to create jobs we have to
invest in industries finding new avenues of work; but taking
a look at the sum of money required to create industries
to find work for the increasing population of Barbados I
find that it is enormous. I have made a check, and I find
that during the next five years in order to deal with the
unemployed, the under-employed and the increasing popula-
tion you will need to invest approximately $176 million In
industries, and if you go as far as 25 years ahead it will
be $420 million based on the calculation of $10,000 in
equipment, building machinery etc. to employ every one
person. It is also based on the estimate made in the West
Indies that everytime you create one job you find work for
another four people.












To give an idea as to how difficult it will be for us, I
have taken a look at what industries do in fact exist in Bar-
bados. There are 60 at the moment employing 3,552 people.
Assuming that those 3,552 will createworkforone and half
their number it means that you have created work for about
8,800. On the other hand, the population is increasing by
nearly 3,000 a year.

One of the big industries which is of great benefit is
the Tourist Industry. I have said this so often that possibly
people are tired hearing it. But that Industry has made a
tremendous increase. It has risen to a value of $22 million
in 1964 and the estimate made in the Development Plan is
that by 1967 the value of that industry will be nearly $30
million. It is getting fairly close to the value of the Sugar
Industry which was estimated at that time to be about $37
million.

I am somewhat disappointed that the Government has
not found it possible to increase the allocation to the Tourist
Board I notice that in the Development Plan they are pro-
posing to give $684,000 this year, $750,000 the next year
and $850,000 the following year. Competition in this indus-
try is tremendous. A lot of our competitors have moved into
colour advertising which is an expensive item. I believe,
although I am not sure, that the Tourist Board asked for
some more money this year, and knowing the good job which
the Chairman is doing, I would say that they deserve it and
need it.

The Tourist Boards of the Bahamas and Bermuda get
over $3 million. With the building of the Hilton Hotel here
I hope that the Government will increase the grant to the
Board bearing in mind how expensive colour advertising is.
I know that some people will say that the hotels are filled
so why worry; but you have to lok forward where this
industry is concerned.

Now, Sir, during the years 1958 to 1964 our balance
of payments were more or less on the credit side. The only
year there was a deficit was in 1960 when there was a
deficit of a little over $1 million. In looking at the Develop-
ment Plan, Page 41, you will see that it is put as minus
$5.5 million for 1965, minus $6.2 million for 1966, minus
$12.0 million for 1970 etc. So Siryouwill see that the Gov-
ernment has quite rightly shown us that we are moving into
the stage where the balance of payments position is deterio-
rating.

We have been depending on large remittances from
abroad. As people have emigrated they have remembered
their families here and they have remitted money back
to Barbados. It is my belief that as emigration slows down
the people on the other side will begin to forget their fami-
lies, and their remittances will stop. I can assure you that
these remittances are in the vicinity of $7 million a year.
That is another difficulty with which we are going to be
faced.

Now, Sir, this island up to the present time -- and I have
been told so by visitors has had a reputation for the
kindly attitude of its people towards people who come here
on holidays and to live. Its reputationfor stability has also
been noted down the years. The sense of humour of its
people has been noted for generations. But on the prediction
that I have made I believe that by 1976 there will be two
unemployed people in nearly every five homes: and this
feeling of stability and the friendliness for which we are
now noted will begin to deteriorate. The pressure on those
who have to carry the unemployed will be so great that
their attitude towards other people may change and Bar-
bados may not be as happy an island as it is at the moment.

The Development Plan also indicates our problem as
far as trade is concerned. Evenifwehave a small Federa-
tion the population would be too small to attract any large
number of industries, and we would have to look for export
markets. How are we going tofindthem?I think that Barba-
dians should realise that investors from developed coun-
tries are doing fairly well financially in their own coun-
tries and therefore if we wish to encourage them to come


into our area we have to encourage them. We have to bend
over backwards.

We also have to remember that there is competition in
all the underdeveloped countries to collect. If we make
special legislation giving tax holidays etc. we must remem-
ber that other countries are doing it too. The Government
found in 1963 that the concessions they were giving were
not enough to attract industries here fast enough so they
introduced legislation in 1963 to give tenyear tax holiday
instead of one of seven years. They also made special
concessions for countries manufacturing in Barbados for
export.

Let us, however, take a look at a country not too far
away from us,the island of Puerto Rico. That island has
free access to the American market. There are no tariffs
on any goods manufactured in Puerto Rico and shipped to
the U.S.A. Also their home market is considerably larger.
And as I have said, they have access to hundreds of millions
of people of a high purchasing power.

But what do we see in Puerto Rico? They are offering
at this moment from ten to 15 years tax holiday. They are
varying the tax holiday period because if you go into an
area which is considered by the Government to be one
that is best for that industry you will only get a seven
year tax holiday; but if you go into a depressed area where
there is a lot of unemployment and that would apply to
the whole of Barbados you get a ten year tax holiday. I
do not know if we are planning to do the same thing.

In addition to that I am going to compare taxation on
companies in Puerto Rico with that in Barbados. Here we
pay a 40 per cent company tax, plus trade tax which when
added is approximately 52 per cent, and income tax. In
Puerto Rico, the tax on companies is up to $25,000 profit,
20 per cent, less than half that of Barbados. On profit up
to $75,000 there is an extra 5 per cent charge. That is an
island which is competing with Barbados. An island that has
free access to the American market.

I feel, Sir, that this Government should pursue a policy
of joining other undeveloped countries in this great cam-
paign that is going on to secure access to the richer mar-
kets for goods, manufactured in the undeveloped countries.
Trinidad and Jamaica have joined 75 other undeveloped
countries and they are putting up a tremendous Joint battle.
We cannot do it on our own because we are not independent
yet.

The first sign of a greater access to these markets
was seen in the Treaty of Romebywhich associated terri-
tories are pressing for freeaccess into the European Mar-
ket as from 1970. From that timetherehas been this move
towards greater access to the richer markets. This
move by the undeveloped countries to make the richer
countries of the world realise that unless the undeveloped
countries do not get free access to their markets they
would be in trouble.

Quite recently, Nigeria which is not associated in any
way with the European countries has been applying to enter
the market, and I understand that she is beginning to find
it possible. It is my belief that within four or five years
you are going to see a removal of tariffs on goods from the
undeveloped countries. I am not pessimistic about this. I
believe that it will be achieved.

Bearing in mind the Government's point that we must
seek an export market for the things which we produce in
our factories, I can say that there should be a new approach
a new method of attracting industries. The Government
should take a look forward and see what is likely to happen;
and if they find that they are facing a crisis they should
take the necessary steps as quickly as possible to end it.

I believe that this Government are the directors of a
big company which they have been entrusted to run. We, the
people, are the shareholders. If youagreewith my estimate
of unemployment in Barbados by 1976 I feel that all of us


I














must agree that this friendly little island of Barbados is
facing a crisis, and that it is the duty of all of us to assist
the Government wherever possible in finding ways and
means of getting work for Barbadians.

How are we going to get this moneyinto Barbados at a
fast rate? If Barbados is like a big company, as I have said,
let us look and see what other countries are doing to attract
capital at a high rate. In Bermuda, as you know, there is
no income tax. I think that we should take a look at the com-
parisons I make between Bermuda and Barbados and then
say who is wrong, and who is right. In my opinion it is
results that count.


What do we find in Bermuda? We find that in 1962
without any income tax Government revenue exceeded that
of the Government of Barbados. That of Bermuda was $26.9
million and that of the Government of Barbados was $25.8
million. The number of people in Barbados at the time was
235,000 as against 57,000 people in Bermuda. So taking it
on the average, the average person in Bermuda subscribed
more to the revenue of Bermuda than the average Barba-
dian subscribed to the Government of Barbados.
Our method of Income tax really means that the richer
people must subsidise the poor. From what I have bben
told that works out very well in developed countries; but
where you are dealing with an under-developed area where
you have to find ways and means of creating a tremendous
inflow of capital it does not necessarily mean that income
tax is the right method or that it gives the best results
to the man in the street.

There are some people who put forward an argument
that I cannot compare Bermuda with Barbados because It is
a tourist island. That has nothing to do with it. If you collect
money from tourism or from sugar I do not see the dif-
ference. I understand from reports by Professor Lewis that
he says that the tourist dollar finds its way down to the
people as well as the sugar dollar.
But in any case, sir, Barbados is not only a tourist
island, but an agricultural island as well. It is true that
the value of the tourist industry to Bermuda in 1963 was
$60 million as against Barbados' $20 million; but we all
know that Bermuda had a tremendous advantage over us
years ago because of their nearness to North America.
Nearness in time. To get to Barbados from New York by
ship took ten days. It was an overnight run to Bermuda. The
difference in time now is only a few hours. That is because
of the tremendous speed at which planes are flying these
days and I understand that they will be flying even faster in
the next few years. So the time distance between Bermuda
and Barbados will be lessened considerably and will soon
be about half an hour only.

Barbados with its security, stability andhappinesshas
a wonderful opportunity to take a greater advantage of the
tourist industry; but it needs capital. Why should the aver-
age investor bring money into Barbados where he will
eventually have to pay a high taxation? I am talking largely
about big development. Why should these people come to
Barbados when there are hundreds of miles of beautiful
beaches in the Bahamas and when taxation is lower in
Puerto Rico?

As I have said, Sir, the suggestions that I am making
are in the interest of the people of the lower income groups
because I am convinced that if income tax is removed from
Barbados the inflow of capital to this island would be tre-
mendous. People would come here and build their homes,
more hotels would be built and we would find it easy to ad-
vertise our island. Can you imagine what would happen if
Barbados could tell the rest of the world that there is no
income tax here? That would be headlines in all the in-
dustrial papers of the world. There are hundreds and
hundreds of big industrial concerns that are seeking this
tax salvation.

There is no reason why we should say that Bermuda is
wrong and Barbados is right. Can we say that there are no


.Y


slums in Barbados. There are plenty of slums here no
fault of the Government but there are no slums in the
Bahamas. In fact a survey has shownthat in the last decade
there has been a noticeable decrease in taxation, in inter-
national debt and in slums. We cannot say the same thing in
Barbados.

The Barbados Government has done a wonderful Job in
Housing. But I would like to say that if the Government
builds houses and puts people in them and then the people
do not have the money to pay the rent there is bound to be
trouble. I have figures here which I would like to circulate
now so that other Senators will see what is happening to
the Housing Authority in Barbados. (Papers circulated)

On the 8th of March I wrote to the Clerk of the Senate
asking him for some information about the Housing Au-
thority. The reason why I did this was because when I
looked into the Report of the Authority for 1963 I saw
something that worried me.

I thought that I should look and see what was happening,
and I asked for the figures for the period ending March
1964. The situation has worsened. I am not criticising the
Housing Authority. I am only making this point to show that
the people of Barbados are either a wicked people, or that
they cannot afford to live in thesehouses.I personally be-
lieve that they cannot afford to pay the rents. They are out
of work and broke.

At the 31st of March 1964 the amounts outstanding
under Labour Welfare Housing Loans, general workers'
loans, houserents, hire purchases, aided self-help and
leases, pre-fab houserents and pre-fab hire purchase ac-
counts totalled $5.7 million.

The auditor also noted that the reserve for possible
losses is inadequate and should be $2.5 million. It also
states that there is no reserve for possible losses in re-
spect of sundry loan debtors and rents outstandingand that
a reserve of not less than $1.8 million should be made.

If you look at this report and seewhat the auditors say
you will get an idea of what is the situation as far as the
Housing Authority is concerned. It does prove to me one or
two things. It is either that the people who move into these
houses do not intend to pay, orthatthey cannot pay. I per-
sonally think that a lot of them cannot pay. The Housing
Authority is aware of the fact that a lot of the people living
in these houses are out of work.

I have only raised this point to show that you cannot
raise the economy of a country artificially. You cannot
build houses and rent them to people and expect the people
to pay if their wages are not such on which they can afford
to pay.

I will use two indicators by which we commonly judge
the standard of living of a country -- motor cars and TV
sets. Take a look at Bermuda with 13,200 households and
7.2 thousand cars, and Barbados with 62,000 households
and 8,300 cars. You must come to the conclusion that the
average person in Bermuda is better off than his counter-
part in Barbados. In Bermuda there is one TV set to every
1.1 households.

If Barbadians were in a comparable position we would
have 34,000 cars, even though it would create a critical
situation on the roads. Wewould also have 56,000 TV sets.
The people in Bermuda are, for some reason or other,
better off than the people in Barbados. I would like to sug-
gest to Barbadians not to accept our ways as being neces-
sarily the best way. Look and see what the other fellow is
doing. We are never too old to learn. I am recommending
that the Government consider this matter seriously.

Another thing that I am a bit concerned about is that
in Barbados everyone wants to blame the other fellow. I
have heard so often in Barbados that you must blame the
English for milking the Caribbean, taking all the money
away and getting us into the poor position in which we
are now. Let us take a look and see what is the truth.














I cannot go back too far, but I have found from inves-
tigation that Barbados has received quite large sums of
money within the last 18 years from various grants made
available to us. For some reason they do not seem to be
published very much, as happens in some other countries.
Once a factory in Germany was loaned some money from
the Marshal Aid Fund, and the fact was put on the front
door to show that this factory had been made possible by
a loan from Marshal Aid. The English people do not seen
to like advertising so much.

It is possible that grants to Barbados and other Islands
during that last 18 years have been in the vicinity of $369
million, and from other sources about $158 million. In ad-
dition, the Sugar Industry has benefited between 1957 and
1963 by a price over and above the world market price for
sugar to the extent of $244 million. Barbados this year will
benefit by receiving a price overand above the world mar-
ket price by nearly $15 million.

I understand that there is an argument that there is no
world market price for sugar. Let it be free now and see
what price we will get for our sugar. We know that the cost
of production of sugar in Barbados is considerably higher
than in Australia. Our industry has gone through a hard
time. It will have to centralise and mechanise.

Another thing is that I do not feel that the Sugar Indus-
try or any other group in Barbados can afford to isolate
itself and say that they can solve their own problems. The
Sugar Industry has a big problem to solve. It has to get the
cost of production down. They have to lay off people; but
if they say that they are nothing to do with the rest of the
Island they will not succeed. Unless work is found for the
increasing population people will begin to hate the machines,
and if the situation gets bad enough those machines will
be broken down. We all have to get together and solve the
problem.

On many occasions, I have recommended the creation
of an Economic Development Council, and it gives me great
pleasure to read in the Development Plan, that this is one
of the Schemes that will be brought into being. I would like
to compliment the Government on being sensible enough to
realise that it is for all of us to assist in solving our mu-
tual problems. I have no doubt that the people in the Sugar
Industry and everyone else will support this Council and
will rally around the Government in an effort to solve the
problem.

What I would now like to do is to ask the honourable
Minister without Portfolio to ask the Government to con-
sider seriously the removal of income tax and the removal
of trade tax and to bring about an increase in wages and
salaries and pensions. I want to make it very clear that I
am not suggesting that income tax and trade tax should be
removed and wages not increased.

There are some people who will ask how will it be
possible to put wages up. I am saying that if all of us be-
lieve in Barbados, when the Government sets up this
Council wages and salaries can go up. I do not want to
go into details about that, but I am suggesting that the
Government send a delegation to Bermuda -- it would not
cost much -- and take a look at the houses people live in,
the wages they get, the tax structure generally and the
economy of the Island and they they could come back and
tell the Government if they think there is merit in what I
have said or not, and whetherwe cannot improve the situ-
ation in Barbados.

As I have said, Sir, 1 think that the Development Plan
is an excellent one; but I still believe that unless some-
thing new is started in 1966 the unemployment situation
will be worse if we follow that Plan only. I say that because
we cannot get capital invested in the Island as rapidly as
we would like. In suggesting the removal of income tax you
will also have to take a careful look at the price of building
Jand, I feel that there would be such a tremendous inflow
4f capital into this Island that the price of land would have
to be controlled.


I have had the pleasureofgoingtothe Bahamas. There
was one Island Great Bahama. Thatwasa desert Island,
not long ago but over 103 million has been injected into
it over the last three years. A hotel for 20 million has
been built other hotels are going up and tourists are flow-
ing in. The people themselves are earning considerably
better wages.

The Development Plan estimates that there will be
2,500 more people in the labour force every year. I would
like someone to tell me where are these 2,500 people going
to get work at the present rate of development. I am not
criticising. I am saying that we should do something new.
There is nothing wrong with doing something new if it
produces good results.

Some people will no doubt say that the memorandum
which I have prepared is a piece of propaganda. There is
nothing wrong with the use of propaganda if it is for the
good of the Island. I can assure Senators that I look at
the numbers of children leaving school every year. All these
ambitious young people will be looking for Jobs and
if we cannot find work for them we will be in a serious
position. We will be in trouble if we do not do something
about it now. Any of the Senators who believe that my
figures are wrong can take a drive up River Road at going
home time and get an idea of the number of children at
school. Between 1956 and 1963 the number of children
leaving school was 22,569. Do you believe that this labour
force that is increasing year after year will find work?

Because of the feeling of stability in Barbados tourists
are coming here in increasing numbers. Last year the in-
crease was 7,000 this year it will probably be more. Tour-
ists like to come to a place where they feel comfortable;
where they can walk around at night without being accosted;
but again I say that when there are too many unemployed
people in Barbados they will accost tourists because they
are hungry and if the tourists begin to feel unhappy they will
not want to come.

I am suggesting to the Minister without Portfolio that
if he finds that my findings are right it is time for all of
us to close ranks and study carefully what we can do to
find work for our people.

SENATOR F. C. CAREW: Mr. President, -- The last
Senator must be admired for the time and trouble that he
takes in compiling these figures but there are certain com-
parisons that he cannot make between Barbados and other
countries. It would be interesting to know if Senator Hunte
wrote his memorandum before it was known thatthe aver-
age worker in Hong Kong works for $3 a week.

SEANATOR K. R. HUNTE: I have never recommended
any cheap labour in Barbados.

SENATOR F. C, CAREW: I am not saying that he did.
In his memorandum he also draws comparison with Ber-
muda. I say that there is absolutely no comparison. First
of all Barbados is mainly an agricultural Island while the
economy of Bermuda is based on tourism. Does the Sen-
ator recommend that we try surviving on tourism only?

On his memorandum he deals with emigration; but he
does not offer any solution to the emigration barriers being
imposed by England orany change in the policy of the U.S.A.
to the people of the West Indies. Would he support a change
in the policy of Canada, Australia and New Zealand?

On Pages 8 to 9 he emphasizes the need for large sums
of money and says that it needs $10,000 to create a job for
one person. In what industries deos he propose that this
capital should be invested? Of course it can be said that
Senator Hunte's memorandum is only a case for more
capital for the capitalists. No where does he give any idea
of the way in which this capital will be invested which will
ensure a better standard of living, better wages.

In order that capital can be provided for the capitalists
he suggests the deletion of income tax and death duties.















He has gone to some trouble to point out that very little
taxation is paid in Bermuda and that there is more indus-
trial development there than in Barbados. Is the Senator
aware that a great deal of the capital in Barbados is still
being invested abroad? Does he have any proposals to
stop that?

It would seem to me that, if you relieve the companies
who pay the bulk of taxation youwillbe passing on the bur-
den to the working class people, some of whom do not have
the capital on which to pay income tax. Has the Senator
thought out what would be the result?

He is saying that if his dream comes true everyone
will own a car and a TV set. He still does not realise that
tourism in Bermuda is a form of indirect taxation. What
will we have as an equivalent in Barbados in order to re-
lieve the working class from the burden of indirect taxation?

To my mind, Sir, after reading SenatorHunte's mem-
orandum the sending of a delegation to Bermuda as he sug-
geste would be a waste of money.

SENATOR C.L. BRATHWAITE: Mr. President, Senator
Hunte in his speech touched on Housing, and he quoted from
the balance sheet to show the amounts that were outstanding.
The Senator must realise that the Housing Authority oper-
ates under an Act that deals with giving shelter to the most
needy. When this Government was elected it found the Hous-
ing Authority in a mess. We found that millions of dollars
had been loaned without any security. Something like $2
million was loaned that way. People have left Barbados
and gone to the U.S.A. and England without repaying once
cent. Only recently owing to the vigilance of the new Author-
ity we have been able to get money back from people in
England and the U.S.A. I could call names if I wanted to.

Can the Senator expect a Government in an enlight-
ened age like this to take children and throw them into the
streets? He has admitted that there is unemployment in
this country. I am not prepared to say that unemployment
only is responsible for the non repayment of loans or the
non payment of rents. There seems to be a general belief
that the money was given to the people; and for some reason
or other no reasonable effort was made to collect it.

We in the Housing Authority are prepared to collect
money from those who are able to pay. There are some
who may not be able. Most of the Senators here will know
that for the first time in the history of the Authority an
attempt was made to deduct payments from salaries. Some
companies told us that they had no time for the Authority.
Some companies have been co-operative. Some time ago
I had to ask the very Senator to appeal to one of his direct-
ors who is a member of the Closed Brethren and who did
not want to have anything to do with the unclean. You get
responsible citizens refusing to do certain-things, and
then coming on the floor of the Legislature and lambaste
the Housing Authority.

SENATOR K, R. HUNTE: I have not lambasted the
Authority nor criticized the Government. I said plainly
that the people of Barbados with their present wages ap-
parently could not afford to pay the rents.

SENATOR C. L. BRATHWAITE. The Housing Authority
today is reaching a new height in its collections. We have
reached from 29.1 thousand in 1961 to 38.9 thousand in 1964.
Let me say this: this month alone we have collected more
money from Labour Welfare loans than in the previous
years.

We realise that we owe a duty to the community. We
want to be as sympathetic as we can be. We are not pre-
pared to press people who are unable to pay or to let those
who can pay get away. If the Authority was governed in the
past by people who thought that it was a place to be taken
for a ride this Government does not feel that way. We are
prepared to see that people who are able honour their com-
mitments to us.


Some time ago the Manager of the Authority nearly
lost his job because he was ordered to put back in two
people owing $400. He was under pressure. We have insti-
tuted a system which will save the wanton destruction of
houses and, as I have said, we have got into contact with
people abroad who have never paid a cent. We are getting
good results. There is no doubt that the Authority is going
from strength to strength, and that next year, Senators
will see a picture that is far more encouraging.

SENATOR J. S. B. DEAR: Mr. President, One of
the peculiarities introduced by the present Government in
dealing with the Estimates is that they tellyou at this time
what they propose to spend; but they do not tell you what
money they propose to raise or how they propose to raise
it. It is noticeable that the Honourable Minister without
Portfolio made a brief speech asking us to pass the Appro-
priation Bill to authorise the Government to spend some-
thing like $37 million. The memorandum submitted with
the Estimates announced that there would be a deficit of
over $1 million; but the Minister has given no indication
as to whether this money will be raised by taxation, and if
so, by what kind of taxation.

In the Other Place the Minister of Finance was more
than careful to say that he was making no promise. He was
neither promising that taxation would be increased or that
it would not be. Weareasked to vote this $37 million with-
out knowing whether the Government will have It to spend or
whether they will be in debt at the end of the year.
I am no economist; but it seems tome that the Govern-
ment can only function like an individual. You can only
budget forwhat you can spend when you have an idea of
what your income will be in the coming year. It seems to
me elementary that before the Government can ask the
Legislature to vote moneys for expenditure it should be
able to say this is the money we propose to raise: and if
the amount is not enough we propose to increase taxation
so as to raise the balance.
Without that, Sir, it is quite easy to say that a lot more
should be spent; that old age pensions should be increased;
that the grant to Senator Brathwaite's Housing Authority
should be increased so as to help these poor people who
cannot afford to pay the rents; but life is not as simple as
that. The demands on the Government's purse, whileprac-
tically unlimited, can never be met in their entirety.

That is why I find it difficult to deal with these Esti-
mates. Any os us can make proposals and suggestions for
spending more money on the most desirable projects but
whether we make these suggestions would depend onwhether
the money is available or whether there are sources from
which we can easily raise this money.

There is no doubt that this Government or any other
Government would be able to find ways and means of
spending money on the most desirable projects, and there
have been one or two points on that made so far.

Now, Sir, there are a number of people in this Island
who would like other people to do their debt collecting for
them; but the protection of Wages Act prevents a company
from deducting anything from the wages of an employee
unless it is specified in the Act. While Senator Brathwiate
may feel dissatisfied that certain firms did not co-operate
with his Housing Authority, and deduct moneys to which he
thinks the Authority is'entitled, I will say that most of the
firms in Bridgetown have enough trouble in dealing with
PAYE deductions.

Do not let us forget, Sir, thatitwas promised by poli-
ticians during the last elections that people could reside in
these houses rent free and that they need not worry about
loans that they had incurred. That was fully aired and it
formed part of the elections campaign.

To return to my first point, I would like some indica-
tion in broad outline as to how the Legislature can be asked
to vote this money without knowing what the Government's


__













plans are in respect of the deficit. It seems to me that this
is a peculiar kind of financial procedure by which you are
asked first of all to commityourself to certain expenditure
without knowing how you will raise the money to meet them.

SENATOR E. S. ROBINSON: Mr. President, -- I do
not intend to enter into this debate as regards the deletion
of income tax and trade tax. I do not think that this is the
appropriate occasion on which the Senate should be asked
to debate that suggestion.

I notice that the Honourable Minister told us that
Government expenditure has steadily increased over the
last decade and that during that time revenue has kept
pace with the increased expenditure. He also made the
observation that it was an achievement of which the people
of this island could be justifiably proud. I think that all of
us sitting around this table will heartily support those
sentiments expressed by him.

Now, Sir, I have had the privilege of being a member
of the Other Place and also of being a member of this hon-
ourable Chamber for a considerable period of time. I just
say that as the years go on the presentation of the Estimates
to the Legislature is getting later and later every year. The
Estimates and the Appropriation Bill have by law to be
passed by both Houses of the Legislature and assented to
by the Governor not later than the 31st of March. In my
experience in the Other Place, on many occasions during
or towards the end of the third week in February the Esti-
mates were laid for the consideration of the Other Place;
and they were passed and sent to the then Legislative
Council a week or two before the end of March, which is
the end of the Government's financial year.

Today, Sir, is the 29th of March, and I do feel that in
future the Government should see that the Estimates are
presented at a much earlier time so that both Houses of
the Legislature can examine them and have enough time
to consider them properly. Only after I arrived in this
Chamber today was I presented with a copy of the Govern-
ment's Development Plan for 1965-68. Naturally, I have
not read it and I do not intend to comment upon it. I notice
that it has been published in the leading newspapers of the
Island and I feel that we as Senators have the right to ex-
pect that Government documents of such importance should
be sent to us before we are called upon to discuss them.

Sir, I want to draw the Minister's attention as well as
the attention of other Senators to the positionof the public
debt in this Island. It is set out in the Memorandum to the
Estimates at paragraph 20 where it states: "That the pub-
lic debt of this Island at the 1st of April, 1965, is estimated
at $42.8 million, and on the 31st of March, 1966, (a year
from now) it is estimated that it will be $62.7 million, an
increase of nearly $20 millionwithina period of 12 months.

The Memorandum goes on to state that loan charges
will fall to be met from additional revenue resulting from
productive development or a reduction of other recurrent
expenditure. To me that is pure theory. How can anyone
expect that in the years to come there is going to be a
reduction in the recurrent expenditure of this Island? I
submit that additional loan charges and interest charges
on debt can only be met from two sources -- by way of
additional taxation and by way of productive development
in the country. To say that it is going to be met from a
reduction of current expenditure is wishful thinking in
this year 1965.

I have been able to get some statistics which are re-
vealing with regard to the rapid increase in the public debt
of this island. From the statistics that I have obtained, on
the 29th February, 1956, it was $4.0 million. At the 31st
March, 1963 it was $34 million. In the short period of less
than seven years the public debts had increased by no less
than $29 million, and the estimates for the public debt on
the 31st March next year is now $62. 7 million.

I think we all realise that the interest and the capital
repayment of the public debt of a country becomes a charge


on the treasury and I can assure Senators, and the Govern-
ment knows it very well, that both local and overseas in-
vestors carefully watch the national income of a country
to judge for themselves whether it is sufficient to meet that
country's own commitments. When it can be clearly seen
that this country's national income does not increase in
the same proportion or in the same ratio as its public debt
there is bound to come a timewhen local and overseas in-
vestors will be no longer interested in subscribing to vari-
ous loans that the Government may wish to embark upon
from time to time. Investors will begin to look at such
loans as risk capital; and the Governmentwill be forced, if
they want to raise loans, to pay a very much higher rate of
interest.

I do not think thatwe have reached the danger point yet;
but I think that the Government should be very prudent and
careful in this matter of expenditure of a capital nature. In
my opinion every year we are drawing closer to the danger
point especially when we are spending capital sums of the
nature that I have indicated. I submit, sir, that loan funds
should be used on projects that are of a productive nature.
Projects that can earn for us not only the interest on the
capital employed, but also earn money that can be set aside
to repay the capital investment. That is the only sound busi-
ness way on which the Government should enter into this
capital expenditure.

I fully realise the position of this or any other Gov-
ernment. We are faced with a population explosion. Senator
Hunte has very aptly described the serious increase in popu-
lation in this island and the unemployment that is likely to
occur as the years go on. I am sure that this Government,
or any other Government that happens to be in power rea-
lises the seriousness of the situation. It is not an easy
problem to solve. It is a very difficult problem indeed, and
I am in no way criticising this Government for spending
sums of money on projects that might not be so productive
but which provide employment for considerable numbers of
persons.

I would like to suggest, however, that in my opinion
there are some projects that could be postponed-- like the
East Coast Road and the money used to better advantage.
The East Coast Road will cost $11/2 million to construct.
I have nothing but praise for the Government staff and the
engineer that constructed these roads, but what are we
getting from the expenditure of that money? You are passing
through some of the most barren land in the island, and
in that area seabathing conditions are some of the roughest
in the island, and of no interest whatever to the Tourist
Industry.

What will happen to the land through which the road
passes? Does the Government propose getting any return
on the $1 1/2 million that it will cost to develop the road?
I submit that the money should have been used to better
advantage, on something that would have given a better re-
turn.

I admit that the project did bring employment to some
people and that it also injected a certain amount of money
into the economy by way of the purchasing of building ma-
terials and other supplies for the construction of the road.
But we must ask ourselves if we can afford that type of
luxury. My answer to that is no.

The Government has also embarked on the construction
of the Hilton Hotel. When that project was first mentioned
in the Development Plan it was put down at a cost of $3.4
million. I see now that $4.9 million is printed in the Capital
Estimates. Does the Government think that this project is
going to be self-supporting? It will be operated by Hilton
Associates and they have a reputationfor being very shrewd
businessmen. The agreement with the Government is that
Hilton Associates will take a proportion of the profits and
the Government will stand the losses. Hilton Associates
are very very clever people. One wonders if this project
is going to be self-supporting. I understand that the es-
timated cost now is somewhere inthevicinityof $9 million
when it is land-scaped, and all the out places have been













completed. Can we in this island afford to spend that type
of money?

I have it on good authority that the Hilton Hotel in
Tr'nldad is subsidized by the Trinidad Government. Are
we, as time goes on, to be faced with having to subsidize
our Hilton? I know very well that it will attract a number
of tourists to the island because thereisa class of tourist
who, I understand, when they are coming to an area always
ask if there is a Hilton Hotel in that area. So I admit that
a certain type of tourist will be attracted. But tourism in
this part of the world as you know, sir, is a fickle thing,
and I am wondering if we can afford to support a project
of that nature.

The whole theme of my argument is to endeavour
through the honourable Minister to impress on the Gov-
ernment that in projects of a capital nature money should
be spent on projects which are going to produce revenue;
that the projects should be self-supporting so that they will
not call for recurrent expenditure year after year.

That is why I have mentioned these two in my
opinion glaring examples with which we are faced today.

I now turn to a Board that was appointed by the Gov-
ernment to encourage industrialisation in this island-the
Barbados Development Board. I want to congratulate the
Government on at last appointing a Manager, in the person
of Mr. C. B. Williams who will, in my opinion, endeavour
to make this Boarda success. This Board has suffered from
a lack of good management from its very inception. I also
note that the post of Economist has not yet been filled. I
trust that the Government will find a suitable man, a
qualified man, a Barbadian, or if a suitably qualified Bar-
badian cannot be found, then one from somewhere in the
area. Failing that they will have to try to get an ex-
patriate to advise the Board on the economics of develop-
ment.

SHORT ADJOURNMENT

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE E. R. L. WARD: Mr.
President, I see that ihe Senator has a lot to say still.
I therefore now beg to move thatwe adjourn until 5 o'clock
so that he may come back a bit refreshed.

Senator C. L. Brathwaite seconded the motion.

The question was put to the Senate and agreed to.

RESUMPTION

On the resumption:

SENATOR E. S. ROBINSON: Mr. President, I was
speaking about the appointment of a trained Economist to
assist the Development Board in the feasibility of various
industrial and other projects which will come before this
Board. I think that a man of that calibre is essential to a
Board of this nature which is advancing money to indus-
S triallsts who come here and set up projects of various
kinds. I think that the Board would save a considerable sum
of money if they had advice of this type, the advice of a man
who could give them feasibility studies of the requests that
they get from time to time; and I trust that in the near
future such a suitable man would be found.

I also notice in the last report of the Development
Board that large sums of money bothbyway of capital and
interest remained unpaid to that Board, and I am wondering
if in his reply the Minister without Portfolio would tell the
Senate if any legal action has been instituted by the Board
with a view to collecting these outstanding debts. From the
report that I have read there is a considerable sum of
money outstanding over a long period of years.

My last suggestion is that this Board, or possibly the
Government, should seriously consider the appointment of
some person well versed in salesmanship. I think that
Puerto Rico has recently sent a delegation of six I un-


derstand that they are paidby the Puerto Rico Development
Board to visit the West Indian area and display various
products that are produced by the industrialists of Puerto
Rico.

Considering the size of Barbados, sir, we have a very
good set-up at the Grazettes Multi-purpose building, and
products of various types are being manufactured; but I do
not think that our sales campaign is good enough. It is all
very well to produce mattresses etc., but unless you have
salesmen who can go around and show the articles that you
are producing you are not getting anywhere. I believe that
it would benefit the Board to employ the services of a
salesman and let him visit the other territories with a view
to showing what is being produced at the industrial centre
in Barbados and to solicit sales for the various products.

Another thing on which I would like to touch is the
Marketing Corporation. This facility was set up by the
Government in order to carry outa policy of diversification
on the ground that it would be good policy to produce locally
grown fodstuffs and vegetables in order to save the large
sum of money that is spent annually on the importation of
these food supplies. Its purpose was to aid and encourage
those people who went in for diversification of their lands
and to provide them with a facility by which they would be
able to market their produce.

I, Sir, have not seen any report of this corporation
from its inception. I should imagine that in the legislation
to set up this Corporation there is a provision that the
Board should supply the Cabinet annually with an account
of its activity and its profits and losses, and that that re-
port would have to be laid on the table of both Houses of
the Legislature.

Lately sir, I have seen numerous letters published in
the Press and signed by peasant proprietors stating that
they were not satisfied with the way in which the organisa-
tion was working, and that instead of giving them an outlet
for their vegetables and other food crops it did not seem to
be functioning along the lines that were first envisaged.

All that I can say is that this is very regrettable, be-
cause it is essential to the diversification of agriculture
that you have an organisation such as this whereby the
produce of these people who go in for this type of agri-
culture can be readily sold to the consuming public.

I asked the Clerk of the Senate if he would be good
enough to get some financial statement with regard to this
Corporation, and I am thankful to the Minister without
Portfolio for supplying me with a printed copy of the
financial position as to the 30th of July, 1964. I am sorry
to say, Mr. President, that on the first year's working of
this organisation it lost no less than $253,809, and for the
first six months of its working after the end of July, 1964,
it lost another $53,156. So for a year and a half working it
has lost no less than $306,963.32. Ithinkthat that is a dis-
graceful state of affairs.

This is a facility provided by the Government at great
expense. This is the taxpayers' money. This is capital that
should be spent on a project that is of a productive nature,
and it has lost over $300,000 in its first 18 months of opera-
tion. I trust that the Governmentwill appoint a Commission
of Inquiry or some legal authority to investigate the reason
for this loss because it is a fact that for some time in this
island there has been a desire foran organisation whether
large or small to assist the peasant in marketing his crops.
This organisation is costing the taxpayers a colossal sum
of money; and there is something wrong all along the line.

With regard to the Tourist Board I would like to offer
the members of that Board my congratulations. It is cer-
tainly a living Board and it is showing results. It is a Board
of which one can say that the money which has been in-
jected into it by the Government is showing substantial
returns to the economy of the island.












There is one other thing that I would like to mention.
Senator Hunte has emphasised the problems of industriali-
sation, population pressure, unemployment etc. I am won-
dering if it would not be possible for the Government to
explore the possibility of establishing a trade school in this
island. We have a Technical Institute which is of value in
turning out technical men; but I am interested in a school
that is not quite so technical, one that would turn out peo-
ple for employment overseas, like at Lyons restaurants,
the London Transport Executive and other avenues of em-
ployment in Britain and North America.
If it is not possible to establish such a school in this
island would it be possible for the Government to con-
tribute some financial assistance to these overseas orga-
nizations which have schools established so that our
people could be trained for the jobs that they are going to
be employed in? I throw that out as a suggestion to the
Government.
There is a little more that I have to say. I think that
we are all somewhat not alarmed, but apprehensive about
the financial future of this island. All of us have been very
proud of the fact that we Barbadians havealways been able
financially to hold our heads above water. We have never
had to go cap in hand to Her Majesty's Government asking
for grant-in-aid like some of our neighbours in the Wind-
ward and Leeward Islands. That has resulted in great
respect for Barbados both in Britain andinother overseas
territories. I think that we should strive to maintain that
position in the future.

I trust, sir, that in the coming year the Legislature
will not be asked to consider a large volume of supple-
mentary Resolutions. Heads of Departments send in their
estimates to the Estimates Committee and then those Es-
timates come to the Legislature for approval. I think that
it is incumbent on them to see that their expenditure keeps
pace with their estimates. This policy of coming down with
supplementary Resolutions should, I think be carefully
watched by the Government and its financial advisers.
(Cheers.)

SENATOR E. LISLE WARD: Mr. President, I would
like to make one or two comments. As a member of the
Development Board, I would like to say that from its In-
ception this Board has been working under very great
strain. We have been unfortunate in getting Managers to
assist us with the capable handling of development in this
island.

Senator Hunte mentioned about economists. We have
been working for two years without an economist. We could
not get one for the salary offered and we had to carry on
without one. We have been operating without a Manager
for nearly eight months. When you get the headship of an
organisation disrupted like that you can understand what
happens to the organisation.

I would like to throw out this suggestion: industrialisa-
tion is a much different set-up from tourism. In Barbados,
a small island with a limited market, youwill find that in-
dustrialists from Canada and other parts of North America
are not very eager to come into this market because one of
the first things they think of the size of the local market
for their products.

About three years ago the Development Board spent
money on bringing down an expert economist to advise us
on the best type of industry that we should put up in this
island which would employ more people and which would
produce things that we would be able to export. His recom-
mendations were what the Board already knew. At the mo-
ment we have small industries operating atGrazettes, one
at the harbour, and all in all the industries which are op-
erating, although they are employing a few people, we do
not ourselves know how fartheywill gobecause there are
many industries of the same type.

In Trinidad they started off with the same type of com-
petition, and eventually one after the other died, leaving
about one or two. It is all right when you discuss a particu-
lar Board to say that the Board has not made as much pro-


gress as it should, but when one is dealing with industries
in a place like Barbados there are many factors which must
be taken into consideration.

One factor is whether the island is stable. As far as
Barbados is concerned, we can say yes. The second factor
is whether we have the raw materials or the necessary
power to operate industries. Barbados cannot boast of having
any great deal of power for industrial purposes. The Elec-
tric Company is just now expanding. If we got big industries
here we would find ourselves in great difficulty. The other
factor is whether we will be able to get a market in the
area. When there was the idea that a federation was nearby
we got a lot of inquiries. After the federation idea began to
get lukewarm some of these inquiries dropped off gradu-
ally.

I think that the reason was that the other islands
themselves started to ask industries to come into their
area and produce the same things that were going to be
produced in Barbados. That made it difficult for industri-
alists who thought that they would have a market for
800,000 to 900,000 people. All these are difficulties which
the Development Board had to face and is still facing.

The Senator also asked about money loaned and not re-
paid. In the Development Board Act it is provided that the
Board can help people who cannot get financial help from
banks and such sources. It is our desire to set up an in-
dustrial estate in the island. The only way we can get
any where past the barriers is to be able to offer certain
incentives. A person may come to you and say that he
wants to put up a factory; but he wants $100,000 as
working capital. You may find that he starts the opera-
tion and then he may run into difficulties. He may not
be able to sell enough locally or even in certain overseas
markets. He asks you to give him a period of grace un-
til he catches his hand again.

The same thing happens to hotels. We advance money
to the hotelindustry, and there are certain times when
that industry is very slack. You will find hoteliers ask-
ing for a year or so grace and promising to repay when
the tourist season gets into operation.

Although it seems that there is quite a lot of money
out in arrears at the present moment, I have no doubt
that we will get it back. A lot of that money is covered
by mortgage and I feel that we are safe as far as that
is concerned. We may be in a little more difficulty
with industrialists, because no one can say when an
industrialist will close a factory and leave it in the
hands of the Government. The factory will, however,
be there for any other industrialist that feels like using
it.

I believe that industrialization will be somewhat
slow unless we can offer big incentives. I was speak-
ing to an industrialist from Ireland and he was asking
about the set-up in Barbados. He said that it would
not pay him to come to Barbados unless he could
guarantee a certain amount of turn over. He said that
there were trade barriers which would handicap him;
and he did not think that it was a wise and opportune
moment anyhow to embark on that type of expenditure
as an industrialist in this area.

Turning to the Estimates, Sir, I would like to sym-
pathize with the Government on the bold steps it has
taken. They are steps that would have to be taken by
any Government because we are at the present moment
passing through a desperate position. Our population is
going up by thousands yearly, and employment is not
increasing in a manner commensurate with the number
of school leaves. The Government is responsible for
the country and they have to spend money whether they
borrow it, or take it out in taxation, hoping that one of
these days some good country may play Godfather to
them.

I do not believe that this Government at the pace
at which they are moving will be able to go on borrowing,


-qqlqq












however, and increasing the already great public debt,
unless we can increase our productivity. Unless we can
do that, we are bound to run into trouble in the not dis-
tant future. It is a hard problem; and I am afraid that
I cannot give any idea as to how it can be solved.

Senator Robinson gave us some figures about cap-
ital expenditure. I feel that in our position, although
we are trying to create employment, we should try to
embark on projects which are more productive. The
Senator mentioned the East Coast Road. I think that
that was only a sop to find employment. I do not think
it can be of any economic benefit to the country; and in
the future it will call for a certain amount of recurrent
expenditure to keep it in order.

The Hilton Hotel project was recommended and I
suppose that the Government has gone into it care-
fully. Members of the Board know very little about it
although we are supposed to handle it. I do not want
to make any statement on the Hilton because I do not
know enough about it.

Now, Sir, everyone knows that I am one of those
people who is not very satisfied with the progress of
the Soil Conservation Scheme. This scheme, we have
been told by experts, will be of first class benefit to the
island. I also see that it will take about $60 million to
put that area right. At the rate it is going it will not
be economical for 40 to 60 years. When one realizes
that at the present moment we are trying to embark
on projects which we hope will be of economic benefit
and we decide to embark on a project of such magni-
tude without any returns one wonders if we could not
do it in a more piecemeal way.

If you read the Farley Report you will see that
the Sugar Industry has a value of approximately $59
million. If you are going to spend $60 million on one-
seventh of the island I think that you are travelling the
wrong road. Perhaps they hope to get a good deal more
from this part of the island than they get from the other
part.

I feel that we should go slow on that project and
spend our money on projects that would give us a quicker
return and employ more wage earners.

Another point that I would like to make was also touched
on by Senator Hunte. All of us sympathize with him in his
efforts to give us his plan or memorandum. He said that
he would abolish income tax and death duties, and increase
wages. What was going through my mind is that Bermuda


depends solely on the Tourist Industry. Our Sugar Indus-
try would automatically go out of existence. We would not
be able to ask the people in Britain to increase the price
paid for our sugar. I feel that his suggestion might be
quite possible in a place like Bermuda. If we could get a
lot of industrialization we might be able to do a thing like
that. We might be able to charge more for our goods if
we could get a market for them.

I would next like to deal with Public Works and draw
to the attention of the Government that there are a lot
of schools badly in need of painting and of being kept in
better order. These buildings cost a lot of money and
they should be kept up to a certain standard. If you leave
them as they are, you may find that you are a penny wise and
a pound foolish.

On the whole, Sir, I feel that this Government has done
a fairly good job in the circumstances. Whether Barbados
will be able to continue to support their ideas is something
that we have to gamble on. They hope to bring about more
industrialization and create more jobs for the people. I
would like to tell them that wewillnever be able to create
jobs fast enough for the number of young people who are
coming out of school because, if we are to compete with
the world, we will have to turn to automation and labour
saving devices.


If we cannot emigrate we face the problem of keeping
up with the living standards of our people, and speaking
about emigration, as soon as you allow people to travel
when they return to their own country automatically they
want to have a better standard than when they left.

I want to make one point about the Housing Authority.
I must blame the Government for the position in which
they find themselves with that Board. I have heard them
myself on platforms advising the people not to pay back
money they had in loans. They saidthatit was the people's
money and that the people in the Sugar Industry got wel-
fare money and did not have to repay it.

I personally have done everything possible to help
the Authority collect, but it obviously the duty of the
Authority or the Government to see that the money is
collected.

ADJOURNMENT

On the motion of the Senator the Honourable E.R.L.
Ward seconded by Senator F.C.H. Carew the Senate
adjourned until 2 p.m. on Tuesday, March 30, 1965.


i


ppppp













THE






House of Assembly Debates





(OFFICIAL REPORT)


SECOND SESSION


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY
Tuesday, 13th July, 1965.

Pursuant to the adjournment, the House of Assembly
met at 2.00 o'clock p.m. today.

PRESENT
His Honour J. E. T. BRANCKER, Q.C., (Speaker);
Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD, (Minister of Development, Trade,
L abour and Social Security); Mr. F. C. GODDARD; Hon.
J. C. TUDOR, M.A., (Minister of Education); Mr. J. W.
CORBIN; Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON, (Minister of Agricul-
ture and Fisheries); Mr. R. St.C. WEEKES, J.P.; Mr.
W. R. LOWE and Mr. J. B. YEARWOOD.


Prayers were read.

Hon. C. E. TALMA entered the House and took his
seat.
SUSPENSION OF SITTING

Mr. SPEAKER: By virtue of the Standing Orders of this
House, this sitting now stands suspended until 2.30 p.m. of
the clock.

This sitting now stands suspended.

On re-assembling,

MINUTES

Mr. SPEAKER: I have the honour to inform the House
that Minutes have been circulated for the meetings of the
25th March; 13th and 27th April; 4th, 18th and 25th May and
the 1st and 8th June, 1965. If there is no objection to the
confirmation of any of those Minutes, they will be duly
confirmed. (A FTER A P A USE) There being no objection, I
declare the Minutes for those Meetings which I have just
mentioned, duly to have been confirmed.

PAPERS LAID

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the
Hon. Premier and Minister of Finance, I beg to lay A
Statement showing Net Customs and Excise Receipts for
three months ended 30th June, 1965.

On my own behalf, I beg to lay the Report of the Utili-
ties Board for the year 1964.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the
Hon. Premier and Minister of Finance, I beg to give notice
of a Resolution to place the sum of $15,899 at the disposal
of the Government to supplement the Estimates 1965-66 Part


OF 1961-66


I, Current, as shown in the Supplementary Estimate 1965-
66, No. 10, which forms the Schedule to the Resolution.

I should also like to give notice that it is my intention
to ask the leave of the House later in the day to deal with
this Resolution in all of its stages at this sitting. Copies of
the Resolution are here and they will be circulated to hon.
members in due course.

Also, on behalf of the Hon. Premier, I beg to give no-
tice of a Resolution to place the sum of $370,455 at the
disposal of the Government to supplement the Estimates
1965-66 Part I Current, as shown in the Supplementary
Estimate 1965-66, No. 11, which forms the Schedule to
the Resolution.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give notice
of a Resolution to approve the disposal of a number of
buildings, owned by or agreed to be purchased by Gov-
ernment, so that improvements can be carried out at road
Junctions as set out in the Schedule to the Resolution.

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice of a Resolution to place the sum of $843.00 at the
disposal of the Government to supplement the Estimates
1965-66 Part I Current as shown in the Supplementary
Estimate 1965-66, No. 9 which forms the Schedule to the
Resolution.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice of my intention to move the House into Committee of
Supply at its next meeting in order to deal with the re-
mainder of the Money Resolutions of which notice was
given today.

REPLIES LAID

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, there are a
number of Replies to Questions ready. On behalf of the Hon.
Premier and Minister of Finance, I beg to give notice that
the Reply to Parliamentary Question No. 47/1964 asked by
the hon. senior member for St. James, is now ready.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give notice
that the Reply to Parliamentary Question No. 45/1964 also
asked by the hon. senior member for St. James, is also
ready.

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice that the following Replies to Parliamentary Ques-
tions are ready:-

The Reply to Parliamentary Question No. 24/1964
asked by the hon. Junior member for St. John;

The Reply to Parliamentary Question No. 36/1964
asked by the hon. senior member for St. James;












The Reply to Parliamentary Question No. 51/1964
asked by the hon. junior member for St. Philip.
2.55 p.m.

QUESTIONS

Mr. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give notice of the
following questions:-

To enquire of the Appropriate Minister:

1. Is the Government aware that a number of workers
who were employed at Haggatts Factory have been dis-
placed as a result of the take-over of the said factory by
Government?

2. If the answer is in the affirmative, will Government
consider the advisability of financial assistance to the said
displaced workers?

QUESTION TIME

Mr. SPEAKER: It is now Question Time, and the first
Oral Reply which has been laid stands in the name of the
Hon. and Learned member for St. James; likewise the
second Oral Reply and the fourth Oral Reply also stand
in the name of that hon. member, and that Hon. and Learned
member's seat is vacant at the moment.

Oral Reply to Question No. 24 stands in the name of the
hon. Junior member for St. John whom I notice is in his
place.

Mr. YEARWOOD: Mr. Speaker, the question is as
follows:

Is the Minister aware that several plantations in the
island have planted less "fall" potatoes this year than
heretofore?

Is the Minister aware that such a reduction in the pro-
duce of such potatoes will lead to severe hardship to
peasants and agricultural labourers during the forthcoming
crop season who look to such potatoes as a staple diet
during the duration of the crop?

Will the Minister take steps to see that that unsatis-
factory situation is remedied as soon as possible?

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: Mr. Speaker, the reply is as
follows:-

"'Yes, Sir. 786.02 acres of land were planted in fall
potatoes by plantations during the crop year 1964/65 as
compared with 1,326.25 acres in the previous crop year
1963/64. The overall acreage planted represented more
than the legal requirements under the notice issued to
plantations by the Competent Authority under the Local
Food Production (Defence) Control Order, No. 2 although
there were some individual plantations which fell short of
their legal requirements. The Competent Authority has
drawn the attention of defaulters to theirfailure to comply
with the law and warned them of the consequences of a repe-
tition of their actions.

2. No, Sir. Adequate supplies of ground provisions were
available to peasants and agricultural labourers during the
crop season. In some parts of the island potatoes were not
reaped during the crop season owing to a reported shortage
of labour to do so.

3. Does not arise."

Mr. SPEAKER: Oral Reply No. 36/1964 stands in the
name of the honourable and learned member for St. James
who is not yet in his place.

QUESTION re HARDSHIP AND EXPENSE
SUFFERED BY OWNERS OF SOWS

Mr. SPEAKER: Oral Reply to Parliamentary Question
No. 51/1964 stands in the name of the hon. junior member
for St. Philip.


Mr. WEEKES: The Question reads as follows:-

To enquire of the Appropriate Minister:

1. Is Government aware that much hardship, inconveni-
ence and expense are suffered by owners of sows through
having to bear the cost of transportation etc. to the several
Agricultural Stations in the Island whenever their sows are
being serviced there?

2. If the answer is in the affirmative, will Government
initiate a scheme whereby artificial insemination can be
done at the homes of owners so as (a) to avoid the hardship
and expense abovementioned: (b) to encourage more people
to rear sows: and (c) to increase the number of piglets in
the Island?

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: Mr. Speaker, the Replyis as
follows:-

"No, sir. No complaint to this effect has been received
by the Ministry.

2. Artificial insemination of pigs is still in the develop-
mental stage in other countries and it is not proposed to
introduce it here until the techniques have been sufficiently
perfected to enable it to be successfully undertaken."

PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS

Mr. SPEAKER: The first Order of the Day stands in
the name of the honw junior member for Christ Church:
to move the passing of a Resolution relating to the Financial
Statement and Budgetary Proposals made by the Hon.
Premier on the 1st July, 1965.

Mr. GODDARD: Mr. Speaker, as the personresponsi-
ble in our Party for financial matters, I would like to make
some observations on the Budgetary Proposals of the
Premier. If we review the past year's workings, we will
readily see that agriculture and the production of sugar
are still the mainstay of our economy, and this will con-
tinue, I am sure, for many years to come. We have seen
other things coming along to help the sugar Industry in
stabilising our economy, but apart from the Tourist Indus-
try which is growing quite healthily and rapidly, the others
are still in the embryonic stage. If we return to agriculture,
we will see that we are still benefiting financially from the
windfall year 1963. Not only did we have $4 million surplus
in 1964 as the result of that year, but it carried forward, as
I had predicted, into 1965, and wefindthat that was mainly
responsible for the large surplus of $7 million In this year.
We are still therefore extremely dependent on the sugar
industry.

We are somewhat worried at this moment because the
United Kingdom Government has put up proposals to the
Commonwealth Sugar Producing countries for a change in
the formula by which they fix the annual price of sugar on
the negotiated basis.
2.45 p.m.

Now, any change in formula from their point of view
is not on an increased basis. I am sure that they are think-
ing of reducing the price to the Commonwealth producing
countries because at a meeting convened in the West In-
dies among sugar producing countries in this region, it
was stated very clearly by the sugar producers that any
change in the formula was not to mean any reduction in
the price from its present basis. That is something to be
ironed out later this year; I think in October.

You can see, therefore, what worry we are concerned
about in this change of formula because in Barbados par-
ticularly we are so dependent on sugar to maintain our
economy. In Trinidad, to a lesser degree, they are depend-
ent on sugar because they are almost 50% dependent on
oil. In Jamaica, they have their bauxite; but in Barbados
sugar remains the greatest export of the country.

We do know that a lot has been said recently about
it and I have elaborated on it in recent months and I do
not intend to go over it again that we are producing large












amounts of sugar at uneconomic prices. This year I am
told that we would be selling about 3,000 tons of sugar
at world market prices which in many cases would be
below the cost of production. This year plantations will
receive for their canes $16.00 odd per ton as against
$19.00 per ton which they were getting in recent years.
The reason is because the World Market price is in the
vicinity of $100 (B. W. I.) as against $504.00 per ton which
they got in 1963. That explains the reason.

We know that the sugar producers are concerned
about this and they are even contemplating diversifi-
cation in other crops. They have recently employed
two agronomists Dr. Gooding and Mr. Hutson who
are actively concerned in the economics of other crops
which would be suitable for Barbados. In other words, do
not go to them and say plant something else and think they
will do it; the economics must be worked out. I am sure
if it can be proven to the sugar producers and cane far-
mers that they can put their land to greater economic
use than in sugar, they will set aside so many acres for
experiments.

Under Agriculture comes fishing and, as I have said,
we will have to go farther in deeper waters if we are to
catch more fish. This year we saw a very a very short
season of flying fish. It lasted about three weeks then
we could not consume the catches which were being landed
here. It did not last for more than three weeks but we
could not cope with it; and I am told that large fish can be
caught if we had larger boats to go into deeper waters to
catch them.

We have seen other fishermen, such as the Japanese,
fish further into the Atlantic and they are now landing
large catches of king fish in Trinidad. They have just
established a plant in Guadeloupe or Martinque which is
their base for sending other catches into the U. S. A. We
can learn something from them, and I am sure the hon.
Minister for Agriculture Lands and Fisheries would be
well advised to pay attention to that -- although I am
thinking he is doing it -- so as to increase our catches
of fish.

The next large item of our economy is Tourism and
this year we have reached the figure of $24 million. It
has grown quite rapidly in the last three to four years,
and it has the potential of growing to a very much larger
figure than that. But we would like to see a healthy growth.
We would like to see the hotel development keep pace
with the demand, but we would not like to see more
building taking place before the visitors have been
educated and told to come down this side, because the
result would be that you will find many hotels fighting
each other for the few visitors who would be coming,
and instead of all making money, some would be losing
money. It would help people in the hotel development
to keep pace with the flow of visitors to the Island.

There are other things which we can do to help the
industry. That is to say, not only should we induce the
visitors who come here for two or three weeks, but we
should pay attention to retired persons settling here.
Barbados can be a resort for retired persons from
North America and other countries for that matter;
but to do that, I have suggested in the past, and I am
going to suggest again, that the Hon. Minister of Finance
should investigate the possibilities of giving up income
tax from money brought into the country by way of pen-
sions. In other words, any retired person whose pension
comes from outside of Barbados, the amount of which is
spent here should be tax free. Allow them to come and
settle here, pay their rents and pay their servants, tra-
vel around the island, enjoy themselves, buy their food
and clothing and pay their utility bills. Do not collect
one cent of income tax from that money, and by so doing
you will encourage large sums of money which are needed
for this island. That suggestion has been thrown out in
the past and it is going to catch on in other territories.
Let us be one of the first to put it into operation. Too
often we have legislation of the sort which is two or three


years behind other territories. We have recently intro-
duced a Bill which is based on the Bahamas, Bermuda
and Jamaica. This Bill is to encourage international
organizations which wish to deal outside of the
territory to have a tax free holiday in Bahamas.
2.55 p.m.

Let them come in; let them trade outside. I am sug-
gesting that the retired person should be allowed to bring
in his money, and only that which is spent in Barbados
should be tax free. If he had an income of $10,000 and he
brought it in here, but only spent $5,000 in one year, you
should tax him on the remainder, on the $5,000. Or, on the
other hand, let him bring in what he wants to spend tax
free. That would be a great incentive to the Tourist In-
dustry. We must realise that the present position of sugar
is such that you must do everything possible so as to
further the next biggest industry in this island, which is
now $24 million. We are also encouraging other industries
in Barbados. This is something for which we have fought
for many years: but because of the limitation of our local
market, people will come and look and then go away. We
have been able to attract some industries recently, and that
seems to be reasonably good. If we can tie in with other
industries in the Caribbean area and if we can tie in our
market. I am sure that there willbea greater flow of such
capital in Barbados. It does not seem, however, that the
politicians of this region have come around to the idea of a
Federation, and Federation seems to be farther away now
than it has ever been before. As a matter of fact, this will
be an appropriate time for me to say that the White Paper
on the Federation Talks, whichwas promised in the month
of June, has not yet been tabled. In the reply by the Finance
Minister, we would like him to state what has happened to
that White Paper and we would also like him to give us
a little wider picture as to his most recent proposal of a
Free Trade Area with British Guiana. We cannot express
any opinion on that; we do not know the details of what it
involves. This Party .is convinced that we will have to tie
in with some other regions in the West Indies if these
other industries are to thrive and expand. The local market
is too small. As a matter of fact, one or two of these es-
tablished industries will soon absorb this-makret and they
will be looking for further fields overseas. They may be
attracted to leave here and go elsewhere if the stagnation
which exists in the Eastern Caribbean remains. If each
island wants to develop similar industries on its own door-
step, then we will be competing with each other and we will
be getting nowhere very quickly.

Mr. Speaker, mention was made of the balance of pay-
ment in the last large deficit of $51 million this year. That
is the largest deficit so far, but that can be broken down.
In fact, an attempt was made by the Hon. Minister of Fi-
nance at least to explain some of the reasons for this large
deficit of $51 million or balance of payment. With new in-
dustries coming in, much of that money is spent in
machinery and imports of that nature; the expansion of the
tourist industry forms part of our invisible exports because
some of that money goes to the purchasing of items for
tourism and for the development of hotels. Also a large
part of that money is met by remittances from England,
the United Kingdom and the United States of America. You
have remittances from emigrants overseas and from per-
sons who have gone abroad to make a living and who send
back money for their families in Barbados; it is estimated
that these remittances are in the vicinity of $7 million.
My estimate, however, is that they amount to more than
that. When we think of the number of $5 bills which come
back here in envelopes, the amount of money remitted in
that way cannot easily be traced.

There is also the question of investments overseas,
remittances and so on. The private sector is often accused,
quite wrongfully, I believe, for not investing sufficiently
large sums of money in new developing industries in Bar-
bados. It is often said that the private sector, or the people
in it, will sit idly by and allow foreigners to come in and
invest in these ventures. Mr. Speaker, that is not so at all.
You take a glance at recent industries and expanding in-
dustries because these industries have been expanded over


~VL












these years and they are almost entirely Barbadian owned.
You take Banks Beer or Banks Breweries; that's a capital
formation of $2 million and the money has almost entirely
been subscribed by Barbadians, and when I say Barbadians,
I mean resident Barbadians. Setting aside the agricultural
community, with the exception that there are a few absentee
proprietors, almost every plantation in Barbados is owned
by resident Barbadians. That is something ofwhichwe are
very proud because in Jamaica and Trinidad the sugar in-
dustry is controlled by Messrs. Tate and Lyle. Dividends
therefore flow out from Trinidad and Jamaica, but in Bar-
bados those dividends remain here. People wonder how it is
that we, in a one-crop economy, could be as stable as we
are. That is one of the factors of which we are very proud.
The recent issues of the Telephone Company have been sub-
scribed by Barbadian capital; Government short loans have
been increasing in number and they have all been taken up
in Barbados. We have the manufacturing of drugs and
bricks in which there is much local capital, although the
know-how may have come from outside Barbados. You
have the manufacture of shirts and other garments and all
of these things. Hotels have been built or bought by pri-
vate capital, but there is still a large sector of local
capital invested in hotels in Barbados and we would wel-
come more.
3.05 p.m.

It is unfair to say that the private sector is not pulling
its weight in the economic development of Barbados. I am
proud to say that after a lookat these items there are many
more. There is expansion of the rum industry and the ex-
pansion of the ice companies.

I will mention one thing, Mr. Speaker, which business-
men have reason to complain about. When they do approach
Government for certain concessions or even to make land
available to establish branches of existing industries, often
they are not given the courtesy of an early reply. I know of
many instances where there are great delays from the
Ministry -- I do not know who is to blame over applica-
tions from local companies for expansion of other types
of manufacturing industries allied to what they are doing,
and they are not given the courtesy of prompt replies. I
will not here call names, but I will tell the Minister of
those that I do know. If that was rectified, you would pro-
bably find a more healthy expansion of local capital in ex-
panding businesses in new businesses. The Government
should be just as concerned as we are about the streng-
thening of our economy. Barbadians are proud of what they
are doing: they have reason to be proud. We welcome
foreign capital, and we welcome foreign know-how because
the two together can put our people to work; but at the same
time we wish equal treatment for local capital as against
foreign capital.

We come now, Mr. Speaker, to the tax allowance which
has been given to working wives. I am very happy to know
that I drew attention to this Just a few months ago, and al-
though I am thankful, and, I am sure that working wives
are, for the increase from $300 to $420, 1 had hoped that it
would have been a minimum of $600.1 do know that there is
not much play left fora Minister of Finance in our economy
to be very spectacular, unless he is going to make addi-
tional taxation to already highly taxed taxpayers, and that
we do not wish to see. We are not advocating that; but we
must find money for essential services and the commit-
ments which we have. I had hoped that the Minister of
Finance could have seen it possible to increase another
allowance which is the deep concern of many Barbadians.
Today, we have a medical allowance, I think, of $120. The
Government has admitted that the cost of medical treat-
ment in Barbados has gone upas a result of the new Hos-
pital Fees both for operations, treatment and for hospital
beds. It has been a considerable increaseoverwhat we had
in the past, and I had hoped that at the same time the Min-
ister would have given us an increased allowance for
medical expenses. I had hoped that with the increased cost
of medical care, the allowance would have been raised to
about $500,00. Actually, it only applies to those who have
sudden medical expenses in one year, and I do not know of
any avenue that is more deserving than a family that is


suddenly stricken with some sickness which needs expen-
sive medical care. I hope that the Minister of Finance will
take note of that and at the earliest possible opportunity
give some relief in that direction.

Now, I also would like to state that if the Minister of
Finance would take businessmen in this community more
into his confidence, he would probably find that on the few
occasions that he has attempted certain taxation, he could
have been put right before hand. I am not alluding to the
proposed tax on travelling. When we first saw the proposed
tax, we knew at once that it was wrong, it was unworkable
and unwieldly, and would be very hard on those who could
least afford it. He must have been reading our minds, be-
cause our proposal was that the tax should be imposed on
every one, because we were convinced that those using
the facilities of the Airport should pay for them, and the
new proposal of $2 per person leaving the Airport other
than intransit passengers has met with our entire approval.
We must find money to run the Airport and extend its
facilities, and who should pay for those more than the peo-
ple who are using it? And those who use it are the ones
leaving the Airport. I would say, therefore, that if the
Minister in cases like that would take into his con-
fidence people who are concerned in these matters, he
would be well advised. He should not think that every one
is going to Jump the gun when there are taxation pro-
posals and capitalise on them. I am not for one moment
saying that if he has good reasons to believe that the duty
on rum, whiskey or gin can bear an increase, that he has
to go and ask the merchants about that; but on other mat-
ters, he could be well advised by persons whose daily con-
cern it is to deal with these matters.

Now this is going to be somewhat of a little departure
from that. I am going to ask the Minister of Finance to make
an exercise into the possibility of reducing both company
and personal income tax in the years ahead. We have such
a high rate both of personal income tax and companies tax
in Barbados that it is holding back the economy of this
island. There should be an exercise by competent persons
into the possibility of a reduction. I am not saying, as
someone, has said that it should be abandoned, although we
would like to see it, but there should be some reduction.
It has been done in Montserrat, and although you may say
that Montserrat can do that because they get no income,
that is not altogether so.
3.15 p.m.

If you can find the exercises: what it would cost the
Government and what effect it would have: if you would be
able to have a 10% company's tax deduction, that is to say
from 40% to 30% and also a reduction in personal income
tax in much the same relation.

It would have one immediate effect. You would not have
the Civil Servants coming as they probably would be coming
in the near future, asking you for salary increases. It
would be given them through the other end. Not only would
that be the case by Civil Servants, but by the entire com-
munity: because one of the first things any person in the
island or out of the island wants to know is what tax re-
duction they are getting per annum. That goes too clearly
to show that income tax has reached Its height. I would
like to know what effect it would have, what savings and
what boost it might be to the economy of the island. I
know that you may at this stage not want even to entertain
the idea for political reasons. The Hon. Premier has been
accused already of taxing the poor and leaving the rich.
But that is not so. If 5% of the population is paying 90% of
the taxation and, may be, fairly heavy taxation, that could
not be so by any stretch of the imagination.

I would like to know what the exercises would result
in if that could be done. In general, with respect to the
Budget Proposals, we are in general agreement. We were
very pleased to learn that a surplus of $7 million was avail-
able this year. When you can realise that, I think that it
would have been unwise to have any increased taxation at
all. Anyhow, the relief in taxation for another year would
help the economy to expand; but if we are to expand in or-


~YV












der to meet the demands of ourgrowingpopulation, some-
thing else would have to be found and you are not going to
find it in one sector or avenue; it must be found in every-
thing. Everything must be made to work to its fullest.
Agriculture, industry and anything which is not too great
a burden on Government Revenue that would encourage
such an expansion should be recommended.

We did not know at that time that there was a surplus
of $7 million. However, I think the Budget Proposals are
wise and the slight increases to protect and encourage the
local shirt and garment manufacturers have been a step in
the right direction. We entirely agree that we must learn
to do more for ourselves, and I am very pleased that the
Hon. Premier has seen fit in order to restrict imports on
quantitative tariff bases if the lower figure cannot come up
to the standard required they still will be able although at
much higher prices, and that is the magic by which it
should always be done.

Mr. Speaker, we have noted and discussed in recent
months the educational proposals for this area. You are
giving 1,500 scholarhhips virtually to Private Schools
and there is also the expansion of the School Meal Pro-
gramme in St. Michael, St. George and St. John, and most
recently you are to have compulsoty educationin the muni-
cipal area, St. George and St. John. This step has been
taken because the facilities in these areas are considered
adequate for the school population of the ages from five
to twelve.

Sir, I wonderwhy you should say 12 and not 14, because
the age of 14 is the school leaving age. The Hon. Minister
concerned may be able to give the reason.

We would say that with the introduction of compulsory
education it is going to be a great burden added to the
Government and the Councils Municipality. I know so be-
cause we of the Municipality have found out that we have to
provide clothing for many children who would otherwise
be unable to go to school; and with this compulsion, it would
be an added burden on the Head, clothing; in the Municipal-
ity..

I go further and say that this proposal is going to
carry a burden on the parent. If the parent does not send
that child to school for some reason or the other, he can be
called before a magistrate. We agree with compulsory
education, but I am only saying what are the implications.

I also notice that under the School Meal Programme,
there is an extension of the Scheme. I do not know if it is a
modified form of meal which is proposed, because that
was a suggestion of ours long ago. A hot meal for school
children of this Island is going to be a great burden, and
almost an impossible task if the school population in Bar-
bados is to receive it; and as you have proved yourself to
be wrong on other occasions, if you find it is so with re-
spect to this scheme, well then, come straightand say that
we have tried out the experiment and we can have a modi-
fied form which no one would deny to the children.

As regards this hot meal scheme, we must also look
at it in the context of our economy as to what we can
afford, and if a bun, a good sandwich and a piece of cheese,
or a hamburger will fill the bill with a quantity of milk
built around it, then instead of your giving cooked bread-
fruit and a few vegetables whichwe startedoff with, try the
other things.
3.25 p.m.

I am not decrying the attempt; but if it is proved to be
beyond the physical and financial ability of our Government
to do that, let them at an early date modify the scheme so
that meals will be given to more children and we would be
in agreement with that. With these proposals and observa-
tions we generally agree with the Budgetary Proposals and
we look forward to a further explanation. I would like the
Minister of Finance to put his economist to work on the
proposals, particularly on the question of a reduction of
income tax and company tax. We want to know what would
be the cost and what would be the benefits. Unless some-


thing like that is done, I cannot see ourselves going very
far in an orderly way.

Mr. Speaker, I was Just reminded of new proposals
which seem to be coming to a head. As to the matter of
social security, we would welcome such a proposal if we
can afford it, but I did note some comment in these propo-
sals which stated that within our life time we shall see a
scheme or system of social security as the chief means
by which the Government is seeking to relieve hardship.
In relation to this scheme of social security, that is being
considered, and with the advice and help of United Nations
Experts, the groundwork is being laid. The appropriate part
of the Financial Statement and Budget Proposals laid by
the Hon. Premier says this:-

"The chief means by which the Government is seeking
to relieve hardship is a social security scheme. With the
advice and help of United Nations Experts, the ground-
work is being laid. Plans for the introduction of the scheme
are well advanced, and we can now look forward to the
achievement within our time of full employment in a really
free society or a society free from hunger and want."

Mr. Speaker, these are very admirable words and
they are very nicely put. They might have been taken from
some textbook somewhere, but we will welcome them.
With our large unemployment figures today and with the
increasing population which we have, there will be another
10 or 15 years for this achievement which, is still within
our life time. If we can have such a society, I take my hat
off to any Government; but for a social security scheme
to handle the work successfully there should be the maxi-
mum of employment and the minimum of unemployment,
which is not what we have. In another place the Hon. Pre-
mier mentioned the unemployment problem, the serious
problem which faces our growing population, and therefore
the Government is aware of that. However, Sir, as I have
already said, this very happy paragraph or expression
which has been placed here might have been taken from a
textbook somewhere else. I do not wish the public generally
to believe that this is really adaptable. Whateveris adapt-
able for us we have to work for, and we have to work very
hard for it. Each and every one who is eligible for work
must do his best. I had hoped that the Government would
have come down with some means I hope they will do it
later on this year of trying to attract the extra money
which is available in a savings scheme. Suggestions were
made to the Government about a year ago in relation to a
Committee which was set up; the suggestion was that
there should be certain proposals for a savings scheme
to be started in schools. This is not now a question of
saving for a rainy day, but it is a question of saving for
a purpose. The Government needs large sums of money
for capital investment and capital expansion. Instead of
people frittering away their dollars in Marhill Street
in races which are being run in Trinidad, some of that
money could take the form of a Government-run lottery
in Barbados. You will always get back the money instead
of getting the Interest on it, and that interest will form
a prize. In every three months you will draw the interest
rate and a few lucky ones will get that interest. That is an
incentive to the Government who would have use of the
money. That is also an investment. There is no doubt about
it that there is a flair for risk and gamble with the people
of this country. All of us have that flair, but the Govern-
ment could capitalise on this scheme. The Government
can run the lottery and have the use of your money, and the
possibility of that incentive is the drawing of a prize of
$500, $1,000.00 or $1,500.00 all depending on the amount
of interest available from the deposit. I hope that that
scheme will work.

We have also suggested a scheme like that which ob-
tains in England whereby children are encouraged to put
in their money weekly in a savings scheme. When they come
out of school and begin to work, they would have something
on which to go. I am submitting that Barbadians must work
to that end. Do not let us think that one small sector of
the community should continue to pay heavy taxation,
whereas others will not be paying anything. The same thing
applies to the public companies. We would like to see a


wpp












greater investment from the people in public companies.
Banks breweries is one example of what I am saying; we
would like to see that widened because each and every one
will have an interest in the activities and in the economy
of Barbados.

Mr. Speaker, with those few remarks I will again say
that the Budget Proposals meet with our approval on this
side of the Chamber. (Cheers)

Mr. SMITH rose to speak.

Mr. SPEAKER: Is the hon. member seconding the
notion made by the hon. junior memberfor Christ Church?

Mr. SMITH: Yes, Sir. Mr. Speaker, you will find me
this afternoon acting in an advisory capacity more so than
in flogging a horse. As to these Budgetery Proposals, I may
say that, as far as the Black Box is concerned, it has lost
its sting.
3.35 p.m.

Most people had begun to believe that whenever the
Black Box. appeared on the scene, death was at the door,
but in this case the death blow had already been dealt about
a year or two ago. In other words the stinger had already
been left in the arms of those people whom it had stung
so hard. As you know, Sir, when a bee stings, it leaves
the stinger, and it is no more a stinging bee; it becomes
a drone bee. The Black Box has certainly left its sting
in the people in the last two years.

On page 2 of the Budgetary Proposals which I have in
my hand the Premier states the following:-

"At the 31st March, 1962, the Island had a deficit of
$948,000. I was faced with the problem of meeting the bill
of over $2 million for Civil Service salary increases and
back pay and some how or the other getting the economy
of the Island off the ground at the same time. A strong dose
of medicine was clearly indicated and we ended up the
Financial Year 1962-63 with a deficit of $74,000 only. The
import duties on twenty-seven items were abolished in
order to stimulate local production. The patient survived
despite the wails and moans of disgruntled alcoholics and
unemployed politicians."

Now, Sir, a strong dose of medicine was recommended
and passed on to the patient, but good luck for the patient,
he was not so weak and sick as the doctor had expected,
because after the heavy over-dose of medicine the patient
still survived. The ones that the Minister of Finance re-
ferred to are the disgruntled alcoholics. When a person
is accustomed to drinking his rum, an over-dose of four
cents on a half-gill is sufficient to make him disgruntled
or moan and do something more than moan; but the people
in this country are so friendly and take things so calmly
that the Minister can afford to call them disgruntled, and
mention that the patient has survived. If we did not have
alcoholics in our midst, I am sure, Sir, that we would not
have this type of Budgetary Proposals here this afternoon.
You can clearly see that by imposing that over-dose he
was only taking a chance. As luckwouldhave it, the patient
survived and we are this afternoon in the happy position
where these Budgetary Proposals reveal that we have a
surplus, when in truth and in fact during the last two years
we were making down the hill financially.

I can remember, Sir, that when this tax was first im-
posed, the Hon. Minister of Finance said that one could do
without drinking rum, and that he had no apologies to make
for inflicting this over dose of medicine on the rum drinkers
and if that were true, he would not be in a position this
afternoon of having a little money in the till: so we can
clearly see that it is good to have alcoholics; and rum is a
food for most people, though at that time theMinister said
they were not supposed to drink it. Whatwould be the posi-
tion if those people had obeyed him and refused to drink it?
The Minister also recommended an over dose for another
patient, but after two or three months he discovered if he
had insisted on injecting the patient, those patients who


had an interest and who were sick at that building on Wildey
Road would have gone overboard, and he has returned. Al-
though he said that rum was not necessary and that people
were not supposed to drink it, it still stood the test, and he
did not have to back down as he is accused by some people
of doing or be given the name of "Back-down Premier".
That shows, Sir, that you have to be very careful with these
injections and that it is not always safe to overdose a
patient.
3.45 p.m.

People of this country have come to realise it and If
they were disgruntled although I do not believe they were
disgruntled because if you had a disgruntled servant I do not
think he would work well. Therefore, if these alcoholics
were disgruntled, they could not raise their minds to that
lovely beverage. 1 will have to say that they were more
satisfied than disgruntled because they stood up under the
overdose and the patient survived.

Now, Sir, we pass on. The Hon. Premier mentioned
that it was due to having to face the Island's Civil Ser-
vants by finding money to pay them. I do not know if he is
thinking that he would not have to look for more again to
pay them; but if the cost of living should keep at the same
pace as it is now, by all means, he would have to look at
them again although it was said that something would have
to happen extraordinary for him to consider giving them an
increase. It is not going to be that anything would have to
happen extraordinarily; he will have to give them an in-
crease because when you take into consideration that
everybody is moving on, and everybody is asking for a little
piece more change and is getting it, therefore I cannot see
for the life of me that Civil Servants of this country are
going to take it sitting down and go on to work as they
were working before for little or nothing. We have to make
increases so as to measure up with the times and to offset
your Budget.

Leading from that, I am going to throw this out to the
Hon. Premier. If he has not thought about it yet, he had
better start thinking about it so as to keep things going, be-
cause as the old man said, itwould be worse than the first.
It is a matter if the Hon. Premier does not consider and
look like doing something as far as the Civil Servants are
concerned.

Coming to employment, I do not know if the Hon.
Minister of Finance knows this, but unemployment is still
on the move; and even in some of the Government Depart-
ments, he may be surprised to know or to hear that some
of the workers who were laid off during the months of
January and February are still laid off up to now and are
not yet re-employed. Therefore, you have unemployment
rampant in the Government Departments. There are
workers who are walking the streets up and down still
looking and asking for work. I feel that it should be the duty
of the Minister concerned to make notes of what has been
stated here this afternoon and go into the question. As I
have said, I am not criticising the Government this after-
noon. I am trying to see if I can be of any help by drawing
to their attention things which are not going in the best
and safest way or in the interest of the country. The Min-
isters responsible should see to it or get in touch with the
Heads of Departments concerned and ask them to find out if
any persons working in their departments have been laid off
and up to now have not been re-employed, and if those peo-
ple are told that there is no work for them to do because
there is no money to pay them.

I do not know if it is true, but when they were laid off
they were told that the money was gone, and that they would
have to wait until the new financial year started. I do not
know when that new year would be, but I am thinking that
the new year of the Government has already started, and
since it has started, it has very nearly come to its end;
therefore, something is wrong.

The Head of the Department, or some of the people in
it, are so sympathetic towards these workers that they are
trying to rotate the workers. In other words, they are lay-


I


-qqlqq












ing off "A" who worked last week and bringing on "B" to
work this week. Therefore itis not the fault of the people
responsible for taking on these workers. They are ro-
tating the workers: so I believe the Minister concerned
knows that such things are being done and carried on in
this Department. However, it was not mentioned in these
proposals or elsewhere that unemployment is at a very
low ebb, but it may be somewhere else. There is not suf-
ficient employment in the Government Departments because
workers are still hanging around. especially the Department
of Highways and Transport, asking the Personnel Officer
and the Supervisor when they are going to re-employ them.
At this time oftheyear, that shouldnever be the case if the
Government was doing its part.

Now, Sir, another part mentioned in the Budgetary
Proposals is this:- "We were treated to such statements
by a former Chairman of the Cabinet as 'putting aside
something for a rainy day' and 'good housekeeping'."

I feel that the Hon. Premier was referring to a Min-
ister or Chairman of the last Government when he was
laying his Budget because in such order, it is a clear
definition.

I will go on to read further:-

"There has been some idle talk that the Government is
over-taxing the population because we have enjoyed sur-
pluses on current account for the past two years, i.e. in
1963-64 and 1964-65. This is far from the truth because
we are borrowing at the rate of $8 million per year in order
to provide the funds for the development which is taking
place and to which the Legislature has given its prior ap-
proval and consent from time to time.
3.55 p.m.

"In truth and in fact we are not paying our way and we
are getting certain facilities now to which we are asking
posterity and those who come after us to contribute. Cur-
rent surpluses mean that we borrow less. For ten years
prior to my first budget, the average $3 million surplus
was spirited away on unremunerative overseas investment
through a lack of understanding of facts of life on the part
of the former Ministers."

Now Sir, if the particular Chairmanwas conscious
enough to try to run his house or to run the Government
in such a way that he is putting up for a rainy day, I do not
see that there would be anything wrong in that, because any
sensible housewife, rather than spend all that her husband
earns by the month or by the week, would not spend it and
not remember that the rain would fall some day or that
someone would be taken ill some day and all the money
will be used up. Something might go wrong, and then the
husband will have to appeal to the Government or to the
Public Assistance Board for help. I do not think that there
is anything wrong in any Government trying to go cau-
tiously. It is all well and good when you take up your last
dollar and spend it and nothing happens. You can pat your-
self on the back; but when you spend the last dollar and
something happens, then more persons than yourself will
suffer. Therefore I feel that the particular housewife who
is thinking about a rainy day is the wise housewife. The
Premier and Minister of Finance in his Budgetary Pro-
posals goes on to say this:


"The reason why this aggregate sum has risen rather
than fallen is that other sectors of the economy have been
expanding. Most important has been the rapid growth of the
tourist industry. It is estimated that tourists spent about
$24 million in Barbados last year. The industry
has continued to swell in the current year, and it is es-
sential that we should press on with the construction of
additional hotel accommodation and the improvement and
enlargement of Seawell Airport. In 1964, 240,399 passen-
gers went through the Airport, an increase of 48,872 on
the number in the previous year. Another indicator of the
growing popularity of the Island is the increase in cruise
passengers from 27,194 in 1963 to 41,671 in 1964."


Mr. Speaker, we would have to praise the shipping
lines and the Airlines for doing such a magnificent job, by
putting two and two together and improving the accommo-
dation of their Airlines, their cruise ships and things of
that sort. All these businessmen have been getting together
with their own funds and while they are thinking of ex-
panding and helping themselves, they are also thinking of
helping this Colony. The Government cannot altogether pat
themselves on the back for this state of affairs because
they did not provide the ships or the airlines. They can
provide the hotels, but the Government did a magnificent
Job when they provided the Harbour. I believe I am right in
saying, and even this present Government will agree with
me, that in spite of all that has been said about the last
Government, this Government should take off their hats to
the last Government when they look back and talk about
what is being done at the Harbour, the increases in the
amount of money obtained and everything which is being
done down there.

The business people of this country or those of any
other country are in truth and in fact really responsible
for this state of affairs. I term any Government as I would
term a housewife. Some housewives remain at home, read
books and listen to the radio and think about the dresses
which they are going to press for a particular party or for
going to the cinema. That is the duty of some of the house-
wives. On the other hand, the husbands of these wives have
to be on the grind in trying to work for money to bring into
the homes. It is the duty of the wife when the husbands
arrive with the money to spend it wisely. That is what is
happening or what should happen with any Government
because the businessmen of this country have to work their
brains and look for capital and do some of everything in
order to raise funds so as to establish a business or
businesses and get them off the ground successfully. The
Government is just there waiting until a business succeeds
in order to get part of the profits by way of taxation so as
to run the country.

As the hon. Junior member for Christ Church has said,
the Government should take the businessmen more into
their confidence and when it comes to certain matters,
they should ask them for their advice and try to get the
line-up from them. In that case, they will be able to do a
better job and, in my opinion, they will be able to get more
money in the till. They should notbe like some people who,
as soon as they see a businessman, they expect him to be
everything in this world, except being honest. They should
not be like some people who will say that that business-
man is not going to advise you honestly or he will not
advise out of his favour and things of that sort. You must
remember that the businessman knows things better than
you know them. Of course, you must not tell him your
business; if it is your intention toput something on whiskey
or rum or anything like that, nobody will expect you to go
to him and ask him if he feels that you should tax those
things.
4.05 p.m.

There are certain things which you might be doing for
the first time and on which you should seek advice; other-
wise, you are bound to find yourself backing down without
anyone asking you to do so. This occurred not too long ago
with the proposed tax on passengers leaving Seawell Airport.
Nobody agreed with that because in my opinion it would
have been imposing an additional burden on Barbadians
and no one else. There are people leaving this country in
search of work, and if a ticket costs $400, you can imagine
what a person would have to pay in addition at 2% on the
price of the ticket. Before the matter could reach this
Table for consideration, the Minister of Finance had to
change it up. If he or whoever is responsible for it had
taken the matter up with the Airline people, when it did
reach us and the public, no one could say a word against it.
The Premier should not adopt an attitude of not listening
to anyone or referring to a suggestion as a "cold pone"
amendment because that attitude gets you nowhere. A person
cannot always be right.

In your capacity, Sir, as one of the best lawyers Bar-
bados has produced, you may have at some time to listen


I











to a layman, and you may find yourself putting down the
book from which you have quoted the law and acting on what
the layman says to you, and you and your client are liable
to come out with flying colours. It is a reflection on Gov-
ernment to bring down Bills or Resolutions to this House,
and before they are debated they are followed up by all
sorts of amendments. It is not a good reflection on the
person who drafts them. That should be left to someone like
me who does not know law. I have been in here long enough
that I can go back out, and I cannot remember anything
like that happening during my time; so it is not a good
reflection on the Government which is responsible for
over 240,000 souls in a country to make such big mistakes.

Mr. Speaker, I do not think you were in the Chair at
the time, but I was told by the Hon. Premier that I under-
take to do things I cannot manage. I do not think I have
proved that up to now, but he has proved it on his part with
certain Bills and Regulations, and that has been proved by
the proposed tax on passenger tickets. The withdrawal of that
proposal has shown me that he tried to undertake doing
some things that he could not manage. I can remember that
years ago when we were discussing a minimum price for
canes, I was told by someone that we could fix the price
or do whatever we liked; it would not prevent him from
loosening the roller where instead of getting eight tons of
cane to a ton of sugar, you would get four or six tons, and
the people would lose. That never saw the light of day be-
cause it could network. One has tobe very careful in trying
to tackle things he cannot manage.

The Government intends to spend money on Seawell
Airport to improve it; but I have not heard anyone say
that he is suffering at the moment, nor have I heard in-
coming or out-going passengers complaining about room;
so if they have the money to spend, they can spend it, though
I always say that first things shouldcomefirst. There are
many other ways in which money can be spend to relieve
unemployment. I have been to a few airports, and 1 feel that
Seawell is among some of the best I have seen; so if you
do not have other pressing matters to attend to, you can
spend the money there.
4.15 p.m.

I am not saying to spendit. I would like you to spend it
but first things first.

Now, Sir, the statement goes on to say: "The main
object of the exercise is to relieve the serious unemploy-
ment problem which faces our growing population. At the
same time, management and labour must see that our local
industries are efficient and competitive. Only on that way
will they be able to obtain the export markets which are so
necessary if they are to survive and expand. Local traders
must be prepared, even at the expense on some profits, to
help with promotion of sales of localproducts. We must all
face up to the fact that in this Island in the ultimate result
we shall all sink or swim together. In this matter of trade
unless we increase our local production and exports and
actively contain our imports we shall come to the point
when we shall not be able to import goods in increasing
quantities. Our total trade will ultimately begin to shrink
and we shall find ourselves unable to support our growing
population."

This is telling us that we will have to get up and get.
We realise that to be sitting back and merely talking, and
not even talking the right thing, is not going to help us be-
cause there are industries which we must buildup, especial-
ly the local industries.

Now, Sir, if we are to build up our industries, we have
to expand; but, as I have said already, Barbados cannot
maintain any industry whatsoever economically. We have
to think of outside markets. We have to try and get out some
of our products. If we do not try to do that, we cannot expect
intelligent business people to come fromfarwith hard cash
and invest it in Barbados by way of establishing industries
when they know that Barbados cannot give them the business
to help them to save their money and to make money.


Let us look around ourselves. This is a very serious
matter. Let us look around ourselves and start to let the
people of the Caribbean territories do the job. It would
appear to me that the leaders are failing or are bound to
fail, or want to fail. Well then, if the leaders have seen the
writing on the wall and they are not trying in any way to save
the situation, I think it is time that the people of the coun-
try should try to save it. It is time that the leaders put
the ball into the court of the people because it is not good
enough for one man, regardless of who he may be, to be
deciding for so many when in truth and in fact the majority
knows that he is making a wrong decision. It is not good
enough when we know we cannot thrive.

We have a teaming population. Everyday more and
more children come into the place. Look in the schools
and see how may children are in them l They are not going
to stay in there forever. The time will come when they
would have to leave. When they come out, what are we
going to do with them when everybody is already in a job
and the emigration possibilities are looking so dim? What
provision are we going to make for these children coming
out of schools and those who are going in? We know that
we have to expand and we have to build up industries and
encourage capital; yet we are still monkeying around
talking.

It seems as if even the tasteof Federation is going out
of the people's mouths. It looks so to me. As I have said,
Sir, this morning, even now the Mother Country has been
waiting on a White Paper from Barbados to know what we
are going to do as regards Federation. We are keeping
back ourselves. The Mother Country wants to know what
her children are doing. I do not know if that is an excuse
because you have some Governments which give some
replies only to keep you off.

The time has come when we will have to do something
and it is no use Barbados playing that she is a "chiachi
King" and that she is the big boss and can do everything.
That is not true. We are still a small island. Do not think
that we can run along with British Guiana an independence
and leave out the small islands.

Mr. SPEAKER: Let us not anticipate that Barbados is
running along with British Guiana.

Mr. SMITH: I am only mentioning that by the way. I have
to make my point clear that we cannot live up to expectations
as far as this Budget is concerned unless we come together.
I am not going to elaborage on it. Sir, you only go off your
point sometimes when everything is not smoth; but when
everything is smooth, you do not have to go off your
course.
4.25 p.m.

As far as this matter is concerned, I am still saying
that Federation is the answer to this particular problem.
That may sound like a Joke, but it is not a joke. If I had
the time and the money at my disposal I would leave here
tomorrow and visit the other islands and when I return
here we would have a Federation. Leave it to me. (Mr.
SPEAKER: After the White Paper.) I donotwant any White
Paper. If you send me off tomorrow, I would go to the
smaller Islands and when I come back here. (Hon. J. C.
TUDOR: You would fix-it-right.) As the Hon. Minister
has now said, I would fix-it-right. We would have Federa-
tion. That is so because I would know how to approach the
various leaders; I would want to know how they stand and
what they are prepared to know. I would want to know how
would each one like to be in the picture. I would want to
find out all of these things. I would say: "Let us come
together and solve all of these difficulties." As one gen-
tleman has said, let us stop the ruling in Hell methods
and have all the ruling in Heaven methods. I quite agree
with him. We want to serve the people; we do not want this
power any more for one or two people. Let us talk about
serving the people. Let us leave this question of power for
the last. Let us start......

At this stage, it now being 4.30 p.m. of the clock,













Mr. SPEAKER: It is now 4.30 p.m. of the clock, the
time when the consideration of Private Members' Business
comes to an end.

NOTICE OF QUESTION

Mr. CORBIN: Mr. Speaker, at this stage, I am asking
leave to give notice of a Question which I was unable to do
earlier today.

Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. senior member for St.
Andrew is asking the leave of the House to give notice of a
Question which was inadvertently not given earlier today.
If there is no objection, leave will be granted. (AFTER A
PAUSE) There being no objection, leave is granted. The
hon. member may proceed.

Mr. CORBIN: Mr. Speaker, to enquire of the appro-
priate Minister:-

Is Government aware that Mr. Archibald Hunte, for-
merly employed by the Department of Highways and Trans-
port in the capacity of a watchman, has been suspended from
the said post without considerationforhis seventeenyears'
service?

2. Is Government aware that an official Enquiry into the
circumstances culminating in his suspension was com-
menced and adjourned sine die over two years ago?

3. If the answer to (2) is in the affirmative, will Gov-
ernment state (a) whether the said enquiry has been com-
pleted; (b) the findings of the said enquiry; and (c) the
date (if any) upon which such findings were communicated to
the said Archibald Hunte?

4. If such enquiry is not yet completed, will Government
state when it is intended that same be resumed?

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I think that the Hon.
Leader of the House earlier today gave an intimation of his
desire to have a Money Resolution, of which he had pre-
viously given notice, dealt with in all of its stages today.
Copies of that Resolution have been circulated to hon.
members. I therefore beg to move that Committee of Sup-
ply be the first Order of the Day under Government Business

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move that
you do now leave the Chair and the House go into Com-
mittee of Supply, and that it be an instruction of the House
when in Committee of Supply to deal with the Resolution
for the sum of $15,899.00 ofwhichnoticewas givenearlier
today.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and the House went into
Committee of Supply, Mr. BA TSON in the Chair.


SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATE 1965-66 No. 10

CADET EXCHANGE SCHEME

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. iCairman, this Resolu-
tion is a Resolution which has been circulated, and it is
for the purpose of financing a scheme for the exchange of
visits between Cadets of Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago,
Canada and Barbados during the period from 18th July to


22nd August, 1965. In other words, the visits will begin
on Sunday next and they will end onthe 22nd of next month.
Arrangements for these visits have already been provision-
ally made. Transport will be provided free of cost by the
Royal Canadian Air Force. The proposal is that Jamaican
Cadets should visit Canada, Trinidad and Tobago and Bar-
bados, Cadets from Trinidad and Tobago should visit
Canada, Jamaica and Barbados and Canadian Cadets should
visit Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago and Barbados and
Cadets from Barbados should visit Canada and Trinidad.
4.35 p.m.

We are giving our Cadets while in Trinidad and Canada
allowances for messing, laundering, and entertainment for
the Cadets who will visit Barbados under the exchange
scheme. I think hon. members are aware or were aware
of the proposal before, and this merely outlines the posi-
tion; but if there is any further information hon. members
may want, I will gladly give it.

In this Resolution we are also asking for $9,417 in
connection with expenses for Wireless Equipment and
Respirators. In the last Estimates we had two non-
recurrent items providing $10,850 and $600 respectively
for the purchase and installation of Wireless Equipment
and for the purchase of Respirators, and we are now asking
for $9,417 for new Wireless Equipment and $600 more for
Respirators, making a total of $20,000 for Wireless Equip-
ment and $1,200 for Respirators.

I beg to move that this Resolution do now pass.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

On the motion of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD, seconded
by Hon. C. E. TALMA; Mr. CHAIRMAN reported the pass-
ing of one Resolution in Committee of Supply, and Mr.
SPE4KER resumed the Chair and reported accordingly.

On the separate motions of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD,
seconded in each case by Hon. C. E. TALMA, the Reso-
lution was read a first and second time and agreed to.
THE HOUSING (AMENDMENT ACT, 1965

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Order No. 3 be the next Order of the Day.

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
Mr. SPEAKER: This Order stands in the name of the
hon. Junior member for St. Andrew, and is the second read-
ing of a Bill to amend the Housing Act, 1955.

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Speaker, this isa small
amendment to the Housing Act, 1955. Section 18 of the Hous-
ing Authority Act sets out how the funds of the Authority
may be spent, and this amendment which we now seek to
make to the Housing Act is to give the Housing Authority
the power to promote sport, provide recreational facilities,
establish any business and also give the Authority power to
make contributions to welfare within the Housing Areas. The
main reason for this amendment, Mr. Speaker, is that re-
cently two Day Nurseries have been established in the
Housing Areas. It is the policy of the Government to place
in our Housing Areas all the amenities which go to make
them good communities, and therefore we have discovered
that there are several tenants who live in the Housing Areas
who perhaps would be able to find jobs, but cannot leave
their homes to go in search of work because of the fact that
they have young children, and there is no place to leave
them or no one to look after them. In many cases six,
seven, eight, nine and ten year old children have got to be
kept from school to look after the one year and two year
olds. If the Government introduces compulsory education,
how can it in one breath say that these children must be in
school, and in another breath not provide in these areas


I












Day Nurseries where the children can be left so that the
older ones can attend school? This is the main reason for
implementing this scheme, and asking for this amendment
to the Housing Act, 1955.

It is to be noted also that a playing field is now being
provided at Grazettes. Later in the yearoneis going to be
provided at the Pine. The Housing Authority must have the
necessary authority to take care of these recreational fa-
cilities.

I beg to move that this Bill be now read a second time.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: I beg to second that.

Mr. GODDARD: Mr. Speaker, this is a very commen-
dable project. These Day Nurseries are necessary todayin
most of these housing communities, because as the Minister
has said, many a mother could find employment if she could
only have someone to leave her child with during the day.
I also would like to draw to his attention that I understand
that it is intended to open these Day Nurseries and close
them at 5 o'clock. If that is so, they would not be of much
use, because many of these domestic servants would be
coming home at 7 o'clock and it would be inconvenient if
these Day Nurseries closed at 5 o'clock, and some pro-
vision would have to be made for them.

I would go further and say that these Day Nurseries
are rather costly and expensive things to run. Would cer-
tainly suggest that wherever possible you should find
voluntary organizations to operate these Day Nurseries,
because it would be to your advantage. I have experience
of this, because I have seen in St. Matthias one operated
there by a voluntary organisation for which funds are
raised by way of dances and other things. We contribute
from the City Council, and appeals are made to the mer-
chants in Bridgetown for such things as food and even
clothing and bedding which they give.
4.45 p.m.

I have known one lady by the name of Mrs. Hall, and
often she had to dip into herhusband's salary to make ends
meet at the end of the month and to pay the Nurses and
maids so as to help through with this sort of work. I know
that it is rather costly, but wherever it is possible that
you can get voluntary workers, try and enlist their aid
because if Government has to run all these organizations,
they are going to find them a financial burden. Subscribe
to them; but try and find in this community people who are
willing to undertake the management and care of Day
Nurseries. You must provide the funds, but let them have
a little leeway. Definitely, closing at 5 o'clock would meet
some of the needs, but not all.

Mr. CARMICHAEL: Mr. Speaker, I am very happy
about this Resolution. As a matter of fact, when I was at
the new Nursery which was opened at the Gazette Housing
Estate yesterday afternoon, a slight feeling of jealousy
prevailed over me.

I hope that the particular Ministry concerned is making
a very good attempt to further develop the Housing Area
at Thorpes, and I have every confidence that the people
in the area, as well as those in the surrounding area, would
show such public spirit that the Ministry would be encour-
aged in a very short time to have a Nursery set up there. I
am certain that there are other citizens in other areas who
would like to have this same facility in their district. Much
would be gained in the island as a whole, and by children
growing up in the area by having day Nurseries.

Mr. CORBIN: I think, Sir, that we all would agree with
this Bill. We are grateful for the fact that one of its objects
is to protect the little children of Barbados. We all remem-
ber that just a few weeks ago we had two fires in which
children were burnt to death, one was in St. James and the
other in St. Andrew; Parents who work in the field have to
go out early and leave their children shut up in the house
because they have no one to leave them with. The little
kids having nothing to do try to find something to do and


that is where the danger lies. The Housing Authority, being
given this power to build Day Nurseries, it would be able
to protect these children and I am sure that they would be
kept busy when they go there.

The hon. junior member for Christ Church said that
even the very estates should erect nurseries on their
estates for the people and should contribute provisions to
them. When you look around and see the number of parents
who are in the field with their little kids, you are bound
to conclude that the prevailing situation had forced them to
go out and work, and they must either leave them at home
or carry them with them in the fields. I know of many
mothers who have to run home at various times of the day
in order to look after the children whom they left at home.

By the bringing in of this Bill, we have a solution.
This Bill would enable the Housing Authority to contri-
bute to Day Nurseries which would be of great help to the
people as a whole. If you care for little children, 1 am sure
you would reap your reward in Heaven.

Mr. WEEKES: Mr. Speaker, I must say how pleased
I am to see that the Government has erected such a spa-
cious building at the Grazettes Housing Estate for caring
for the children in that area. I would like to commend the
Government for this. In my opinion, Sir, in the near future
we should try to have these various centres throughout
the whole island. It is not only the people in the parish of
St. Michael and the City of Bridgetown who need such a
building for their children. I hope the time will come soon
when the Government would consider the erecting of Day
Nurseries in every parish for the care of children during
the time when their parents are out at work.

Mr. BATSON: Mr. Speaker, I am happy to see that this
Government is making an effort to establish Day Nurseries
in the various Housing Areas. Two years ago, I posed a
question to the Ministry in connection with the establishment
of a Day Nursery in Redman's village, St. Thomas. I think
the Hon. Minister, no doubt, now that there is a scheme to
establish Day Nurseries, would find it convenient to have
one established in Redman's Village because the parish
which I have the honour to represent is a predominantly
agricultural parish and I feel that being such a parish, it
should not be overlooked in this scheme.

Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: In reply to the hon. Junior
member for Christ Church, the average Day Nursery closes
at 6 o'clock in the evening, but the question of closing at
five o'clock depends on the need of the area. If it is found
impracticable to close at 5 o'clock, well then, it will be
opened until later.
I know that there are some Day Nurseries which close
at 6.30 o'clock; for instance, the one at Belleplaine closes
at that time and sometimes later than that.

As regards voluntary effort, the DayNurseries estab-
lished by Government are not run by Government. They are
run by a Committee. What the Housing Authority is doing
is paying the staff. A dollar a week is contributed by the
parents and this is added to contributions made by firms
and other public-spirited people, like the hon. Junior mem-
ber for Christ Church and this fund is used for the day-to-
day administration of the Nursery.
4.55 p.m.

What the Housing Authority is doing is contributing
towards the payment of the wages and salaries of the peo-
ple employed. There is still an amount of voluntary effort
with these Nurseries and it is by means of contributions, as
has been pointed out, that the children are fed. Some people
made a contribution in kind while others make their con-
tribution in cash. Therefore, the aim to which we aspire is
to establish Nurseries in every one of the housing estates
throughout the island. We have plans for the conversion
of two houses at Sayes Court, and the hon. Junior member
for Christ Church will be glad to hear this. We have a
voluntary Committee, and two or three members are em-
ployed to look after the children of that area. Those people
will be employed by the Housing Authority. Parents willpay


YVV











a fee of 75 cents per week and the Committee will hold
fairs and dances and what not, so as to get money for the
purpose of feeding the children. If a parent contributes
$3.00 a month the subsidy which is necessary for keeping
a child in a Day Nursery is $11.00; that is to say, it takes
at least $14.00 a month for the maintenance of each child.
As I have said, Sir, if it takes an average of $14.00 per
month per child to run the Nursery and the subsidy is
$11.00 per month, then the remainder would have to be found
by contributions. The wages and the attendance to the chil-
dren will be paid for.

Mr. Chairman, it is also planned to convert a building
which has been recently bought at St. Patricks into a Day
Nursery. That is the building which adjoins the Boys'
School. That building is required by theMinistry of Educa-
tion and the land is for the extension of the playing field. In-
stead of having the building closed, we are looking forward
to having a Voluntary Committee to look after the raising of
funds for the establishment of a Day Nursery in that area.
We are satisfied that St. Patricks is an area in which a Day
Nursery in needed: we are dealing with these areas as the
priority goes, There is a great need for a Day Nursery in
the Pine and the same thing could be said for the Grazettes
Housing Estate and the Silver Sands area. As I said, Sir,
we are dealing with this matter in order of priority. The
next area will be Thorpes because the Housing Authority
has just planned an extension of the area. More houses will
be built at Thorpes this year because there is a demand
for housing at Thorpes. We have a large area of land in
that vicinity, and we will extend the area. The hon. senior
member for St. James need not worry because we will be
coming with this extension.

The hon. Junior member for St. Philip has suggested
that this project be an island-wide project. We would like
to make it an island-wide one, but it does not mean that it
will be carried through the whole island this year. How-
ever, Sir, hon. members can rest assured that wherever
possible we will do something to assist those people who
have to leave their children at home and go out to work.
We are concerned about the recent accidents which have
taken place. Just a few months ago, two children were
burnt to death in a house and the mother was out working.
Last week I heard about a child who got killed and it was
reported that this child was left in the care of a younger
child. These are things which we are concerned about and
we are also concerned about ameliorating these conditions.
This campaign will be intensified and we will try to find
money so as to have as many of these Day Nurseries
as soon as we can afford them throughout the island.
The question that this Bill be now read a second time
was put and resolved in the affirmative without division,
Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr, Speaker, I beg to move
that you do now leave the Chair, and the House go into Com-
mittee on this Bill.

Hon. C, E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and the House went into
Committeeon the Bill, Mr. BA TSON in the Chair.

Clauses 1 and 2 were called and passed.
Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS: Mr. Chairman, I beg to move
that you do now report the passing of this Bill in Commit-
tee.

Hon. C. E, TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

The CHAIRMAN reported, and Mr. SPEAKER resumed
the Chair and reported accordingly.

On motions of Hon. A. DaC. EDWARDS, seconded by
Hon. C. E. TALMA in each case, the Bill was read a
third time and passed.

5.05 p.m.


THE RATES OF INCOME TAX ACT, 1965

Mr. SPEAKER: Order No. 4 stands in the name of the
Hon. and Learned member for St. John; to move the second
reading of a Bill to settle the rates of Income Tax for the
year one thousand nine hundred and sixty-five and to
make provision for certain other matters in connection
with the levying of the said tax.

Hon. W.A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I am asking leave
to take charge of this Bill standing in the name of the Hon.
Premier.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leaderof theHouseis seek-
ing the leave of the House to take charge of this Bill, and if
there is no objection, leave will be granted.

There being no objection, leave is granted the Hon.
Leader of the House.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, asyouand hon.
members are aware, it is necessary every year to legis-
late for the rates of income tax to be charged for what is
called the assessment year. It is an annual exercise; and
for the year 1965, the current year, it is proposed not to
vary the rates which were effective last year, so that the
Bill before hon. members therefore seeks to leave the
rate on chargeable incomes at the same rate as was in
effect during the year 1964. Since there is no change in
the rates, and there is, therefore, no reason in my opinion
for any lengthy introductory speech on the matter before
us, I therefore beg to move that this Bill be now read a
second time.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
On the motion of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD, seconded
by Hon. C. E. TALMA, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair
and the House went into Committee on the Bill, Mr.
BATSON in the Chair.
Clauses 1 and 2 were called and passed.

The Schedule was called and passed.
On the motion of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD, seconded
by Hon. C. E. TALMA, Mr. CHAIRMAN reported the
passing of one Bill in Committee, and Mr. SPEAKER
resumed the Chair and reported accordingly.

On the separate motions of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD,
seconded in each case by Hon. -C. E. TALMA, the Bill
was read a third timeand passed.
THE INCOME TAX (AMENDMENT) (No. 2)
ACT, 1965

Mr. SPEAKER: Order No. 5 stands in the name of
the Hon. and Learned member for St. John: to move the
second reading of a Bill to amend the Income Tax Act, 1921.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I am asking
leave to take charge of this Bill standing in the name of
the Hon. Premier.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Hon. Leader of the House is asking
leave to take charge of this Bill standing in the name of the
Hon. and Learned member for St. John, and if there is no
objection, leave will be granted.

There being no objection, leave is granted the Hon.
Leader of the House to proceed to move the second reading
of a Bill to amend the Income Tax Act, 1921.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, as YourHonour
is aware, this matter is also a matter dealing with income
taxation. It deals, Sir, with the allowances given to wives
whose incomes are chargeable in the names of their
husbands. At the moment under Section 20, paragraph IX
Subsection (1), it is permitted to allow from a wife's earned
income an allowance of $300, and under the present pro-












posals it has now been decided to increase this allowance
to $420 a year with effect from the income tax year com-
mencing 1st January this year. The increased allowance,
it is estimated, will cost the Government something like
$35,000 in decrease of revenue. Nevertheless, although I
am sure there are people in the community and even hon.
members in this House who will cavil over the fact that the
allowance has not been increased to a greater extent, yet
still I am sure that hon. members will see that under the
circumstances it is an admirable gesture on the part of
Government, and that this further remittance to the extent
of $35,000 of revenue annually is about the most we can
afford at this stage, bearing in mind the present heavy
commitments of the Government.

In our fields of Labourand Social Welfare, In the fields
of Housing and Education, in the fields of Public Works and
Communications, and in the fields of Community Welfare
and Development, the expenditure of public funds is in-
creasing, and therefore the Government has to be extreme-
ly careful that in making gestures towards relieving the
incidence of taxation due care is given to the circumstances
that we do not allow our commitments to extend beyond
our finanical capacity. This increase by 40 per cent on $300
to $420 a year is, as I say, as far as the Government can
be legally expected to go at this stage.
5.15 p.m.

I beg to move that this Bill be now read a second time.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

Mr. GODDARD: Mr. Speaker, I am very happy to sup-
port this Bill although in doing so I regret that instead of
the figures "420" they are not "600". I know of the com-
mitments of Government; but when it is known that many
housewives have to go out and work in order to supple-
ment their husband's income, and in doing so they leave
their children at home for which they have to employ other
help, I think that that in itself would take up the allowance
of $420. That is taken up in wages and in travelling back-
wards and forwards to work.

I am sure that the Government is just as conscious
of the burden of housewives as I am, and I am sure that if
the Government could have given more allowance, they
would have done so. However, this is one bright spark in
the Budget Proposals for the taxpayer.

The question that this Bill be now read a second
time was put and resolved in the affirmative without
division.
On motion of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD, seconded
by Hon. C. E. TALMA, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and
the House went into'Committee on the Bill, Mr. B4 TSON
in the Chair.

Clauses 1, 2 and 3 were called separately and passed.

On motion of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD, seconded by
Hon. C. E. TALMA, Mr. (ClAIRMAN reportedthe passing
of one Bill in Committee.

Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair and reported
accordingly.

On separate motions of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD,
seconded by Hon. C. E. TALMA in each case, the Bill
was read a third time and passed.


RESOLUTION re RENTAL OF GROUND FLOOR
OF BUILDING TO MARKETING
CORPORATION

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I do know that
Your Honour as well as other hon. members would like a
short adjournment at this stage, but as Order No. 7 is a
rather small item which can easily be disposed of I would
suggest that Order No. 7 be taken before the suspension of
the Sitting.


I beg to move that Order No. 7 be taken as the next
order of the day.

Hon. C, E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolvedin the affirmative
without division.

Mr. SPEAKER: Accordingly, Order No. 7 is the next
Order of the Day, and it stands in the name of the hon.
senior member for Christ Church: "To move the passing
of the following Resolution:

Resolution to approve the rental of the ground floor
of the building formerly used as the Police Post at Speights-
town, St. Peter, to the Barbados Marketing Corporation.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, the Addendum sets
out very clearly the Resolution.

This resolution seeks the approval by the Legislature
of rental to the Barbados Marketing Corporation on a month
to month basis at the rate offortydollars per month, of the
ground floor of the building, approximately eight hundred
and sixty square feet (860 square feet) in area, and for-
merly used as the Police Post, at Speightstown, St. Peter.
The Barbados Marketing Corporation will be responsible
for the maintenance of the premises.

This is purely an extension of the operational ar-
rangements of the Barbados Marketing Corporation to the
consumers in the Speightstown area on the same score as is
carried out by the Corporation in the City of Bridgetown.
The ground floor of this building at Speightstown which was
formerly used by the Police is considered eminently
suitable for this purpose and we are asking the approval
of the Legislature to rent this floor.

I beg to move that this Resolution do now pass.

Hon. A DaC. EDWARDS: I beg to second that.

Mr. MOTTLEY: Sir, I am sure the Hon. Minister can
give us further information on this matter. Can he tell
us if they are going to use refrigeration there? The Ad-
dendum only says that the Resolution seeks the approval
by the Legislature of rental to the Barbados Marketing
Corporation on a month to month basis at the rate of forty
dollars per month, of the ground floor of the building, ap-
proximately eight hundred and sixty square feet (860 square
feet) in area, and formerly used as the Police Post, at
Speightstown, St. Peter. The Barbados Marketing Cor-
poration will be responsible for the maintenance of the
premises.

I have to apologise to the Hon. Minister. I did not hear
his introductory speech. I can understand from the Adden-
dum that they are renting this building.
5.25 p.m.

What I mean is this: Will the Marketing Corporation
be engaged in the processing of fish? In the Northern Area
they catch quite a lot of fish. Are they dealing with fish in
this area and storing vegetables? And will there be any
cold storage or anything of that sort? If the hon. member
cannot give me this information now, perhaps I will await
the reply which will be given by the Minister of Agri-
culture.

Mr. SPEAKER: Is there any other hon. member who
wants to contribute to this debate before the Hon. Minister
replies? (AFTER A PA USE) Apparently there is no other
hon. member who wants to enter this debate and the Hon.
Minister may exercise his right of final reply, if he so
thinks fit.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, the Hon. Leader of
the Opposition would like further information as to the use
of the ground floor of this particular building which was
formerly the Speightstown Police Post. I have already in-
timated the purpose for which the groundfloorof this par-
ticular building would be utilised. I said that it would
facilitate both the consumers and the producers of vege-


___












tables. The hon. member wants to know if any further
facilities will be granted for cold storage and things of that
sort. I repeat that we want to assist the producers and the
consumers of vegetables, but as far as the question of
refrigeration is concerned, I am quite sure that the Mar-
keting Corporation would provide for cold storage oppor-
tunities, but now it is a question of catering for the
vegetable section as distinct from the fish section.

The question that this Resolution do now pass was
put and resolved in the affirmative without division.

SUSPENSION OF SITTING

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that this sitting be now suspended for 15 minutes.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division, and fr. SPEAKER suspended the sitting
accordingly.
On re-assembling,

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I observe there is no
quorum present and I make the request that the bell be
rung. I observe that there is no Clerk either.

Mr. SPEAKER: Mr. Senior Official Reporter, will you
please ring the bell?

On the bell being rung, a quorum was obtained.

Mr. SPEAKER: The Order which was last dealt with
before the suspension of the sitting was Order No. 7.

MORTGAGE INSURANCE (AMENDMENT) BILL

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Order No. 1 be the next Order of the Day.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. SPEAKER: Order No. 1 is therefore the instant
Order of the Day. That Order stands in the name of the
hon. and lea rned senior member for St. John: To move
the second reading of a Bill entitled "The Mortgage In-
surance (Amendment) Bill, 1965.

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, the provisions
of this Bill seek to amend the Mortgage Insurance Act which
was passed in 1962 so as to transfer the functions there-
under of the Minister responsible for Housing and the
Housing Authority to the Minister responsible for Finance
and the Land Development Corporation respectively. The
reason why we are introducing this amendment is that
since the passing of the Mortgage Insurance Legislation,
we have decided to establish an Urban Development Cor-
poration, and we think that it is more appropriate for
these functions to be discharged by a separate Corporation
than by the Housing Authority which has some of its time
taken up with the provision of low cost housing for the
working class community.

There are two amendments which I shall be moving
to this Bill when we are in Committee and they are in
Clauses 2 and 4 respectively. In Clause 2 we propose to
change the definition of "Land Development Corporation"
into "Urban Development Corporation" so that those
words "Land Development Corporation" will be deleted
and the words "Urban Development Corporation" will be
substituted in place thereof. We have to deal with that
because, as hon. members will see, the next Bill as
printed has the words "Urban Development Corporation"
in it. At the time when this Bill which we are now con-
sidering was printed the use of the term "Urban Develop-
ment Corporation" had not yet been finally decided upon.


I think that the Bill is a very simple one. I therefore beg
to move that this Bill be now read a second time.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
5.55 p.m.

On the motion of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD, seconded
by Hon. C. E. TALMA, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and
the House went into Committee on the Bill, Mr. BA TSON
in the Chair.

Clause 1 was called and passed.
Clause 2 was called. It reads as follows:

2. In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires -

"functions" includes duties and powers;

"Housing Authority" means the Housing Authority
constituted by the Housing Act, 1955.

"Minister of Finance" means the Minister
charged for the time being with responsibility for
the subject of finance;

"Minister of Housing" means the Minister charg-
ed for the time being with responsibility for the
subject of housing;

"Land Development Corporation" means the Land
Development Corporation established by the Land
Development Corporation Act, 1965.

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Chairman, in Clause 2,
there is an amendment which we should like to make in the
last definition "Land Development Corporation". The
words "Land Development Corporation" should be deleted
wherever they occur and the words "Urban Development
Corporation" substituted therefore; so that it will now read:

"Urban Development Corporation means the Urban
Development Corporation established by the Urban Devel-
opment Corporation Act, 1965."

I beg to move that Clause 2 as amended stand part.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
Clause 3 was called and passed.
Clause 4 was called. It reads as follows:-
4. The functions of the Housing Authority under
the Mortgage Insurance Act, 1962, are hereby trans-
ferred to the Land Development Corporation and
accordingly -

(a) the definition of "Authority" in section 2 of the
said Act is hereby repealed;

(b) references to "the Authority" in the said Act
shall be read and construed as references to the
Land Development Corporation; and

(c) the reference in subsection (1) of section 3 of
the said Act to "the Housing Act, 1955" shall
be read and construed as a reference to "the
Land Development Corporation Act, 1965".

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Chairman, in Clause 4 the
word "Urban" should be substituted for the word "Land"
In the three places where this word occurs; so that Clause
4 should now read:

"The functions of the Housing Authority under the
Mortgage Insurance Act, 1962, are bereby transferred
to the Urban Development Corporation and accordingly -













(a) the definition of Authority in section 2 of the said
Act is hereby repealed;

(b) references to "the Authority" in the said Act
shall be read and construed as references to
the Urban Deevelopment Corporation; and

(c) the references in subsection (1) of section 3 of
the said Act to "the Housing Act, 1955" shall
be read and construed as a reference to "the
Urban Development Corporation Act, 1965".

I beg to move that Clause 4 as amended stand part.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
On the motion of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD, seconded
by Hon. C. E. T4ALMA, Mr. CHAIRMAN reported the
passing of one Bill in Committee, and Mr. SPE4KER re-
sumed the Chair and reported accordingly.
On the separate motions of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD;
seconded in each case by Hon. C. E. TALMA, the Bill
was read a third time and passed.
THE URBAN DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
ACT, 1965
Mr. SPEAKER: The next Order of the Day stands in
the name of the Hon. and Learned member for St. John;
to move the second reading of a Bill to provide for the
establishment of an Urban Development Corporation with
responsibility for managing the development of areas
designated as areas for urban development and for pur-
poses connected therewith.
Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, in 1962 the Gov-
ernment introduced, and the Legislature passed a Bill, to
make provision for mortgage insurance in connection with
new town development. It has taken threeyears to acquire
the land necessary to carry out the scheme for middle
income and low income housing, due to legal and other
difficulties in the acquiring of titles to the land. In the
meantime a comprehensive physical development scheme
in the island of Barbados has been prepared by the Town
and Country Planning Department with the assistance of
United Nations and experts from the Department of
Technical Co-operation in the United Kingdom. We have
just passed an amendment relating to the present Bill to
amend the Mortgage Insurance Act to transfer the power
to carry out this Development from the Housing Authority
to a new statutory body to be known as the Urban Develop-
ment Corporation.

The provisions of the Bill which we now have before
us, Sir, are similar to the provisions of the New Towns
Act in the United Kingdom. They are similarwith necessary
modifications to suit our pecular circumstances here in
Barbados, and the purpose of this Billthereforeis merely
to create or establish a statutory authority which will be
responsible for the construction of the new urban develop-
ment areas, the laying out of the land, the acquiring of the
land, the sale of the land and all the other necessary acts
which would enable the community to acquire these houses
and pay for them under the Mortgage Insurance Scheme.
6.05 p.m.

The Clauses of this Bill are, apart from the provisions,
similar to the Act of the United Kingdom. The Clauses
closely follow the course taken by legislation for the es-
tablishment of statutory authorities, and therefore mem-
bers of this House would be more or less familiar with
the kind of powers and functions which statutory authorities
such as this would be investing.

The Bill is divided into parts. I cannot say that it is
divided into three parts, but the first part deals with the
Establishment, Constitution and Status of the Corporation.
The second part deals with the Functions of the Corporation
and the third part deals with the Funds and Resources and
General Financial provisions made for the successful
carrying out of the work of the Corporation.


I therefore beg to move, Mr. Speaker, that this Bill
be now read a second time.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: 1 beg to second that,
The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
Onmotion of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD, seconded by
Hon. C. E. TALMA, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and the
House went into Committee on the Bill, Mr. BATSON in
the Chair.
Clauses 1-27 inclusive were called separately and
passed.
On motion of Hon. W. 4. CRAWFORD, seconded
by Hon. C. E. TALMA, Mr. CHAIRMAN reported the
passing of one Bill in Committee.
6.15 p.m.
Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair and reported
accordingly.
On motions of Hon. W. .4. CRAWFORD, seconded
by Hon. C. E. TALMA in each case, the Bill was read
a third time and passed.
BUSINESS COMPANIES(EXEMPTION FROM
INCOME TAX) BILL

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Order No. 6 be the next Order of the Day.

Mr. SPEAKER: There is no need to make that motion
because Order No. 6 is automatically the next Order of the
Day. That Order also stands in the name of the honourable
and learned senior member for St. John:- To move the
second reading of a Bill to make provision for the exemp-
tion from Income Tax in whole or in part of international
business companies which are not trading locally.

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, the Bill which we
now have to consider makes provision for international
business companies In the island to be exempted from
income tax in whole or in part, provided, of course, that
these companies are not carrying on business in the accep-
ted sense of the term within the island. Hon. members may
ask why the Government should be interested In passing
legislation in favour of corporations or companies which
are not trading within the island. The purpose of this Bill
is to create further employment opportunities for the peo-
ple of this island because if we have international business
companies with registered accounting and forwarding of
bills, orders, proclamations and so on, will have to be
carried on in this island. Although the companies will not
be manufacturing here, yet there will be a tremendous
amount of clerical work and employment generated by
these activities. Quite apart from that, there is also the
added factor that the profits of these companies tax which
local businesses have to pay, will be deposited and will be
invested in this Island in the form of Treasury bill or
Government debentures and we think that this type of legis-
lation has had a very salutary effect in those developing
countries where it has been introduced.

This legislation is not to provide for wealthy people;
we are only concerned with business people who are actual-
ly creating employment and carrying on business on a very
large scale. The popular term by which this type of opera-
tion is known is "off shore" trading. You are actually
trading, but not in the place where the operations are being
carried on and which will be Barbados, we hope. This
legislation was, naturally, proposed by the Barbados Devel-
opment Board. We had a firm of experts in the United
Kingdom some two years ago to look into all the legislation
of a similar type in other territories, and to put up a joint
scheme, and it is on that shceme that this present Bill has
been founded. The countries which go in for "off shore"
trading are connected with Barbados in the field of
tourism, and these countries are the Bahamas, Bermuda
and Jamaica. Similar provisions also, of course, operate
in Panama. What the Bill roughly proposes is that a rate
of 40% should be charged for a period of 20 years and
thereafter the Legislature would have the right to fix the
rate from time to time- the rate which these international
business companies which are operating underthis Actwill
pay.


___













There are certain safeguards which have been inserted
in the Bill and some of these safeguards are (a) that more
than one-tenth of the sums which on a liquidation thereof,
would be receivable by holders of share or loan capital
would not be receivable (directly or indirectly) by or for
the benefit of persons resident in the Island: (b) more
than one-tenth of the assets which, on a liquidation thereof,
would be available for distribution after the payment of
creditors would not be receivable (directly or indirectly)
by or for the benefit of persons resident in the Island;
(c) more than one tenth

(1) of the interest payable on its loan and loan
capital, if any; and

(ii) of the dividends payable on its preference
share capital, if any, not being preference
share capital,

is not receivable (directly or indirectly) by or for the
benefit of persons resident in the Island.
6.25 p.m.

One of the reasons why this is being inserted is that
obviously we do not want to introduce legislation which
would exempt companies which have been established here
for donkey years and have already liquidated all of their
investment, and probably reaped benefits one hundred fold
that they should not amalgamate themselves into an inter-
national business company and so deprive the Treasury of
this Island of much needed revenue.

The purpose of this Bill, Imustmakeit clear, is not to
discriminate against local businessmen. The purpose of this
Bill is to encourage new well-established and reputable
businesses to establish offices in the country, so that we
would have employment in the form of clerical services,
processing, accounting and that kind of thing.

I beg to move that this Bill be now read a second time.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.


On the motion of Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD seconded
by Hon. C. E. TALMA, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and
the House went into Committee on the Bill, Mr. BATSON
in the Chair.

Clauses I to 6 inclusive were called and passed.

On the motion of Hon. Wt. 4. CRAWFORD, seconded
by Hon. C. E. TAL.MA, Mr. ( AIRMAN reported the
passing of one Bill in Committee, and Mr. SPEAKER
resumed the Chair and reported accordingly.

On separate motions of Hon. W. 1. CR.AFORD,
seconded in each case by Hon. C. E. TALM4, the Bill
was read a third time and passed.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, Your Honour
will recall that at Question Time today there were tabled
as ready Replies to three Questions standing in the name
of the hon. senior member for St. James, who at that time
was unavoidably out of the Chamber. I am proposing now,
Sir, to ask leave of the House to revert to Question Time.
A suggestion is that rather than asking for leave to deal
with the Questions, a motion should be made for the sus-
pension of some of the Standing Orders in order to revert
to Question Time. Personally I see no difference at all; the
end is the same.

Mr. SPEAKER: I gather that the Hon. Leader of the
House is disposed to revert to the suggestion.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: This depends on Your Hon-
our's approval.


Mr. SPEAKER: I think that the intimationgivenme by
the Hon. Leader of the House that he is disposed to revert
to that suggestion is the more pertinent course to follow.

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Standing Orders Nos. 5, 14, 16, 18, 40 and 45 be sus-
pended for the remainder of today's Sitting,

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division,

QUESTION TIME

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I beg to move
that Question Time be now taken.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

The question was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.

Mr. SPEAKER: It is now Question Time, and Question
No. 47/1964 stands in the name of the Hon. and Learned
member for St. James.

QUESTION re UNAVAILABILITY OF FORMS
IN MAGISTRATES' COURTS

Mr. CARMICHAEL: Mr. Speaker, the question reads
as follows:

To enquire of the Appropriate Minister:

Is the Minister aware that certain printed forms -
such as forms for summonses for informants or com-
plainants, forms required for processing appeals to the
Full Court, Accused Statement Forms used at the end of a
preliminary hearing in indictable offences are unavailable
in several of the Magistrates' Courts in this Island?

2. Will the Minister take urgent steps to have this un-
satisfactory state of affairs remedied, and that the said
printed forms be made available at the earliest possible
opportunity?
6.35 p.m.

Hon. E. W. BARROW: Mr. Speaker, the reply to
Question No. 47/1964 asked by the Hon. senior member
for St. James is as follows:-

"Investigations reveal that there was a shortage of
forms during the month of April, but that all such forms
are now available at all Magistrates' Courts."

POR DRAINAGE OF THE HOLETOWN RIVER
Mr. SPEAKER: The next question is Question No. 45/
1964 standing in the name of the Hon. and learned senior
member for St. James.

Mr. CARMICHAEL: To enquire of the Appropriate
Minister:

Is the Minister aware:

(a) that the poor drainage of the Holetown River
causes great difficulty to persons living nearby in getting
in and out of their homes during the rainy season and at
hightide?

(b) that the poor drainage isahazard to the health
and comfort of persons living in the area?

(c) that the Northern District Council has brought
this matter to the attention of the appropriate Ministry?

Hon. C. E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, the replyto Parlia-
mentary Question No. 45/1964 is as follows:-












1. (a) Yes, Sir.
(b) Yes, Sir.
(c) Yes, Sir.

2. The Department of Highways and Transport is
experiencing a grave shortage of qualified engin-
eering staff and the lack of a drainage engineer
has curtailed the Government's plan for carry-
ing out effective drainage schemes throughout
the entire island.

As soon as the services of a drainage
engineer are secured theHoletown area will be
given a high priority rating in drainage schemes
to be undertaken for the whole island.

PIGGERY AT BULLENS AGRICULTURAL STATION

Mr. SPEAKER: The final question also stands in the
name of the hon. and learned seniormemberfor St. James.
It is question No. 36/1964.

Mr. CARMICHAEL: To enquire of the Appropriate
Minister.-

Is the Minister aware that there is no proper system
of disposal of urine and waste from the piggery at Bullens
Agricultural Station in the parish of St. James?

2. Is the Minister aware that owing to the lack of such a
system a nuisance is being caused to the residents of the
district surrounding Bullens Agricultural Station?

3. Will the Minister take immediate steps to have the
present situation remedied and a proper system put into
effect as soon as possible?

Hon. G. G. FERGUSSON: Mr. Speaker, the replies to
question No. 36/1964 asked by the hon. senior member for
St. James are as follows:-


1. Work on improving the system of urine and
waste disposal which commenced on the 19th
February, 1965, has since been completed and the
system is now operating satisfactorily.

2. It is not considered that the system previously
used constituted a nuisance.

3. Does not arise in the light of the reply to 1.

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: That brings Government
Business to an end for today.

THE ADJOURNMENT

Hon. W. A. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I thereforebeg
to move that this House do now stand adjourned until next
Tuesday, 20th July, 1965, at 2.30 o'clock p.m.

Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.

Hon. J. C. TUDOR: Before your Honour put the ques-
tion, it would be remembered, Sir, that when we were about
to adjourn last Tuesday, you intimated to us that a servant
of this House had suffered a bereavement in the death of
his father. He is our Senior Reporter.

On behalf of hon. members, I desire that you see that
the customary message of condolence is sent to Mr. Cal-
lender.

Mr. SPEAKER: I shall give that undertaking.

The question that this House now stands adjourned
until Tuesday 20th July at 2.30 p'clock p.m. was put and
resolved in the affirmative without division and Mr.
SPEAKER adjourned the House accordingly.


6.42 p.m.





Subsidiary Legislation Supplement No. 35.
Supplement to Official Gazette No. 46 dated 9th June, 1966.


L.N. 70
The Customs Act, 1962

ORDER MADE UNDER SECTION 25 OF
THE CUSTOMS ACT, 1962
The Cabinet in exercise of the powers conferred
on it by section 25 of the Customs Act, 1962, as
amended, and of all other powers enabling it in that
behalf hereby makes the following Order:-
1. This Order may be cited as the Customs Duties
(Trophies) Order, 1966.

2. Part III of the First Schedule to the Customs
Act, 1962, is hereby amended by inserting therein
immediately after the paragraph beginning with the
words "The baggage, personal and household effects,
including motor cars, of any officer provided for the
Government" the following new paragraph:-
"Trophies viz:- Cups, medals, shields and
similar trophies, not being articles of general
utility, proved to the satisfaction of the
Comptroller of Customs to be specially im-
ported for bestowal as honorary distinctions
or prizes or when won abroad or sent by
donors resident abroad: provided that -
(i) the articles do not bear any advertise-
ment, and
(ii) this exemption shall not apply or extend
to the importation or stocking of the ar-
ticles for purposes of trade."

Made by the Cabinet this 26th day of May, 1966.
F. M. BLACKMAN
(M.P. 5007/7/T. 17) Secretary to the Cabinet.







SUBSIDIARY LEGISLATION


L.N. 71

The Interpretation Act, 1949
DELEGATION OF POWERS

In exercise of the powers conferred upon it by
section 28A of the Interpretation Act, 1949, as amended,
the Cabinet has been pleased to delegate to the
Minister for the time being charged with responsibility
for the subject of Town and Country Planning, the
power conferred upon the Cabinet under and by virtue
of the provisions of subsection (1) of section 6 of the
Town and Country Development Planning (Interim
Control) Act, 1959, to grant further time than that
prescribed within which an applicant may appeal to
the Cabinet from a decision of the Town and Country
Planning Officer:
Provided that the Cabinet may at any time revoke
the delegation of the aforesaid power and that such
delegation shall not prevent the exercise of the said
power by the Cabinet.
Dated this 7 th day of June, 1966.


F. M. BLACKMAN
Secretary to the Cabinet.


(M.P. 3064/18/2/T.2)




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