• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Main
 Supplement: House of Assembly,...
 Official gazette: Extraordinar...














Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00014
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Supplement: House of Assembly, 14th August, 1956
        Page A-315
        Page A-316
        Page A-317
        Page A-318
        Page A-319
        Page A-320
        Page A-321
        Page A-322
        Page A-323
        Page A-324
        Page A-325
        Page A-326
    Official gazette: Extraordinary
        Page B-1
Full Text




















dir


0fflcial


PUBLISHED BY


AUT


NO. 14










HORITYt

HORITY


BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 18TH FEBRUARY, 1957


NOTIcE No. 101 -(second publication)

MEETING OF LEGISLATURE
The Legislative Council will meet on Tuesday
19th February, 1957 at 2 o'clock p.m.
The House of Assembly will meet on Tuesday
19th February, 1957 at 3 o'clock p.m.


NOTICE No. 105
GOVERNMENT NOTICES

Assumption of Duty
R. A. Cowland, Instructor in Mechanical Engin-
eering, Technical Institute, on the 9th February,
1957.
(M.P.-P. 4497)
Leave
J. A. Holmes, Principal, Technical Institute,
nine days' duty leave with effect from 11th Febru-
ary, 1957.
(M.P.-L. 3849)
The.Honourable J. W. B. Chenery, Acting Chief
Justice, two days' casual leave on the 15th and 16th
February, 1957.
(M.P. L. 420)


T. T. Headley, Public Trustee ninety days' ex-
tension of sick leave with effect from 13th February,
1957.
(M.P. L. 211 Vol. II)
Acting Appointments
Sir Allan Collymore to act as Chief Justice on
the 15th and 16th February 1957.
(M.P.-L.420)
M. D. Kirton, Long Grade Clerk, to act as Public
Trustee with effect from 13th February, 1957.
(M.FP.-Li.2lll Vol. II)
Promotion
K. A. Jordan, Long Grade Clerk, Accountant
General's Department, to be Assistaht Accountant
Accountant General's Department with effect from
1st February, 1957.
(M.P. 3173/4)
NOTICE No. 106
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
(Transfer)
The application of Olive Brewster, Shopkeeper,
Hunts St., City, purchaser of Liquor Licence No. 810
granted to Elease Henry in respect of bottom floor
of a two storey wall building at Sobers Lane, St.
Michael, for permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&c., with said Liquor Licence at a board and shingled
shop at Hunte St., City.
Dated this 13th day of February 1957.
To C. A. ROCHEFORD, Esq.
Ag. Police Magistrate, District, "A".
NEVILLE BABB,
for OLIVE BREWSTER,
Applicant.
N.B.-This application will be considered at a
Licensing Court to be held at Police Court, District
"A", on Tuesday the 26th day of February 1957
at 11 o'cock, a.m.
C. A. BOOHEFORD,
Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. "A'' .


3ag. T72

3^K.8 ro


_ _-___.___ __~,- _









OFICA GAET EiAY1,15


NOTICE No. 107


NOTICE

The Estate of
ERNESTINE MABEL EDGECUMBE
deceased

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all persons
having any debt or claim against the Estate of
Ernestine Mabel Edgecumbe who died in England
on the 23rd day of March 1956 are hereby required
to send particulars of their claims duly attested to
Lloyds Bank Limited, the qualified Executor of the
Will of the deceased, in care of Messrs. Cottle, Cat-
ford & Co., No. 17, High Street, Bridgetown, Solici-
tors, on or before the 25th day of May 1957, after
which date the said Executor shall proceed to dis-
tribute the assets of the deceased among the parties
entitled thereto having regard only to such claims
as the said Executor shall then have had notice of,
and the said Executor will not be liable for the
assets or any part thereof so distributed to any
person of whose debt or claim we shall not have
t!ad notice.

All persons indebted to the said Estate are re-
quested to settle their indebtedness without delay.

Dated 15th day of February 1957.

LLOYDS BANK LIMITED,
Per J. C. Armstrong, Atty.


NOTICE No. 70 -(fourth publication)

BARBADOS.

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

In pursuance of the Chancery Act 1906, I do
hereby give notice to all persons having or claiming
any estate, right or interest or any lien or incum-
brance in or affecting the property of the defendant
to bring before me an account of their claims with
their witnesses documents and Vouchers to be
examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between
the hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon
at the Registration Office, Town Hall, Bridgetown
before the 10th day of April 1957 in order that such
claims may be reported on and ranked according to
the nature and priority thereof respectively other-
wise such persons will be precluded from the benefits
of any decree and be deprived of all claims on or
against the said property.

Plaintiff: CYRIL BRUCE BROOKS
Defendants: RUSSELL SIMPSON
EITHEL CLEMESHA
LORRAINE STADLE
J. LISLE MARSHALL
By their Attorney
CASPER CARLTON GALE

Property: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel o'
land situate in the parish of Saint Joseph and Island
aforesaid containing by admeasurement, Two acres
thirty seven and one half perches be the same more
or less butting and bounding on the lands of Spring


field Plantation, on lands of one Roach, on lands
of one Gill and on the Public Road or however else
the same may butt and bound.
BILL FILED: 18 January, 1957
DATED: 1st. February, 1957.

V. I. DeL. CARRINGTON,
Registrar-in-Chancery (Ag.)

NOTICE No. 71 -(fourth publication)
BARBADOS.
IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

In pursuance of the Chancery Act 1906, I do
hereby give notice to all persons having or claiming
any estate, right or interest or any lien or incum-
brance in or affecting the property of the defendant
to bring before me an account of their claims with
their witnesses documents and Vouchers to be
examined by me any Tuesday or Friday between
the hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon
at the Registration Office, Town Hall, Bridgetown
before the 10th day of April 1957 in order that such
claims may be reported on and ranked according to
the nature and priority therefore respectively other-
wise such persons will be precluded from the benefits
of any decree and be deprived of all claims on or
against the said property.
Plaintiff: ERNEST LISLE WARD Executor
and Trustee and Personal Represen-
tative.
Defendant: EDWARD DANIEL CUTHBERT
ROGERS
Property: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of
land situate in a district called Headings in the par-
ish of Saint Philip in this island containing by
admeasurement one acre three roods two apd one-
half perches or thereabouts (inclusive of three perches
in the Public Road) Butting and bounding on the
East on lands of Carol Fields, on the South on
lands of Mr. Lyte on the West on lands of Mary E.
Williams and on the North on the Public Road or
however else the same may butt and bound together
with the message or dwellinghouse thereon.
BILL FILED: 16th January, 1957
DATED: 1st. February, 1957.

V. I. DeL. CARRINGTON,
Registrar-in-Chancery (Ag.)

NOTICE No. 96 -(third publication)

IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF APPEAL

Re estate of
SUNNY AUSTIN BURKE,
deceased.

I hereby give notice that VIOLET AUGUSTA
BURKE of Clapham in the parish of Saint Michael
has lodged in this Court a petition for grant of Letters
of Administration of the personal estate of the above-
named Sunny Austin Burke alleging the intestacy of
the said Sunny Austin Burke and that his personality
is under the value of 50.
Any person desirous of opposing the grant of let-
ters as prayed for must appear at the above Court on
:.'e 6th day of March 1957 at 10 o'clock in the fore-
noon, the time appointed for hearing the said applica-
tion.
OWEN -. SMITH,
Clerk of the Assistant Court of Appeal.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


FEBRUARY 18, 19'57








FERUR 18. 197OFCALG TE


NocICE No. 97 -(third publication)

NOTICE

IS HEREBY GIVEN that Winston Clyde
Stewart of Deacons Road in the parish of Saint
Michael in this Island, School-teacher, has petitioned
His Lordship the acting Chief Judge of the Court of
Ordinary of this Island for a grant of Letters of
Administration of the estate of his late wife Desmond
Rita Stewart who died-in this Island on the 9th day of
. anuary 1956, intestate.

AND NOTICE is further given that an ex parte
application for such letters will be made to the Court
of Ordinary on Friday the 1st day of March 1957 at
11 o'clock in the forenoon.

Dated this 11th day of February 1957.

HAYNES & GRIFFITH,
Petitioner's Proetors.


NOTICE No. 100 -(third publication)

BARBADOS.

CHANCERY SALE.

The undermentioned property will be set up for
sale at the Registration Office, Town Hall, Bridge-
town, between the hours of 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the
s-um on the date specified below. If not sold it will
be set up on each succeeding Friday at the same place
and during the same hours until sold. Full particu-
lars on application to me.

Plaintiff: LOLEITA GILL

Defendant: EDWARD KENNETH KITCHENERI
CORBIN, Per Attorney.

Property: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of
land situate at Church Street in the parish of Saint
Peter in this Island containing by admeasurement
Five Acres, one rood, twenty-four and one-fourth
perches be the same more or less butting and bounding
on lands of one Walker, on lands of one Jordan of
Joshua Maloney, of Blackett, of Harris, of H. F. Ram-
say, of D. Osborne, of W. Richards, of C. Alleyne on
a road four feet wide which leads to the public road,
on lands of Cardinal Urbane King, on lands of one
IGodding, on the Salt Pond, on lands of C. Rollock, on
lands of Clairmonte Farnum, of one Roach, of Oscar
Cadogan, of L. Rollock, of estate of W. F. Rollock,
deceased, of K. N. R. Husbands, of H. Sobers, of L.
Rollock, of one Scantlebury on a road known as the
New Road, on lands of the Salvation Army, of E.
Kellman, of one Wiggins and on the Public Road
known as Church Street or however else the same
may butt and bound Together with the message or


dwelling house and all other erections and buildings
thereon both freehold and chattel thereon erected
and belonging to the defendant.

Upset Price: 4,075 0. 0.
Date of Sale: 1st March, 1957.

V. I. DeL. CARRINGTON,
Registrar-in-Chancery (ag.).

NOTICE No 26 --(third publication)

NOTICE

Resolution made by the Governor-in-Executive
Committee under Section 2 of the Sale of Poisons
Act, 1885.
The article known as amphetamines (beta-amino-
propylbenzene and beta-aminoisopropylbenzene) is
hereby declared to be an article deemed to be a
poison within the meaning of the Sale of Poisons
Act, 1885.
Resolved by the Governor-in-Executive Commit-
tee this tenth day of January, 1957.

By Command,

K. A. HALL,
Acting Clerk, Executive Committee.
(M.P. 2016/S.3/T. 2)

NoTIC No. 382 --(sixth publication)
NOTICE

Re Estate of
AUGUSTA CLARK
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any debt or claim against or affecting the estate of
Augusta Clarke, late of Fairfield Cross Road in the
parish of Saint Michael in this Island who died at
the Parish of Saint Michael on the 26th day of
January, 1956, are requested to send in particulars
of their claims duly attested to the undersigned
c/o Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfield, James Street,
Bridgetown, Solicitors, on or before the 28th day
of February, 1957, after which date I shall proceed
to distribute the assets of the deceased among the
parties entitled thereto having regard only to such
claims of which I shall then have had notice and I
will not be liable for the assets or any part thereof
so distributed to any person of whose debt or claim
I shall not then have had notice.
And all persons indebted to the said estate aro
requested to settle their indebtedness without delay.
Dated this 18th day of December, 1956.

AUGUSTA CLARKE,
VETLAND KNIGHT,
Qualified Executrix to the Estate of
(Deceased).


OFFICIAL GAZETTE.


FEBRUARY 18. 1957









112 Oi-.ilCIAL GAZETTE


RETURN OF RAINFALL AT CENTRAL AND DISTRICT POLICE STATIONS FOR THE
WEEK ENDED 11TH FEBRUARY, 1957



STATION "3;




Central Station ... .. ... .08 .05 .12 .25
District "A" Station ... ... .05 .03 .10 .10 .02 .30
S "B" ... ... .05 .44 .49
S "" ... ... .06 .06
Four Roads Station ... ... .07 .09 .16
District "D" Station ... ... .26 .07 .02 .10 .45
S "E" ... ... .15 .06 .22 .16 .59
Crab Hill Station ... ... .05 .15 .20
District "F" Station ... ... .15 .01 .05 .21
Belleplaine Station ... ... .06 .04 .17 .03 .30
Holetown ... ... ... .32 .14 .02 .08 .56

AVRAGE ... ... .. .11 .04 .07 .10 .32


Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown,
Dated 16th February, 1957.


R. A. STOUTE,
Commissioner of Police


FEBRBARY 18, 1957














VOL. XCiL


SUPPLEMENT TO


aIje


ntfiial


(azettl


PUBLISHED


BY


AUTHORITY


BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 18TH FEBRUARY, 1957


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

(Tuesday 14th August,
Pursuant to the adjournment the
Assembly met at 3 o'clock p.m. today.


1956)
House of


Present:
His Honour Mr. K. N. R. HUSBANDS (Speaker) ;
Hon. G. H. ADAMS, C.M.G., Q.C., B.A., (Premier);
Hon. H. G. II. CTMimiNis, C.B.E., M.D., C.M.,
(Minisfer of Social Services); "-Ion. AM. E. Cox,
.llli;is.tr of Communications, Works and Housing'
MAr. L. E. Strnr, J.P.. (Chair*man of Committees)
Ihon. R. G. MAReI. (Minister of Trade, Industry adl
Labour,) Mr. O. T. ALLDER; Mr. J. A. HAYNES, B.A.,
Mr. J. C. MOTTLEY, Mr. V. B. VAQGHAN.
Prayers were read.
M'r. CRAWFORD entered the House and took
i:is seat.
MINUTES
Mr. SPEAKER : I have the honour to inform
the House that the Minutes of 'the last meeting are
not yet ready for circulation.
DOCUMENT
Mr. SPEAKER: I have the honour to inform iv(
House that I have received a copy of the accounts
of the Sugar Industry Agricultural Bank for the
financial year ended 30th June this year.
GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Hon. G. 11. ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice of the following Resolution:-
Resolution to place the sum of $5,000 at the dis-
posal of the Govemror-iui-Exeteutive Coimmittee to
supplement the Estimates 1956-57 Part I -- Current
as shown in the Supplementary Estimate. 1956-57.
No. 19 which forms the Schedule to the Resolution.


lion. Dr. 11. G. 1i. CUMMINTLS: Mr. Speaker, I
tbeg to give notice of a Resolution to place the sum of
$60O at the disposal of the Governor-in-Executive
Committee to Supplement the Estimates 1956-57,
Part I Current as shown in the Supplementary
Estimate 1956-57 No. 18 which forms the Schedule
to the Resolution.
In connection with this Resolution, Sir, I want
to state that it is my intention to move the suspension
of Rules 88 and 89 to deal with it today. It is rather
urgent but on account of the paucity of honourable
members I cannot do so now. It may be possible to
do it later on.
Hon. M. E. COX: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice of the following Resolutions:-
Resolution to place the sum of $2,000 at the dis-
posal of the Governor-in-Executive Committee to sup-
plemeut the Estimates 1956-57. Tart I Current as
shown in the Supplementary Estimate 1956-57, No.
21 which forms the Schedule to the Resolution.
Resolution to place te sum of $43,000 at the dis-
posal of the Governor-in-Executive Committee to
supplement the Estimates 1956-57, Part II-Capital
as shown in the Supplementary Estimate 1956-,7
No. 20 which forms the Schedule to the Resolution.
Hon. R. G. MAPP: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice of a Bill to consolidate and amend the Acts
of this Island relating to Factories.
Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: Mr. Speaker, I
beg to give notice of my intention to move the House
into Committee of Supply at its next meeting to deal
with the Money Resolutions of which notice has just
been given.
PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS
Mr. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, I beg to give
notice of the following Address to His Excellency
the Governor:--
The House of Assembly
To
jis Excellency the Governor
The House is deeply concerned over the position
of the owners of fishing craft wiTh sails who in con-


----- -- --------- ~-


NO. 14







316 OFFICIAL GAZETTE


sequence of the availability of mechanised boats, are
finding it impossible to obtain crews to man their
boats at sea.
In view of the past contribution made by these
craft to the economy of the country, the present dis-
tress of many of their owners and the fact that these
boats which represent a considerable investment on
the part of the owners are at present rotting on the
beaches, the House is of the opinion that some assist-
ance should be rendered to them to enable them,
wherever practical, to convert the boats into
mechanised units.

BILL READ A FIRST TIME

On motion of Hon. R. G. MAPP, seconded bl
Hon. M. E. COX, the Bill to consolidate and amend
the Acts of this Island relating lo Factories was read
a first time.

CHAMBER OF THE HOUSE

Mr. SMEAKER: Gentlemen, before the business
of the House proceeds, I should like to draw the
following to the attention of honourable members:-
For sometime now my attention has been direct
ed towards the provisions made to ensure the main-
tenance of dignity and order in and about the
precincts of the Honourable House, especially with
reference to the conduct of strangers in the gallery,
and the need for revision of those provisions with a
view to upholding that dignity and enforcing the
order usually associated with Chambers of this
nature.
2. With regard to the conduct of honourable
members and provision as to decorum generally
within the House, this has been assigned by the Hon
ourable House to the Rules Committee which, it is
hoped, will shortly report on the revision of the
Rules of the House.
3. After consultation with the Honourable
Premier, the Honourable Leader of the House and
the Commissioner of Police, I have made certain
regulations touching the conduct of strangers in the
gallery, the mode of entry of strangers into the
precincts of the House made especially to avoid
unnecessary loitering and the easy availability of
honourable members to their constituents during
sittings of the House.
4. In this connection it has been thought advis-
able to create a post of Deputy Marshal and to place
the additional duties created thereby upon the holder
of post of Messenger and Library Attendant, who
will be the means of contact between honourable
members and persons desiring to see them, and who
for that purpose will be allowed to enter the House
during session and be generally at the convenience
of members.
I have thought it desirous to inform the House
of these proposals which are given in greater detail
in the attached appendix.

APPENDIX

1. It has been established by long standing
custom that the control of the House and its precincts
is vested in the Speaker.
2. The precincts of the House include the fol-
lowing:-
(a) the House of Assembly Chamber;
(b) the Speaker's room;
(c) the Lobby;
(d) the two corridors leading from the
Chamber to the landing at the head of
the stairs;


(e) central stairway and landing to the
House;
(f) the office ol the Clerk of the House;
(g) the luncheon room;
(h) the Library of the House;
(i) the portion of the corridor which borders
and adjoins the Library of the House.
3. Under present Police regulations, it is the
duty of the constable stationed at the House to en-
sure that, after the public seats are filled, no other
members of the public except members of the House
are admitted except on the instructions of the Speak-
er. The constables are also responsible for keeping
the stairs and corridors free of loiterers.
4. It is proposed to keep three (3) constables
on duty during each session of the House, one to be
placed at the foot of the stairway, another on the
landing, and the third inside the visitors' gallery.
5. No stranger will be allowed to enter the pre-
cincts of the House after the public seats are filled
save for the purposes hereinafter set forth.
6. A stranger may enter the precincts for the
purpose of interviewing a member of the House.
To do so, he shall make application for entry to tle
constable on duty at the foot of the stairs who shall
issue to him a coloured card upon which shall be
written the name of the member he desires to see.
The card shall be presented to the Deputy Marshal,
or the constable at the head of the stairway, who
shall show the stranger into the Lobby of the House
where he shall await the member.
7. Members of the Press and the caterers will
be issued special cards to ensure their admittance.
8. The following are exempt from these in-
structions:-
(a) Members of the Other Place;
(b) the Clerk and other officials of the
Other Place;
(c) officers and staff attached to the office of
the Clerk of the House;
(d) members of the Public Service attached
to the various Ministries entering the
precincts upon official Government
business.
9. A constable shall be posted at the landiug
of the House on every day of the week between the
hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.
(Sgd.)K. N. R. HUSBANDS,
Speaker.
3.25 p.m.

Mr. CRAWFORD: If I may be permitted to
ask a question, Sir, the Appendix states: "It has
been established by long standing custom that the
control of House and- its precincts is vested iL
the Speaker." May I ask of you, Sir, whether these
Regulations have been referred to the Rules Com-
mittee whether Your Honour is the sole author of
them? And secondly, without questioning Yoor
Honour's prerogative in drafting these Regulations,
I should like to enquire what machinery would be
utilised in the case of a divergence of views between
honourable members and Your Honour and the mat-
ter before us.
Mr. SPEAKER: I shall most gratefully respect
any divergent opinion by honourable members, but
it is still within my province to make such regula-
tions; and as far as the Rules Committee is con
cerned this matter is out of their province.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT; I should like to know
in paragraph three (and I do not question Your
Honour's prerogative because if you have the pre-
rogative: I presume you should use it,) why is it
necessary in a matter like this, in an old established
custom, to have the Commissioner of Police, the


FEBRUARY 18, 1957








FzAu -18. 1957 OAZTT


Premier- and, the Leader of the Houset I wonder
whether something has gone wrong to cause this to
be done? .I would like to know if this is any at-
tempt by you or any of these members concerned
to restrict the freedom of the strangers entering the
gallery, because I will take it, it is an old tradition-
asd. we have not reached the stage in 'Barbados
where so many people entering the. House come by
ears for many purposes. There are many open seats
as you can now see. Any restrictions on the conduct
of the members in the gallery come under your pre.
rogative and. yours only,- and not the vCommissionei
of Police or anyone else: I would just like to know
in these things whether -you have not the prerogative
1 act without consultation:with anybody.
j,- Mr SPEAER: If -the honourable member
reads further in the Appendix, and ILhope he will,
he will find that no attempt whatever has been made
to restrict strangers entering the House; it is only
for the purpose of controlling order within the
House.
ORDER PAPER

Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: In connection with
Order No. 1, I am awaiting the arrival of another
member in order to move the suspension of Rules
88 and 89.
Mr. SPEAKER: Can the hdnourable member
not proceed with anotlkhr Order intthe mean time?
COMMIFEE OP SUPPLY

Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: I beg to move
that Your Honour do now leave the Chair and the
House go into Committee of Supply
The question was put -aid resolved in the affirma-
tive wVithout. division, 1Mr. Speaker left the chair
and t House went into Comirinlte of Supply, vMr.
Smith in the Chair.

-: WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT
Hon. R. G. MAPP: Mr. Chairman, this is quite
a straight-forwaid and non-contentious Resolution
for the sum of $5,000 to meet any further claims
which may arise underr the Workmen'st'Compensa-
tion Act out of death or injuries sustained by any
Government Servants. As honourable members will
see from the Addepdum, the amount of $2,000 was
provided under the' Estimates for this purpose, and
so far $1,373.98 have been paid but in charges under
the Act. This Resolution seeks $5,000 to meet the
present contingency of $1,800' and any further
amounts that may be due owing to injury or death
sustained by Government employees.
As I said, Mr. Chairman, it is quite a straight-
forward Resolution and I beg to move that it do
now .pass.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. Chairman, I am
sure that this honourable Committee will remember
, that this question of' Workmen's Compensation arose
somb time ago; and it was stated then that any
amendment to the' Workmen's Compensation is a
charge against the Treasury and therefore could not
be proceeded with; but I am sure that I am express.
ing the sentiment of organised and unorganised
workers in this .Island by saying it is extremely
painful that nearly two years after Profesis'
Richardson has made a Report, on the question of
Worlkmen'st Conmpensation, we find that up Lo tbi"
dar no 4gislation, as been passed, and we are still
labu ring' under the Workmen's (- ompenaation Act
that was passed. thirteen :years ago, Now, it is evi


dent to everybody concerned that the money values
have changed since thirteen years agorPAd it is cle
to everybody that a workman 'injured under the
present circumstances is, far worse off now than he
was when the Workmen's Compensation -Act was
p passed. Moreover, a man injured at work today hap.-
pens tq be in a worse position than a man who takes
sick with influenza or pneumonia where the employc
decides to give him. full pay. The Trade Union
pointed out to GovernmUent for over four years that
the time' has, come to amend the Workmen's Corn
pensation Act in order to provide greater benefits io4
workers., Professor fichardson indicated what had
already been indicated by me and other persons: tk
'Act in order to provide greater benefits for workers.
Professor Richardson indicated what had already
been indicated by me and other persons: that the
the amount of money being sent overseas from this
Island for Workmen's'' Compensation should bd
created into a fund to pay people better benefits
and provide a better fund for them.
3.35 p.m.
Each time we have an instance like this, it
brings to my mind forcibly the question as to what
is the delay in dealing with an amendment to the
Act in order that the workers could have greater
benefits. It is within the province of this Govern
ment to do that; they have been asked to set up a
Committee for this purpose, because. this is not a
matter which can be dealt with by one man; it is
the sort of thing in connection with which you
should have a Committee of employers, workers and
independent people. I find that the workers are.
protesting over this matter all the time; it is only
last week that we' had the instance of'a man who
was taken ill, and his maximum payment was 11
days' pay for an illness, of three Weeks. Do you
realise, Mr. -Chairman, what -a hardship it is on a
workman to receive payment on a half-p'ay basis?
Nobody has seen fit, because it does "ot affect them,
to see the necessity of implementing something in
the interest of the workers.
Professor Richardson- made hi-report some two
years ago, and somebody should ask: why should
the workers be deprived of this benefit after two
years? After all this time, you are actually depriv-
ing workers of this benefit when they are taken ill.
The employers are not paying the full wages, be-
cause they are p~ing insurance premiums; can
you not see that it is time for us to start a fund in
order to provide the workers proper benefit by wat
of Workmen's Compensation? I should like to say
that Barbados is not lacking in people of goodwill
and ability to see that it is time that we deal with
this matter. Each time that an instance like this
comes before this Chamber, I must voice my feeling
that it is a lack of interest which has caused this
matter to be kept on the waiting list for so long.
On the last occasion, it was ^the question of. the
Labour Code; but something must be done because
you do not know what the 'Labour Code will provide.
You have people sitting down, and no attempt is
made to amend the Workmen's Compensation Act
which has been on the Statute Book for the past 13
years. In Trinidad-as &, matter 6f'fact, in nearly
every progressive territory in the West Indies--
they have seen fit to make 'a change; but we have
allowed the Act to remain as itis. since it was passed
in 1943, based on the Act of 1925 in the United
Kingdom. Why is it that Barbados must lag behind
in a matter like t-his. -and. meanwhile tbh workers
are suffering? Those of us who Ihave to do-any-
thinr with the Workers' Or'uanisation. know that
we have people inindustry who, whenever they are
taken ill, are the worse off because of theantedilu-
vian methods of the Workmen's Com~ ensatioft Act-
:in Great Britain, weh there.,wasrtle- idea -that you.


rir~kr~l--~.'------l~-Li~-


Eaeavat 18 1957


O~IGI~~O;B~lrEQTP








I


are just giving a man a pittance. These people are
not getting any social security benefits so that you
could say that it does not matter where the amount
of the Workmen's Compensation is concerned.
I do not think that there could be any reason-
able excuse for not regarding Professor Richard-
son's Report which contained a recommendation on
this matter of Workmen's Compensation, which re-
commendation has not yet been implemented so as
to give the workers the benefit of a more liberal Act,
in order that they might be able to get proper bene-
fits. I do hope that this will be the last occasion
when we will have anything concerning Workmen's
Compensation coming before us, and no attempt
made to amend the Act.
Mr. CHAIRMAN: The question is --
Mr. CRAWFORD: Before you put the ques-
tion, Mr. Chairman, I would like to say that these
anomalies and injustices which are possible under
the prevailing Act, are due more or less to the fact
that when we passed this legislation, we refused to
accept the recommendations of the Royal Commis-
sion of 1938-39, and to introduce the Ontario sys-
tem of Workmen's Compensation rather than what
we have at present. Under the Ontario system from
the beginning-the slightly injured, or partially dis-
abled, or people who were killed-in such cases,
their dependants would be entitled to infinitely
larger sums of money by way of compensation.
Even although when we passed the Act, the Govern-
ment of that day had refused to consider the intro-
duction of the Ontario Act, there is no reason why
the present Government should not have done so
long ago. The hon. junior member for St. Peter
has made reference to the Richardson Report on
Workmen's Compensation, and all things being con-
sidered, I do not think that he should be excused
for having wasted the time of the House. He
knows, as well as we all know, that the Govern-
ment had no real interest in Professor Richardson;
they did not intend to pay any attention to Pro-
fessor Richardson, and they only brought him here
because he happened to be in the area. He was in
British Guiana, and because it would have appeared
to be negligent on the part of the Government not
to take any notice of him while he was in the Carib-
bean area, they brought him here. He made a com-
prehensive Report, not one item of which the Gov-
ernment intended to implement or take seriously.
A few weeks ago, the hon. senior member for
St. George attempted to deal with a Bill, under the
provisions of which an injured workman would have
been entitled to far greater compensation than what
is proposed here. For instance, in the present
Resolution which is before us, in respect of the man
who died as a result of an injury sustained while
working for the Government, his dependants are
only entitled to $1,800. As a matter of fact, the Act
as it now stands says in respect of fatal accidents,
the compensation is a lump sum equal to 156 weeks,
or $1,800 whichever is the less. For example, this
workman was working for no more than around
$12.00 a week, so that rather than pay him 156
weeks' wages, they are paying him $1,800, which is
less than what the weekly payment would have
amounted to.
Now, under the provisions of the Bill which
was introduced by the hon. senior member for St.
George, the compensation payable to the dependants
of a fatally injured worker would have been, as
far as I recollect $5,000 or $7,000 to which accord-
ing to what he said, the workers in Antigna are now
entitled. There is a vast difference between $1,800
to which the Barbados Act entitles the dependants
of a fatally injured worker, and the $5,000 or $7,000
to which such a worker in Antigua in the same
position is entitled. Therefore, there cannot be any


excuse either for not introducing the Ontario
system or amending the Act along the lines proposed
in the Bill of which notice was given by the hon.
senior member for St. George.
MlVr. CHAIRMAN: I think the hon. member is
straying from the Resolution. This Resolution is
asking for a certain amount of money by way of
Workmen's Compensation, but the hon. member is
now dealing with the Bill which was given notice
of by the hon. senior member for St. George.
Mr. CRAWFORD: I am doing nothing of the
kind. This Resolution is a money Resolution, and
a certain amount of latitude has to be given to
deal with the policy surrounding the matter in this
Chamber. I hear the Hon. Premier asking the Chair
to call me to order on this matter, but, if he wants
to be the Chairman of Committees let him go in
the Chair.
3.45 p.m.
Mr. CHAIRMAN: The honourable member is
straying. I only want to draw to your attention that
this is a money Resolution with which you are deal-
ing; not with the Ontario Acts and other Acts.
Mr. CRAWFORD: This is a Money Resolution
for compensation and charges under the Workmen's
Compensation Act, 1943. I am expressing my dis-
satisfaction with the amount of $1,800 which falls
due to the dependants of workmen who are fatally
injured. I am taking it that I am entitled to say that
the present system is wrong and that in the interests
of workers it should be abandoned at the earliest
possible date. Rather than being accused of making
wild, non-constructive suggestions, I am suggesting
what should be done. I am suggesting that the Work-
man's Compensation Bill which was given notice of
by the honourable senior member for St. George
should be allowed to become law, or to use the Ontario
Act, or to endorse and implement the recommenda-
tions made by Professor Richardson to which the
attention of this Committee has been drawn by the
honourable junior member for St. Peter. Professor
Richardson recommended that under the present
Workmen's Compensation Act the system of lump
sum payments should be replaced by a system of
monthly payments for life to workers who are totally
and permanently disabled or who are partially and
permanently disabled to the exent of thirty per cent
or more, according to the scale given in the Schedule
to the Act of 1943. He also made a recommendation
in regard to increasing the compensation because of
that fact that it was small, and medical attention
and appliances required by way of accidents had at
present been taken from the sums which the depend-
ants of those workers now get.
The honourable junior member for St. Peter has
said that the Government should give consideration
to operating its own Workmen's Compensation fund
to which employers would pay premiums; and in the
body of the report by Professor Richardson itself, he
(Prof. Richardson) drew attention to the appreciably
high premiums charged by insurance companies and
suggested that the Government should provide its
own Workmen's Compensation Fund at a low rate of
insurance charges. The overall result would be that
they would be able to pay higher premiums and
higher compensation to the workers wo are injured
or to the dependants of those who were fatally injured.
May be, it is a matter on which the Government
prides itself with smug complacency that the depend-
lans of the workers who are injured are only
entitled to the small amount of $1,800 and feel that
that is all that a worker's life is worth to them. Even
if at the time when the Act was originally passed,
the sum of $1,800 appeared an appreciable sum, it
is not so today. Since the Government itself is ap-
parently convinced that $1,800 represents an an-


F7mBu~ny 18, 19577


318


OFFICIALBT GAZETTE









PBM'R 18, 195 OFFCIA GAZETTE_


propriate amount, it is not the view of the consider-
Iable opposition from this side of the table and this
Sis an attempt to draw attention to its inadequacy.
The cost of living in Barbados today is between
280% and 300% to what it was at the time when
tl1he Workmen's Compensation Act was placed on
the Statute Book; so for all practical purposes all
that we are giving these workers today is about $600
oi $800. That is what it means today. When the
Legislature fixed the sum of $1,800 as the amount
for a worker fatally injured, the prevailing circum-
stances were such that the amount would be worth
$5,400 today and that is the reason why I said
earlier that in the Leeward Islands -- the colony of
Antigua and possibly elsewhere in the Caribbean -
the amount fixed is between $5,000 and $7,000.
The hon. junior member for St. Peter is quit.-
right. No one who sits here will agree with Govern-
ment's views of merely awarding $1,800 to the de-
pendants of workmen who were fatally injured and
feel we are discharging our responsibility towards
them. There can be no excuse for Government's
actions in view of the fact that over two years ago,
the Government had the -specific recommendation
of Professor Richardson on the matter who stated
that the present reward for injury or in case of
:fatality is infinitely less than what it should be.
Mr. HAYNES: Mr. Chairman, I am not pre-
pared to go into the point relative to the amount
given for. total disability; I think that ought to be
left to the statisticians who know exactly how these
things are worked. My point is relative to the
amount of money which goes out of the Island from
this matter. I am wondering what is Government's
attitude toward this matter: I am wondering if
Government realises what a tremendous amount of
money goes out of this island annually on account of
the enforcement of Workmen's Compensation,-
money which I feel should remain .in Barbados. I
am.not saying that it should -ot be enforced but I
am wondering if it is possible for Government to
either start a Government insurance scheme which
would bear all the premiums, and any profits made
would go to the Treasury.
I am told that the amount of money which
goes out of the Island through the enforcement of
insurance for workmen's compensation is really fan.
tastic. I do mot like to quote figures but I am told
that it is a sum between $50,000 and $60,000 a year
which gor out of .this country in premiums. It would
be better if that money was circulated in Barbados.
but it now goes-and quite rightly so-to those who
take the risk. I maintain that this Government is in
good. finatnial position and it would certainly be
better if they take on the scheme of Workmen's Com-
pensation Insurance just as the Government in
England takes on the scheme for health insurance
in Wngland. In that case all the money would go
tack into the Treasury instead of going into drafts
to th6se big co-operations who can well afford to do
business otherwise. Let.the Government keep these
funds in territorial waters.
3.55 p.m.
I was only speaking, Sir, to throw a suggestion
to the Government as to the importance of it, if they
understand what I said.
Mr. ALLDER: Mr. Chairman, the hon. junior
member for St. Andrew has ade a very constructive
suggestion, but how could the hon. member expect
OGternment to carry'~out What he suggested since
-the sime Government exports millions 6f pounds of
the workers' money through the Savings Bank to
Kenya a~d South Africa and places of that sort


The Government would first have to put its house in
order and call back in such moneys for local invest-
ments before they could succeed or set about to
prevent Insurance Companies from collecting it
here and dumping it over there.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. Chairman, I did
not want to rise again but when you see the smugness
of people when they are dealing with something
particularly to better the position of people, you
are appalled. I am going to put it to you as a
business man; if you are to comply witli the law
in your business, you make a rough calculation to
see what it is. If you have twenty workers insured,
the incidence of insurance may be something less
than 10Z: which means, with the amount of money
on Insurance Premiums, less than 10% accidents is
going to occur. You will see how many years it will
take for twenty workers to be insured. These hon.
members who know about it know that the amount
of money you pay in insurance premiums is taken
out of your business; the Income Tax Commissioner
is going to write it off as expenses, but it is' still
coming out of the business. It cannot be distributed
to you in profit or the workers do not get it in wages,
but the benefits which accrue on your workers are
infinitessimal. What we are suggesting is this. Pro-
fessor Richardson said if the money were funded
now-and the amount of accidents for'Workmen's
Compensation of this island is small-it wold go
to reduce the premium, and if you compelled more
people to insure the fund would become larger; if
you did not reduce the premium, then you should
increase the benefits to the people. Take the case of
a man working for $10 or $15 a week in Barbados!
Can you imagine his plight if he is insured and
gets injured? For the first three weeks he gets $7
a week-and not only on a casual basis, it, is on an
average, this means that if he has been accustomed-to
working for $15 a week for the last twelve weeks, he
is going to be paid on an average; and you get
this smugness as if everything is all right in Den-
mark I Sometimes you wonder if any of the characters
in the Bible mean anything to people. [A VOICE:
Those characters are fictitious!] We know it is
fictitious for those people who are atheists, because
some people only believe in the Bible when they are
dying, but if the characters in the Bible are fictitious,
the moral is not fictitious and the moral is, "are we
our brother's keeper?" Those of us who have some
responsibility think there is no smugness about it
and it is too long now you have to wait before you
can get things like this done. We are going to deal
with a Resolution to bring a Prison Administrator
from British Guiana here to go into the prisons, and
vou say this is more urgent. You get people to go
into the administration and then you do not adhere
to it: that is the sort of thing you get. But for the
people who are injured now, there is no attempt
made to oive them better benefits or even to amend
the Workmen's Compensation Act. but you con-
tinne to allow people to work under the ouite in-
anlpnut. Workmen's Compensation Act passed ini
10o a. d there i' this smueness thqt PnTelh fepl nleaO-
ed about it. That is the sort of thing we have to

The question that the Resolution'do now pass was
put and resolved in the affirmative without division.
Hon. r. G. H. CUMMINS: Mr. Chairman,
I beg to move that you do now report progress and
ask leave to sit again.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the Ofirma-
tivt without division and Mr. SPEAKER resumed
the Ohair and reported acordingly.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


1-*EBRUARY 18; 19,57








I0 OFFICIAL GAZETTE
i--- C-i--i 1 ,iupl 1 .. .:


SUSPENSION OF RULES

Hon. Dr. H. G. H. OUMMINS: Mr. Speaker, I
indicated earlier today that I intended to asi leave
to suspend Rules 88 & 89 in order to deal with a
Resolution for 6tU00. It is an urgent matter, Sir, ana
I will briefly give the history of it. A few days
after our prison disturbance here, you may have
noticed in the local papers that a Prisons Officer
from the United Kingdom, was shortly going to
'British Guiana to investigate the Prisons there and
the Government here had contact with British Gui-
ana and asked whether it would be possible for that
Officer to visit Barbados.We were told that probably
on his return from British Guiana he would stop
here which would have given us time to deal with
the Resolution in the ordinary way, but we were
informed on-Thursday that he would be coming here
on the 20th for six days. I just mentioned that so
that hon. members will see the urgency of the Reso-
lution and the 20th I believe, is Monday. That is
my reason for asking leave to suspend Rules 88 & 89.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. Speaker, in a matter
like this that is urgent, is it urgent because they had
la disturbance at the Prison a couple of weeks ago, or
is it urgent because the gentleman happens to be
in British Guiana, The British Guiana contingency
has nothing to do with Barbados. How can it be
urgent so far as the Officer coming here to investigate
the Prison is concerned when Government has set
up its own Committee to go into the Prison disputes ?
And I don't think I can be accused of starting the
strike at the Prisons because I happened not to be
in Barbados at the time, and I was not one of Her
3Iajesty's inmates at that institution. But what I
would like to know, Mr. Speaker, is why are we today
called upon to pass a Resolution to bring a Director
bf Prisons, here to go into this question of, the
administration when we have not been given an
opportunity to know what the local Committee has
said about the Prisong? Is that Rerport going to be
published or given to the public? In other words, how
can this matter be so urgent when this Committee
has not been given the opportunity of knowing what
the local Committee has reported, so that we may
know what is required? There is a lot more we can
speak about on this Resolution.
4.05 p.m.
I would like to know what is wrong with the
present administration of the Prison before we pass
a vote like this. Unless the Hon. Minister of Social
Services is prepared to give that information to chis
House, we cannot deal with this Resolution as a mat-
ter of urgency. I think that a full-dress debate on
the recent happenings at the Prison should be allow-
ed today.
Mr. SPEAKER: Is the hon. member objecting
to leave being granted the Hon Minister?
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: There has been no in-
dication given by the Hon. Minister that he intends
to allow a full-dress debate on the present adminis-
tration of the Prison.
Mr. SPEAKER: That is not before us now.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: I am objecting to leave
being granted.
Mr. CRAWFORD: rose to speak.
Mr. SPEAKER: Whenever an objection is
taken. the question has to be put. There is a Stand-
in. Rule that when.I am on my feet, the hon. member
must sit.
Mr. GRAWFORD: I had risen before Youm
Honour rose.
Th rmeetimon fAat leave be.mrnrted th. 77w0.
Minister to movie fr the sspensan of Rules 88. &
89 was put and resolved in the affirmative.


A division was taken as follows:-
Ayes: Mr. SMITH, Hon. G. H. ADAMS, Hon,
Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS, Hon. M. E. COX, Hon.
R. .G. MAPP, Messrs. BIYAN, J. C. MOTTLEY and
HAYNES.-8.
Noes: Mr. F. L. WALCOTT, CRAWFORD
and ALLDER.-3.
Mr. CRAWFORD: May I remind Your Hnn-
our that a vote of 12 hon. members is required for
the suspension of a Rule.
Mr. SPEAKER: On what motion is the hon.
member speaking
Hon. Dr. H. 'G. H. CUMMINS: I beg to move
that Rules 88 & 89' be now suspended.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
Hon. Dr. H. 4. H. CUMMINS: Mr. Speaker,
I am asking leave to withdraw my motion.
There being no objection, leave was granted 'tho
Hon. M'ivn,er to vi thlraw hi3 notion.
Mr. CRAWFORD: I presume that the Hon.
Minister is desirous of withdrawing his motion now,
so as to bring un the matter later on. That would
not he playing the game.
Mr. SPEAKER: The House will be in control
of that matter.
CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT ORDER NO. 16
Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: Mr. Speaker,
I am asking leave to postpone the consideration of
Order No. 2, and to take Order No. 3 as the nest
Order of the Day.
Thole being no objection, leave was granted
the Hon. Minister.
RESOLUTION TO APPROVE "THE CIVIL
ESTABLISHMENT (GENERAL) (AMEND-
MENT) NO. 16 ORDER"
Mr. SPEAKER: The next Order of the Day
stands in the name of Hon. Premier:-To move the
passing of the following Resolution: Resolution to
approve the Order entitled "The Civil Establish-
ment (General) (Amendment) No. 16 Order, 1956
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, as hon. mem-
bers will see, this is a Resolution affecting the Bar-
bados Regiment. From the Addendum to this
Resolution, it will be seen that according to the
Volunteer Act, 1909-6 as amended by the Act,
1948-11, the posts of Staff Officer, Local Forces and
Adjutant, Barbados Regiment, and of Instructor,
Barbados Regiment, should be filled by members of
Her Majesty's Regular Forces. It is, therefore.
necessary that the salary and conditions of service
of these officers should conform to those applicable
to persons of equivalent rank in the Regular Army.
It is therefore a customary thing that when these
salaries and conditions of service are changed in
Great Britain, we have, because of the Act, to com-
ply with them. This is just a simple matter, and
the sums are set out here. In respect of the Staff
Officer and Adjutant, the total emoluments will be
$7,005 instead of $5,940; and in respect of the In-
structor, the total emoluments will be $5,344 instead
of $3,996. It is proposed that these revised conm
editions of service should be made retrospective as
from the 1st April this year, the date with effect
from which the improvement in Service Emoluments
in the United King-dom became operative. I beg to
move that this Resolution do now pass.
Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: I beg to second
that.
Thk question that this. Resolution do now wao
w'a. puot and resolved in the affirmwive without divi-
o4.15 .
4.15 p.m.


---- ---------r-- -- --; f -- -- Ir--------n-n--- a


FEBRuARYY 18, 195.7









FE- --uA 18. 1957 OIArAZiErT .


CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT ORDER NO. 17

Mr. SPEAKER: The next Order stands in the
name of the Hon. Premier: to move the passing or
.a Resolution to approve the Civil Establishment
Order No. 17.
Hon. 1G. H. ADAMS: This Resolution, Mr
Speaker, is to approve the Order entitled "The Civil
Establishment (General) (Amendment) No. 17 Or
der, 1956. The object is two-fold: (1) to increase,
the staff of the Public Trustees Department by the
additional post of Deputy Marshal at a salary of
$720 x 48-$1,152; and (2) to add the addition,
post of Secretary at a salary of $888 x 72-$1,392 A
96-$21,160 and a Long Grade Clerk at the General
Hospital. I do not propose to say anything on Lhe
medical side, may be, the Hon. Minister of Social
Services will give it.
As far as the legal side is concerned, the Public
Trustee sometime ago brought to the notice of the
Government that it is necessary to have the additional
post of Deputy Marshal. I do not think hon. mem
bers, especially those on the opposite side, will ques-
tion that because it is they themselves that raised
the question over the great amount of work which
the Marshals of what we should call the Supreme
Court have to perform.
The Addendum shows the great increase of work
and the number of executions and summonses sent
out and since we have divorce legislation in this
Island, there is also a great increase in the number
of divorce cases. The divorce suits received from
1940-45 were 38; from 1952-55 there were 241.
As far as the medical side is concerned, I repeat
that if there is any extraordinary detail which hon
members may proffer, the Hon. Minister of Social
Services doubtlessly will give it. It is sufficient for
me to say that to deal with the confidential corre-
spondence of the Surgeon and Physician Specialists
of the General Hospital the services of a Secretary
are needed. The Secretary will also relieve the
lone Stenographer-Typist in the office who is already
finding it impossible to cope with the growing
volume of work resulting from the considerable rise
in the number of out-patients.
I beg to move that this Resolution do now pass.
Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: I beg to sec-
ond that.
The question that the Resolution do now pass
was put and resolved in the affirmative without
division.

CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT ORDER NO. 18

Mr. SPEIAKER: The next Order stands in the
name of the Hon. Premier: to move the passing of
the following Resolution.
Resolution to approve the Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) No. 18 Order 1956.
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: This Resolution, Mr.
Speaker, is to approve the Civil Establishment
(,General) (Amendment) Order, 1956 which seeks
to abolish the post of Plant Diseases Inspector.
The post of Plant Diseases Inspector was created
thirty years ago when it was necessary to do quite
a lot of going around to advise peasants and others
on the question of mosaic disease. As hon. members
know, we have succeeded in reducing the disease by
the planting of a resistant type of sugar cane; there-
fore it is no longer necessary to have that post. The
object of this Order is to delete that post from the
Civil Establishment. I leg to move that this Reso-
lution do now pass.


lon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: I beg to sec-4
ond that.
Mr. HAYNES: Mr. Speaker, I quite agree
with the Hon. Premier that mosaic disease is not
prevalent but I think this is an appropriate time to
ask the Government a question on another
important disease which is worrying the sugax-cane. I
must ask the Hon. Premier the question because I
see that the Hon. Minister of Agriculture is not in
hi place. It is common knowledge that mealy-bug
has not been eradicated; it is still prevalent in Bar,
bados and although there is not the need for a Plant
Disease Inspector, the eradication of the mealy bug
needs an active entomologist with modern ideas to
carry out a campaign for handling that disease.
To my mind, one of these days this country is going
to lose a lot of revenue by not having a fully staffed
Agricultural Department, especially an entomolo.-
gist.
As I have said, we do not want a Plant Disease
Inspector anymore; we want an entomologist to tell
us what to do with the canes when they have mealy-
bug. The present entomologist come- and looks
around and tells us he does not know much himself
about the disease. He is retiring finally now.
I am sorry that the Hon. Minister is not here but
I would like him to interest himself in the matter.
However, I am sure the Hon. Premier will see to it
for me and will tell him all about it. The mealy-
bug disease is a very serious thing in Barbados. I
repeat we do not want a Plant Disease Inspector;
we want an officer who would become like a doctor
to a sick patient and tell us what to do. I drop
these few remarks in the hope that some effort will be
made on the part of the Government to meet the sit-
uation.
Hlon. G. H. ADAMS: I apologise if I did not
hear the hon. member correctly and I hope he will
get up and correct me if I am wrong. I understand
him to say that he feels that the post of Plant Dis-
ease Inspector should still remain on the staff of tne
Agricultural Department.
Mr. HAYNES: No, Sir, I said I did not think
so. I said we do not want a Plant Diseases Inspec-
tor but we want someone to come around and remedy
the mealy bug disease for us.
4.25 p.m.
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: Of course, if there is
anything that we cannot ourselves cure we would
get somebody, but I thought the Barbados Planters
knew all the answers to everything! I am sorry,
Mr. Speaker, I was referring specifically to the
Mealy Bug. If something like the Mealy Bug to
which we are not accustomed should arise and we
have difference of opinion among the planter com-
munity, we will do as we did with the Mealy Bug;
that is, try and get expert advice from outside, but
we do know as in so many things that experts differ
considerably even on the Mealy Bug which is
prevalent in other parts of the world; but I do
appreciate the point the hon. member is making. If
perchance something new should arise, it is neces-
sary for Government immediately to try and get the
best advice possible and I am sure the hon. member
knows that the Department of Agriculture only has
to whisper to the Government and it gets every-
thing done; at least that has been my experience
for more than twenty years in this House.
The question that the Resolution do now pass
tao put and resolved in the affirmative without
dwiisioth


OFFICIAL GABZETTE


FEBRUARY 18 1957









OFICA '3AET FERUR 18, 1957..


CUSTOMS TARIFF BILL

Mr. SPEAKER: The next Order of the Day
stands in the name of the Hon. Minister for Trade,
Industry and Labour to move the second reading of
a Bill to 'amend the Customs Tariff Act, 1921.
Hon. R. G. MAPP: Mr. Speaker, this Bill is
comparatively simple. This Bill seeks to implement
certain terms of the International Convention which
has been followed by the United Kingdom Govern-
ment in order to facilitate the importation of com-
mercial samples of negligible value. The Convention
allows certain countries to grant exemption to these
samples from Customs duty. We have decided to
come into line with this convention and follow this
recent practice since these samples are of little or
no value and there is therefore no real loss in
revenue from following this convention, and this
Bill is to give effect to this decision. Hon. members
know that at present samples of no value at all do
get through Customs without paying duty, but as
I said already this does not entail any or perhaps
just a slight loss in revenue. It does help as far
as trade is concerned and falls into line with other
countries in these things.
I beg to move that this Bill be read a second
time.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affir-
mative without division.
Hon. R. G. MAPP: I beg to move that Your
Honour do now leave the Chair and the House go
into Committee.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affir-
mative without division, and Mr. SPEAKER left
the Ciair amid the House went into Committee, Mr.
SMITH being in the Chair.
Clauses (1) and (2) were called and passed.
On motion of Hon. R. G. MAPP seconded by
Hon. M. E. COX, Mr. CHAIRMAN reported the
passing of the Bill in Committee, and Mr. SPEAKER
resumed the Chair and reported accordingly.
On the separate motions of Hon. R. G. MAPP
seconded in each case by Hon. M E. OOX, the Bill
was read a third time and passed, and the title
agreed to.

MAGISTRATES' PROCEDURE BILL

Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: Mr. Speaker,
I am asking leave to go back and take Order No. 2
as the next Order of the day.
Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member has asked
leave to take Order No. 2 as the next Order of the
day and unless there be any objection leave will be
granted the hon. member.
There beimg no objection leave was granted the
ron. member.
Mr. SPEAKER: The next Order of the Day
stands in the name of the Hon. Premier to resume
'Committee on a Bill to amend and consolidate the
Acts of this Island relating to the jurisdiction of
and the practice and procedure before Magistrates'
Courts and appeals therefrom, and to matters con-
nected therewith.
Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair, anf the House
owe,'t into Committee on the Bill, Mr. SMITH in
the Chair.
Mr. CHAIRMAN: The onestion is that the
proposed words be inserted stand part.
Mr. E. D. MOTTTLY: Before vou do that. Sir.
we were discussing this last Tuesday. and certainly
you ought to remind us about what the words are.


The Clerk read the words which are as fol-
lows: "And in any event not later than 48 hours."'
4.35 p.m.
The question that the words proposed to be
inserted stand part of the Bill was put and resolved
in the negative, the Committee dividing as follows.
Ayes: Messrs F. L. WALCOTT, J. C. MOTTLEY,
CBAWroRD and E. D. MoTTr--Y-4.
Noes: Hon. G H. ADAMS, Hon. M. E. Cox, Hon.
R. G. MAPP. Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS and Mr.
BRYAN-5.
The question t';at Clause 66 stand part of the
Bill was put and resolved in the affirmative without
division.
Clause 67 was called and passed.
Clause 68 was called.
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: Mr. Chairman, during the
second reading of this Bill, objection was taken to
this Section. I am perfectly willing to meet the
wishes of the Opposition by saying that we should
postpone the consideration of this Section. The
House is not as full as it might be, and hon. members
may have views to express on this Section. I under-
stand that the hon. senior member for St. Lucy is-
objecting on the ground that you cannot trust the
Police as regards the destruction of fingerprints. As
the hon. member is not now in his place, and I have
no desire to get this Section through in his absence,
I am asking leave to postpone the consideration of
this Section.
Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY: Mr. Chairman, I quite
appreciate what the Hon. Premier has said. He has
Maid that the House is not as full as it might be,
and he is willing to postpone the consideration of
this Section. However, I am wondering if the Hon.
Premier is sympathetic with the points which have
been made. I have often heard the Hon. Premier
say that the Magistrate -
Mr. CHAIRMAN: Is the hon. member opposing
the leave being granted for the postponement of this
Section ?
Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY Yes Sir, I am doing so
in order to get the opportunity to speak.
Mr. CHAIRMAN: The hon. member must speak
on the question of the leave being granted.
Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY: I do not think that we
are actually against the taking of fingerprints, but
this Section is rather wide. Sub-Section (1) of this
Section says this:
"Where any person not less than fourteen years-
old who has been taken into custody is charged
with an offence before a Magistrate, the iMagistrate-
may, if he thinks fit, on the application of a police
officer not below the rank of inspector, order the
fingerprints of that person to be taken by a
constable. '
It is rather wide to say that for any offence at
all the fingerprints of a boy of the age of fourteen
years must be taken. I wonder if the Hon. Premier
is in sympathy with the suggestion that this Section
could be so amended so as to confine the taking of
fingerprints to certain offences. There may be a
highway offence committed-a bus conductor might
have overloaded a bus; and do you mean to say that
that would be an offence which would warrant the
taking of fingerprints? I am not opposing the re-
quest for the postponement of this Section because
we are pleased to see that the suggestion has won
the favour of postponement from the Hon. Premier.
Mr. CHAIRMAN: Are you in favour of the
postponement then?
Mr. E D. MOTTLEY: T have not yet finished
speaking. I am saying that as far as the legal
luminaries of the Opposition are concerned, they
would be in a better position to propose an amend-


__ ___


OFFICI&L GA~YZETTE


FEBRUARYI 18, 1957







OFFICIAL GAZETTE 323


meant to this Section than I am. I do not know what
is the idea of postponing this Section, if it is for
further discussion.
Mr. ALLDER: Mr. Chairman, 1 am one of those
hon. members who felt very worried about this Clause.
Mr. CHAIRMAN: Are you objecting to leave
being granted the Hon. Premier?
Mr. ALLDER: Yes, Sir. [Laughter].
Mr. CHAIRMAN: Well if you are objecting to
the leave being granted, allow me to put the question.
Mr. ALLDER: Will the Hon. Premier allow
you to Rule?
Mr. CHAIRMAN: You are objecting to leave
being granted; therefore, allow me to put the question
please.
Mr. ALLDER: I must give the reasons why I
am objecting. What I am trying to do -
Mr. CHAIRMAN What you are trying to do I
do not know; but as long as you are objecting tG
leave being granted, allow me to put the question.
Mr ALLDER: What I am objecting to -
Mr. CHAIRMAN: If you are objecting, then
let me put the question.
Mr. ALLDER: The Hon. Premier has given the
impression that he is willing to take out this Clause.
Mr. CHAIRMAN: The Hon. Premier has asked
leave to postpone Section 68 and you are objecting
The question is that leave be granted to post-
pone Section 68. Hon. Members in favour will please
say "Aye" and those against will please say' 'No.'
I think the 'Ayes' have it.
4.55 p.m.
Clauses 69 to 150 inclusive were called sepa-
rately amid passed.
Clause 151 was called.
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: I beg to move that this
be Clause 151.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
Mr. J. C. MOTTLEY: Clause 151 here reads
thus:
"Every person who, being duly summoned to
appear and give evidence upon any appeal neglects
or refuses without lawful excuse to appear at the
time and place specified in the summons, or who,
having appeared, refused without lawful excuse to
give evidence or to answer any question put to him.
by the Supreme Court, shall be liable, on the order
of the Court. to a fine of one hundred dollars, or
to imprisonment for three months."
Is that in order? Is it on all-fours? Is that the
usual procedure? Because I think it is a bit harsh.
I do not know but it sounds very drastic to me. If
you refuse to give evidence you will be fined $100.
What do you think about this ? I really am a bit
fearful over that clause. It may be in order and I
am not competent, Sir, really to question the legality
of it, but I would like a little information as to
whether it is in order.
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: It is perfectly true it is not
now the law in Barbados. It is the law in Trinidad,
but I do not think hon. members should mind that
too much. If you have a lawful excuse that you can-
not appear in Court that is alright; but if you
refuse to give evidence, that is worse. If you do
not anpear in Court the Maristrate can send for you;
but if a man refuses to give evidence and you can
prove he knows everything about it and he says
he does not know about it. that is perjury.
If he says he cannot remember, then it is a
different matter; the Court may allow hostile wit-
nesses to be cross-examined by lawyers; but I do
not think there is any hardship. Is the hon. senior
member for S'. John in order? I cannot see his face!


I do not think it can work any hardship because if
he has an excuse he has an excuse.
5.05 p.m.
The question that Clause 151 stand part of the
Bill was piwt and resolved in the affirmative without
division.
Clauses 152 to 156 inclusive were called and
passed.
Clause 157 was called.
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: I beg to move that Clause
157 stand part of the Bill.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
Mr. ALLDER: Mr. Chairman, when a. motion
is being made and seconded is it not the practice
of hon. members to rise to their feet?
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: On a point of Order. Can
an hon. member ask the Chair to answer a question
The question that Clause 157 stand part of the
Bill was put and resolved in the affirmative. without
division.
Clauses 158 to 165 inclusive were called and
passed.
The six Schedules of the Bill were called and
atgreVt to.
Hon. G. ADAMS: I beg to move, Mr. Chair
man that you do now report progress with leave
for the Committee to sit again.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
The question was put and agreed to.
The CHAIRMAN reported and MR. SPEAKER
resumed the Chair and reported accordingly.
Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: Mr. Speaker, in
connection with this Resolution for $5,000, I beg to
move that Your Honour do now leave the Chair and
the House go into Committee of Supply.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
The question was put and agreed to.
Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair and thle House
went into Committee of Supply, Mr. SMITH being
in the chair.

COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY

Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: I beg to move,
Mr. Chairman, that you do now report the passing
of one Resolution in Committee of Supply.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
The question was put and agreed to.
The CHAIRMAN reported, and Mr. SPEAKER
resumed the Chair and reported accordingly.
On motions of Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS,
seconded by Hon. M. E. COX in each case, the Reso
lotion passed in Committee of Supply was read
first and second time and agreed to.
5.15 p.m

ADJOURNMENT

Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS: Mr. Speaker,
that concludes Government Business for the day and
I beg to move that this House do now stand ad-
journed until next Tuesday, 21st August, 1956, at
3 o'clock p.m.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. Speaker. it is really
amusing to hear the honourable member after finish
ing Government Business and before asking other
honourable members if they have anything to do
and they want to go on, move the motion for the
adjournment of the House until next week. Mr.
Speaker, it is my intention to go on with the first
order of Private Members' Business which stands
in my name.
Hon. M. E. COX: Mr. Speaker, I beg to second
the motion moved by the Hon. Leader of the House.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. Speaker, --


FEBRubuy 18, 19,57








324 OFFICIA GAZTT Faiui_ 18 1957___; ~ I


Mr. SPEAKER: The motion must be put. A
motion for the adjournment has been made. If
there is no other motion, I am going to put the ques-
tion. The honourable member will not be allowed
to go on speaking.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: I am speaking against
the motion.
Mr. SPEAKER: Speaking against it is not
enough.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: I am speaking against
it. The matter which I want to speak on is a matter
of Private Members' Business. Without any hon-
ourable member having the slightest idea, the Hon.
Minister of Social Services put the motion for the
adjournment. It is now 25 minutes after five o'clock
and the Hon. Minister just said that that concludes
Government Business and straight away moved the
motion for the adjournment before he sat down.
That is far from being democratic. Any honourable
member for that matter can get up and move the
adjournment of the House.
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, I would like
an amendment to the motion that the House do now
adjourn until Thursday. I have done what every
body in my position should have done. I have
given opportunity to members of the Opposition
who are opposing a certain Section of the Bill deal-
ing with Magistrates to speak on it by postponing
it for further consideration. I have given them the
undertaking that I will be prepared to come back
on Thursday to deal with the points which they may
wish to make on it and that is the reason why I
moved in Committee that the Committee report
progress and ask for leave to sit again. I am there-
fore moving an amendment to the motion: I move.
that we meet on Thursday.
As regards the $600 Resolution which was given
notice of today by the Hon. Minister on my immedi-
ate left, (Hon. Dr. Cummins) whatever be the poli-
tical views of honourable members, I wish to say
that whenever you are investigating matters as we
are doing with the Prison and you can get someone
to help you, you should do so. We have a unique
opportunity of getting a super Prison Official from
the United Kingdom who happens to be in the West
Indies at the moment and he will be coming here
on Monday: but he will not come unless we have
the money. We have only discovered in the last
couple of days that he is available and can come on
Monday provided this Money Resolution to bring
him is passed. It would be monstrous if any of us,
whatever political views we may have, would do
anything to prevent us from getting the opportun-
ity to get this Prison Officer to come and advise us
on Prison discipline. For that reason, I am appeal-
ing to honourable members to come back on Thurs-
day. It would be rather hard for the Opposition
to object now.
The reason why Government is asking for the
adjournment of the House until Thursday is be-
cause Government is trying to meet the Opposition
to express their views on one of the Sections in the
Magistrates' Bill and to deal with this Resolution
for $600. I therefore beg to move an amendment to
the Hon. Minister's motion that this House do now
adjourn until Thursday this week-the 16th instant.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I was
speaking against the adjournment of the House.
You stopped me.
Mr. SPEAKER: I was trying to accommodate
the honourable member, I was hoping that one of
the honourable members would have got un and
moled an amendment that the House proceed with
P te Members' Business.
.ir. F. L. WALCOTT: So far as the vote is
co 'ned, it does not interest me one bit.
Mr. SPEAKER: I am not questioning the in-
terest of the honourable member on the vote. I am


only questioning the honourable member on what
should be done.
Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: The Hon. Leader of the
House was allowed while speaking on Government
Business to move the adjournment of the House
before questioning other honourable members on
whether they have anything to do. I am saying
that that is a dishonourable thing to do. No honour-
able member had any knowledge that the whole
House was going to be adjourned until next Tuesday,
but there and then he took advantage of his position
to move the adjournment of the House at this time
of the day. How can any honourable member get
up in here to adjourn the whole House at this time
of the evening without giving other honourable
members the opportunity to discuss Private Mem-
bers' Business? That can only mean that any of us
can come in here any day and ask Your Honour for
permission to move the adjournment of the Housu
and then ask that the whole House be adjourned
and you do not get any Government Business done.
If the Government is afraid of my amendment
to the Trade Union Act which is making provision
for peaceful picketing at houses, they may vote
against it. [Hon. R. G. MAPP made a sotto voce
remark]. You are the Minister of Labour, so you can
vote against it.
Mr. SPEAKER: The honourable member may
not address the Hon. Minister of Labour; he should
address the Chair.
Mr. F. L. WALC.OTT: Mr. Speaker, I am say-
ing how can you agree to any situation like this.
The matter on the Order Paper standing in my
name was there since the 8th May. What is the
point of trying to deprive any honourable member
from doing it particularly as Government Business
has finished at this time of the day? Are honour-
able members of the* Government going to a funeral
or a party that we cannot remain and do this or are
they going canvassing? It is true they are not inter-
ested in what happens to the Trade Union: they are
only telling the people to get out the traitors.
5.25 p.m.
It is true they do not know, but they can come
to the Trade Union and tell the people to get out
the Traitors. I have the answers and some of them
will come in due course. That is the sort of thing
they do and I would challenge them by saying they
want to prevent me from doing my business because
they want to adjourn the House at 5.30. You are
afraid of it going down in my name, because you
know that peaceful picketing is in the English Act,
and when workers go to the United Kingdom or
Great Britain they can enjoy these privileges but in
Barbados you cannot; and. to prevent me putting it
on the Statute Book you try all sorts of devices to
prevent it from going there; but whether you do it
or not the answer is in the hearts of the people. All
your tricks do not work.
Mr. CRAWFORD: I am voting against the
adjournment and the amendment because I see no
reason why the House should come here on Thurs-
day. We have been told that the Government has
endeavoured to meet the position in the matter and
are prepared, to give members a chance to express
their -iews. When that happens, Sir, you know that
the Government has been impressed with the reason-
ing in the matter of the points raised by the Opposi-
tion on the Judicial Bill. [Asides] After these debates
I will proceed.
Mr. SPEAKER: The honourable member may
continue.
Mr. CRAWFORD: I am saying, Mr. Speaker,
that I am opposing the amendment to come here on
Thursday to deal with this Resolution to bring a
Prison Administrator here. The Government has
appointed a Committee to investigate the causes of
the disturbance at the Prison, their own Committee.


324


OFFICIAL GAZEITTB


FEBRU'muy 18, 1957r








O1FF1CIA4,L QAZBTTB


The Prison Superintendent had been sent to the
United Kingdom on Study Leave to learn how to
administer the: work of the Prison. Why then should
we spend $600 to bring this gentleman here merely
because he happens to be in the West Indies ? Two
years ago Professor Richardson was in British Gui-
ana and we spent some money to bring him here to
investigate the possibilities of the institution of
social security in Barbados. He came here, spent a
long time, made an exhaustive report which was
circulated, and the Government has done nothing
about the Report since then. It is an absolute waste
of money. No w we have a disturbance at the Prison,
a disturbance springing from simple reasons, and if
the Minister of Social Services were discharging his
responsibility ....
Mr. SPEAKER: The honourable member has
been given some latitude; he will not now be allowed
to go into the merits of the Resolution.
Mr. CRAWFORD: Anyhow Sir, there is ai
justification for the House being called here on
Thursday or on any other day to vote for this Reso-
lution to bring this Prisons' Officer here. There is
always some expert from the United Kingdom knock-
ing around the corner on whom we can spend money
te bring him to Barbados for no purpose at all. If
Mr. Speaker, this gentleman were not in British
Guiana, he would not be here and we would have
done without him. I hardly suspect, Mr. Speaker,
that they would have sent to England for him. They
could not have been so bare-faced. If we want him,
then their Committee was no use at all.
Mr. SPEAKER: The honourable member is
discussing the justification of the Resolution.
Mr. CRAWFORD: 1 am opposing the motion.
You have finished the Magistrate's Bill and there is
time enough to deal with this Resolution; and there
is no justification for coming here on Thursday to
do it because the principle is completely wrong and
represents a complete waste of money. He will come
here and drink a few free beers about the place, go
to the prison and find what the Committee has found
wrong; that is, if it has done its work. In my opinion,
neither he nor the Committee is necessary in this
matter. All that we need is for the Government to
see to it that the prisoners get food fit for human
consumption, and that the prison officers do not take
advantage of the situation by mis-spending Govern-
ment funds and money allocated for prison diet in
the wrong manner. I should like, Sir, and I propose
myself to go through the Resolution ....
Mr. SPEAKER: The honourable member will
not be allowed to go through the Resolution at this
stage.
Mr. CRAWFORD: I am not going to do it now
i propose to do it in order to present the House and
public with an idea of the amount of money we have
spent within recent times on bringing experts here
tc no advantage. They come and write Reports which
are sometimes worthwhile, but so far as advantage
to the community is concerned they need not even
write because Government pays no attention to them
at all. If we want somebody to come here and white-
wash the Government's failure, and efficiently to con-
trol the affairs of the prison, say so. If the Govern-
ment want to bring them here, Mr. Speaker, without
cost to us or at the expense of the Ministers, they
can come.
Mr. SPEAKER: We are not debating that yet
'The honourable member is now dealing with the
merits of the Resolution. I have already spoken to
the honourable member and I shall not be speaking
to him again. I have been very tolerant. Will the
hon. member sit? I have told the honourable mem
ber at this stage he cannot enter into any of the
merits of this Resolution. The honourable membe-
will know he has already been given a great deal ot


attitude, and he will not I e allowed to make an3
reference in connection with the justifiability of the
Resolution which is not now before us. It is not nwyi
before us.
5.35 p.m.
Mr. CRAWFORD: Your Honour can rest
assured that I am taking your pronouncement very
seriously; I have paid almost as much attention to
it as to the Holy Writ, but all I am saying is this:
I will vote for the amendment to come here on Thurs-
day, if the Ministers will pay the .cost of bringing
this man here. I am not voting for the amendment
to come here on Thursday if the taxpayers will have
to pay the cost of bringing this man here. It is a
waste of time, and the necessity for bringing this
man here, is because the Government has not dis-
charged its responsibility.
Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY: I am sorry that I was
out of my seat when the motion was made for the
suspension of the Rules, because I would have voted
for it. One can vote to give permission to deal with
something and then you can voTe against the Reso-
lution. [Mr. CRAWFORD: Be practical and realis-
tic. Who is here to vote against it?] I reserve m,
tight to vote, but whether there are sufficient mem-
bers of the Government to vote for the Resolution
is another matter. I am not coming here on Thurs-
clay; I have something else to do. I appeal to hon-
ourable members to let the Hon. Minister put forward
the matter; I should like the opportunity of discuss-
ing it today, because we have not~got anything much
to do, and we are in a talking mood. [Laughter].
As far as I am concerned, I would certainly
1;ke to appeal to the Opposition to give the Govern-
meut permission to deal with this Resolution; but
whether I would vote for it, is an entirely different
matter. For those of us who have to work for our
living, we cannot just come here for the purpose of
entertaining people, because a lot of what we say in
here is entertainment for people, you know.
[Laughter] I say: let us give the Government per-
mission to deal with this Resolution today. There are
some things which you can give the Government per-
mission to deal with. This is how I feel about it; hon-
ourable members must be realistic as the honourable
senior member for St. Philip has said, but when you
refuse to grant the Government permission to deal
with this matter today, and then next week when the
Government members are here, they will still get it
through.
I will support the honourable junior member
for St. Peter in allowing him the opportunity to
proceed with his Bill under "Private Members'
Business," but I am opposing this question of
"Peaceful picketing," at people's private homes.
[Mr. F. L. WALCOTT: All the Conservative peo-
ple vote against it; they voted against it in England
too.] I say, I will vote for this Bill being dealt with
but I will oppose this question of "peaceful picket-
ing" at people's private homes. I say again; let
the Government deal with this Resolution, and let
us oppose it; let the Government suspend the Rules
and deal with this Resolution. I give notice now
that I am not coming here on Thursday; let us
deal with this Resolution now, and if we like, vote
against bringing this person here.
Mr. BRANCKER: On the subject of the ad-
journment, this is how it appeals to me; I agree
with the postponement of the further discussion of
the Magistrates' Jurisdiction and Procedure Bill,
because I realise that the only two Practitioners in
the Island who are members of this House be-
sides myself would find it very difficult, if not im-
possible, to attend here tonight, because of a certain
very important professional commitment. For that
reason, I support the postponement of that Bill.


-- ----- -- ---: --------~ PC~F~LI~-~JZ-~~


FFBizu'Any 1, 10677








OFFICIAL GAZETTE FmRTYAHY 18, 1957-


. I would like to mention apropos of that subject
matter, something for investigation by the Hon.
Premier. It is sometime now since he had to work
for his living in the hard way, I mean as a Practi-
tioner at the Bar of this Country. You will remem.
ber, Mr. Speaker, that there was a violent differ.
ence of opinion between us last Tuesday on this
question of the granting of bail being left entire
ly to the Police, and only last night, 'I had the ex
perience where a Police Corporal, who happened
to be the Police Officer in charge of a Police Station,
said that, in his opinion, the offence with which a
person was charged, appeared to be serious, and
Mr. Speaker, the offence with which that person was
charged was one under Section 54 (1) of the High-
ways Act, 1900-5, for which the maximum fine was
40/-, but the Police Corporal said, that no bail
would be granted!
I will let the Hon. Premier know the name of
the Police Station and of the Corporal if he wants
to know. I feel that the Corporal did that in igno-
rance. [Mr. SMITH: Which Station?] A Station
within the metropolitan parish. The wife of the per
son who was charged had to find herself at my
place, and produce a Lawyer's fee for Counsel to
be retained in order to take every possible step to
ensure that bail was granted her husband. How-
ever, she should not have been put to that expense,
much as my creditors would appreciate it; it ran
through this Corporal's mind that this Bill was the
law of the land, and he would not grant bail. Coun-
sel had to get in touch with a Superintendent of
Police and show him how asinine he would make
the Police Force and himself look in this refusal
to grant bail.


Those of us who live on Mount Olympus do not
know what happens in the bye ways and hedges.
That is the good fortune of the Hon. Premier be-
cause he no longer has to work as he used to before
he made his livelihood. There are matters of Private
Members' Business standing in the name of the
honourable members and myself and I do not see
any reason at this very early hour why we should
agree to the motion for the adjournment. When
the motion was laid, there was not the usual par-
lia;nentary pause after the Hon. Leader of the
House announced the conclusion of Government
Business. There was the absence of that pause to
which we have been accustomed by the Hon. Min-
ister to see if any honourable member was going
to ask leave to proceed with Private Members' Busi-
ness.
The question that the House do now adjourn
until next Thursday 16th instant was put and re-
solved in a tie. The House voting as follows:-
Ayes: IHon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS, Hon. G.
IT. ADAMS, Hon. M. E. Cox, Hon. R. G. MAPP, Mr.
SMITH and Mr. BRYAN.-6.
Noes: Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY, Mr. F. L. WALCOTT,
Mr. BRANCKER, Mr. CRAWFORD, Mr. ALLDER. and
Mr. HAYNES-6.
Mr. SPEAKER: The question having resolved
a tie, I cast my vote with the "Noes'.
The question that this House do now adjourn
until Tuesday next the 21st instant was put and
resolved in the affirmative, on the declaration of
Mr. SPEAKER "I think the Ayes have it".
5.55 p.m.
Mr. SPEAKER adjourned the House accord-
ingly.


OFFICIAL GAZETTE


FEBRUARY 18, 1957























^ official uettte

EXTRAORDINARY

PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY

BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 18TH FEBRUARY, 1957


By His Excellency Brigadier
Sir Robert Duncan Harris Arundell,
Knight Commander of the Most
Distinguished Order of Saint Michael
and Saint George, Officer of the Most
Excellent Order of the British Empire,
Governor and Commander-in-Chief in
and over the Island of Barbados and
its Dependencies.
&c., &c., &c.
.. D. H. ARUNDELL,
Governor.

A PROCLAMATION
WHEREAS by section three of the Bank Holidays Act, 1905, as amended
by the Bank Holidays (Amendment) Act, 1946, it is enacted that the several
days in the Schedule to the said Bank Holidays Act, 1905, and any other day
or days declared to be a bank holiday or bank holidays by the Governor-in-
Executive Committee from time to time by proclamation in the Official Gazette
shall be kept as close holidays in all Banks in this Island, and as public
holidays at the several public offices;
AND WHEREAS it is deemed expedient that Monday, the 25th of
February, 1957, not being a day mentioned in the Schedule to the said Bank
Holidays Act, 1905. shall be kept as a close holiday in all Banks in this Island
and as a public holiday at the several public offices;
NOW, THEREFORE by virtue of the power and authority in me vested,
1, Brigadier Sir Robert Duncan Harris Arundell, Knight Commander of the
Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Officer of the
Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Governor and Commander-in
Chief in and over the Island of Barbados and its Dependencies, do hereby in
Executive Committee declare that Monday, the 25th of February. 1957, shall
be a bank holiday.
Given under my hand and the
Great Seal of the Island of Barbados at
Bridgetown this fourteenth day of
February, one thousand nine hundred
and fifty-seven and in the Sixth Year
of Her Majesty's Reign.
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN
By His Excellency's Command.
O FL G. T. BARTON,
SAActing Chief Secretary.

SA26 MAR19
ga8Cfm S.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs