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Group Title: Official gazette, Barbados
Title: The official gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076861/00007
 Material Information
Title: The official gazette
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 33-42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Barbados
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: BridgetownBarbados Published by authority
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Barbados   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: Supplements issued for some of the numbers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076861
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001043625
oclc - 12594829
notis - AFC6434

Table of Contents
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    Supplement to the Official Gazette
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    Supplement: Report of the Comptroller of Customs… for the year 1954
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Full Text











VOL. XCII.










Je ffici1al


05azte


PUBLISHED BY


AUTHORITY


BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 17TH JANUARY, 1957


Xw'I'iclE No. :32
MEETING OF LEGISLATURE
The Tegislative Connicil will meet cn Friday
1Sth .January, 1957 at .:3() o'clock )p.im.
The House of Assembly will meet on Tuesday
22(nd Janulary, 1957 at :3 o'clock p.m.
NoTICE No. 33
GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Resumption Of Duty
V. I. deL. Carrington, Acting Registrar, on the
18th January, 1957.
(M.1P. L. 287)
The llonourable Dr. A. S. ('ato, M.I.C., Police
Medical officerr District "A", on) the 12th January.
i9)7.
M.LP.-L. 3057,
Leave
The Iloiiiiirable )Dr. A. S. Cato, M1.L.C., Police
Medical ()ffier, District "A", duty leave with effect
!'rmii 19tth .January, 1957.
Acting Appointments
Dr. A. L. Stuart to act as Poliee Medical Officer,
Distirit "A", with effect froiii 19th .January, 1!)57.
,M.P.--,. 3057)
Dr. F. N. (irainniu, Ilealth (Officer (Port), t'i
,,r Senior Meldical officerr of IHealth iin conijunctio'i
Switl hiis substanitive duties with effect froWm 1st .lanu-
nry, 1957.
;M.P.-:,658 Vol. II)

g7. 7s'l
/3,ag ^71


<. E. Wellington,. Barrister-at-Law. to act as
PI'lice lMaistrate, District "E", with effect from 18th
January, 1957.
I f.'. 1477)

Appointment
'lfle (iivrill(r-iln-Exeutive Commlllitte(e has be'n
pleased to alpplint Mr. E. V. L. Morris to le a mnii-
1br of lt Trainsport Bhoard wtii effect f1rom0 1411
Ja nuaryI 1!.57.
(No. C. 55 3)

Sugar Industry Agricultural Bank
His Excellency the Governor lias appointed the
Ilouourable J. A. Mahon, M.L-C., to be his nominee
on tlhe Sugar Industry Agricultural ;ank for the
Legislative Session 1956-61. His Excellency has
also appointed Mr. Mahon as Chairmlan of the Ban';
for the Session.
(M.P.-1105/39/S. 1)


NOTICE o. :34
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICES
The application of Watts Barnett, of Labon, N,'.
Slpenmrs, ('I., (h., for permiission to sell Spirit4,
Malt Liilquo's, &c.. at a wooden shop attached to a
wall building at Labon; Nr. Spencers; Ch. Ch.;
within D)ist. "B".
IDated this 16th day of Jaimuwrvy 195.7.
C. L. WALWYN,
Police Magistrate, Dist. "1l''.
IIERMON A. lAKRNETT.
for Applicat.
N.B.- This application will be (considerl d at a;
1iicensing Court to be held at Police Court, Districi
"B" on Monday the 28th day of J.anuary 1957 :t
11 o'clokl, a.lm.
C. L. WAIVYN.
Police Magistrate, Dist. ".


___ ~__
I--


'r t._C* ~/~


I


1009hhh,









.UR. iN AY 17, 1957


LIQUOR' LICENSE NOTICES-Cont'i '
Application for a New Liquor License Und.er
'The Liquor Licenses (Amendment)
Act 1912.

Namio: CYNTHIA (0. WELCll.
i)clcuipation: SIItPKEEPER.
ilesidence: 0('l[ 1Wh STREET. ST. PETER.
)escriptionl and Situation of el'r(ise-: Par;
:' a O'ne Storey wall and wooden building at
Chiilrchi Street, St. Peter.
I)ated this 14th (day of January, 19!57.
'Tc o:-SYDNEY 11. NUlRSE, Esq.,
Ag. Police. lMagistrate, District "E."

CYNTHIA u. WELCII.
Applicant.

N.1B.-This application will be considered at I
Lri'-nsiing" Court to lie held on Monday 2Sth day ola
-i.iuay, 1957 at I'olive (Court. Distrcl "E." at 1!
o riork Hal.l
SYD)NEY 11. N'liSE.
Ag. Police Magistrate. Dist. "E."


Transfer

The application of Mary E. Marshall of Coach
Hill, St. John the purchaser of Liquor License N:i.
929' of 1957 granted to Harold Proverbs & Co. in re-
bpet of a boa-rd and shingled shop at Ilaynes IIill
St. John, to remove said License to a board and gal-
vanize shop at Coach Hill. St. John and to use it at
such last described premises.
Dated this 16th day of January, 19'7.
To:- D. A. W1LLIA3IS. Esq.,
Ag. Police Magistrate Dist. '"C."

EDWA RDI MA ISl I .\ 1L,
for Appliraiit.
N.B.-This application will be considered at a
Lice,;ing 'Court to be held on 30th .Janiary 1957 at
H! T'cick a.m. at Police (Courts Dist. "('."

D A. WII.AIAMS,
AS. Police lNagnistratc, DiMt. "C"'


Removal

T 'I ap ilivation of M illivent Lyder, s|h(])]ke(' eri
he\,.w ;ioad, Plxink lHall St. Michiael, liolder Vt li(lior
L.i.' !.' No. 1142 in respect of a board and shingled
'"i1 ith shedr -t' a!tta;i.h d at lKew ioadl ll i link Hlial,
St. M 'irhlael for I,'rmission to remove s;iid liunor
I ,! to ia LI o rd and st lingled shop wiith ri'iside hi.-
attach-d at Ilaylies Hill, Blaak Hall, St. Mihiael, and
14 us it at Ilte ail last mentioned proi i .ii .
I)lted this 1l thi day otd .la inuary 19 1)t7.

T :-Mliss-, M. E. tII'tlIEE.
Police .\Matis-I rate. Dist. "A'"

\IL I'[CENT l.YI)1' ,.
Applic ant.
N.B.-This application will be considered a"t a
Lricendsins Coirt to le held at Police Court. District,
"A." on MAonday the 24th day of January, 1:1)57 at 11
o'p lock, a.1m/.
M1. E. B1-RNE,
Police Magistrate. Dist. 'A."


Nit rcii: No. ;35

VACANT POST OF SUPERINTENDENT OF
PRISONS, ST. LUCIA

Applications aIre invnt,,l 'for the permaieIl
pensiomnable post of Sllperiut,,lde!t ol' Prisons. St.
Lucia.

Salary And Allowances
The post carries a salary of ,,-2.,SO x $12(0
$:i3,0()0 per iiunmn which is also subject to a '0)"o
increase recently approved. The n(.1nal point o!'
'enry in tlhe scale will depend (oi I lh qualificatlinm.
and experience, of the candidate selected. No allow-
ances either transport or otherwiise, are payable.

Quarters, Passages, &c.
Free unfurnished qlurters w ill bIe provided.
Free first Iclass passages not exceedinL i five )passatges
in alli. will be provided on first appoint tent forI tIhe
officer, hii wife and children who are uhder eighteenl
years of ag',, unmarried and dependent upon t11'
officer. The officer's family should accompany him
or join him within twelve months of his appoint
ment to qualify for passage concessions.
Leave &c.
The officer will be eligible for vacation leave ai
the rate of 45 days for each completed period of 12
minthsl resident service, accumulatingt up to a
niaxinnmun of 180 days. Leave passages will be pro-
viled inl accordance with local generall Orders.
Qualifications
The candidate should have experience in Prison
Administration and/or training in some recognized
Prison Officers' College.
Duties
(lelneral supervision of the Roy-al Glaol and tlhe
Prison for Females, the Prison F'irm and assumi)-
tion *f snich other responsibilities a- may arise from
time to limit or as are prescribed in local legislation.
e.gr. The Act 1838 (1 & 2 Viet. Cap. (i7) Chapter
19 of 191(i. Tie officer will also be subject to
Colonial Re]Igulations, Loca(il (enoteral Oirders and lhe
financial litnles in force in lite Winidward Island-
from tinme to time.
Application
Applli(cations iuist Ie illn hlie .mlidate's (,w
hlandritini andl slihold g ive tLhe followii n parti!-
lars:-
(a) \ 'e
I1) i Stchools, Colleges., e!. ;!t hillcl educated
and certificates and (Iu:lifici.nl ions obltainii!,.
with dates;.
(i ;Vatnre of' present nl p])st 'liploymen'l
with dates.
il Eliuioln 'nlts earned in present posl (or pI '
iii whi-ch last emllloyed e.
lPasl experience in work smilar to ilh !-
,l',ired inll the post nmow advertised.
(f Marital status aid nItier tof children.
Applicants should ;iis) furnish copies of
testimonials whichh will not be reItiurmed) ertiliil
as true copies by a Justice of the Peace. Mini--t"',
of Religion, or a 1Head of a C(Tovern li' t Department.
Appliciations which do not contain t1le required
information will not be considered.
App!i.alions should be addressed to 1he ecre
tary of tle Public Se'rvice Comlissi on. Iovern,.
Office. Castries. St. Lucia, and shlionl reach him not
later than ;1st January, 1957.


1MMM _1 -A


OFFICIAL G.ZETTE









JANUARY 17, !!;-,


OFFICIAL GAZETTE.


uNOTrLE No. i36


NOTICE


Is here vy .;ien i'tat it is the intention of th
Asst-ialion known as lhe liarbados Association for
thi, Blind and Deaf to cause( to be introduced in tihe'
lounse of Asseii bly of this island a Ilill to in(.irpo"-
ale lite said Association.
'i.. C il i :;.
llony. Secretary.



NoTrl'i: N'o. :i7

VACANT POST OF COLLECTOR OF
CUSTOMS. ST. VINCENT

ApIplicatiols are invited from suiltl)ly (|alitied
candlidates for al)p intiiinll to th' post ,'' collectoro r
of Cllsto .i!s, R!. Vinc(ent. 1Irtid:Itlar' o' liwhich ar'. a'-
follhws :-

Appointment
Th1 post is at Iprese(,nt n-p)'nsional. le. 1u1ll step'sS
are being taken lto d-'clare it pensionable. Tihe alp-
pointmeln lt aries with it the liability to transfer o
any posl )i of e(uivalent status within thie Wiindalrd
Islands. 'The Officer will be subject it tlhe Colonial
RcguI'lioNs. (Genemral ()Orders and Finamlniill mot Store
rules of tI l Windward Islands. for the l ime bheinl:r in
force, in so fiar' as they are a!pplic(able.

Salary And Allowances
Thei salar- oI f the p1ost is at thi rate' of s:;.:( )( 'e
mannum in the scale of $;'.:(iO x 120 -- 4,320. pIlu,,
a pay addition of 20% of salary. Travelling and
subsistence allowances are payable in ;i.,rhci with
loal regulations.
Duties
The offlier will ie responsible for ihe general
Iimail;iemeItII and administration of tIic Customs anotl t
Excis, D)eplaiina iii'. and for the observance of 111,
irovisi, ms of all I.aws pertaining to trade and enus
nis and excise. IIh, will also carry out the dutie
,'' ol e -trar of Sh1iplping'. and of thle l'iled Kinll'
dont Trade (':)rresl)ondent.

Qualification s
.\i intin.ate acw(llaintance with all matters rela.
in< to Trade and Customs work and usines ,C gener-
ally. ;iiid a !;nowlled'e of the duties of ihe Rh e g'istrar
of Shipping.
Quarters
Quarters are noi provided.
Passages
i'ree first,-class p)assag'es to St. Vinceni will b,?
pIrovilded for tle officer, his wife and children; chil-
hdren should b'e under 1S years of ago'. unmarried
n1d dIol-penli t on the officer..
Leave And Leave Passages
Vacation leave on full salary will Ie granted ai
till rate of --, days per annum, aceumulatin' up +o a
mximmln o' 1SO days. Lave passages will he pro-
vided in :i -ordanee with loen regulations.
Medical Attention
Free n medical alelniioni and medicine" arel not
provided.
Taxation
All ( wovernm it offi,.c!rs are li.IbI, I taxation
inmnosed by locan le"ilation.


Appliatio s, giving fuli pa ti daciili ; appli.-







IH I. No. 3i



IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS

IX :'liE MATTER (OF
T'IE ,i,,;.\i),S -!'lAT] \E COTTON
l'ACTOI;" LL',1lTE1)
anil
IN TiIllr Ai"'.Ei l' THiE CW (1PANLES
ACT 1910

N) It l i l h'rii givcn lhat a pltitioa was i o
ltI' 1]i li (ity of .January 1957, presented to his
i ords;ii ) :ihi Acling! ('Cliit' i ltJudge of tlhe Court ,*
'Coillllii' i'l'"s iy abovea)lll d Comlllpanyl to o(,n-
firnm an alteratiotn of the said company's ol. jets pIro
p]osed ito I(e "fl'ected by a special resolution of ihll
company unanimously passed at an extraordinary
l*;n'ral I',e'tin olr llh' said company held on til,:
2:'rd day of April 19)54. and suhseqmuntly unali-
monsly nifiHrnid al ;i i extraordinary general mneetl
ing of ilth saaidl (co.ipany held oil tle 7th day o'I
\Imay 19-)1. and which resolution runs as follows:-

"Tlhal the' provisions of the Memorandum of
Association with I rXspl' Ito the ComIpany's objets
alt ,:', l I : i..- ii L: ,i m;; r,, i1gr 1p 1 to 0w nnberA l
,> I I, t b t i':i"- h i;i IIn' l noraid llim of Asso ida
iion thl w lords following that is to say:-
(1) i1 Tl o establish and siippotii sor ai l in ITw (ta lish
isnie and sipI )(iort of associations, institutions, furl'id
WInsls. A!;d hoiivnin, ls a alc elated to benefit rini-
pil r implies ex-(eiI loy i th ll C y the.e ih
pelndents r onIic(,tions of 1c.h i lrsons an{d o g'r:i!
1'.ensioiOp and allowancies and to make payment to
wards itlnsi ral c ;lll.d to subsl 'ribel ( 0' *iiari;;.l"to e monlll"
for charitable or henevolent objects and to enter int'
wany Wshee calcVlaedl 1o benefit employees or ex
employers onr t lie company or thle deplnlants or,
coinneelions ofi sll'llch ersollns."

A-nd nolie is furlTher giivn that the said petition
"s directed to he heard before His Lordship the
Acting' Chief .de of the Court of C('non PIe:,,.
cn Tuesday the 121h day of February 1957 at 10
''Clock in the foronoonl. and any person interstet,!
in the said company. whether as creditor or otihe,
wise. desirous to oppose the making of an order fo:
lhe confirmation of the said alteration under the-
above Ac.1 should appear at the time of hearing', by
myself or his counsel. for the purpose, and a copy of
the said petition will be furnished to any sueb
person requiring the samo by the company's solicitors;
Messrs. CttlIe. Catford & Co.. 17 Hiarh Street.
' "id,,'elwn. on paymvnnt of thle related charge for
the same.

Datld 1the 15rh day of .January 1".7

COTTLE CATFOIRD & Co.
Rolicitors for the Commnay.


----- I-~--I I-----` I---










32 UOFFIC'IIAL GUAZE1TTE IA\ 1Y II, AiJai

NOTICE No. :Ni*I
PERSONNEL OF THE SUGAR PRODUCTION AND EXPORT CONTROL BOARD FOR THE
CURRENT LEGISLATIVE SESSION.


Se ion 3 (2) aud ()) of Act, 19401-3.


*iii in I ouorable. E. S'. Itolbiiis~iol, 2l. .


E. Smith, M.C.P.
1i-. L. Thorne, I.C.P.
\r [ec.D. Blunt
iv. IT. A. C. Tihomnas
\i.I'. 19/,. 20)


\(ilc'ia No. 40
i;-RStONNEL OF THE PEASANTS' LOAN ;'AiNK FOR THE CURRENT
LEGISLATIVE SESSION


:h Director of Agriculture,
ite Honourable J. A. Mahon

:r. I. E. Smith, M.C.P.
-I. E. St. A. Holder, M.C.P.
\{r. K. E. M2lKenzie
;I.1 4, 2/1).


.OTICE No. 12 -(fifth publication).

BARBADOS SCHOLARSHIPS, 1957

The examination for iarbhados Scholar-iips wil
he the examination for T h General Certiticate o0
Education (Advanced and Scholar>hip Levels)
ihe Oxford and Cambridge Schools Exwaminaticn
Tv ard, and will be held in Bridgetown in .TJly ncxt
in Iceordance with the Time Table of the Examina-
tion Board.

Candidates will be expected to offer at le:)st
I!!'1 subject at Sciihlarshi- Level aIPd0 o0ne at
Advanced Level.

Candidates must be
(a) nnder twenty 20) years If age on
:list, May. 1957;
i(h natives of Barbados; or
(0) children of a native of Barba0l1s; or
(d) children of persons who are dm.nieilea
and have been resident in Barbad;&s
for a period of not less than ten ( Li
Scars.

<";' d!i'ates miiust i}','uce ,w ilih tl:(e!! *: '| !i ta-
ihi 'i. ih C-rtificates, ;!>, well ai S ci,"; ';f *, : tie-
L',i{., 000,,!.!-,i:, that they have been re".,i'- ,!' ; I [i ir
,,(du 1: iion ii) Bab1)ados or) a toial oi' '),i n >t
is ti) T1'''e (2) years within ihe priojd ol five
". year'.s imnnediately preceding the year of award,
a;'l' 4,a 161 ille!ir moral he rneto' Ind i'n o int
are s;' k- t:- r *'< 'v.

.olic<,ions comnpl( d on form '?s ?"hicF.c n
/ihliq ln hl from the DrnirInrntt of Education must
i,', i,; !/ thr Director of NEducation not lnatr 17thi
:'1, t '' nr I ,57.

inih .lan vary. 1957.


. Allppind1 by the (Govetrnor.
. Appointed by the Legisiative 'Colicil.

Aiiiiltlo itd bylie ollons' if Asemnbly.
p.\p))

NXo', E No. 11 --(fifth publication)
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST
INDIES

Barbados Government Exhibitions

applicantss for admission as candidates for
Barbaidos government t Exhibitions tenable at the
University College of the West Indies are required
to suitnit their applications to the Director of Edu-
cation not later than T'hursday, 31st January, 1957.
Application form:s may be obtained from the
Dep),tartment of Edhtcation. Public Buildings, Bridge-

Cilidates nius hbe --
a under \twenty (20) y-ears of age or '3ks
January, 1957;
i1i) natives of Barbados; or
(.) children of a native of Barbados; or
<) ,hiidren of ipersonis who are domiciled
aill have been resident in Barbados
I'':- a period of not less han ten (10)
years.
'nandhtai,,s in isi pirodche with their applications
Birth (' ilicates 's well as orified stalcmentis
declarin.:- !hii thie, have hnbii receiving their edu-
,ation in Banrhados for a total period of not less
than ithiree years within the period of five years
'nmedciatelvy pnre'ediji>' the year of award. and th a
ieir inoral olharacier ancd general conduct i c
Satisfactory.
"'.B. A)lic-ants for admission ;s candidates fo
Barbados Cove"'lmnent Exhibitions mus' al.'
forward direct io to the lR'istrar of the Tmn
verlsi-v. CollePe of tlie AWest Indies, JamniiC:,
1ci pn;lica-ions for Entrance to t! e TUri
-(, -:;Iyv c'11"'i ,'. 'I'll cl o' inin l dn- for ianoli"-a
tions fr Eltrane is lft JTpvnary. '1957

p)11 fni 'f Edueation,.
10th January. 1957.













O


_ __ __


- 'k & ,


i --_- ..... .. 1 -l 1 l


I'lic o









____ SOCIAL GAZETTE 33


'ni c. No. lb third publication)


TAKE NOTICE



EQUANIL


That JOH(IN W'YETII & Blid) tTHlE


Sc(lompany orgalnised(l under the laws of the I 1iit'l
Kilingdom of (ireat Britain acid Nori Icirn Ireland.c
inlfactil'ing Chemliistfs, liwhose tir or bisii ,
Viccre'ss is The PFactcory, I'railoii Road(, T.ind(n.
N., England. halas applied for the, regisitralion ol' i
icrauie lirk illn Pirt "A" of c i egisler i '. respect
plarmilaceitical preparations for human use aInic fi
veterinary use, and will ble entitled io r'egisler li
same after one mouth from tle 10th day of .Janiil:ry
1957 unless some person shall in tlihe m.eanlim ie g ,,'
notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposilion
of such registration. The trade muirk cal n bi s,.'-
on applic-ation at my office.


iDaltel this 9!h dcay of .January i)17.


A. W. SYMMUI'XIDS,

Acting HIegislrar oL' T'irade i irk...


X )'iE N'o. 1! -, li ird


publication)


i;A i DAD1S.

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

in Ipur.stiance of the Chaincery Act 1106, i do
hereby give notice to all persons having or claihciig
any estate, right or interest or an1x lien or incum-
lI:rance in or afi'ecing ilie property of the defendant
to bring before me an ac-count of their claims with
their vwitnesses cdocumenticis iand vouchers to )be exam-
inecd by me oni anl Tuesday or F'riday between lthe
hours of 12 noon and :3i o'clock in the afternoon at
he Tle:tistra;i 01o (lic., Town liall, Bridgetown before
t1le 2011i day of Mar(ch 1957 in order that such claims
may be reported onl andl ranked according to the na-
ture amn priority thereof respectively otherwise such
persons will be ni' lc,. l' ecd u 'n tc(, niefits of ;n'v
dcc'ree apicnd l dl riv, i l c l clai ns on i r I !'ainst ihe
-aid property.

Plaitiff : D V I'Y it vWSTI- SCPOTr'
i.fl'rdic. c: E;, BEIrE' V\\Vi E E, 1'.\N\,I'I' T

.f" land s ;:. .., ..,,l i : ', -,- Iic c"ic-c o Saint
Peter in 1."' [ c,:' nd !l ; cnin -' iv 1 c li e -,ceix '
seventy t!' "; :]'!(l -"--n h m)h',e.1 1 eb i r..hi,--ive
scIiuare f,' ',c- .c \ ni~tinl "nd cio ul!1c ; c
toward- i .. i,,, 1l; ; cc f Pc ,. t,-,: 1'


LIMITED,


IA-NU(Ryr 17, 1957


- --- ~-


ii:, 1.ii, ui icl public irad running from lloletoc'n,
SSpeiillowit ,m.e iuing )Il the public road aforesaid on lands of one
rrd(e !i latiK of on), Williams on lands of one
:iill: !!!d onl l i, public road aforesaid and towards
ci' SnIolith on, liMd. of Beatrice Bannister and Cecilia
icThicias i'p'cttively aind towards the West on the
-,,o!- 'i or hliwcever 'lse Ihe same may abut and

Hi /,'i! / : -' November, 1956
Iated: 9th January, 1957

A. W. SYDMMONDS,
Ag. fiegistrar-in-Chancery.


N)Im i: N\'. 2) thi2d publication)

i,.\ il;A L ) .)S.

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

In pursiance of the Chancery Act 1906, I do
crlivi giv 11e noe to all persons having or claiming
aN; Istaite, rihlit or interest or any lien or incutibrance
min ,r iiiac'ritng the property of the defendant to bring
Sor o liie a cn rount of their claims with their wit-
,:i -'. (ido,'niicilts, a!ii \ciin -lich rs to be examined by
)i) 1i ainy Tiesday or Friday between the hours of
" ici ,,i and :i o'clock in the afternoon at the Registra-
iioa officee, Town Hall, Bridgetown before the 20th
i ay iof Marcii 1957 in order that such claims may be
irepmited on and ranked according to the nature and
piWil- thereof respectively otherwise such persons
\ill i ,c pireelued fromn the benefits of any decree and
,'i 'lprivd l of dll claims on or against the said pro-


c',.c/ ;/il: -OSt'A1I ELIJIAlii B3IIDGEIAN
!'i, !iicn: SAMEITE ASII'IELD HIEADLEY

I'roJ r/lg: AlJ T1JAT certain piece or parcel
i;i land :itate lat St. Helens in the parish of Saint
;cgiriie in this Island (formerly part of the lands of
SI. lleicns i formerly containing by admeasurement
c':tir acrei- onie rood seven perches but found by sur-
vey muide by L. l. edman and L. G. Quintyne,
SwNMon S'1urve11 rVs on second November )ne thousand
i'iie liiul.id( and fifl\-six to contain by admeasure-
iin ct foiir awre-s (one rood twelve andi four fifths
c'rcihes (inclusive of sixteen and three-tenths perches
i,; a road inl commonly which runs along the southern
o)nididary) oI' lie said parcel of land and leads 'o the
public ricld l:niutiing and bounding on the North on
Jiands of' (Irov'- Plantation on the East on lands of
.iiines Clarke omi thle South on Ihe remainder of the
*;ii cro'l ic, cciinnoi and on the West on the public
!'ia!1 o- invi'er c else e dn sIame may butt and bound
% vcth c.. ccwithi tie m ces-usa0',e or dwellintihouse and all
clior el in.c is i ii i] 1; li ni 's both freohbolh i 'l cl:)t-
; onc ''c, 1-:i l :;mi ( :1' l c (,- h(ll ilf st1;1dic ; and


?'c7 F ,: ,7 : :- N.veimber. I -"
"i r7l: 19^ .!';;, -, 957


A. W. SYMAMONDS'.
A!r. Ree'iitr nr-in-Ccracn-ry.










34 OFFICIAL GAZETTE T A-R 17, 1957


TARE- NOTICE


SPUD



c 1(11111toHi o021 ized mitd existing IIInud r the lawS
of tile State of Vir-i''ina, I iiItSi iAI henna.;
2timailfactili-rr,. wlos trd ot1.I" ls a-ldn1'-
1001( Park Avenue, (JitN oL St h.~ 'ak, of
: o~k. Ir.S'.\. llas 1)pl)i'd for the ('2istritilon of al
trade "llaak ill Part "A- af R[g-i'l r ill re'spNrc1 'L
0iimrottoi 1' i, llll 1111iwi t01.(.o rot'tilew, illid will Ith

'0( 'toy !!.\- 'of JImImairv 19,7 muless same person
s110l ill dir !l '0ielltilll' 1TLve mIotih' ill I1)hlplj lto' io me

tt'odh' Iijoik Ca1 h tll 6, teli on piil.11 [ 2

D)oted it], 9lth (lda of -Januarv 1.957.

A?. YV.~~n~i iiH


;ruir No. 22


TAKE NOTICE






That THE NATIONAr L (A I I tE;STEl
COMPANY, a corporation organized and existing
under the laws of the State of M~rylamn, 1- ited
States oft America. Manufacturers, whose trade or
business address is Main & K Stree!s. Daytlon, Oi(io,.
Tnited States of America., has applied for tihe
registration of a trade markl iin Part 'A" of rcVgis-
ter in respect of Cash registers' iln general. las"h sale
registers; credit registers; autographic registers:
ae ontiing machines; calculatinig a'nd comnptilng
machines; combined typewritinlg and 1 ahtlatin
m.-1-hines: registering devices of flexible design
hraviin one or more possible flnctilns of indicating.
ticket printing- amnd issuing', comlpting, ca'culatiIngl
accounting', datai declassifying. typewriting or type
printinig- and data recording; and parts and acces-
sories of said machines, registers and devices; all oif
which nmay* be with. or without indiceatilg mechanism,
liclet printing and issuing mechanism, calculating
meehanisin, data classifying mechanism, typewrilingl:
or type printing' mec-hanisim, registeriing hanim
or ( csh drawers: paper cutting machines: paper


sorting' machines; pap'rj' staking' machines ; and hw
pat; a1d accesmsoies of said machines; paper in
I'eneral. such as writillU paj'per'. Ipritinl' paper,
i:l)'rw .nl.-, paper .strips and receipt paper; and sta-
tionery articles, in g'elneral, sm-h as Forill hooks, aiwe'
nisa., riec'ipt books and tablets, statement books
and cash register account books; alnd in i'eural.
';liclhs t'lfr prinitng, bookstores, stationery, litho-
graph. book1)indiill', (-lrdboavnd inakiniii. teiclhiniL'.
drawing' ;lid the office': writiii- calhulatinO regis-
tcriig,' na,chines and ;.dding machines: and ilin.
cabinets, combined electri.d iprilting or marking,
and conn'Minni(ctiing syst'lll. priutinll' ink. ink ribbon)
and in*k rolls, and will be entitled to register the
same after one month from thle 0th day of .Jamlay
19.-7 unless some person shall illn he 1n':lin1 give
Intitce in duplicate to lit.' at imy l .itic of opposi)tioIL
of suchll rcgistr:;,tion. TJie trade mark cali 1 steei
on applications at my office.

Dated this 9th day of January 1957.

A. W. SYMM(XNI)D,
Actlin' !e'gistrar ocr Trtde Mark-.


Nlw'l' No. 2:S


TAKE NOTICE,



ANG08


'Tha AN(-OSTUl1A BITTERS' (D)r. .. G. 1i
Siegcrt & Sions) LIMITED a company incorporated
1nder the laws of Trinidad, Manufacturers and Mer-
chants. whose trade or business address is 6 & S,
(Ieorge Street, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, has applied
,or the registration of a trade mark in Part "A" of
i:'-gister in respect of Wines, spirits and liqueurs, and
will be entitled to register the same after one month
from the 10th day of January, 1957 unless some per-
son shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to
lm at imy office of opposition of such registration.
The trade mark can be seen on application at my
ofrice.

Dated this 9th day of January, 1957.

A. AV. SYMMONDS.
Acting Registrar of Trade Marks


-- --L_~ 1 A


t1lir'l 1)III)IR.tf loll )


--(third imbi~llicatioll.)










OFFICIAL GAZETTE


N, t: No. 24 liihird publication)
NOTICE
IS IEHEREBY GIVEN that it is the intention oi,
the Vestry of the Parish of Saint Michael to cause
to lie introduced into the Legislature of this Island
a Bill to amend the Vestries Act 1911 (1911-5) so,
a;s t authorise the said Vestry to increase the salary
of the Collector of Rates and Parochial Treasurer
of tie said parish to a maximllllum of t',I inl' per
aniim '-land to increase the salary of the Clerk to
the Churchwarden to a maximum of $3,192.00 per
annum,i such amendment to take effect from the 25th
day of March 1956.
Dated this 8th day of January 1957.
E. C. REDMAN,
Vestry Clerk, St. Aichael.

Noricy No. i31 -(second publication)
VACANT POST OF LIBRARIAN

PUBLIC LIBRARY, ST. VINCENT, B.W.I.

Applications are invited for the vacant post i'.i
Librarian, Public Library, St. Vincent.
The salary of the post is in the scale $1,:i6b x
$72 $2,160 per aninum together with a pensionable
pay editionn of 21)'( of salaries, and commencing
salary will depend on the qualincationis aln
exlpriince of the officer.
ih ... will be responsible for tile rlunllnilg
an(l organisation of the Public Library in King"-
tn\\ and for the organisation and supervision ot.
varion, branch libraries throughout the Colony, and
ilIl ,e( required to perform such other duties con-
iu c' !l with Library work as may from time tl ) tiln
In ;i-iiigned by the Administrator.
Preference will be given to applicants wh.i
po--,.. the Associateship (ertificate of thle Engilishi
l.ilit.,i u Association.
Tih post is pensionable, and any cliim to pen-
sion acquired in respect of previous Colonial Servi'e
will be retained. Free first "lass passages arc
provided for the officer, andi up to four members 1'
hi,, family, namely a total of 5 in all. on first appoint-i
menit only. No assisted passages are granted on leave.
\pplicatiions should be addressed to tile Assis-
ta!t Administrator and Esta.blislhment ()ficter,
i(;v.'rnlmlt IOffice, St. Vincent, and should reach
hlimi not later than 15th February, 1957.

NOT i:l No. 10 -(fourth publication)
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Government Exhibitions tenable at Government
Aided Secondary Schools-Boys and Girls
1'orms of application for First Grade Exhibitions,
1!'i: i xny to First Grade Exhibitions and Seconr'
Exhibiitions are available at the Departmert
ot' inlation, Public Buildings, Bridgetown.
Senior First Grade Exhibitions
Candidates must be under 16 years of age on
J ,' :'1thb, 1957.
Junior First Grade Exhibitions
Candidates must be under 13 years of age (on
S ,:' tl. 1957,
Primary to First Grade Exhibitions
Candidates must be under 13 years ef age oni
,!:: i :1(h, 1957, and must lie a pupil in attendance at
;ii Publie Elemenlary School.
Second Grade Exhibitions
Candidates must be under 12 years of age rn
Jon;t :90th. 1957.
Renewal Second Grade Exhibitions
Candidates must be holders of Second Grade Ex-
]ilbitions which are about to expire.


Application forms, accompanied by Birth/Bap-
tismal Certificates must be forwarded to the Depart-
mien of Education not later than Saturday, ICth
February. 1957.
9)ti January, 1957.

No'CE No. 5 --(fifth puibliciation
INCOME TAX NOTICE
Notice is hereby given in accordance with eec-
tion 24, Income Tax Act, 1921, that income tax re-
iurns are required from
(a) all resident companies whether" incor-
porated or unincorporated, scie'ties,
trusts or persons engaged in anu' trade,
business or profession;
(b) all non-resident companies whether in-
orporatedcorporate r uiorporated, socie-
ties, trusts, or persons engaged in any
trade, business or profession or havin.
income arising in this island;
(e) all owners of land or property whether
a taxable income has accrued during
the past year or not;
(d) all married men who are living with
or wholly maintaining their wives whose
income including the wife's income is
$1,(10 or over for the past year;
(e a!l other persons whose income is
$720 o over for the past year.
Forms of reiiurn may be obtained from the
inland Re\vene Department, Bridge Street,
AFTER THE 1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1957,
and the forms duly filled in must be delivered to me
on or before the following respective dates:-
1. lIeturns of persons whose books were
closed on the 31st day of December, 1956,
on or before the :lst day of March, 1957.
2. letiuris of nersons whose principal place
of business is not situate in the island on
or before the M0th day of June, 1957.
3. Returns of all other persons, on or i-efore
the 31st day of January, 1957.
N. D). OSBORNE,
Acting Commissioner of Inland Revenue.
FORMS to be used-
Use WHITE form if you are in receipt of emol-
uments which will be subject to Pay As
You Earn deductions.
Use PINK form (a) if yon are engaged in
trade or business as a
Proprietor or Partner.
(b) if return is submitted on
behalf of a limited liabil-
ity COMPANY.
Use GREEN form in all other cases.
Note:-
(1) Any person failing to make his return
within the due date will be liable to a fine
not exceeding $480.00U and not less than
$9.60.
(2) Except in cases where the owncr of the
income is incapacitated and/or the per-
mission of the Commissioner has been
obtained to signature by another person,
I he form must be signed by the person
whose income is returned.
(3) Either the husband or the wife may re-
quest the Commuissioner by notice in
writing on or before the d;- 1 ..... ~cribed
for the deliver- of tihe return 1o divide the
tax and issue separate assessment notices.
(4- Any person who is not (domiciled in this
i.-t!!!d .mil who, althloun'h nonl bvingi resided
here for six months drinuc' 195i;. would
still be regarded as resident for taxntion
purposes mua claim,. 0 o r before the date
prescribed for the delivery of the return,
to be charged as a non-resident.


__ ~n __ __


1957


IL -


1 JANUARYn 17,










.36 OFFICIAL GAZETTE JANU-ARY 17, 1957


NOTICE

Statement of Unclaimed Articles etc., now in possession of the Police at Central, Hastings,
Worthings, Black Rock, Belleplaine and District "A" Stations. All persons entitled to them should
establish claims within one (1) month from the date of this Notice.


DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY


Central Station
One (1) Felt Hat
One (1) Handbag
One (1) Ladies' Hat
One (1) Rubber Cloak
One (1) Motor Car Wheel Cap
One (1) Purse & two (2) Pieces of Gold
One (1) Vest
One (1) Wrist Watch & Strap
One (1) Bicycle
Eight (8) Boxes of Envelopes
One (1) Sports Coat & Head Piece
One (1) Fountain Pen
One (1) Receipt for B.T.C. Tickets
One (1) Gents' Shoe
One (1) Car Tyre & Wheel ...
One (1) Pair of Eye Glasses
One (1) Felt Hat
One (1) Chauffeur Coat ...
One (1) B.T.C. Book
One (1) Rubber Bladder
One (1) Chisel..
One (1) Pair of Sun Shades
One (1) Generator
Five (5) Pieces of Board ...
One (1) Piece of Plank ... ..
One (1) Piece of Plank
Two (2) Eye Clip Shades & Five (5)
Penicillin .. .
One (1) Brown Pants ...


Hastings Station
One (1) Rosary, one
('ase
One (1) Rain Coat


Phials
Phal


(1) Key & One (1) Leather


Worthings Station
Three (3) Plates, one (1) Dish, one (1) Bowl, one (1)
Saucer & one (1) Lunch Plate ...

Black Rock Station
One (1) Mot or Car Wheel Cap ... ...
One (1) Sickle ...
A Quantity of (loth ... .. ..

Belleplaine Station
One (1) Piece of Card Board .. ...


District "A" Station
One (1) Torchlight ... ...


Date Came
into
Possession




20. 2.56
4. 3.56
4. 4.56
10. 7.56
16. 9.56
18. 9..56
19. 9.56
28.10.56
22. S.56
30. 8.56
4. 9.56
10. 9.56
29. 9.56
5.10.56
20.10.56
14. 6.56
30. 9.56
9.10.56
6.11.56
2.11.56
10.11.56
11.11.56
15. 9.56
26. 9.56
14.10.56
19.10.56

1 .11.56
25. 9.56



21. 7.56
22. 9.56



1. 2.55


12. 9.56
17.10.56
20.11.56


21.10.56(



16.11 .56


REMAnL


KS


Found in (areenage
,, on Bay Street
Left at Bridge Station
Found on Nelson Street
,, Lower Collvinore Rock
S Grant's Ave ,Bay Land
., Bay Street
Dropped from Diamond Bus
Found on Marhill Street
,. Synagogue Lane
at Gov't Savings Bank
Son Walrond Street
Pinfold Street
,, Swan Street
Roebuck Street
,, Martindale's Road
,, ,, 5th Ave Belleville
,, Constitution Road
,, Lower Bay Street
,. ., Tudor Street
,, Roebuck Street
Coleridge Street
Unlawful Possession









Found on Grave's End Beach
Found on Grave's End Beach



Seized in Larceny Case


Found on Bridge Gap. Black Rock
., ., Lower Bank Hall Road
.. Tamarind Lane Black Rock


Found on Belleplaine I'oad.
St. Andrew


Found on Mansion Rd.. Bank Hall


14th January 1957.


- -r











-
-, ~".; .~
2_ ,

.- ', 1


\,q


1."',77:, .5 "


SUA ,1aIV


PUB LI


U -,---1HORIT "Y


BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, 17TH JANUARY, 1957


HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY



T.-. i... 24th July, 1956i.
1-ur'suant to lte adjournment the House. of As-
,cmb"ly met at 3 o'clock p.m. today.

FPresent :

lis HonouIr Mr. K. N. 1R. H,:SHANDS (iSpeaker()
ifOll. (!. 11. ADAMS, C.1.(. ., Q).C., II.A ., (I'r mi) r)
ltil. M. E. Cox, ( 'nii r oif ('Comui i iicatio i..
i ,o'/s o ain Houising), iMr. L. E. S.IIIl, ..IP.
;('haii wai of ( ICo il 't S c ) Mr.I. I'. E. 31irrin:. \Ir
.. A. ITAYi,:s, B.A., AMr. VB.1. VAriiAnx. li,\.
(. TALMA, ( 'i?.sflJ(" Of driultHr, Luaioh i(d1
iVnhries), Mrs. E. E. Boixt.NE, P.nd Ar. .1. ('. Ti' no,
MA.

IPria s Ic'r' rad1.
ll[ n. )Dr. ('fIMI .I[I.\ cnt(rdi fi l, ]1 i oii /
'(.,O/I' bis scat.

MINUTES

Mr. S'IEA.\l-E : I have the hliii)noir to ilnforti
lIhie loluse Ill thal the M inuti's o(f the ls ow'c illu ;ir"
1:ot yet r't(lvy for --,' .. ..' ion.

DOCUMENTS

AIr. SlE.\IKEIL: I live thle hlionour) to iii4'oriI
11 i o' Iollu tlhat I hI:v;Ie\ ri'c( ivo (d tile following tfl'oli
toe lion. ActIn!' hief Sh tariy :-

Chief Sec'relary's ("Iftice.
Barbados,
171Th uNy.I 1956.

Cir,
I iav' 11i' hlioiioir 1o 'i'fei to Sectioii ., (2) ol'
11i' SIuP_1'ar 4I1ml 1'an.y 4]lro]isss I''rod(ietioni & Export
Control Act. 1940, which read as follows:1


"iThe Loardl shalt consist of the Ditrector o
Agriclitlttiir and seven other itleilmbers appoinit-
e ill thie lmanlller following', that is to say, olln
meniber by the Governior, two members by the
,Legislative C(onndll and, four by the lHoulse ot
Assemblyy'
2. I shall be grateful if you will let mie have
diie namti(es of the four llmembers appointed to the
Si'iu;ar IP'roduction and Export Control Board by the
House of Assembly for the current legislative session.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. T. BARTON,
Acting Chief Secretary
Thie Speaker,
The lionse of A\ssembly.
Mr. SPEAKER: I have the honolur to inform
th(e Hlouse that I have received I'roil the Highway
( oimissioners of the parish of Christ Church a
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure on tenantry
lads for the half year ended 31st March, 1956.
Also, from the HIighway Commissioners for the
parish of ( ... t Church a Statement of Revenuc
andl Expelditure for the half year ended 31st March
this year.
Mr. SPEAKER: I have tlhe hloour to remind
tile House that there has been a vacancy on the
.ancy- Molasses controll and Export Board, due to
Ith resignation of Mr. H. O. Emtage-

PAPERS LAID

B.f cI( nniladi oif Hlis Ex,('cellenocl the Governor
It, foullowinUi /pi(iprs were laid:
Hon. C0 Ii. ADAMS: The Civil Establishment
(C;eral'a (Amiendment) No. 16 Order, 1956;
The Civil Establishment (Teneral) (Amendment)
\o. 17 (I)fr. I')194 :
The' Civil Establishment (General) (Amendment)
No. 19s, Order. 195f :
T'hli J.Ti'or (Remnu'eration and Allowances)
(,eu-ilatio is, 1956);
Statement showing amounts advanced by the
(Golvrnmenll o(f Barbados and the amounts received


VOL. X<.


NO. 5


_I__ ii 1_11111--11


--


- ~a~.l-,~---~---l--~__~--


--


BY










212 OFFICIAL

from Her Majesty's Government in the United King-
dom under the provisions of the Colonial Develop-
ment andl Welfare Acts for the period ended on the
5! r- Marehl, 1956, in respect of the several schemes
,,iLtionIed by the Legislature;
Report of a Survey of Secondary Education
by G. S- V. Petter, Education Adviser to the Comp-
troller for Development and Welfare.
Ilon. M- E. COX: Statement of Post Office
Advances for payment of Money Orders to 3iL
May, !)0 6.
lion. C. E. TALMA: Report of ti4 h 1 ip;'iial
Coilehe of Tropical Agriculture for 1954-55.
lion. C. E. TALMA: On behalf of ie .i Hon.
Minister of Trade, Industry and Labour:-Thei C('.-
toms (Petroleum Products Bulk Storage) Regula-
tions, 1955
Annual Report of the Department of Labour
for the year 1954.

NOTICES

(ove!i'iwi, nt Notices w' re -iv,' : I
Hon. G. HI. ADAMS: Resolution to pla-e tihe suil
of .$16,166 at the disposal of the Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee to supplement the Estimates 1956-
.i7, Part I -- Current, as shown in the Supplemen-
iary Estimates 1956-57, No. 12 which form the
Schedule to the Resolution-
Resolution to place the sum of $14,676 at the
disposal of the Governor-in-Executive Oommittee to
supplement the Estimates 1956 57 ;i t 1[- ii-
rent, as shown in thef Supplementary Estinmates 19 !6-
7., No. 13 whi,,l! form the Schedule to the lResolution.
Hlon. Dr. H. G. II. CUMMINS: resolutioni to
place the sum of $11,898 at the disposal of the (Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee to supplement the Es-
timates 1956-57, Part II-Capital as shown in the
Supplementary Estimate 1956-57, No. 11 which forms
the schedule to the Resolution.
Resolution to place the sum o' $37,779 at the
'isp),osa'.1 .,f die (-'n1:1'iior-in-Exeutiv'e C(ommiitfee
1' .' ')ii1'0 't I l' r l-tinates 195i; 7 V' -
Current, as shown in the Supplementary Estimates
1956-57, No. 14 which form the Schedule to the
solution.
Ionm. C(. II. Ai)Ai'I : liesolutiol to approve 1the
Order entitled "The Civil Establishment (General)
i(LAmendment) No. 16 Order. 1956".
Resolutiol to approve the Order entitled "The
I ivil Establilshient ((General) (Amendment) No. 17
Order 1956"'
Resolution to approve the Order entitled "The
Civil Establishment (General) (Amendment) No.
V1 Order, 1956.
Iuon. C. E. TALMA[A: Resolution to s,;,ti, ,
Customs (Petroleum Products Bulk Storage) Regu-
lations, 1955.
Bill to amend the Customs Tariff Act. 1921.
1Hou. IG. ADAMS: Bill to ],id ih,, ,ll' S i;. -;
Act, 1896.
Il1m. (. II. ADAMS : ,,l.]ultioi to p)'i; )o'
sum of $5,695 at the disposal of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee to supplement the Estimates,
1956-57, Part I Current, as shown in the Sup-
plementary Estimates, 1956-57 No. 15 which form
the Schedule to the Resolution.
Hon. Dr. 11. G. CUMMINS: '.. Speak'.
beg to give notice of my intention to move the House
in Committee of Supply at its next meeting to deal
with, th-, m1o1-mey Resolintions of whic'' notce h!i-; jlust
been given.


GAZETTE


JANUARY 17, 1957


PRIVATE NOTICES.

Mr... C. TUI)OR: Mr. Speaker, I rise to give
notice of the following Address to His Excellency
the Covernor:-

The House of Assrobly
To
Ixis Excrll hncy The Governor

The House has learnt with pain and dismay of
11 e high death rate from starvation of children in
the Island.
2. The House is of the opinion that a free dis-
tribution of milk to the parents and guardians of
all children under five years, would tend to ameli-
orate this condition.
3. Accordingly the House request Your Excel-
lency to take all the steps necessary to make such a
benefit, available to the parents and guardians of
young children.
.J._5 in.

QUESTIONS

Ir. J.. A. iAYNES: Mr. Speaker, I beg to,
-i've noti',; of tile following questions:
To e, nquire ()o the Minister of Communications,
,,ks ;),4l lHousing:-
Is 1he ministerr aware that no tenantry roads
),;ive been 'lone in the years 1955 and 1956 in thi
parish of St. Andrew?
2. is he aware that at the request of the
Department of HIighways and Transport a priority
list of roads was submitted by the Vestry of St.
Andrew and that no ;:,tion ha:; been taken on same?
3. Will the Minister investigate this state of
affairs 1and take the necessary action to have the
above ,grievances remedied?
To enquire of the Minister of Communications,
Works and H1ousing:-
Is tile Minister aware that the road titrough
TuriI'r s fll l Wood has been impassable i'or many
years due to sl)bsidlences and landslides .
2. Is he aware that the above road is a vital
link between St. Simons and Hillaby Villages and
that churchgoers and school children are considerably
incoinvenjienced )by lie Jack f t' ,'v(
3. Will the Minister at his earliest convenience
investigate questions Nos. 2 and 3 and examine the
possibilities of by-passing this landslide area and
adopting the suggestions for a more suitable road to
connect the above villages?

BILLS READ A FIRST TIME

Hon. G. H. ADAMS: I beg to move that the
Bill to amend the Solicitors' Act 1896 be now read
a first time.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
: -', ,, ; ; w .' o) ] ) ,'a ( ."r;'d !
Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to move that the
Bill to amend the Customs Tariff Act 1921 be now
road a first time.
Hon. M. E. COX: .I beg to second that.
Th (' fsfon rs p l aV)d i(1rrod' lto.

STATEMENT ON INCOME TAX BILL

Hon. G. H. ADAMS: Mr. Speaker, before the
business of the House begins I wish to make a state-
ment with regard to the interpretation to be given
to the proviso to Section 18 (2) of the Income Tax
Act, 1921.


_ ___










.JNURNII 1!'57OFICA GA TT


1. The attention of the Government has been
divawin io a; receiii ([i i t-, oif the CouI'r of COliiiiiu
Pleas as to the proper iierpretation to be given to the
proviso to section 18(2) of the Income Tax Act, 1921,
and in particular to the word "voluntary" appear-
ing in that proviso.
2. The Government has been advised that this
decision of the Court of Common Pleas reveals a
*: i :t in -ie ijlnoe TP.x Act, 1921. and that if
taxpayers chose to take advantage of this defect,
the revenue of the Island would suffer.
3. It is accordingly the Government's policy
to remove this defect and the Government will there-
fore be introducing legislation in the near future
to seek to achieve this purpose.
4. As the matter is still with other related
matters under review, no indication can at present
be given a. to the precise form that the proposed
amending legislation will take, but as it is intended
that such legislation should, when enacted, take
effect as from the 17th day of July, lV56, I have eon-
sidered it only fad ix tll d 1xpaiy i i i.-
notice of Government's policy.

PUBLIC HEALTH BILL-C'td

Mr. SPEAKER: The first Order of the Day
-ail ~~ ii l i' Ihe Ilon. M minister for Social
Services: to resume Committee on the Bill to amend
the Public Health Act, 1908.
Mr. SPEAKER left thr C'hair and the House(
went into (Conmittec on tle Bill. Mr. SMITH in the
Chair.
Hon. Dr. H. G. II. CTUMMINS: Sir, hon. mem-
bers are familiar with this Bill. It was referred
to some weeks ago and Section 3 was postponed.
The Government is asking leave, Sir, to withdraw
sub-section 3 (1).
Mr. ALLDER,: .Mr. Speaker, we were not quit,
able to hear the HIon. Minister and we would like
him to repeat that.
There being vo objection leave was granted the
Hon. Minister.
Hon. Dr. IT. 0. I. CUMMINS: Section 3(2)
is already contained in (2) above, that is, the amend-
ing of 2,400) to 1,SO() which llha already been passed.
I beg to move Clause 3 as amended stand part.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
The question was put and resolved in the affirm-
ative without division.
Hon. Dr. TH. G. H. CTMMINS: Mr. Chairman.
I beg to report the passing of a Bill with amend-
ments in Committee.
Hon. M. E. COX: T beg to second that.
The question wias put and resolved in. the affirn-
faive without division.
Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair and reported
accordingly.
On srep arole motions of Hon. Dr. H. (G. TT.
C(MM'TYi sr'n~ : irdo' h in iirh are bhf J,'. i1/. /;.
( 0r thr Rill w.s read a lhird time and pasn,,'d.
:.'35 p.m.

POSTPONEMENT OF ORDERS

Ion (. 11. ADAMS : ,lr. Spk'acer. with regard
to Order No. 2. I am sorry that I amn inbl! to pro-
ceed with it today. It is necessary for me to conil'i'r
with members of the Judiciiary and others, but I
should like in 'ive hio IToous(, thi anslnrtilw thai 1
iam prepared to go( on with the next (Ordetr n',r
Tuesday. I therefore ask leave to postpone the con-
sideration of this Bill.
There being no objectio-n, leave was granted the
Hon. Premier.


Hon. Dr. H. G. H1. CUMMINS: Mr. Speaker, as
regards Orders Nos. 3 and 4, the Hon. Minister in
charge of ithent is out of the Island at present, and
[ am asking leave that they be postponed and that
Order No. 5 be taken as the next Order of the Day.
There being no objection, leave was granted the
IHon. P're nier.
Lease Of Land To Barbados Light And
Power Company Ltd.
iMr. SPEAKE1 R: The next Order of the Day
.si,,;. i, he nali of the Hlon. Minister of Comninuin-
i.dtiuons, workss and Ilouaing: to move the passing
0 tlhe following Resolution: Riesolution to approve
tile lease of a parcel of land situated at Grave's End
1.) the Barbados Light and Po,' er Compiany Ltd.
lion. M. E. COX: Mr. Speaker, this Resolution
seeks the approval of the House to authorise the
tovernor-in-Executive Committee to lease a parcel
of land approximately 3,150 square feet in area
situated at Grave's End to the Barbados Light and
Pow-er Company Ltd. for the purpose of installing a
imiip house and pipe-lines leading to and fron
the se;a o be used as a water cooler for the steam
turbine plant which the Company proposes to install
at their works.
T'ie Addendum explains fully the purpose of
this !Nesoiution. The land is to be rented to the
Compliny at a cost. of t,240.00 pet'r iiannum; the land
will be lh,:sed for lhe first fourteen year., after which
the C('mpny laas the right to renew the lease for
.anotlh( pli''i! of seven years. IMr. Speaker, we
haIve lIin givi tile a Isulraince tliht there w ill lie no
poilliu io o ith sea as a result, of ihe i-nstallation
of thiis pnlip house and tnhc(e pipe-lines. The only
difftel'iTce, w aie re old i;s lhiit the xxaer which re-
turns to the sea will be about 4 Falhrniiheit warnil.r
or in excess of the t,'mperalure of the water xihen
it coellls li'oiii the sea.
eon. members will rentoeiber that the honour-
able junior member for Christ Church, who in-
trodduced the Bill a ico!!ipanyii!g This il es.'l ii, mn,
postponed it because the point was raised by the
honourable senior member for St. George about tile
denial of tile people of their rights to go on the
beach and bathe and play cricket as they used to
do before. That matter had been gone into quite
thoroughly long before the Bill was brought before
this House, and there was absolutely no question or
any interference with the beach as a beach. As a
natter of faec, the pipes which are to be laid by the
Company will be laid underground, and therefore
the people who go to bathe and play cricket o0-
Sundays (although they should not play cricket en
Sunda.ys. Sunldays being days for rest [Laughter )
will continue their games as they have been doing
in tle pat-1. b ; ii, ,',, ili l in fibers shioild1 have no fear
therefore as to the interference, of the privileges
which li i pe(opIl now enjoy; tliat fear can be
allayed inasmuch ais I have explained to the House
;he position as it stands.
I have plans here of the exact area at which
these works will be carried out. 1 should mention
that this matter was put before the Director of
Public Works and also before, I he Officer com-
manding the Barbados Regimnent, and they have
'othi a 'reed to the (rection of the pump, hons -
and the installation of these pipe lines. Therefore,
there is absolutely no1 danger as to the interferenee
with the rifle range. as it is proposed to
constrnet this pump house (,n the North Eastern
side of the building which is now leased by Mr.
A. E. Taylor at Grave's End.
As far as I can see, there is no danger as to the
installation of this pump house and these Dipe lines.


JANUARY 1-1, 1)57


OF~FICIAL GAZETTE







244 OFFICIAL


I assure the House that every possible question has
been gone into, and we are satisfied that there will
be absolutely no harm if we agree to lease to the
Barbados Light and Power Company Ltd. the area
which they desire to lease for the purpose of carry-
ing out these works. I beg to move that this Resolu-
tion do now pass.
Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
Mr. ALLDER: Mr. Speaker, nobody wants to
put anything in the way of the industrialisation of
the Colony, but when leases such as this one are
being given, we have to be very sure that nothing
contained in them will cause any unhappy feelings
on the part of the public. While the Honourable
Minister has said that guarantees have been given
that there will be no pollution of the beaches in ths
area, yet, I have noticed that he has admitted that
the water which will be coming from the plant will
be some degrees Fahrenheit greater than the adjoin-
ing seawater. I sincerely hope that the Honourable
Minister will make sure that these pipes will be
carried some distance from the fore-shore so as to
prevent any unhappiness; even although the dif
ference in Fahrenheit may not be great, it may not
be desirable that this water should be mixed with
the water in which people bathe when they go to the
sea. I hope that the Honourable Minister will see
that everything will be done alright; that is to say.
that these pipes will be made to run far enough out
side so that no water which comes out of the Com-
pany's premises can flow back into the position of
the sea in which members of the public habitually
bathe.
3.45 p.m.
Besides that, Sir, I would like to know in
respect of that land something as regards a particu-
lar matter. I noticed that some of that land was
leased a couple of years ago to Mr. A. E. Taylor
for the purpose of erecting a restuarant and some
time after it was erected and put into operation, that
gentleman observing that it was not a paying con-
cern closed it down. It was closed down for about
three years, speaking under correction. You can see
from that that the purpose for which the lease was
made was not enjoyed by the public. I notice that the
building is now rented out to another individual
and that there is some difficulty in keeping that
place opened. It is said that the Government re-
fuses to give permission for the sale of alcoholic
beverages at that place.
Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member is now
speaking on a subject matter which is not pertinent
to this Resolution. He is not speaking on any lease
of land.
Mr. ALLDER: Mr. Speaker, I thought what
I was speaking on was permissible because it was
in connection with the same land. There was some
disagreement in the giving of that lease by the Gov-
ernment.
Mr. SPEAKER: That does not come under
the subject matter of any lease.
Mr. ALLDER: All right, Sir.
Mr. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I am very grateful
to the Hon. Minister of Communications, Works and
Housing for letting us see the plans of this proposed
erection because it is usually very difficult to under-
stand these things without such plans. However, I
do not think that there is any objection in principle
to permission being granted to the Barbados Light
and Power Company to erect these pipelines, although
Your Honour will remember when the hon. senior
member for St. George spoke about this matter, i-
had certain reservations made particularly as regards
the discomfort which might be caused to bathers who
enjoy the amenities of that beach.


I think there will be some discomfort to bathers
but perhaps, in the long run, as the Hon. Minister
says, it may not be too much discomfort: and the
fears as expressed by the hon. senior member for
St. George, may not be realized.
What I am disturbed about is some of the con-
ditions of the lease as laid down in the Schedule.
For one thing, I think that the lease for a period of
14 years with the option of renewal for another seven
years is rather too long. Looking at it from the
point of view of the bathers-the people who might
want to enjoy the amenities of that beach-it does
seem, despite all assurances given, as if the inconve-
niences to the public are greater than are now fear-
ed; and if that is so, it will take the greater part of a
generation before it can be rectified or even renewed.
If, on the other hand, the Barbados Light and Power
Company has the prospect of getting a renewal after
14 years I do not think there is any harm in cutting
down on the initial period of the lease. You see,
Mr. Speaker, it-is all very well for them to say now
that they can guarantee that there will not be any
inconvenience or that there will not be any noxious
matter coming out of the pipes to disturb would-be
bathers, but. it is quite possible that the very pipes
themselves might burst and as a result there might
be possibly a discolouration of the water. I am not
saying that it will be of the proportion that you
might not be able to bathe in it, but it might be
just rust-coloured water which, though it may not
necessarily be a pollution, is a disturbing matter
to people who like to bathe in clear water, as Bar-
badians and the majority of us like to do.
Perhaps, some conditions may be attached to the
granting of this lease. One such condition should
be to have a shorter lease. I think a lease of 14 years
is rather too long because this thing is in the nature
of an experiment. It looks alright now. I noticed
from the plans which the Hon. Minister has allowed
me to see that while the pipe which takes in cold
water extends a good way out to sea, as it appears
from the scale of the map, that the pipe that lets
out warm water is a bit nearer in to the foreshore. I
have been made to understand that the water will
not be appreciably warmer, but unless there is a tech-
nical reason I am wondering if it would not be better
for the prospective bather if the pipe taking in cold
water was nearer in than. the pipe giving out the hot
water. As I have said, it does appear to me that the
lease of 14 years is too long and I think it should
be modified. Of course, it does not effect the prin-
ciple of the Resolution.
My next point is with respect to the sum of $240
per annum which will be paid for the tenancy of
the land.. I have no. knowledge of. what. the land
values are in terms of a lease, but I do know
that the Barbados Lightkand Power Company is a
big monopoly and in respect of allowing, them to
use 3,000 square feet oft land for what seems to me
the slender sum of $20 a month seems to be some-
thing wrong. It is a great privilege we are giving
them and however little it might be, we are depriv-
ing the people of this country of the use to some
extent of that beach.
I am wondering, Mr. Speaker, whether this
Government is doing the very best thing in allow-
ing the Barbados Light and Power Company to use
3,000 square feet of that beach in return for only
$20 a month, and I am also wondering whether this
is one of the conditions that can be changed. I am
convinced that if the Barbadog Light and Power
Company wanted this bit of land so badly and if the
Government can acquiesce with the request, a great-
er degree of bargaining should go on. I think the
Company should be asked to pay a greater sum.


GAZETTE JANUARY 17, 1957









~~JANEABYI~ 17, 195 OF ICIA GAETE 245-


There is no question of a non-industrial develop-
ment going on. This power house is just an .acces-
sory for the company. It does not make the enter-
prise more protitable,.so there is no harm in ask-
ing them for more money.
3.55 p.m.
But we must draw the line somewhere; and if
people in this island have no prospect of getting
cheaper electricity-at least we have,not heard that
company said anything about that, and if there are
no prospects of getting electricity in more houses, I
think it is disturbing to find" that the Governor-in-
Executive Committee is prepared to lease land which
is the property of the people of Barbados for so
little in return. Twenty dollars a month is too little;
and it does not represent what I think to be a realis-
tic view of the whole matter and if this is the con-
dition, as it seems to me, of the terms attaching this
grant of land, it is a condition which can be modified
and made more realistic. They ought to pay more
because it is valuable land' they are using, and a
valuable stretch of beach during the time they
ccupy it, will be denied some part of the bathing
population.
With respect to the undertaking which was
given by the Company about there being nothing in
their view which will disturb the bathers generally,
I should only say this: that Government would be
well advised to have one of its Departments made
responsible for the periodical inspection of that
beach, and the periodical testing of the water in the
sea around the pipes. That, I think, would be the
very least that could be done because it may well
be that to the naked eye there may be nothing of
which you can complain, but there might be an
accumulative process of pollution which could only
be discovered scientifically; and I do not think that
Government should leave it to 'the Company to give
the assurance that the water would be alright with-
out carrying out periodical inspection. I think it is
an inspection which should be done every three
months, and it cannot be left to them.
Mr. Speaker, I should just re-emphasise this.
I think some change should be made in shortening
the period of the lease, that a much higher scale of
remuneration than twenty dollars per month should
be the price charged them by the Executive Com-
mittee, and that Government itself ought to under-
take a periodical inspection of the beach and the
water surrounding the pipes to make sure and to
satisfy itself that no great harm, if any at all, is
being done.
Hon. M. E. COX: I can assure the hon; mem-
ber, Mr. Speaker, that every care will be taken to
i.ee that the Company carries out its assurance and'
see that the water is not polluted ib.-i.i.,- it is a fact
that the majority of poor people go there to bathe.
Mr. TUDOR: I should like the Minister to say
whether he thinks the $240 per annum is reasonable
or whether it should not be more.
the question was then put and carried nem. con.

CARIBBEAN FARM INSTITUTE

Hon. CI E. TALMA: Mr. Speaker, the next Reso-
lution seeks to secure Legislative approval to the
draft agreement which appears in the' schedule
thereto. The terms and conditions of this
draft agreement in connection with the East
ern Caribbean Farm Institute contained
in the the Addendum to the Resolution.
The Addendum sets out the whole history of
the Eastern Caribbean Farm Institute provides
inception to date. As honourable members will see,


the Eastern Caribbean Farm Institute from its very
agricultural training at imterimedlace level on tnie
ineoretical side, ana, on the practical side is up to tle
standard oi the Diploma or tle Imperial College or
i ropicai Agriculture. 'Te object of the Eastern Uar-
ibbean Farm Institute is to provide a pool of quali-
lied instructors in the middle grades ot Governmeii
Departments, particularly those concerned with agri-
culture and education, and ii commercial agriculture.
.''he Addendum further states that with the concur-
"ence of the Legislature, this Government has parti-
:ipated in the Scheme and quotes various messages
,sent down to the House in 1950, Message No. 30,
replies given by the Hon. Legislative Council and
the Hon. House of Assembly on each occasion sanc-
tioning the formation and establishment of the East-
ern Caribbean Farm Institute. It will be seen that
Barbados' capital contribution to the cost of this
Farm Institute was $20,520 up to now; that is, the
capital cost. Barbados is sharing the capital cost of
i'u,52IU, and funds to meet Barbados' share of re-
current costs have been voted from time to time in
the Annual Estimates. Hon. members will in all
probability want to know how much Barbados has
spent up to now in the cost of running this Eastern
Caribbean Farm Institute. I have the figures here.
'oou can see from your Estimates what is, actually
,cted, but what is voted and what is actually spent
aue entirely two different amounts because there
sre supplementary estimates which are voted from
time to time. To give the actual recurrent costs
of running this Eastern Caribbean Farm Institute
from its very inception: in 1952-53 it cost this
Government $1,251.25, that was before it actually
got into operation; in 1953-54 the actual cost was
22,748.69; in 1954-55 the actual cost was $8,470.01;
in 1955-56 the actual cost of recurrent expenditure
was $6,955.61, and in this financial year the actual
recurrent cost or the actual money expended so far
up to December this year is $6,632.44. Barbados'
-ontribution is based in a proportionate relationship
which h the number of student places bears to the total
lumber of student places at the college; that pro-
portion is the proportion which Barbados pays so
_ar as recurrent costs are concerned.
4 05 p.m.
The funds to meet Barbados' share of the recur-
rent costs have been voted in the Annual Estimates
from time to time, and these contributions have been
jased on the proportionate [cost of the number of
student-places occupied. In other words, Barbados
has four stucTent places at present, and there are
fourteen student places so that Barbados' share is
about 10%. The Government has guaranteed, sub-
:!ect to our minimum contribution, at least four
student places. The Institute is being expanded, as
the Addendum to the Resolution further sets out, and
with that expansion, it will accommodate sixty stu-
dents instead of forty. The Addendum further ex-
p'lains that this Institute is now in the process of
expansion to accommodate sixty students, and this
will enable the cost of the student's places to be
maintained, despite the rising cost of living.
Originally, British Guiana did not seem fit to come
into this scheme, but in 1955 it decided 'to do so. and
'cntributed its share of the Capital cost. The Capi-
tal cost of the expansion has been met from this
payment, and also from a grant from Colonial De-
velopment and Welfare funds, and further from an
increased Capital contribution by the Leeward
Islands consequent upon a decision of that Govern-
ment to increase the number of student places for
which payment of recurrent cdst is guarariteed.


JANUARY 17, 19577


OFFICIAL GAZETTE t


245 -









OFFICIAL GAZETTE


'liere'ore, tiere will be no addi'iwnal oust ais lar-
.ls IHB-rbados is concerned.
The arrangements for the operation of the In-
iIituie have now been reduced to the form of the
draft, Agreement, which is set out here in the Schled
le t to t1he Resolution itnd which. oi( tlie 'Fceo of t,.
is reas:ina)ble, and contains all the various terms anti
touiditions under ,-\iluch thc l);; r[bat!<; Go e (.r(n'r nm t a
willing to participate.
[oln. members will h;.\c gone through; 1lie t: ;,'-
of tlhe draft Ag'rec'n(nl and they w ill have se'en tiha
;arb;a(doks is entitled 1to four places lritisih (luiana
ten, Antligua two, St. Kitts-Nevis-Au guil a two.
Montserrat and Ithe PBritish Virgin Tslands one, Trini-
dad and Tobago thirteen, (iremiida. St Vincent, St
Lucia and Dominicia two each, making a total of
forty places.
Under the new arrallgefglentiTs, wihin the expand
sion at the Instilulte shiil have taken place, larba
dos will be entiltld 1o six s!lidlent places, and that
will be implementing the ,vislwhs of this Chamber
which, in 1951, insisted thal Barbados should hae c
more than four student places. The ITouse has tihe
assurance lhe)'cfore, thal in tih very near fiutre-n
the expansion programime is taking place at present
-probably, by the ind of tlie year I;arbadials will
be enjoying six stlu'l pl laces whlichl has been ithe
desire of this Chamber from! tle time of the incep-
tion of thie sclihe(.
As Clause 5 12) of the Schedule sets out, in ill-
event of ihe expansion of the Institule, thei total
mi, iuber of places which the I'articipat ing- over i-
:,ints may be occupying through their ]nominees
shall be determined in the same proportions as those
;,dopied it A\ricle 5 (1), provided that ile propor
i'n;t:le basis of .contribution towards Capital i.::-
pi Iilitiur as, between the Participating Governments
-it in A\rticle 4 (2) is maintained.
Mr. Speaker. the terms of this draft Agreement
Simply implement 1lhe lerOms and conditions to wh.ii'
this Government has agreed during 1951; all the
Sliher I'arlicipating Governments have already signed
this Agreement. and had the concurrence of their
respcelive Logislatures in assenting to the( terms of
this Agreement. It is on account of the hlirrirnne and
nithler f1Lacts whi]-h are well known to lion. meml:ers
that we are the last of the Participating (fovern-
n.ents ncatillly to assent in tile LA'islature l tI thi,
draft. Agrreement. lio. ioni mbers can rest assured
that the terms a!id o diiion, (. d is .\ 'renl al 1'
perfectly in order, andl that they imipleent, ilhe
conditions ullter which we .ent into the formation ,
and estalilishment of this Eastern (arihhb'an Farnm
Institute. T ')eg to move that thii Resolution do no',
pass.
tson. M. E. COX: I beg to second that.
The ourssion that this Rrsolution (do inor p1a)
was put and resolved in the affirmative without diris
ion.

OFFENCES AGAINST THE PERSON BII.L

Mr SlPEA KER: The next Order of tihe D ay
stands in the name of the TIon. Minister of Socia!
Services:- To move the second reading of a Bill
to am"nd the Offences Against The Person Act. 186G.
lion. Dr. IT. G. II. CUMMINS: Mr. Speaker.
in moving the second reading of this Bill. I should
like to point out that Seetion 45 of the Offencell
Against The Person Act, 1868, discriminates against
women of immoral character by denying them pro.
section against procurement. That might have been
quite in order in 1868 when the Act was passed, but
recently, there has been an Tnternational Convention
brought into force and among the provisions of tiha:


Convention, the removal of this discrimination wa,
sought. The Act, as it stands at present, is found ti
be at variance with the present Act in the Uniter
Kingdom. In 1931, a similar step was taken for the
removal of this discrimination, and we are now ask-
ing the Legislature of this Colony to honour that
International Convention by removing that discrimi-
nation which exists now' in the 1868 Act.
Section 45 of the Act reads as follows:-
"Any person who -
(1) procures or attempts to procure any girl
or vwoan under twenty-one years of age, not being
a common prostitute, or of known innmoral charac-
ter, to have unlawful carnal connexion, either with-
in or without the Island, with any other person or
persons; or
(2) procures or attempts to procure any woman
or girl to become, either within or without the
Island, a common prostitute; or
(:' i 'il'.irc':, Pr 'it |)s to proc, ure any womaI i \( I
or girl to leave the Island, with intent that she may
become an inmate of a brother elsewhere; or
(4) procures or attempts to procure any woman
or girl to leave her usual place of abode in the
island (such place not being a brothel), with intent
that she may for the purposes of prostitution b;:-
'* i;!"' "! r i,,'i, :;. i ,wni hid ;: w ilhin ut th.
"i;', ,.^ itIc ;,. ;!^ >* i,: i-dem eanour ."
And t th, penalty oni bIiig convicted is set out.
We are asking in lhis amending Bill, to delete from
s'.., 1, lit following words: "not being a
commonlyl plrostitulte. or of known immoral character"
In Sub-section -i the w'rds "such place not being a
brother" occur, and we are asking to delete them.
13v deleting these words in those two Sections it
will brilngl ie Act of 1868 into line with present
(d:'y th'iol"ght in connellction with women of tha..t sort.
I hI er to lmove that this Bill be now read a second
time.
flon. Ai. E. COX: I beg to second that.
4.15 p.m.
7b 'h question that the Bill be now read .second
timle was p t/i and riserled in the affirmative without
dhciXSif11.
(On ,otion of lHo. n. Dr. c. I(. CUMMIINY ,
....../, d ( y itii .u.I .iE. COX.l Mr. ,pcak er left thr
Cnmohr ,ini rIli Hofr th ,lVi in/ ('Coiunittec n.,
hill. Mr. SMITHl biR in the Chair.
(tlaufsc. 1 to 3 inclusire were called and passed.
On motion of 1oni. Dr. T o. G. I r. (ICUMINR, ser-
'ide(l b1. TIo. soij. E. CO Mr. C OIAIRMAN re-
ported tihe pssling orf the Rill in Cnommittee.
Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair and reported
accordmingly..
On separa.tc motions of Hon. Dr. H. G. H.
OCfTMITT.,. secomed by lion. M. E. COX in each
casr. the Bill was read a third time and pased..

WATERWORKS, BILL

Mr. SPEAKER: The next Order of the Da.'
stands in the name of the Hon. Minister of Commni i-
cations, Works and Housing; second reading of a
Bill to amendl the Waterworks Act. 189 5.
Hon. M. E. COX: Mr. Speaker. this Bill seeks
to anmend the Waterworks Act, 1895. 1 think hon-
ourable members will remember some time ago. I
intimated to this House that a Bill was coming down
to simplify and make easy the administration of the
Waterworks; Act. As is set out in the Objects and
Reasons of the Bill. honourable members will see
that various clauses of the Act of 1895 are antiquat-
ed, and it is absolutely necessary to have a new Bill
so as to fit them in with modern developments. (I
have copies of marginal notes of the various amend-
ments and T would like the Clerk to hand them to


JANUARY 17, 19,57'









OFFICIAL GAZETTE 247


hon. members in order that they will be able to tul-
low the amendments more easily.) (Copics wcre
handed hon. members.)
As the 'Objects and Reasons" of this Bill set
out, this Bill seeks to amend the Waterworks _Acl so
as to bring that Act into line with modern adminis-
trative practices and to nma.ke certain amendments
rendered necessary by the defects of legislation en-
acted since the coming into force of that Act and
by scientific and other developments that hav-e occlr-
red since that date.
Clauses 2, 3 and 10 (b) seek to make provision
were the days of horses ana carts andl buggies) no
provision was made under that Section for motor
vehicles. Since w;e have nowadays quite a number or
motor vehicles, it becomes necessary ior ius to auii I
that Section in order to include motor vehicles in
that Section.
Clause 5 substitutes ior the reference in See-
tion 9 of the Act to the Compulsory Powers (Land)
Act, 1888 reference to the Land Acquisition AJct,
1949 which has since taken the place ol IIr Act of
1688, and similarly Clauses 8, 19 (.a) and 20 substi-
tute for the references to "Manager of the Water-
works Department" .and "'Colonial b','retary'', re-
ference to the "Chief Enguincc of the \oWaiiwork
Department" and "Chief Secretary.'" Hitherto in
acquiring lands for the \Vaterworks you had a spe-
cial Act-the Act of ISS8. Since ilien that Act has
been superseded by the 1949 Act which emibraces ;ill
sorts of land which are necessary to be secured by
the Government from lime to tinm; therefore, hon.
inembers will see that Section 5 of tlhit Act is no
longer necessary because we have an Act daii;n inl
general with the compulsory acqulisitioln oF land. IT
is therefore necessary to have this Clause deleted.
Clauses 8, 19(a) and 20 make references to "Mana-
ger of the Waterworks Departmentt" and Colo-
nial Secretary." Now that we have a cihinge in no-
menclature of those two offices in the civill Estab-
lishment Act, a change is necessary; so you will see'
that wherever it refers to "Manager of the Water-
works Departnmnt" and "Colonial Secretary" those
words have b'oen deleted and inserted in the place
of the first phrase are in the words "Chief Engineer
of the Waterworks Departmenet," and "Chief See-
retary" in place of the second.
Clauses 11, 12 (a), 13, 14 (a) and (bW nnd Cinui-
17(b) seek to provide for the introduction of Fir-e
Hydrants which now are used instead of Fire Plugs.
Years ao, tihe term "fire plugs" was used but to-
day we have "fire hydrantss" Therefore it i-, necPs-
sary to take out the words "fire plugs'' wherever
they apnear be',au i' h r is no nncition of riferr-
int"' to fire phu-,..
4.25 p.nm.
It goes on tn tate that whilst C,-iis,' 21 seeks to
effect minor clihiges in lhe language of SiTioi 52
.thei At to accord with ilhe provisions of the Po'ic,
.tl,.i-trale', Act, 1905.
I think it is necessary to read out all (,f these
Se-tions. bl ,s lihon. members will sro th!'I i. '
change in the -i ris I lintiid, and it will ti'he soti
time if I hav- to read all tihe Sectioncs :wit wthih
I am iiealing.
As the law slandis. tle Act requires that fre-
(ii le t r''eren'cii ie ii.l ,, lo ,i ( L, gislatilr and to
the Governoi-iE -xecutiv e (Coimint't-;' .witlh rVee'ict
to matters of ;a pi'-ely administrative at nature. Th,,r.
Sir, hon. members know is unmecessarv at present
For example; if you are moving a standpost beyond
twenity-two yards, you have to come to tb.- ,
with a plan and cet permission from the Horue.--
a book of reference it is generally called--with the
a .,ompatrv, ?P--, nlrin to h;:ia thl stticn 1 <'et


, '. ci luni' iLUai pari-iclar site. tlut is a was-L. 0o
lille ; it costS soinettllig lt gc iA bteiore tie jlcgiia-
tUire, and it 1. a int. itlin aili couli bDe octILC ad-
nunisterei by the UeparLiient concerned. it night
have suited us in 1f9Y under the Act, but I am sure
non. members would agree that we have long passed
L.-at stage, and it is time that an aliendnlient should
be effected. The Act also contains several provisions
which have since become superfluous. Clauses 4, 9,
10 (na) and it), 12 (b), 15 td), 16 [a) and 17 (a)
accordingly seek to free the .Act of these defects and
(' uses 6 and 7 seek to effect certain anmendmenlm,
ionLsequentl upon tie repeal of the Sections which
arel in the firsl Schedule to the Bill. As you look at
the Bill, Sir. members will see the Section set out in
the first Schedule which should be repealed. You
,.t Clause 14 dealing with the same plans as I said
just now. Section 14 says "true copies of the said
plan and sections and book reference or extracts,.
therefrom certified by the Colonial Secretary, which
or'tifflto ith,' (','i1al, SeP'crtaryv when required
-hall give to all parties interested. shall be received
in all Courts of Justice" and so on. That is consid-
erod unilter ssary ; nd cumbersome at present and
tir'it'ore it i, nlwcc.s-ry to repeal these Clauses that
I referred Ito.
Now, bir, by Clauses 14 (c), 16 (e) and (h),
K- amn 24, it is sought to express the penalties ".'-
vided under the Act in terms of dollars and in cc:
tain cases to increase the amount of the penalty. At
present, hon. members will remember that we have
changed over from pounds, shillings and pence to
dollars and cents and the decimal system, and it is
nlcce-.lvry to amend this section and in places where
reference was made for example to 5 which is $24,
you round it off by saying $25.
From experience it has been found that the lan-
guage of Section 32 of the Act fails to prevent the
accumulation of outstanding debts and that it is ino
always practicable for the Department to observe
provisions of that section which require the Depart
i, ent to install service pipes within the time limited,
and it is proposed in the Bill to give power to the
, ,'pi;rli-'nt to s;o p water from flowing in one'; pci
vate premises or otherwise if one fails to pay for the
installation and so on. (.'! in-. 15 (a), (b), (c) and
('() Iccordiniily seeks to cure these defects, the ii,-
feets to which I referred to just now. The amend-
mienits cointainel in clause 18 (b) ;ire in line with
those effected by clause 15 (a) and (b).
Clauses 16 (b), (c) and (d) seek to amend see-
tion 5:i of the Act in view of the abolition of occu-
pancy tax, there is no longer occupancy tax.
ilerelori tliese clauses have to be amended-whilst
clauses 16 i() and (g) seek to improve the adiniis-
trative procedure set out under section 35 (3) of thte
.. ;-':1n i! the tfila i paragraph, Mr. Speaker, a mi.o:
change of language to effect a more correct descrip-
tion is sought to be made by clauses 18 (a) and 2:3,
whilst clause 19 (b) seeks to make more explicit tile
provisions of section 44 of the Aiat.
Mr. Speaker, as 1 said, Sir, it is bsolite!;
necessary that we have changes such as these at this
stage. As youll know, x lt present thi, A-t lays it down
that the Executive Committee is actually in charge
of running tile Waterworks, and that is why con-
slIait reference's have to be made to the Governor-in-
Excnutiv-c Committee: but under this amendment
*he Waterworks Department will be administered
just as. say. the Public Works or any other Depart-
lepnt without this constant reference to the Gover-
nor in Executive Committee, and. as T s cid, constant
reference to the Legislature for simple administra-
tive matters. For example, it has never-or rather


JANUARY 17, 19577








248


OFFICIAL GAZETTE JANUARY 17, 1957


for many years, alt least since I came to this House,
antu even Delore--we nave never aatiered to that
section which makes it compulsory to have plans
submitted to the -Legislature tor any development in
water. In other words, in aV- area that is to be de-
veloped in which water mains must be laid under
the present Act, that has never been done. For pipes'
that are laid in the various tenantries or along the
highways, no plans for laying these pipes come to
the Legislature although the Act says that; but as I
said, from long before I came ito this House in 1944
and since, the only plan that comes, is when you
want to remove a pipe from a certain distance or
rather to a certain distance beyond 22 yards, or if:
the pipes are laid on lands belonging to the Govern-
ment for development purposes; otherwise no plans
have come to the Legislature and these sections are
more honoured in the breach than in the observance
4.35 p.m.
Therefore, we have found that it is unnecessary
and.also expensive to have plans drawn up and put
before the House from time to time when we are lay-
ing down water mains; and many other sections of
the Act make it necessary to have these amendments.
The Sections are no longer workable in view of the
improvement and the advancement which have been
made from time to time; hence, we feel that the
time has come when the Act must be amended in
order to catch up with modern day practices.
If there are any questions which hon. members
desire to ask, in so far as I am able to answer them,
I will do so. With those few remarks, Mr. Speaker,
I beg to move that this Bill be now read a second
time.
Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
The question that this Bill be now read a sec-
ond time was put and resolved in the affirmative
without division.
On the motion of Hon. M. E. COX, seconded by
.lon. C. E. TALMA, Mr. SPEAKER left the Chair,
and the House went into Committee on the Bill, Mr'
SMITH being in the Chair.
Clause 1 was called and passed.
Clause 2 was called.
Hon. M. E. COX: I beg to move that Clause
2 stand part of the Bill.
Hon. C. E. TALMA: I beg to second that.
Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY: Mr. Chairman, it may
be that I should have waited until we got to Clause
3 of this Bill to say what I want to say, but this
Clause 2 is so bound up with Clause 3, that I will
say what I want to say now. This Section deals with
the inclusion of motor vehicles in the Act, and I am
wondering whether what is proposed here is the cor.
rect thing to be done. Section 3 of the Act says
this:-
"(1) A supply of water for domestic purposes
or for domestic use shall not include a supply of
water for cattle other than domestic stock, or for
horses, or for washing carriages where such horses
or carriages are kept for sale or hire or by a com.-
mon carrier, or a supply for any trade, manufacture,
cr business or for watering gardens or for foun-
tains, or for any ornamental purpose.
(2) Domestic stock shall mean stock kept by an
individual for domestic purposes and not for trade,
:sale, or agricultural purposes."
Section' 2 of this Bill inserts the words "motor
-vehicle" between the definition of the words "City"
and "rate" in the Act, and give the words "motor
vehicle" the same definition of "motor vehicle" as
set opt in the Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic Act,
'937. As-the position is now, if that definition goes
in, without any further explanation-well we have
come a long way from washing carriages and what
not. I should like to point out that 90% of the peo-


piL who own motor vehicles, only have domestic taps,
iley have no garden taps, ant this amendment is
saying that if you have a domestic tap on your,
premises, and you own a motor vehicle of any sort,
vcu cannot wash it, or you cannot even put water in
the radiator from that tap. This amendment is
r-ally beig put in without giving the matter any
h,,rious thought, and I would urge hon. members to
give it very serious consideration.
It might have been alright in 1895 when you
had carriages, but when this amendment is inserted,
it will affect persons who have domestic taps only.
It will affect such persons who make their living
out of the use of cars, and I say that if you insert
this amendment as it stands, you will leave it wide
open to anybody, not excluding the Police, to say
that you cannot use water at all for washing cars,
although you may not be washing any car. We have
not reached the stage where we are using something.
other than: water, and therefore, I counsel the Hon.
Minister to say whether or not this Section should
not be further defined. This Section might be phrased
in such language as to let it be understood that if
anyone Ts hailed before a Police Magistrate for using
wai-ter from a (domestic tap and putting it into the
coolingg system of the engine of a motor car, no offence
has been committed. I hope the Hon. Minister will be
able to clear up that point.
Hon. M. E. COX: The hon. member has not
got the point. We are not saying that you cannot
use water in any car, we axe saying that you can-
not use the water for washing cars. I think the hon.
member should know that the large garages carry me-
ters in respect of the water with which they wash
Their cars and buses. We are not saying that you
"annot wash your car, we are saying that you cannot
)wash it from the domestic tap; we are saying that in
order to wash cars, you must have a water meter.
We are saying that you should not wash horses
which are used for freighting, and so on, from your
domestic tap, but you can wash them from your tap.
which carries a meter. That is all we are saying.
Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY: When I am dealing
with legislation and passing it, I am not thinking of
any big garage. You have four or five big garages.
If the Hon. Minister will read the Act, he will see
the words I have already read out. It says this:--
"A supply of water for domestic purposes or for
domestic use shall not include a .supply of water
for cattle other than domestic stock, or for horses,
or for washing carriages where such horses or car-
riages are kept for sale or hire or by a common car-
rier."
What I am telling the Hon. Minister is this: we
know that the big garages have meters, and it will
hardly be necessary for them to use their domestic
taps for washing cars. You are really enacting some-
thing in respect of which we know that 90% of the
people who keep' cars for hire are people who would
only have a domestic tap, and you are therefore en-
acting a farce and exposing people to the danger of
being prosecuted for using this water for the purpose
of washing cars.
4.45 p.m.
The question really is not a question of big
garages at all. This is a question that after you
have enacted this law and put in motor vehicles, it is
going to affect not only the people who own big
garages for whom you are legislating but also the
people who own only a car or so. The great majority
of people who own ears use water from domestic taps
to wash them. As a matter of fact, to the majority
of them there is no other means. Mr. Chairman, how
many people do you know who use motor cars who
will be able to put in a water meter? It is not like in









JAURY1,197OFIILGAET


1920 when six people owned motor cars and those
people by the overwhelming majority were the only
people who had domestic taps installed on their
premises. As a matter of fact, in a great number of
cases owners of taxis actually use the public stand-
post for washing their cars. You can go down to the
l owner Ge en at any time and see them using water
from a public standpost to wash their ears.
Hon. M. E. COX: If they do that, they will
be breaking the law.
Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY: Mr. Chairman, :surely
they are breaking the law but you have come a long
way from the days of carriages. The Hon. ilinist.-r
says that if you wash off your car with water from
a public standpost, you will be breaking the law.
That is out of the question. He also talks about the
owners of big garages and racehorse owners. Let
us forget the question of the owners of big garages
and racehorse owners. That is brought home forcibly.
We can do something in this matter but not in this-
way. I do not think we should include motor vehicles
in this sense. No number of big garages in this
1h;,ndI should convince lhis C'hamnber tilat we should
make a, amendment in this way.
The Section goes on to read 'or a supply for
any trade, manufacture, or business or for watering
gardens, or for fountains or for a.ny ornamental
purpose." Everybody agrees to that. I may say at
this point that with your new system of tourist o n-
couragement, you are offering prizes to people inl
villages for well kept gardens, and certain allow-
ances should be made for that. I am sure tite lion.
Minister if I asked him a question about this mat-
ter will say that this amendment is only inserted
for those who are carrying on trade.
We have registered in the parish of St. Michael
over 2,000 hired cars. The business of hired cars is
Iot collfillned to 'in' or two (i r I i11 nllllrds orf
people are making their living by keeping a taxi or
a motor lorry. Some who own hired cars and motor
lorries do not even have a pipe in their ywrli. tIll
these people have to present their taxis to their
clients in. a clean and sanitary condition. If they
have to present their motor vehicles in a lean and
sanitary condition, must they wash them off with
sea-water? This amendment would be alright if you
were dealing with garages of the old days. but a
man who keeps a; taxi has to ppit water in the radiat-
tor of the ear and wash it off to keep it saniitary. 1
do not think this amendment should he made in this
way.
Mr. ALLDER: Mr. Chairman. every possible
Clause of that old Act should le scrutinized by us
Sri- carefnillv t ense we have L-one at far wyiv since
-'1.. In 1895 tih exploration of Illh water resources
of this Island was then being carried on and the dis-
tribution was considerably smaller than w.it t it i
now. At that time we spent a negllgTbi i aiion! for.
running the Waterworks Departmtent but today we
ar, spending o(ver s1t. l million to e idlor, ;-. w:'.,"
resources, and millions of gallons of water ihav beeni
released for public consumption. Therefore, the pro-
iihiition which ihe ,1i')5 A ; ,ntilu in-,. docs iit ,.--
sarily mean that that should be included in any new
Bill. When a hing is scarce, von nie l,.'is|tio'i.
punitive or otherwise, to take care of the limited
supply to be released hbuti after yon have spend mil.-
'nns of dollars (tn your water supply aind von have
it in greater quantities, you do not have to put in
viu1 new Act these prohibited hits of le'isl;,tiii. Ti
is shortsightedness to do so. You have a sufficient
sulnly of water. Districts which suffered for water
in the past now have a generous supply: therefore
von do not need to have all these old clauses inserted
into the new Bill. It is unnecessary. Why should


yout ask Lax payers whose rates have been increased in
recent years and whose money has been taken from
them so as to spend larger sums on the extension of
the water service to pay for the water which they
take to wash off their motor ears? You are telling
them now that if they have a motor car they cannot
wash it with the water from a domestic tap.
1 am going to suggest to the Govellrulitlll it;l,
with the realisation of the water supply of the Island
being what it is now, these restrictions should not be
applied because they cannot help the colony pros-
per. You are getting a greater use of a natural re-
source which does not cost a cent. Water is like the
air; you only have to tap it. We have( the nccessarx
:,ll ailn machinery to do so; therefore these puni-
tive Sections of the Bill need not be re-inserted.
I can remember, say, from 1910. This Water-
works Act was draiftedI in 1f95 when most house-
holders had to walk two or three miles for a pail of
water. Only exclusive householders could afford a
tap in their homes or could obtain water from a well
on their premises. This amendment might all be very
well if we were living in those days but today tht
situation has changed entirely. As a matter of fact
our water situation is such today that no 12
or 24 persons should be allowed to assemble
;il one g'iven aindpost to draw a pail of water.
Instead of having one sitndpost to accommodate
people from a district a an an adjoining village
i (-ry village slhouhil have its own standpost.
Every village contains some two hundred or
three hundred people. If a private householder ii
allowed to have two or three taps in his house, where
the people of a district are too poverty-stricken to
afford a tap, you should make sure now that you
have such a generous supply of water that the in-
conveniences suffered in the past are absolutely re-
moved.
4.5,5 1) p.
Therefore, that Clause can lie taken out, because
you know full well that every man who owns a motor-
car is going to wash it. Not a member here would
say he is not going to wa-h his motor-car whether he
has a private tap or otherwise, so what is the use of
putting in legislation which would bring conflict be-
tween legitimate citizens and the police. It is a
waste of time. I believe it must be a little short-
sightedness on the part of the Attorney General's
(iriee, but it is unnecessary in tlis delay. We have
Iravelled fast from 18935 to nowv and it should be cut
out. The more freely you allow the population to
' :;,, r re r ,.lI ess of how they it- it, tie quicker
1te e0ominy, of tle i0.1nd wonull rise. because I know
many a householder earns an extra dollar because of
th, increased applies of water whiiIi we have been
able to get, and I am hoping that the Government
v.iil soe the wisdom in the suggestion of the hon.
:cnior member for the City. It is unnecessary and
it should be removed.
Mr. BRANCKER: Mr. Chairman, T must con-
fcss like the hon. members who have just spoken that
I do not find myself enamoured by this proposed
;noendment. It says 'i motor-vehi'cle' shall have the
same meaning as is assigned to it by the Motor Vehi-
rles and RIoad Traffic Act of 1937." a-nd the meaning
Sir, is any mechclaniciallv propelled vehici for nse
on the road, but it does not include vehicles con-
structed exclusively for use on rails or other specially
prepared trains, so you will see how wide this defini-
'on i. n 19 t. of conrse.--T believe that neither of
ii- waVs livin'- al1 the tim --people who owned horses
were people in affluent r'ircumstances,. In 1894. T
doubt whether there arP more thlan two menmbepr of
this present Chalimbhr sittlii in hoeri n tl iw imomeni


C`


JALNuARY 17, 1957j


OFFICIAL GAZETTE






OFFICIAL J BETT. 7,


who could have owned horses, but today a motor
vehicle is owned whether for hire purposes or other-
wise by almost everybody j-. the, community except
those people who prefer to" A tlhei friend's means
of locomotion. Now, I do xtt know if it is going to
be contended that by inserting the words ."mator
vehicle" after the.word "carriages" that that will
mean that this will apply only to motor vehicles
which are kept for the sole purpose of hire or other-
wise, and I do not know whether. tis is the inter-
pretatio4, but,even if it is, I.am not conceding that
it might not,. because a lot of legal difficulty will be,
iound in the .i 4trpretatiobecause, a you see Bir,
that is how it appears in the original Act of 1894,
SEtjin.3, where it says that."a supply of water for
dome.tiS,jgrpos or; for domes ti use shall not; in-
clude ~ supply od satqr for battle other than domestic
stack,, or for horses, or for washing carriages where
suih hlwres. or ccarriages are kept fbr, sale or hire or
by .a .common carrier, or a supply for any trade,'
manufacture, or business,' or for watering gardens, or
for fountains, or for any ornamental' purpose". So
inj other-words, it may be the subject of interesting
legal discussion as to whether if you put "motor
vehicle" there after ''Carriages'" it refers only to
motor vehicles for sale or hire by ia common: carrier:
If the big' garages have their other isupply of water,
ob'nuio this would' not deal with them hnd whatl I
'aft fearful about is I mean; ii?'ili is Iterpreted'
as' I-P'id',I eAntiot help interpreting it to, apply to,
the one-man 'taxi-I think it 'is: bbtnd- t' a create '
hardship if "e limited it to rint "more thap
one car 'or nrt more thak .'tWd- ciaris on cer-
tmin premises.' Sometimes, Sii:, the owner of .a
single'taxi merely has 'a' lieish 'for hire; s:o'
that if a friend wants to boridw it, he could say it is
licensed for borrowing, and the rent is so much per
day or per mile; and it would be working a hardship
with the proprietor who runs a taxi and whoi'hs to
have-an extra supply of'Water beside what he had for
domestic purposes in order 'that'hU might'legally wash
his ear. That is where I said in the old days the
owners of horses were well-to-do; people, so ih 1894
the Hon: Leader of the Opposition or ;ay the honou r-
able junior member for St. Andrew would have own-
ed their 'carriage-and-four.' Of course, they should
pay for water, but even in those days the justifica-
tion. was that the supply was so limited and the
sources which we have recently tapped were then
untapped; but, Sir, I am not in favour of the inclu-
sion of these words because I do see that as wide as
it is now, the one-man taxi owner would have to
have an extra supply of water; otherwise he may
not legally wash his car in his yard. i make little
distinction between that person and a person who
has a'eprivate car. As a matter of fact, a person
with a private car is usually a person in quite a
better position than the person who has one car for
hire in the majority of cases, because he has a private
ear for comfort and convenience and sometimes' for
ptarbses,'of- lrfury,' whereas the "proprietor 6E a
one man taxi has~ source of slender liveihood'and
he,; deserVes, more consideration than this would
entitle him Tto. 'That is why I look with disfavour
onu'the inclusion of these words. It seems to me a
matter of trying to bring the Act up to date so that
anyone reading the Waterworks 'Act 'would realise
that Barbados has motorcars-just putting in some-
thing ,'o-say we have motor vehicles in, this island
and no longer have horses and carriaAes,-but Sir,
that's'injr view of the matter and I am not persuaded
that't' is wise to include "motor vehicles" when
certainly that can be interpreted to apply'to the case
ofta single vehicle owned by someone wvho happens
to have a licence for hire.


: ,Mr,, GODDA RD; Mr. Chairman, I must agree
with those other members on this side that we are
making, this ameqdmentto -bring the Act uprto-late
from 1895 to 1956. We need not include carriages or
any of these things today. There are no carriages
anyhow. If you want to bring the Act up-towdate,
eliminate carriages and do not put in automobiles.
Apart from half a dozen, large garages who have
already lu:stalled means of water which I am' sure
they will continue to pay for, cars for hire are owned
individually. There are owned not only in Bridge-
town, but throughout the island.i Are you'going- to
t ell me that these individuals will be asked if they,
have domestic taps now, to have in another one.
metered because 'they happen to have one or two
cars Thatis what yoti are asking!
5.85 p.m. "'
Or" else you ao r asking people not to wash their.
cars at home; they must go somewhere and buy
water and wash i. em! .I,.think'that this Bill wouid
be more 4p~op-date ii these vehicles, were eliminated;
if, you put in an established garage employing 10 or
12 taxi drivers, you may say that you, cannot, afford
to loser, anything, but the majority of cars in this
island .which arelicensed for. trade 'are owned indi-,
SvidUally and areiowned in such a,way that it would
lye impossible for :persons," .to tur i in, 'another. ta ,
:and ave it mettered' I think that the: Governmenit
b would see. that poi it,. and&.at-. ihis stage,' I think
they shouldrealiseAthat a further Amendment should
ho b made.: '.i *i ) .* .
;Hon.' G' H. ADAMS: ; P'lohIld lik& to ask the'
.hon.' nmefmbi whether his 'argument 'applies only to.
cars. Does the hon. member r'elise that the digtinc-
ition between~ a domestic' sUiply 'hndi a noa-id6 'estic
supply of water extends to baker shops tdo --Does
the hon. member realise that every person who is
carrying "ont every single bit bf trade of any kind
has to pay for a nri-domestic"supply I'Is he goingg
to carry hi" argument'ftrther and say that 'litt only
should ydu 'eAlect' fibm peddle *h6 own 10 cars or
12 cars: but yoi should als eW6i t'from bakeries 'r
garden: of a certain 'siseV Is he gbin'. t'o eliminate
'sbtgar factories and gardens? tWhat has 'halipened,
,i that the hon. imehmber has forgotten, and I myself
forgot, that 'a private person cannot use his domestic
waterfsupply for washing off his cdr. I used to uSe my
garden hose for washing off my car; I am not saying
that is on every occasion,-[YMr." E D. M1OTTLEY:
What?] if the hon. member .Sill let me, finish my
sentence--my car gets washed sometimes when the
,rain falls. '
The hon. senior member for .the City, being more
astute then the hon. senipa member for St., John,
could at once tupir h argument in a different dirge.
tion; having failed on the question of the domestic
supply, he'*ent off in respect of one car owner, The
hon. senior member *tor St. Xi6ohn, more lumbering
in his arguments than the hon. senior member for
the Citk, made'the fiistake of saying that we are
hitting -t a person who owns a private car. To sug-
gest that,-after all, you can always Icall it a domes-
tic supply-remin~s me of a case which I once hap,
opened to hear the late Mr. Walter. Reece argue. A
baker was charged with using water for domestic
purposes in carrying on his business and the late Mr.
Walter, Reece argued that the baker sold his.bread
hi Barbados,. and did not sell fifabi6oad. [Laughter].
Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY: Thie argument of the hon.
senior member for St. John was: even stronger than
mini. The: G0oveimtent got a-few shillings' as licence
fbr a car, and it is' a fact' that, you have been able to
develop your water-system in Barbados. I should'
like to say that on every gallon of gasolene which a


3


___ ~II__ _I~


JANUARYP 17, 19517









OFFICIAL GAZETTE 251


Uilr Oinerlt' es, )~ o ge[t 2e t -. aiul iV.ic \ n)ti talk about
washing off" a car with this water, i should like uto ias
how else dlid you get this water supply : If you
are usilnr' your car for hire, and you wasu oil that
ear, then under this Bill yon will have to pay somen-
thing extra.
As regard.,s the question of 'bakeries, that is an
entirely different matter. 1 have argued this iiatter
(.1 anllI er o casion. lcl IIs take o 11w facIories
where (drinks ar .. 1L' ..tured in thi. Colony:
whether they make $4-)0,000 or $50,000. 1 argue
that tihe manulfaictur'ers of these drinks shoulti pay
at a higher rate than anybody else in this Colony.
Another 'point is this: every time vou -,I a gallon Il'
run, you get 3 pints of Nwater. That is ci.,inion km\now-
ledge. [Lao.tlif',r. It i:s a trade secret, says the
Ton. Leader of tih positionio, but how else can you
do business? [lion. i. 11. :\DAMS': What aloni
the milk' Well. !he Ilon. Premier knows more
:bout that than I know; he has been practising in
hle oursrt.
I contilted that the Hon. Premier's argument in
ripect of tlhe bakeries is not on all-fours with the
other argument. In connection with a person wvho
has a. car and who must keep it in a proper condition,
lie is told that lie minst install a meter in respect of
water; that is not at all on all-fours with the bakerie>
;'Ipd the runt shops which actually sell tide water
With treeard to dairies and drug stores, they sell all
xvater: 1 il)pe the heon. junior member for St. .lohn
wdill not l ike umbrage at that. [Laiughter I am
iiot sayi.ii that the dairies generally sell water, bui
they must use a lot of water if they must sell clean
milk.
I an niot wasting any more time with that; I am
not voting for this amendment. We have come a long
way from the carriages: today yon collect from the
owner of a motor vehicle a tax which is laid down,
hut you collect 28e. on each gallon of iasotletn he
uses, and now yon say that he cannot wash his car
on the domestic( water supply, allhoulnh the watIer
si1,pply ha-. 'been obtained as a result of this taxation
":I the ear.
1 do not think that the Attorney General or 0lie
'L.-al Dranuehtqman would he as well 'acquainted with
lir local conditions as the TTon. Minister wotil lie.
YVun will find I hat some of the owners of thi ws
vehicles have not even cot any taps in their yards
n-ver miimd a domestir- watpr supply.
515 p.m.
1.V ia d 1 it '\ (h i !(\\ .' If '(, '_'n into il e llow\ -
er Green. you will see them Isins \w;Iater flrill the
public standposl Io wasl telir cars. Those whliis axis
ai.r parked in front of this building usie water from
the standpipe in this yard to wash lIt-iI off. Thcy-
are not washing their ears with water registered
by a garden water meter system. As soon as you
put amendments like this in an Act you make it.
difficult for people. I am suggtesltin to Governtent
that this is an error. It is wrong and it shonui
not be included in this Bill. We on this side of
the table are not going to vote for it-
?,lr. CHAIRMAN: The question is-
Mr. E. D. MOTTLEY: Mr. Chairman, before
\( 1 pill 111i q e l iont I -wantt to -ay llhat il is not
r< all on C(lause :, 1];Hll Oi Ilmiestion should I'e put. it
should lhe Clause 2-). Thw reason why I would vote
;-'ainust Clalsw 2 is because thal Clalluse d1als ;a.ftually
will what we are dtl aiiitt'.
Clause 3 minges on that.
The question that Clause 2 stand part was put
and resolved in the affirmative, the Committee
dividing as follows:-


Ayes: MR. SPEAKER, HON. H. ADAMS, HON.
DR. H. G. H. CUMMIN'S, HON. M. E, Cox, HON, C, E.
r'ALMA, MRS. BOURNE, MR, VAUGHAN and MR. MIL-
lER--b.
.ri,:ll : [1'r. BJ RANc 'KEti I. J. I TI'DOR. MR.
ALLDER, MR. HAYNES, MR. GODDARD, and MR. E. D,
MOTTLEY-6.
On muliont of Hon. Dr. H. G, Cummins, secona-
ld by Hon. M. E. Cox, Mr. CHAIRMAN reported
progress and asked for leave for the Committee to
sit again.
1Mr. SPEAKER resumed the Chair and repar-td
accordingly.

ADJOURNMENT

I-on. Dr. HI. G H. CUMMINS: Mr. Speaker, 1
be' to move that this House do now adjourn for
half an hour.
lIon. M. E. COX: i beg to second that.
T7'h qiu.slion was put and resolved in, the af-
jiot'anirc witVhoui t division aLnd Mr. SPEAKER ad-
journed tlli Houise accordingly.
5.25 p.m.

On res'mnptioin.

WATERWORKS BILL

Mr. SPEAKER: On adjournment the House
was ii C(ommittee.
Mr. s''EAKER Ieft the Chair and the House
trsumed (',omi nilet, Mr. SMITHI in the Chair.
(lause 1 and 24 inclusive were called( and passe:.
T7he first, second and third schedule were called
',id pa..sed.
(OI tIH( ilrion of lHo. M. E. COX secon-ded
bYf lir. ('. E. TALMAJ Mr. Chairman- reported the
passi'it orf t/'e Bill inl Comminttre.
.ilr. N/'l'l'. 1 e d ith. I'Daif,. ant r tportd :l
1 ,,r i l".
(oil .'K s< paral ti i tolions ot: lion. 11.. b (. COX
srcicidei by li Ioin,. ('. E. TALMA in cach. case the
,' ,' ,., rc 0 a (1 ir 1Md 1n ( / and persed.
lion. I)r. II. G. 11. (CI'MMINS: Mr. Speaker.
this closes lih( Government business for the after-

(lhris ('hli.rch I w\ lnts lo o on wilt hi s l ill.

PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS

Mr. (l))DAI): Mr. Speaker, .
Mr. iR.N 'i li: (On) aI point of orlher. Il
view of what hais tbe(i sitid by the lhon. junior mem-
lIer for St. TI'onas, I am williiin to proceed with
(Order No. 2 of lPrivate Members' Business standing
in my name.
Mr. SIPEAKER: The hon. junior member for
Christ Church was on his feet hrst.
Mr. BRANCKER: Order No. 1 is first, but as
the proposer for that is out of the House at present.
the next one is Order No. 2.
Mr. GODDARD: Mr. Speaker, I wanted to
ask leave to take Order No. 8 as the next Order of
Ile Day.

XMAS BONUS FOR GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYEES
Mr. SPEAKEHR: The lion. member has a right
to take the orders as they stand. The next Order of
the Day stands in the name of the hon. senior mem-
ber for St. Lucy, and unless there be any objection
leave will be granted.
There being no objection leave was granted the
hoq. member.


JANUAR1Y 17, 1957







252 OFI


Mr. BRANCKER: Mr. Speaker, this Address
is one which I am sure hon. members should at least
be convinced of its dire necessity. As you recall,
Sir, it was in September 1949 ....
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: I hope the hon. member
does not mind if I interrupt him. I want to inform
him that this question is being put before the Salar-
ies Commissioner; and I wonder whether he would
still go on with it.
Mr. BRANCKEER: I am sure hon. members of
this Chamber are prepared to strengthen and fortify
the attitude of the Salaries Commissioner in review-
ing a matter of this kind, and I am certain if the
hon. senior member for St. Joseph, the Minister of
fiinance, tells the Salaries Commissioner that this
has passed this Chamber, he will look with greater
favour on it than if the matter had been done with
cat scrutiny accorded to the public purse. You will
recall that in September 1949 when we fully and
first threshed out this matter, in those less enlight-
ened days there were only six members to be found
to support this Resolution and seven members who
were then to oppose it. That unlucky number of thir-
teen was the number who happened to be in the
Chamber at the time. The Address reads as fol-
lows:

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY
TO
HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

1. The House draws to the attention of His
Excellency the Governor the necessity for the insti-
tution of an annual Christmas bonus for all public
employees whose pensionable emoluments do not ex-
ceed fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) annually.
2. The House requests that Government take
effective action whereby such will be paid as from
December this year."
6.10 p.m.
As you know, Sir, it is the practice of private
firms in this Island, hard as they undoubtedly are
in many instances towards their employees, to give
a certain amount of Christmas bonus; sometimes,
they will give a fortnight's wages or a month's wages
as the case may be. It is the Government which
should set the example and leave it to private enter-
prise to follow. We cannot, in this case, set an ex-
ample, because the precept is already before us: but
I do not see the justification for continuing to lag
behind private enterprise, and allow the lower--paid
employees of the Government to suffer. Your Hon-
our will realise, as a person who mixes with people,
what it is to the humbly-paid employees of this Gov-
ernment-from the casual employees of the Highways
& Transport Department and the Water Works De-
partment to the Elementary School Teachers the
difficulties which they have tide over, never without
assistance, I am sure, over the Christmas period;
and also the difficulties of those who are paid monthly
after their salary cheque has been cashed on the 19th
December, and they have to wait for six weeks, un-
til the 23rd or 24th of January before they are in
receipt of any further remuneration. Despite the
assistance which they get from the Friendly So-
ceties, they draw their salary a week or two before
hand, and there is nothing at all left: ir the three
weeks of January until they are paid again.
Mr. Speaker, I do not think it is necessary to
place any burden on the Public Treasury by includ-
ing the more highly-paid Officials in this proposal.
Certainly a person who is getting $200, $300, $400
or $500 a month should be able to look after him-
self. Everybody likes to receive a present-I do not
suppose even the hon. junior member for St. An-


drew, would refuse a substantial present-but there
would not be any justification for taking money
from the Public Treasury and giving it to those per-
sons who can spend a happy Christmas irrespective
of any bonus. Private enterprise is more partial to
their highly-paid people and will continue to give 3,
4, 6 and 9 months' salary as bonus. I am suggesting
that the equivalent of 4 weeks' wages be the amount
of Christmas bonus which the Government should
be prepared to sponsor.
I have mentioned this figure of $1,5UO, but 1
am not wedaed against $1,44U or l,U00, ,out I thin
that a figure in tnat vicinity deals with the persons
in that category who have a really hard time at
(:hristmas in order to survive the economic orcleal
I is aili very well to say "Happy Christmas' anu
"Merry Christmas" to everybody, but if we want
persons to whom we are responsible for payment, if
we want to enable those lower paid people to enjoy
a happy or merry Christmas, then there is only one
has quite rightly, in my opinion, drawn attention
way which would not, in my view, constitute too
ilcavy a drain on the public purse, but it would be
a most justifiable measure to assist them at that im-
portant season of the year which is the spending
,eason. It would greatly assist the lowest paid
persons in the public employment in this Colony.
We know that the Elementary School teachers,
the casual workers of the Highways & Transport
Department, the casual workers of the Waterworks
Department, the Police Constables and people of that
(lass, find it almost impossible to survive at that
period of the year. I suppose that every member of
this Chamber is asked in the course of the year.
"'VWhat is being done about the Christmas bonus? Is
the Iouse no more enlightened or sympathetic to-
wards this proposal than it was in those black days
in September, 1949, when an Address of that kind
was defeated by the close margin of 7-6 in the
Chamber?"
I do not think it is necessary for me to emphasise
the point any more; I think that the actual details
can be worked out by the Government. I am suggest-
ing that the equivalent of four weeks' wages or a
month's salary as bonus to persons in the salary
range of $125.00 a month or to people who are draw-
ing no more than $25 or $30 a week. They are the
people who stand in dire need; they have to borrow
i, early January and pay that back from the Janu-
?nrv nay cheque. The month of January is one in
'vhibc nobody can live on less than two months'
normal expenditure or salary. Without any more
arlo. Mr. Sneaker. T formally beg to move that this
Address do now pas.
6.20 p.m.
Mr. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, in rising to second
the motion for the passing of this Address which has
been brought forward by my colleague, I should
like to say, first of all, that far too little attention
has been paid in this House to the situation of those
employees of the Government whose wages and sal-
aries fall below a certain range.
Mr. Speaker, unless Your Honour's memory
fails you, you will recall that the Government Party
suffered its first crisis in this House over the ques-
tion of what should, and should not have been paid,
to the employees of the Government and it has left
a heritage of bitterness inside and outside of this
House which will only be removed by the electorate.
Here is a chance before that fateful day to see
whether it can be removed.
It is, therefore, not a matter which savours of
much political controversy, because it is not a poli-
tical matter at all. In all its essentials it is very sim-


FICIABL GAZETTE


Ja~NuaRY 17, 19,57








JANUARY 1, 17 F


ple. It is a recognition of the fact thlia; (Government
employs some people who are worse off than some,
and those who are worse off are those at the end of
he Establishment. It is only common decency that
whenever the opportunity offers itself, as it is in this
Address, that some reservations should be made
to those employees whose cases should be looked in-
to when salaries are revised. The Salaries Commis-
sioner is now going into the pros and cons of this
very aspect of Government policy to recommend, if
he can, what scale of remuneration should be given
for those who are paid out of the Public Treasury.
I should like to express the hope that all the
blunders, all the hardships and all the anomalies will
be removed; but in the meanwhile, this Address
which is more limited in its scope, merely asks that
the Government adopt as part of its policy that at
least once a year bonus (the particular sums can be
arrived at) be paid to the lowest paid employees of
Government so that the hardships of struggling
with the cost of living will not bear too heavily on
them.
The people referred to by my colleagues are
people who are members of the working class. It
does not matter that because they are postmen,
police constables, nurses or teachers, they are lifted
out of that category of persons which this Govern-
ment allegedly represents. They are of the people,
and any boon which can be conferred on them will
be received not in the belief that something wonder-
ful has been done, but that the principle reached
has been upheld. I have therefore great pleasure in
supporting my colleague and in commending this
Address to the House.
Mr. CRAWFORD: Mr. Speaker, before you
put the question, I think that if you read between n
the lines of the speeches made by the hon. Mover
of the address and the Seconder, you will probably
arrive at the real basis of the argument. Implied in
the Address is the fact that since workers in this
categoryy are underpaid, some reference should be
made in some form or the other to give them a more
living wage. The hon. Mover of the Address is ask-
ing that the deficit should be made up by a Christ-
mnas bonus and the hon. junior member for St. Lucy
has quite rightly, in my opinion, drawn attention
to the fact that what is really wrong is that their
basic wages are really too low and Government when
minded to give an increase of wages to Government
servants puts on a greater increase on the people in
the higher brackets, and when it gets down to the
employees in the lower bracket it gives them more
sparingly.
In 1953 when there was the last salaries revis-
ion the Government did not see fit to award the
workers in this category more than one penny an
hour. We on this side of the table demanded at least
a four cents increase and after strenuous opposition,
the Government made some sort of compromising
gesture by adding another cent to the proposed in-
crease. The hon. senior member for St. Joseph, now
the Premier, actually told the House that the in-
crease would mean a complete cessation of the Pub-
lic Works Programme and that we would have to
curb our social expenditure. There would be no
finances for carrying on the educational programme
and the most serious lamentation which came forth,
from him was to the effect of the financial destiny
which would overtake the colony if he agreed to the
request of the Opposition and give those workers
the increase which was demanded. The hon. mem-
ber said that the entire Public Works programme
would have to come to an end, and yet you will re-
member after that he allowed the then Colonial Sec-
retary, Mr. Robert Turner, who was appointed as


Salaries Commissioner for officials in the higher
brackets of the Service, to award the most extrava-
gant increases to Government officials over and above
the remuneration mentioned in this Address.
It will be still fresh to hon. members of the
House and the public, of course, .of the strenuous
debate which ensued in this House when the pro-
posals came before us, and it is still a matter for
heartburning how unfair was the answer of the Gov-
ernment when it came to giving an increase on the
one hand to those higher officials and what it did to
those who were lesser paid. So, Sir, by this reminder
that the salaries of these workers are manifestedly
much lower than what they should be, you can very
easily understand why the minds of some hon. mem-
bers on this side of the table should be exercised
over the unfair wages paid to the unestablished
staff, so to speak, in the Government Service.
Of course, this is not the time to dilate unneces-
sarily on this matter because at long last the Gov-
ernment has got around to the fact that Govern-
ment servants are in need of higher remuneration
if they are to cope with the higher cost of living. It
is a matter for regret that the large bulk of the
workers in Government Service gets less than those
who are working on sugar plantations. The average
agricultural worker when he gets work is paid at
a higher day's rate than, say, people who are work-
ing on the staff of the Department of Highways and
Transport or the Public Works Department, and it
is also known that among the members of the un-
established staff there is also a wage scale which
does not compare favourably with workers in similar
categories in private employment,
6.30 p.m.
Either therefore, Sir, the Government realises the
obligation under which it exists, in respect of these
workers by endorsing the words contained in this
Address and giving them this special bonus at
Christmas time, or better still, Sir, should endeavour
to ensure that their weekly earnings bear a better re-
lationship to employees in the high brackets of the
public service who for the greater part are entitled
to these high wages, long vacations with pay, holiday
with pay, pension rights and so on; and I repeat, Sir,
Ihey should endeavour to make their wages bear a
better relation to the remuneration of those in the
higher brackets -by seeing. to it that they are paid a
salary more in keeping with the abnormal high-cost
of living: The Government has done its best to in-
crease the cost of living; it has made a special effort
to see to it that the cost of living 'in Barbados is the
highest in the area. You will remember, Sir, what
they did with the Customs Duties. which themselves
were the highest in the area.
Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member is now go-
ing outside the terms of the Address. He must really
l:cep to the Christmas Bonus, and although the hon.
member has admitted that this was not the time to
deal with it at unnecessary length, yet he in speaking
of the wages of these workers, has repeatedly and at
some length dilated from the subject an4 I am sure
he should not now further dilate in the matter.
Mr. CRAWFORD: I have no desire to do that
Sir, but my recollection in connection with the matter
is that the last time it was before the House, the
Government members were inclined to treat it very
facetiously and there was opposition expressed today
on the floor of the House from the Government
Benches. One Government member at the time actu-
ally Icalled it trash so thaI my idea today is therefore
to endeavour to impress upon the minds of hon.
members that so deserving is this type of worker at
the hands of the Government in the moving of the


IJANUARY 17, 19'57


OFFICIAL GAZETTE











i.A dress, Iliat i can do no bcL Lc- Sli, iu.I .li reL..ul iU
l iiL' s l iat il people eed tills Ilmo(iy because oi
tLhe high cost of living. Far be it from me to dilate
today on aspects of the matter which might be more
properly considered if and when the actual salary
increases come before the House, but for the purpose
of lle Address before us, il is still hi :li ih esseutia
na:;.l hon. lmeninubrs should have impressed upon their
1iiinids the fact that while it i;as been oii:int i out ly
both previous speakers that these people are now
inilerpaid, the mere fact that the Government has ai
I ast appointed a Salaries' Commissioner is an ad-
nission that they regard salaries below what they
wouldul d he; and since these facts are unconrrovertible.
Ihen something should be done to redress these un-
fair ballances in so far as this type of worker is con-
i Vned. Therefore, S'ir. I make no apologies for:
remilindinl the House that the cost of living in Bar-
b~lo is is d !idal ;hi her thani t iS ii i n l ll l ii i
West Indian Colony in the area. It is higher than
the cost of living in Great Britain, it is higher than
tie cost of living in Canada, and it is higher than
the cost of living in the United States of America.
.;Foodstiuffs. .lolhos ind thn baic. i- ll f i '
,.ost more irl Barbados today than they do in these
places. Due mainly. Sir, to the policy of the (oov-
ernment it has directly contributed to the cost of
living by increasing Customs Duties: its policy as
regards commodities from America is the most strin-
gent in. the area where they allow far less than any
other West Indian Island. Everybody knows .
Mr. SPEAKER: The hon. member is now
pursuing a different line of argument.
Mr. CRAWFORD: I must Sir, most, necessar-
i'-y. What I want to respectfully submit is: that
there can be no argument for giving this I onus on
increased wages to this type of worker unless one
i ;l prove that the co-t of livi;;! 'nmil c I him 1o il an
I me1 Ti iTi ~m iin7 'Zij 'lint f ) !hr' ,no I,'.iid yvm
d.retiv increase the cost of living by taxation policy
a;d on the other hand, you purposely restrict the'
,oicapest eoods from coming to the market-and that
is what you are doing with American commodities-
there is no qniestion alboif it. Tn the other islands ot
tihe Woet Tndies the dollar expended in proportion iQ
for hi ex -,,s for essential (-nlini litie.i thini iln ]i '
'ido<. T repeatedly hear Commission MRVrchants
vwhrose business takes them to the other West Indian
-l inv ni:." ,liin< 0 1w t hl" 'l i rili ,''v i)i"' orders
w0hicl1 they can get in a small island like St. Vinceni
-. cR. Kitt: for American goods in comparison witli
.hat th,- can cet in Barbados. There is not one
sin)'lh essentiiil coni(io lit\ in Pl r 1-a s todiny whii'h
von cannot get cheaper from America than froiI
(roat Britain.
6.40 p.m.
Even when allowance is made for the difference
in exchange for putting sterling on a par with the
.LLmerican dollar, even the basic commodities, every
single one can be obtained cheaper from America
than from Great Britain. The policy of the Govern-
ment is to see that the minimum amount of goods is
bought from the American market, but n.oods are
obtained mainly from England.
Mr. SPEAIKE : 1 think the hon. member has
well elaborated on that.
Mr. CJA WFOR)D: I regret very much that T
am not allowed to say anything more on the matter
because I have some facts for the House which are
astounding. Be that as it may, since the Govern-
ment is directly responsible for the actual existence
of this type of worker, and since the Government is
adding an unnecessary burden to the back of this


Lj pe oui ,rer, then the obligation falls on them, as
said earlier, to endeavour to make this burden as
light at possible for the worker.
If, for the future, that is to say, if after tde
salary revision, we may expect some more reasonable
scale of remuneration, then as some sort of gesture
for all tile years that these people were underpaid
and exploited, the Government might well endorse,
iLe suggestion contained in the Address. Whether
you call it a Christmas bonus or not, they should
make some adequate lump sum payment to this type
of worker between now and 31st December. As I
said, we expect that when the salaries are revised, the
's will coliloi ii l '-irat- with tlhe ability of tnhe Gov-
ernment to pay, considering the enormous wealth
,lhich is extracted from the Country, and if the
wages are going to be reasonable in the future, let
lheni discharge that responsibiliily for Thi past by do-
ing something along te lines indicated in this Ad-
dress.
Mr. HAYNES: Mr. Speaker, while I see
ninny good points in what tihe hon. Mover of the pas-
ing of this Adi,ress has said, especially with regard
to the lower brackets of the Unestablished Staif of the
Civil Service, yet, I am not in favour of the title of
1 h Address. With regard to the question of an in-
centive bonus, I believe that most of the personnel in
charge of Departments could make note of all the
points of efficiency or working conditions and those
points could be considered by the Departments, and
;and an incentive bonus could be given on that Scale,
if you like, at Christmas time. I am quite sure that
the money thus spent would: be money well spent if
[hat system were adopted, but I certainly cannot con-
ceive the idea of the hon. senior member for St. Lucy
proposing that this Christmas bonus should be given
in this way. I do not think that any rational person
could conceive of it, T will support the Address if
11'1. (1111i 011' wo( l(1 i silo'ta an am eenlle llnt alohllg t.-
lines I have indicated.
Mr. BARROW: I do not regard it as a sound
economic policy to withhold the just reward of their
work from the workers for eleven months of the year
and then give them something at a time when it is
highly unlikely that tle workers will be able to re-
serve any of the money which is given to them for
purposes other than those of their own advancement.
At the same time, human conduct being what it is,
weply ingrained in this Colony. I would be the last
person to oppose the idea that at the very time when
the demands on the resources of the working class
mnan are at their highest, his purchasing power should
be increased in some measure in the way in which
the purchasing power of the clerk who is fortunate
enough to work with a big business firm is increased.
We all know that in certain business under-
takings in this Island, the employers pay big bonuses
to their workers including themselves, because they
consider themselves, by some peculiar act of mental
gymlnastic to be workers, although they may be sit-
ting in chairs and doing absolutely nothing all the
day long; but in order to cover up their reluctance
io pay into the Treasury of this Island, the excess
profits which they are making from time to time,
especially under a so-called Labour Government
they have adopted, the device of paying fantastic
i.lilnuies ill the region o(f 7,1000. $r(,000 or $9.000 to
themselves as Directors, and therefore, as employees
of the firms which they control. varying ii inversc'
proportion to the rank of the particular worker in the
firm down the Scale to bonuses of $300 and $400 a
month.


I


i, d






_OFFICIAL GAZETTE 255


Some firms pay as much as 10 months' bonus, some
5 months, some 2;,some of them pay 10 months' bonus
to Directors, and some 6 months' bonus to the junior
managerial staff; they pay various amounts depend-
ent on the amount of excess profits which the Control
Board and the Labour Government have allowed
them to accumulate in the space of eleven months of
the year.
7.00 p.m.
Now, their ability to make large disburse-
ments at Christmas time does not spring from any
conversion to christianity on their part; its springs,
as I have said before, from the desire naturally, on
their part, because of the hegemony under which
we are suffering at this time of our history to pay
as little money into the Public Treasury as they
legally are allowed to pay. That is their first instinct
and this instinct is. engrained in the economic life
of every citizen, so to speak, during the last five
years. They are saying: "I am not paying into the
Public Treasury more than I have to pay because
it is going to be squandered." In the second place,
they are able to pay this large bonus at Christmas
time for the simple reason that there is an increment
incurring to the financial assets of the firm during
the course of the year which is not provided for
even in their wage structure or their demands for
mortgage and capital outlay; in other words, the
excess profits are due to the fact that they are pay-
ing out to the workers less money during the course
of the year and the Christmas bonus then becomes a
deferred payment of wages.
In so far as the Government is concerned, the
only undertaking which it has of a commercial nature
is the Transport Board and we all know that that
Board will pot be able to pay out a bonus this year.
We know that Government is not of a commerical
nature and the people who work in Government can-
not stake their claim to a deferred payment on' the
same consideration which would prompt the clerical
worker in Broad Street to make his demand. But
there are other considerations. This Government has
thought fit that any one working for $180 a month,
whether he be in a profit making concern like the
General Post Office or in a department like the 'Edu,
cation Department or the Waterworks Department
which operating on a profit and loss basis cannot'
possibly pay for itself-without any distinction be-
tween Department and Department-has elected in
its wisdom and succuu~bed to the blandishments, o!'
certain officers of the colony a few years ago and
top-ranking Civil Servants to pay to those particu-
lar officers working for more than $400 a month a
deferred payment so that they can go' on holiday.
I challenge anyone to say that it is not a deferred
payment you pay him every three and a half years
in the form of leave passages for himself and his
wife. Leave Passage means a minimum of 400 given
to those employees who get over $180 a month for
every three and a half years of service. Let me say
that before the Labour Government came into power
in Barbados, no one thought that the climate of the
colony was inimical to the upper branches of the
Civil Service so that any one of them could claim,
as they do in Africa, that the climate is so inimical to
them that they need this deferred payment by the
granting of a leave passage to allow them to go back
home to recuperate. We have a policy laid down by
this Government that the basic needs of a human
beings are food, shelter and clothing. You get this
Government deciding though it had said so, that
Civil Servants who work for more than $180 a month
should have a deferred payment of 25% of their
salary given to them once every four years; that is,
at the end of 3/2 years they go on six months vaca-


tion and get something like 400. By simple arith-
metic it works out to 257 of their salary per annum.
This Government has also decided to give to
another section of the people of the colony, the agri-
cultural workers, especially at election time, a 19%
deferred payment although they are represented by
a strong and virile Trade Union; therefore we take
it that they get the maximum to which their labours
entitle them, taking into consideration the state of
the sugar industry.
Now, let us start with these assumptions. We
start with the assumption of good wages being paid
because of the revision of wages among the sugar in-
dustry.. You start with the assumption that the
Trade Union is already, getting for the workers a
fair and just proportion of the profits which were
and are being made by the sugar industry of Bar-
bados, and at election time you get Government
seeing to it that the sugar workers get this 19% de-
ferred payment. Speaking of that new principle
which Government has established, we have then at
one side of the stage, the Government deciding for
their own; employees a deferred payment. We have
as well a permanent system in the sugar industry
whereby the agricultuiral workers get a deferred
payment. Whether they get it in September or De-
cember (it is for some mysterious reason not un-
related to the election date) is a matter of supreme
indifference to'me, bit it is a fact'that after Ju ne
they get a deferred payment although they are well
organized in a Trade Union arind although their
average wages are far in excess of the average can-
tonnier who working for the Barbados Government
gets less than $11.60 a week 'of which $1.60 is cost
of living bonus. I will not refer to people like jani-
tors because they get less than $7 a week.
It is elementary, Mr. Speaker, ~ tat human re-
quiremerts' being more or less similar between per-
son and person, aid country and country, that when
a man has an income which Will provide him with the
basic requirements and leave him with an' excess over
and above his basic requirements, he has an element
of choice in the disposal of that part of his income
over his basic requirements. It may sound to some
hon. members as if I am theorising but I am quite
serious. A man who is working for $6.50 a'week ni t
no element of choice in the disposal of his income
because he has no excess income. A mat who. works
for $180 per month has an eletaent of choice'in the
disposal of his income, but a man working for, $45
per month has no element of choice in .the disposal
of his income.
7.10 p.m.
His income is disposed of for him the minute
he wakes up in the morning and demands his break-
fast because his whole purchasing power is consumed
by basic requirements. If we accept therefore the
fact that we are living in a Christian community and
that we have acquired the habit'of increased spend-
ing at Christmas time, and that you, recognize moral
obligations both to your friends and to your family
and to those who work for you and with you at this
time of the year which you are content to ignore
for the rest of the year, it means a maii working
for $11.60 a week-and I would go so far to say
a man working for less than $180 a month-cannot
give play to his desire to participate in the season
of goodwill to the extent to which he would like or
at all. He has not got any 'scope to allow hi'dself to
feel the same human being 's the. man who gets a
leave passage every four years or three and a half
years; he does not get leave passage at all; he has
not got that to look forward to. Every year in the
United Kingdom, so great is the increase in the
circulation of British Treasury notes that the Treas-
ury has to issue 256 million at the beginning of
December which they call back in during the


JANUARY 17, 1957









256 OFi' ICIAL GAZETTE


second or third week in January and destroy; but
there is this terrific temporary inflation, this terrific
desire of every single person in the community to
spend more money than he has been spending during
the rest of the year; and if I may come back home
to my original proposition, I would like to say this:
in the light of the talk of making appointments to
the higher branches of the Civil Service, in the light
of their elevation into the Sugar Industry and that
the payments are in an undesirable state of affairs,
iit should ino1 be computed with weekly workers that
tl:ere should be this 1111)p sn1 piayillmnt whihl is
:s ;|lly ilisicx r'led l 'efor, l.ahlur 1);y or be'or(e .Eh'-
t!on time; lthey have expected these deferred pay-
ments, whether yon call it leave passages or produc-
tion bonus or Christmas bonus for that matter; de-
ferred payment is a principle which has not only
1- endorsed and ,lr cepted bi'y i overi"v.,Iiient i'il1 illnii-
ated by them. and no other person, in so far as
Government spending is concerned.
Now, I would like to draw a reference to the
hon. junior member for St. Andrew for his not par-
ticularly liking the way in which the Resolution is
framed because he would prefer the payment to be
called an incentive. The hon. junior member for St.
Andrew says that he would agree it it were called an
incentive, ibut I would like to say this: !tlat aln
payment to a worker which makes him feel happier
and more content in the job that he is doing is an
incentive towards doing the job better; it must stand
to reason and I would like to know whether his
lieutenants and the other captains of industry along-
side of him call their Christmas bonus an incentive
payment or whether they call it a Christmas bonus.
In the last analysis, whatever you call it, whether
you call it Christmas bonus or production bonus, is
it not really and truly an incentive payment made
to the worker in order to make him feel he is getting
a bigger share of the product of his labour than
he would be if he did not get it at all? So it is no
argument against the Resolution moved by the hon.
senior member for St. Lucy that he has not elected
to call it an incentive payment. I will go so far
a;. to say it is an incentive, but it would he a mis-
payment for the simple reason that incentive pay-
ments should always be based on time rather than a
period of time during which you have worked. I
would like to say this before I sit, that even when
you take the people who are working for only 1.000
in the Government Service in Barbados, you will
find that with that 1.000 a year when they get leave
mnent to the lower branches of the Civil Service-and
I hope the hon. member for St. Lucy would accent
an amendment to let that run from 425 per annum
downwards, because that is the lowest salary level
at which leave passages are given; therefore, since
you have given everybody over 425 a year leave
passages, I feel it would be a good point, a point
chosen by Government themselves, to grant new
dispensation to the lower salaries of the Government
, i'tvi'e and I '.vmtlh like it po til 'o l hat i
month's salary at Christmas time is only eight and
a half or more correctly eight and a third per cent.
of their salary while sugar producers are getting
nore, and people with leave passages are getting
I 0 r' 15ok ;r *.','>% Thel arr drlira\ n td f lat l iolln tllt
over and above their salaries at the end of three
and a half years, when a man in the service would
get leave passage for himself alone not including
passage for his wife and children. In other words.
since they believe in the principle of maintaining
:iierelntlials. it is al oimsl as ;,,obl ,ioils :" tenlm as 1l,"i--
Ing economy because that economy is not going any-
--Icre at all, it is like a cork bobbing up and down.
hie Address of the hon. senior member of St. Lucy


would preserve the principle of wage differential,
because that would be giving the workers 8%, where-
as people getting 1,000 get 10% at the end of the
year and those getting 4,000 are getting 25%.
whetherer .\yo)i .aIl it inlceoliive )pay\ile l produictionl
bonus, Christmas bonus or otherwise, the principle
must be reduced to the lowest common factor.
Mr. E. D. MOTT1,EY Mr. Speaker. I \\ill not
be long. I voted for the Aiddress in 1949 and I will
\i)te for it agaill today. I have ri-,en in offer con ratu-
iations to the Government or to cominmeind the G(veri-
i.ient because oi' what thle lionl. Premier lias sai.
()n the last occasion, tlhe lion. Premiieir niade ia ver
w itty speech, aind said that we should have amelnd-
ci Hi e Atddress so as to iclhide persons who wanted
to 'o inl a week-end spree, or ,who wanted to have
a birhd ti'. pifary and so io. I a11 not mlakiln'. any
lengthy sp'eeh today : I amt voting for the Address on
the a n mrii eC, whi!h t .- lion. !Preiilier lIas given to
ihe holl. senior ienIber for St. Lucy. that tile matter
is now\ before the S'alabries Collllissioner, and it would
Ie taken care of.
Thai sei ind to Il ib quite contrary to the lion.
lPre.mier's opiilnion t1 the last loccasion. The lion
rol'llier has inferred tlihat they Iare ill favoi r of thli
Address: lihe said, when 1e asked ift thie holn. senior
nienber fr S1. Lawv would .,ive way to hint, that
Ine 11iialir is liefol'r the Salarie s Cllomi issiolner.
lake i t ihlt the Government is ill lavotir iof tile 1)1p (
fo-'ial contained in !his Alddress.
lion. (. II. Al)AAM: (Oi a point of explanation
Samn too olt to be Ica'lht in anyv trap. IA MEMBEI :
You are caught in it now!] I have not expressed any
opinion \whatievr. WhVle ilie Salaries Conmmissioner
has the conpletle position before hill, he will report
to us: then we will be able to sayi to what extent
we agree with him. I am not saying what is the
opinion of the Gover'nment towards this matter, he-
cause we have not discussed it yet.
Mr. E. I). MOTTLEY: The Salaries Commis-
sioner must have had terms of reference of some
sort. I might be a fool, but you could not accuse
the hon. senior nmenmber for St. Lucy of being a
fool. lint how else coulld ;i'nybodYv ilterpre! the llon.
Premier vwhen. lie got up after the hon. senior"
member for St. Lucy began to moi-,. tlh passing
of this Address and asked the honm. Member to give
way to him?. From what the H[on. Premiier said.
well, if he were pokinilg funl. I do not k w110; lhe
min.i-ht have been nnki!likuo f1in. 1uin he asked 1iwe
honl. senior meihber fto St. Luitc to give way to
1111 and he said tlat the tnltter is before tile Sal-
anie's (Coitlissionler. We all know that tile Ilon
Premier would not waste alny time in plotting l'-
folre tie Salaries (Coln issioner any thing with
which the Governlmlnt was iot in favour'. I take
it that the Government is in favour lo the pay-
mient of this C('hristtimas olllns as s't oult in this
Address, and if 11hf Salaries Commissioner recomi -
mtiends 15;. the liHon. Premier will recoiinl etid 10'.
I amil glad indeed to know that tl Ilon. Premier',
who is r''allyv thle Governi'leil, ha been convertedd
and( feels [IMr. TTfDOI: lie has not said sol -
well, the lion. Premier says that tlhe matter is inow
before the Sralaris Commissioner. I say that I am
supportingl this Address. atld amn 'lad to see frlom
the expression of tlhe hlon. Premier. that the G(ov-
o'lrnment is ill fiavout r of it.
Thei qtiistioni that this A lddr 1/as pil and reslp'd in /i r r,. hr. fthn T ,itsei
; .,1l;li l ,. follow s : -.
At jrs: Messrs. VArTTrcAN, [laughter], BRANCKER,
BARRow. TDnoR, CRAWFORD, ATL.nR, HAYNTES, (IOD-
DARD and E. D. MOTTTY.-9.


J \ \ r_xy 17, 1957










1-7eI, 19), Ulti-IWAL GAZETTE 257


.<.;: H on. < ;. I;. A A :"s, [t.oi. Li G. 1. I.
Cit N I lon. 1]. ox. lion. C. E. 'iL,:. M r.
: Li ; l I* 1 -10W PY YV. _MiLRI-7.
'lr. S`i'EAK, E: iTh question ihas becL u decided
in i ;. Dilnrmative, nin-e h'.i members votia' "Aye.'"
;ial,' -.'vn hon. em i'i"' voItin-g "No." I dec.': the
', s e it. I er k the hon. senior Ie.111 ,ih,:' e for
St. Iucy to present this Address.
A-K. i;lLA\C l K : s our 1.: L '"

TLE BARBADOS LIGHT AND POWER COM-
PANY (PUMPING STATION) BILL

Mr. G ODDA)l.\): Jr. Speaker, i ask l"ave to
jn .. 'd \.ith XI rder No. as the next (' ," ~ thl

There being no objection, leave was grated the

110 Is, the House wc':t into C('oiiiitee "'i, I/N Bill,
The 1-Prconiable wias postpolnd.
Claus. 1 and 2 wre' called aind passed.
.Vlua~iie 3 rwas called. It rcad as follows-
'3. The company is hereby authorized to con-
.i'i ut and maintain two or more pipelines begin-
niiug at a place near the shore of Grave's End in
t.lh ,arisli of St. Michael in this Island to be ap-
pli \-d by 'the (Governor-in-Executive Comunitt-ee,
thlec.ei' roiitinuilgi on or under the fore-shore aind
aloi,;' the sea lbed to a place in the sea to be approved
by u!e Governor-in-Executive Conomittee for the
ijlll'nse Of coiiveyinug sea water to he pumped froin
tlih' ,.,a, into the colmpanly's circulating water pIunp-
ing p iant and thence returning to the sa.i by such
jijielin es.
2ir. t)OD)1Al): I beg to move 1lat Clause
3 ;;.. -!d. part.
ri. ALLI)ER: I beg to second tihat.
2 r. iA. l\lil Ai\: AIr. C liairimiiin, Clanuse 3 is to
Th" .cl9 that the company is hereby :nuthiorised to
cole:,- t and lmailntain two or more pipelines be-
gi'l, 'i- ;'t a |)lar near the sh 're tf 11 lii,- parish of S1. Michael in 1his island to be ap-
jei o'ed by 111e (overnor-iii-ExecCutive Commiiiittee,
tliei. ceontinlin g on to or under the foreshore and
along the sea-bed to place in the sea to be approved
by tie (Iovernor-i(i-Executive ('Conittee for the
pur~,Ios' of conveVing' sea water to be pumped from
the sea into the (company's circulation wa ter pnllp-
in1) plant andu thence returning lo the sea ,by such
pil .Iinc'. I want yon to read those( liis carefully.
I wonder, Air. Chairman, if any memniber of the
(' l\-,-'in!u t w1ouild like to get up and inform lelill-
oers of this lHouse that they mot only approved of
tli, ilatt:'r before it passed lit'e 11'luse illt that the
ii'lines wvere lewing' laid down s.ime three weeks ago
a iqi' oxinttely sixty-five feel north of the canteen,
'h;-' is tL1r, all along with that, they have entered
lif') a) i' v'ree'nl)ll already for tilh purpose of putting'
\.' thit !)i)l'hline. As a matter of fact, it you go
up) to Gr ,v1s E1i11, a.s you are austomed, you are
lil.cl to a11 down and breaks your ieck causee of
ihe !. vo-fte diilln eler pipelines, which are lying, on
ith,! Iad1 It is soteihiung which anlly ho. member
ran h'i1c( floor hiiimsel1f.
.ir. CiATlII AX: I would lie ti ti ll thle hon.
nwi;iier that this House has alr'ady a.-sed a R(eso-
]it, )r on this sainm 1hing.
Jr. io' ,,i; V: But I am] sparking nl Clause

:r. (:'1I.\!! I\AX: I am only telling you that
i, bT- y hi's pIa-eOd tV]e l'esoluhti n to api'ronve of
th,, 1,- o,' X ],hi, had at ( rave's I "1nd to the Barbados
LiJ'h. ah" l Power Co(mpany.
1Mr. PA.1\1(>^: I ani saying that not only have
we ac'rePd to the PR'solulin ii to )1nrove of if I e' b-


.,' Th< inl, binu tin the honourabhle junior inen, or
for C('hris-t LChurch ihas il ntroduciie ihis Bill in this
1ous1 when all of that had been agreed to already,
so thai' we are only going through a Gilbert and
Sullivanl 'arce of passiinH something which is ai,
accomplished fact. In other words, tiNs Chamber ia,
reduced to the level of' a school ldeliaing society
because it has no !powli' to disallow or disapprove
of anything which is against the public interest.
.1 do not want to go into another aspect of the
matter now, because I have already talked at length
on thal, but I do not like us to be going through the
mockery of passing a Bill in all its stages when the
Executive has already agreed to lease the Barbado,
Light and Power Compa ny the land, As a matter of
fact. they have seen and show n us tlie plan. a priv-
diege wilh which the hon. junior inmember for Christ
Church has not been vouchsafed.
I want to say to this Committee: do not ask me
to support you int giving permission to any retrospee-
tive thing which they have done int connivance with
hie Government or on their own. As it appears to 1me,
it is not necessary for them to come to the House with
this Bill to authorise them to lay down pipelines
which were not manufactured in Barbados and which
ale aiout 20 to -24. inches in diameter and which they
have already laid out on the foreshore of Graves
End, where they are to be laid down. These pipelines
lave colloe all tle way front England and must have
t-wenl ordered over a year ago. This matter is at fore-
Cone i(colusion and I am1 not participating in any
miockery like this. If this Comnpany w'as owned by
the people of Barl ados as .should have been done
according to the ierms of the Barbados Light and
Power Company, it might have been alright, but I
think it is an etrirolltory on their part and whoever
assistedl them to illt down the pipelines. I strong'
o(iject to it. I aun never vote for it because, in my
t(pinion this whole thing is a hollow moi'kery; the
vway in which public affairs in this island are co;-
d!iit'el is a nmoikery both to the rural law andi
Plarlianmentary de(,mocracy.
T'( qollcslo,. tllha/it (Cli"se :: sNttd. part ir'Ls put
a d resolved in the affirmative without division.
'l(auscs 4 to 10 inclusively wrce called and
passed.
Clause 11 was called. It reads as follows:-
"This Act shall continue in force until and in-
,lusive of the day, oi 1P!77."
Mr. (CODDAlID: I am asking leave to fill in
the spaces, the first with the word thirty-lirst i' ;. :
the second with the word "August."
I beg to move that Clause 11 stand part.
Mr. AILLDER: I beg to second that.
Thd question was put and resolecd in tihc affirm-
alirec withl.out division.
7.40 p.m.


Air. ALLD)iltl: I b'e! lco e'ond tiai.
The ques'lioni was put a(nd resolved in hle af'irc:-
ilirc wrilhout ih'cision.
On tlhe moiio, ,.f Ji'r. (1ODD0 i 1iD c,, 'id :,/ byi
rI. ALLDER I/hr Plreamble wal s passed.
O(n the imoion, of Mr. (O)lDADI) setonded by
Air. ALLDER, lIr. ( .. niin retporerd hli passing
of 1te fH ill in Committce, .' 31i. f2R 777i? re-
li:tncd tf/, PChair and reported accordinglyy.
On the xc'prait motions of lir. GODDARDA
,condd)(ld in. each ease 1)y I/r ALLDER thie Till was
rqnr d a third time tand passed.
Hon. G. H. ADAMS: Mr'. Speaker. I shonla
!ike to say iin eoIll! tion with Order No. 9 of Private


t








OFFIC4&L1 G ZTT JANARY17,, TI 1957


Members' Business standing in the name of the hen.
junior member for St. Lucy. When he gave notice
of this, it occurred to me that the honourable mem
ber would find considerable difficulty in getting a
ruecessful answer if this Address passed or was even
forwarded. I made the necessary enquiries and I
am sure that there is no chance of having the hopa.
member's request complied with, and I am suggesting
that he does not proceed with this Address because
it would be rather embarrassing,, to say the least, if
the House of Assembly passed an Address asking for
something to be done if the answer is: gping to be
"g4o". I believe tTie honqurable memb, sees the
serisibleness, if I may coin a word, o 7not proceeding
with it and I wanted to make that, statement so that
the. hon. member may be clear on ce;taia things which
however much we may like, are not just done and
1his, I am sure, is one of the things, Sir.
Mr. TUDOR: Mr. Speaker, I have heard with
interest the statement of the Hon. tile Premier and
I am; glad to hear also that a, check has been made
before haad to ascertain the feasibility of the passing
of this Address in. this House. Far be it from me,
M*. Speaker, to sponsor an Address.in this House,
noaCreptrqversial a it is, which might- be visited by
a ,rqbfi f this HIuse. The Address itself is of
coarse nonrpoljical in character but still very serious
I wilj tellyou-wh.tt I will do, Mr, Speaker, I won't
aetu~ a wit d4p.w, iti from. the Order Paperj but: I
%i'J just lave. it, there so that I. can satisfy myself
by an inlepe*a.t check, of it in the House of
Conlmons aVdother, interested, parties as. to whether
the proce4dre envisaged was as wrong as it is alleged,
to be.


I-on. G. H. ADAMS: I hoped the hon. members
would have understood the explanation given. I took
the trouble to make enquiries so that he would not
he in the position of not knowing what the answer
was going to be. I have seen some such questions
asked, but of course if the hon. member is going to
get a member of the House of Commons to ask the
question, he along with that person would be made
to look silly.
Mr. TUDOR: If the hon. member would give
way, I never said I would get a member of the
House of Com~mons to ask the question, I said I
would have an independent check in the House of
Commons.
Hon, G. H. ADAMS: I could not do more than
I have done through the most appropriate channels.
1 found out wbht the answer --as going to be and
the hon. member said he was going to make enquiries.
Hon. Dr. H. G. H. CUMMINS:. Mr. Speaker,
the hon senior member for St. George a few moments
ago made some remark in connection with the Bill
under consideration of work being done in advance
at Graves End. The Minister of Communications and
Works is trying to find out if that. is correct and he
will know next Tuesday.
The Order Paper having been fited.
Hon. Dr. H, G; H. C GUMINS. I beg to move
that the House do now adjourn until this day week
at 3.00 p.W.
Hon.G. G.; ADAMS: I beg to second that.
The question weas put and- resorted in the ffirm-
alive without division, and Mr. ~PEAKER adjourned'
the Jouse accordingly:
7.40 p.m.


oFFICIap QAZETTE


jANUARY 17, 19-57






Supplement to Official Gazette, January 17, 1957


13-(1956-61)


1957


BARBADOS



REPORT


OF THE


Comptroller of


ON THE


Customs


Customs


Revenue, Trade,


Shipping


Excise of the Island


FOR THE YEAR



1954


Advocate Co.. L.td -- rintcrs to he Governmenl 1 of E;B!,iic-


and














CONTENTS


REVENUE
Gross amount collected iunl er each subl-head (Io revenue i tlhe years 19.2. 1953 and


1954 ... .
Drawback of Duty ... ...
Net Revenue Collected ...
Import Duties ... ..
Surtax... ...
Cause of increased revenue ... ...
Value of Total Imports ... ...
Value of goods imported free of duty
Recapitulation of Imports for Home (ConIsumption
Alcoholic beverages and tobacco entered for Home (Conslumptiion
Goods entered foi Home Consumption paying duty at specific rates
Goods entered for Home Consumption paying duty at Ad Valorem 1
Vessels entered ...
Aircraft entered ... ..
Excise ...
General


Review ,.f the vear's trad, .
Explanatory Notes ...

TABLE
1 Total Trade-Imports.


Exi


Trade Years 1938. 194i


l~ntes


... ... I'ar)a raph 2

4
5- 7

9
10
.. 11--12'



16
... .. 17
... .. is
19-29
30-410


STATISTICAL APPENDIX

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 2
... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 5


ports (Domestic and Re-Exports) and Balance of Visible
s to 1954 ... ... ... .. ..... ... ... 26


2 Value of Imports. Exports of Domestic produce and Re-Exports-Anlalysis by
Sections Year 1954 ..
3 Direction of Trade-1949 to 1954-Analysis by ('urrencY Areas and principal Coun-
tries of Origin and destination ......

4a. Value of Imports-1954. Analysis by (Currency Areas and Sections

4b Value of Exports-1 954. Analysis by Currency Areas and Sections

5 Value of Imports-1954. Analysis by Sections and Divisions

6 Value of Exports (I)omestic anll Re-Exports)-1954. Analysis by Sectionis and
Divisions ....


7 I)irection of Trade-1954. Analysis by Geiographical Areas ...


... 45


8 Imports-1954. Detailed Analysis showing quantities and values and countriess of
Origin .. .

9 Exports-1954. Detailed Analysis showing quantities and values and Countries of
destination .


10 Trade with the British Caribbean Territories-Total Imports-1954 ...

11 Trade with the British Caribbean Territories-Total Exports-1954 ...


... ... 203)

... ... 206


12 Imports of (Gold and Cuirrent Notes and Coins-1954. Detailed Analysis showing
values and countriess of Origin ....


13 Exports of (Gold and Curirrent Notes and Coins-1954 ...

14 Expoirts of Sugar-1945 to 1954 ... ...


...... 20

... 210


Exports of Molasses-194 to 1954 ...
Exports of 'Rum---1945 to 1954 ...
Value oft' Domestic Exp)ort-195.) to 1954
Value of Re-Exports-1950 to 1954 ...















REPORT


OF THE



Comptroller of Customs


ON THE CUSTOMS REVENUE, TRADE, SHIPPING AND EXCISE OF THE
ISLAND FOR THE YEAR 1954.


Customs Depart ment,
Barbados.
7th I)ecemeber. 19,55.

THE HONOURABLE,
CHIEF SECRETARY.

Sm,
1 have the honour to forward for the information of His Excellency the (Governor, the Annual Report on
the Department of Customs and Excise showing the Revenue. Trade. Shipping and Excise of t he Island for the
year ended 31st December, 1954.

CUSTOMS

R REVENUE


2. The following Table shows the amounts under various heads
1954 with the increases or decreases comparingg 1954 with 1953.


collected during the years 1952, 1953 and


GROSS RECEIPTS


Import Duties ... ...
Surtax ... ...
Tonnage Dues ... ...
Ships' Bonds ... ...
Petroleum Warehouse (ent ...
Government Spirit Bond Rent
Powder Magazine ent ...
Inspection of Animals Fees ...
Additional Petrol Tax ......
Package Tax ......
Additional Tax on Diesel Oil used in
Road Vehicles ... ..

TOTALS ... ..


1952


S
3,714.569
431.036
109.542
1.S42
294
85.275
15.766
94
761.841
192.757

3.293

5.316.309


1953



3.533,347
377.374
100.649
l.8()0
4316
93.130
1.033
147
927,725
140.477

3.543

5.179.667


1954



3,981,554
439.662
111.725
1.S63
289
95.927
31
140
976.624
167.407

6.153

5.781,375


Increase


8
44 8.207
-2.288
11.076
57

2.797


48.899
26.930

2.610

602,864


S)ecrease







147

1.002






1.156


Net Increase .S601l,708.


REVENUE REFUNDED AS DRAWBACKS, ETC.

3. To arrive at the Net Revenue collected during the year, it is necessary to deduct the following
amounts which were refunded as drawbacks etc.


(a) On goods slhortlanded. etc. ... .. .... .. ...
(b) On goods exported (Bayv Rum excldd) ... .. ......
(c) On Bay Rum exported ... ... .. .. ... ...
(d) On Commercial Samples exported ... ... .. ... ... ...
(e) On Goods I)utv Paid at the General Rate, pending the production of Cer-
tificates of Origin ... ... ... ... ..
(f) On Road Tax (Act 1942-1) 1947-27 ... ... .....

TOTAL ... ............


823.815
1 1.100
16.206
1.547

3.648
1.945

;.. "2'il












NET REVENUE

4. The total 858,261 refunded as drawbacks etc., when deducted from the Gross Receipts makes the net
amount of Revenue collected for the year 85,723,114 compared with $5,108.382 in 1953 an increase of $614,732.

5. Import duties are sub-divided into three heads as follows:-
(a) Duty collected on goods paying Specific Rates.
(b) Duty collected on goods paying Ad Valorem Rates.
(c) I) ity collected as Surtax.

TOTAL DUTY OBTAINED AT SPECIFIC RATES.

6. The Revenue obtained from Imports paying Specific Rates of duty excluding Surtax, amounted to
$1,819,436.
TOTAL DUTY OBTAINED AT AD VALOREM RATES.

7. The Revenue obtained from Imports paying Ad Valorem Rates of duty excluding Surtax, amounted
to $2,162,118.

SURTAX.

8. The Revenue obtained from the Surtax amounted to '-4..'1 ;.1'

CAUSE OF INCREASE) REVENUE.

9. The Increase in Revenue as compared with 1953 is due mainly to the increase in the quantity ot Manu-
factured Goods, duty paid for Home Consumption.

IMPORTS

VALUE OF TOTAL IMPORTS.

10. The value of Total Imports for the year 1954. exclusive of Bullion and Coin and Intransit Trade
amounted to $48,763,353.


11. The following Comparative Statement shows the Value of Articles imported
purposes during the years 1953 and 1954.


free of Duty for special


For His Excellency the Governor ...
For The Colonial Government ... ...
For The Barbados Electric Company ... ...
For The Barbados Gas Company ..
For The Barbados Light Aeroplane Club ..
For The Barbados Regiment ... ...
For The Barbados Rifle Association ... ...
For The Barbados Telephone Company ...
For Bona Fide Gifts for distribution to poor persons
For The Boy Scouts and Girl Guides Associations ...
For Colonial Development and Welfare ...
For Consuls ... ... ...
For The Extra Mural Department of the W.I. University
For The Imperial and International Communications Ltd.
For International Aeradio Ltd. ... ... ..
For Places of Worship ... ...


Totals ...


1953:


$
7,883
598,145
212.478
6,437
2.336
4,828
1,086(
226,180
336
784
929
9.503

147,621
1,532
22,149

1,242,227


1954



527
826,192
264,852
1,327
1,944
1.136
942
224,008
60
984
915
9,054
175
141,370
4,603
8.809

1,486,,898










5

12. The following Statement shows the Value of all other articles on the exemption from Duty List
imported during the ears 1953 and 1954.


Advertising Matter of N.C.V. ... ... ... ......
Animals and Birds Living for Food Poultry ... .....
Other kinds ... ...
Animals and Birds Living not for food ... ... ...
Agricultural Implements ... ... .. ... .... .. ... ...
Articles used in converting spirits into Articles requiring Rum in their manufacture
Books Printed ... ... ... ........
C har oal ... .. ... ... ...... ... ... ... ...
Coconuts ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Cotton- R a ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
E earth and Sand ... .. ... ... ... ...... ... ...
E gg s... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Fishing Equipment ... ... ... ... ......
Fish Fresh including Turtle ... ..... .. ...
Fruit- F resh ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Lemon and Lime .luice ... .. ........ ..
Hides and Skins ... ... ... ...
Insect icides for t he Control of Plant Diseases ... .. .
Machinery a nd Apparatus for Agricultural purposes (Tractors and Parts)
Maclhiner and Apparatus for Agricultural purposes (Other kinds) ... ... ..
Malchinery and Apparatus f)or Boringt for Oil and refining ...... ... ..
Machinery and Apparatus for manufacturing Biscuits ... ...
Machinery and Alpparatus for manufacturing Bricks etc. ...... ...
Machinery and Apparatus fr Copra .. .. .. ... .. ..
\1 ,. 1111 ia' and Apparatus for manufacturing Cotton Yr Cott o Ynn Cotton Goods from
Cotton Yarn ... ... ... ... ... ...
Machinery andi Apparatus for manufacturing Ice ... ... ... ...
Machinery and Apparatus for Irrigation ... .. .. .. .. ...
Machinery and Apparatus for Printing ... .........
Machinery and Apparatus for Sugar and Rum ... .
machineryy and Apparatus for manufacturing Tobacco ... .
Machines- Sewin ... ... ... .. .......
Maps and Charts ... .......
Oil- Bay ... ......
Paper-Currenc'y Notes ... ..
Paper-Printing, Writing and Wrapping ... ... ... ......
Parcel Post ... ... ... .. .. ....
Pictures. Engravings etc. ... ... ... ...
Pioneer Industries-articles specified for .. .. .. .....
Plants. Seeds and Bulbs ... ... ... .. .......
printing Ink ... ... ... .. .. ... ... ... .. ...
R a g s ... ... ... ... .. .. ... ... ... ... ...
Rayon Staple FIres ...
Sea Island Col L l 'a res .. .. ... ... ... ... ...
Tablets and Toiimlistones ... ... .. .. ... ... ......
W\ ood. Fuel ... ... ... ... ...
Yeast- Except Proprietary Branlds .. .. ... ... ... ... ...


Totals ...


IHullion and Coin


_~__~~I~


~


1953




32.291
5.570


24,133
1.793
43.946
188,235
11.300
20.228
8.252
24.846
40.497
6,840(
90.224
907
20
3.532
230,253
33.862
674.229
19,582
28,678
76,966

3,134
4,129
12.802
45,752
1.233.855
1,206
61.893
88
540
2.210(
398.055
12.970
7.383
147.405
19,815
4.482

t 2
35. 124
2.278
75.2(14
852

3.635.421


1954




11.342
12.501
30
48
8.488
865
61.461
178.020
18,800
27,889
11,281
18.013
57.076
7,742
176,053
2.951

70,677

81,411
460.846
3.243
2,233
73,238

585
3.880
8.482
4 ,, ,1

866,821
4,253
120.402

231
20,422
561,432
14.548
4,759
199,271
16,778
7.171
99
9.981
60.9(05
3.914
81.196
5.021

3.614 G2


s.Ss(o












13. Recapitulation of imports for Home (Consumption during the ycars 1953 ail 1954.

VALUE C.1.F.


1953


... ... 1.242,227


Free of D)uty for Special Purposes
Other Comnmercial Arlicles:-
(a) Free Goods ...
(1) )utiable Articles ...


III. Bullion and Coin ...


... ... ... ... 3.635.421
... ... ... ... 37.378.50.,s


1.0S87


SPIRITS, WINES AND TOBACCO

14. The following Comparative Statement shows the quantities of Spirits, Wines and Tobacco entered
for Home Consumption during the years 1952 to 1954.


Brandy, Whisky and liqueur gals.
Gin
Wines. sparkling ... ...
Other Kinds
Tomacco-leaf lbs.
Manufactured
Cigars and Cigarettes


9,485
7.394
S33
13.887
282,096
3,574
33.931


1953


9,300
6,730
807
14.793
291,767
2,942
27,651


1954


10,103
7,335
722
13,738
293,745
3,345
27,556


1.4S6,89S

3.614.526
42,049.lH04

47,150,.42S

S,880(












HOME CONSUMPTION

15. STATEMEiNT OF ALL GOODS SUBJECT TO SPECIFIC RATES OF I)UTY ENTERED
FOR HOME CONSUMPTION DURING THI YEAR 1954


COMMODITY


Calves tor rearing aln breeding
Swine lor rearing and breeding
Other Sw ine for Slaughter
Goats and Kids for Rearing and
Beef and Veal-Fresh ... ...


Breeding ...


S.I.T.(C.
No.


001--01.2
001-03.1
001-03.2
00()1-)09.1
011-01


011-03

011-04

011-09
012-01.1
012-01.2
012-01.9
012-02
013-01
013-02.1
013-02.2
013-02.9
022-01.1


022-02.1


022-02.2


023-01
024-01
031-02.1

031-02.2
031-02. 9
041-01
042-02. 1
042-02.9
043-01
044-01
045-01.2
046-01
047-02
048-04.1
048-04.3

048-09.1
051-04
054-01
0454-02
054-09
054-09
055-02.9


Salmon and Trout-Pickled ...
Other Fish Salted, Dried etc. ...
Wheat and Spelt-Unmilled ...
Rice in small packets for Retail sale
Other Rice .
Barley, Unmilled ... ..
Maize (Corn) Unmilled ...
Oats, Unmilled ... ..
Meal and Flour of Wheat and Spelt
Meal and Flour of Maize ((orn)


Biscuits-Sweetened ...
Biscuits- Unsweetenedl

Corn (Maize) Canne ...
ApplesFresh ...
Potatoes .
Beans and Peas ...
Onions ..
Other Fresh Vegetables
Vegetables-Canned ...


055-04.1 Arrowro'ot .. ..
061-0(2 Sugar Refined ...
071-0)1 Coffee-Raw ..
071-02 Coffee--Prepared ....
* Free of Duty for Special Purposes.


No.
No.*
No.
No.*
lb.
lb.*
lb.
lb.
lb.*
lb.
lb.*
lb.
lb.
Ib.
lb.
lb.
Ib.
lb.
lb.
lb.

lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.*

lb.
lb.*
lb.
lb.
lb.
Ib.*
Ib.

lb.
lb.
Ilb.
11b.
lb.
lb.
lb.
Ib.
lb.
Ib.
lb.
lb.
lb.*
lb.




11),.
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.*

cwt.
lb.
lb.


Quantity



2
1I




248
159.510
10.541
162
28.634
18
38.153
49,787
124.242
3.759.130
979.100
14,417
68.175
83.289
1.054.217

3.377,566
71.360

218,280)
1.458

37.161
250.726
1,007.984
559,375
2.909,412
34.008
29.460
214.434
79.344
51.1000
15.758.926
119,3904
142.845
3.378.226
20.923.245
4.616.945
36.265
18.633
30
1.313
41.01il
8.095.212
2,485.460
3.089.136
55.411
121,579
1.425
45.228
2.588
51.520)
59.202


Value
C.I. F.
S B.W.I.


700
569
24
60
374.989
290
64.333
6,129
163
27,060
19
18.739
46.535
113,259
950.857
366.202
9.679
79.588
53.582
625.747

776.120
12.346

189,656
998

10,685
i61.039
804.975
292,706
692,969
8,213
10,.117
36.9(01
6,410
8.807
1,767.923
13,375
10,702
223.588
1,754.199
376,574
29.461
17.796
109
615
11.911
31 8,.:37
325.719
201.005
10.734
37,037
315
9.413
33.596
39.336
101.048


Mutton and Lamb-Fresh ... ... ...
Pork- Fresh ... ...

Poultry. Killed or Dressed ... ... ...

Meat Other Kinds Fresh ...
Bacon-Dried, Salted etc. not Canned ...
Ham-Dried. Salted etc.. not Canned ...
Other Salted Pork ... .....
Beef and Veal-Pickled ......
Sausages-Not Canned ... ...
Hams-Canned .. ... ...
Sausages-Canned ... .. ... ...
Meat-Other (aned .. .. ..
Milk and Cream-Condensed or Evaporated
not less than 8% of Butter fat ... .

Milk and Cream-dry-not less than 8,, of
Butter fat ......

Milk and Cream dry-less than 80, of Butter
fat ... ... ... ... ...

Butter .....
Cheese ......
Codfish .... ...l


Duty and
Surtax Col-
lectible


-



7.037

804
53

157

193
682
1.502

4.945
72
1.634
1.763
16.730

38.885


661


2,590

29.888
14.160
11.222

176
478
28


344
282
1.789
12,113
5,498
1.677
410

12
72
30,212
5.720
15.565
661
824

131
11,.522
618
1.420










8

HOME CONSUMPTION-(Continued)

15. STATEMENT OF ALL GOODS SUBJECT TO SPECIFIC RATES OF DUTY ENTERED
FOR HOME CONSUMPTION DURING THE YEAR 1954

Value Duty and
S.I.T.C. COMMODITY Unit Quantity C.I.F. Surtax Col-
No. $ B.W.I. lectible


072-01 Cocoa-Raw ... ... .. ... ... lb. 672 191 8
072-02 Cocoa-Prepared ... ... ... ... lb. 263,239 111' 20
074-01 Tea ... ... ...... lb. 227,282 280,180 16,332
lb.* 2,100 2,614 -
081-01.1 Hay and Fodder ... ... ... ... lb. 33,830 2,649 24
081-01.2 Bran and Pollard ... ... ... ... lb. 5,344,697 262,212 3.400
081-03 Oilmeal and oilcake ... ... ... lb. 10,026,878 677,182 10,238
081-04 Food Wastes and Prepared animal Feed
N.E.S. .. ... ... ... l. b. 12,837,629 1,036.904 3,170
111-01 Aerated and Mineral Waters ... ... ... doz. pts. 535 2.533 77
112-01.1 Sparkling Wine ... ... .. ... gal. 722 11,022 3,972
112-01.2 Still Wine in Bottles ... ... .. ... gal. 4,979 33,013 14,572
gal.* 268 1,270 -
112-01.3 Still Wine in Wood ... ... ... ... gal. 7,299 21,648 18.570
112-01.4 Medicinal Wine ... ... ... gal. 1,200 9,421 1.008
112-02 Cider and Perry ..... ... gal. 394 1,285 66
112-03.1 BeerandAle ... ... ... ... ... gal. 151,670 287,785 48,265
112-03.2 Stout and Porter ... ... .... gal. 116,056 233,859 32,507
112-04.2 Whisky ... ... .. ... 7.811 67,171 68,448
gal.* 29 259 -
112-04.3 Gin ... ... ... gal. 7.32 42,739 51.266
gal.* 12 112 -
112-04.4 Brandy ... ... ... ... ... gal. 1,186 17.426 11,646
112-04.5 Bitters ... ... ... ... gal. 399 3,752 3.496
112-04.9 Distilled Alcoholic Beverages N.E.S. ... gal. 1.222 21,215 9.323
121-01.1 Tobacco Unmanufactured-leaf Unstemmed lb. 293,745 332,497 898,860
122-01 Cigars and Cheroots ... ... ... lb. 64 556 256
122-02 Cigarettes ... ... ... .. lb. 27.419 88.067 114,083
lb.* 73 133 -
122-03.1 Tobacco Manufactured ... ... ... lb. 3,339 10,957 8,281
lb.* 10 -
122-03.2 Snuff ... ... ... ... lb. 6,266 7.824 7,653
221-02 Copra ... ... ... .. ... cwt. 72,290 1,128.178 2,604
221-03 Other Oil Seeds, Oil Nuts etc. ... ... cwt. 219 4,410 7
243-02.1 Douglas Fir ... ... sup. ft. 3,329,458 562,191 2,875
243-02.2 Pitch Pine ... ... ... .. .. sup. ft. 2,093,486 449,331 4,463
243-02.9 Lumber-Other-Conifer ... .. ... sup. ft. 3,013.115 635,613 2,170
243-03.1 Caribbean Cedar ... .. .. .... sup. ft. 113.316 31,264 82
243-03.2 Hardwood ... ... ... .. ... sup. ft. 168,492 47.692 242
sup. ft. 3,756 1.028 -
243-03.3 Lumber-Other-Non-Conifer .. ... sup. ft. 19.384 3.437 15
272-05.1 Salt Coarse and Rock ... .. ... ... cwt. 1.739 2.052 100
272-05.2 Salt, Fine ... ... ... ... ... t. 41535 107.966 2.554
311-01 Coal, Coke etc. ... ... ... ... ... ton 1,134 50.453 162
312-01 Petroleum, Crude ... ... ... ton 8,338 345.162 12.007
313-01.1 Aviation Spirit ... ... .. .. ... gal. 274 126 6
313-01.9 Other Motor Spirit ... ... .. ... gal. 3,289.073 744,359 72,359
313-02.1 Power Kerosene Oil ... ...... .al. 17.867 4.897 858
313-02.9 Other Kerosene Oil ... ... ... ... gal. 2206,123 462.044 105.910
313-03 Gas Oil. Diesel Oil and Other Fuel Oils ... ton 4.752 228.322 15.952
313-04.1 Lubrical in Oils ... .. ... ... al. 142.858 15S.746 14.224
gal.* 33 78 -
313:-09.1 Road, Oil ... ... ... ... ton 49 1,333 34
412-01 Linseed Oil, ,Raw .. ... .. .. l. 16.883 27.386 1,417
al.* 24 61 -
412-02 Oil from Sova Beans. Cotton Seed etc. ... eal. 1,544 S;.80 148
412-07 Cocolut (Copra) Oil ... .. ... ral. 158,156 321.338 7,591

*Free of Dlt!/jfr Special purposes.












HOME CONSUMPTION-((Continued)

15. STATEMENT OF ALL GOOI)S SUBJECT TO SPECIFIC RATES OF DUTY ENTERED
FOR HOME CONSUMPTION DURING THE YEAR 1954


COMMODITY


Oils. Oxidised Blown or Boiled ... ...
Hydrogenated Oils and Fats etc. ...
Sulphuric Acid ... ... ... ... .

Turpentine ... .. ... ...

Calcium Carbide ...
White Lead ... ...
Distempers Dry or not ......


Paints and Enamels ...


533-03.3 1 Varnishes and Lacquers


Soft Soap and Resin Soap ... ...

Soap Powders, Flakes Granules
Cleansing Preparations Containing Soap
Polishes (Furniture and Floor) ...


Fertilizers-Nitrogenous
Fertilizers-Phosphatic
Fertilizers-Potassic ...
Fertilizers-N.E.S. S...
Starches ...
Shingles .
Rope and Cables ...


Bags and Sacks ......
Cement ... ......

Bricks... ......
Floor and Wall Tiles ... ......
Revolvers, Pistols and Rifles ......

Other Firearms ... .... ...
Stockings and Hose ... ... ... ...

Footwear wholly or Mainly of leather ...
Rubber Footwear etc. ......
Films-Cinematograph .....

Candles of Tallow ...
Candles-Other ....


Matches ... ... ....
Playing Cards ... ...... ...
Horses under 14 hands ... ...
Horses over 14 hands .. .. .. ...
Asses ......
Mules ....

ogs ... ......
Personal Effects
Additional Tax on (asole n and other Petro-
leum Distillates used for road Purposes
Package Tax ... ...

TOTAL ...


* Free of Duty for Special Purpos.s.


Unit


Quantity


Value
C.1. F.
8 B.\W.I.


S-----


S.I.T.(C.
No.


413-01
413-02
511-01.1

512-01.2

512-01.4
533-01.2
533-01.3

533-03.2


lb.
11.
lb.*



lb.
lb.
lb.*
lb.*
lb.

gal.*
lb.
lb.*
lb.
lb.
gal.
gal.*
ton
tonz
ton
ton
lb.
doz.
lb.
lb.*
doz.
cwt.
wt.*
doz.
doz.
No.*
No.







No.








No.
ft.
No.*
No.
lb.
lb.*
gross
boxes
hdoz. pcks
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.*
No.


6,595
3,334.244
213.319
612
4,595
58
20.937
10,659
155.280)
25
917.267
6.046
3.90S
S
336
1,400
79,027
13.341
1,838
5
9.407
52
5,541
148
28,068
494,300
79,204
2,504
51.066
181,446
26.445
4,436
12.982
24
6
39
7,965
35
323
316
3,338.258
1,7W
1.700
15,498
8,946
4,707

52,215
1,439
27
45
25
32
1
12


Duty and
Surtax Col-
lectible


1,377
692.393
20,327
164
7,673
94
3,287
3,226
30,408
11
433,070
:1.970
20,772
53
57
200
18,820
3,414
9,093
23
1,028.400
3,613
506,633
21,195
3,436
125.433
29,832
1,130
258,428
4136,157
61,715
8,386
17.568
592
1,407
344
34,301
656
2,968
3.272


6.941
3.087
1.297

70,600
5,155
2,488
88,098
1,084
3,400
325
997


67
18,304
410

1,065

132
94
1.118

6,737

1,159
]


341
73
529


125
13,298

252
2,562
684

14,705
21,948

77
324
119

120'
5.328

706
1.192
7,483

187
221


13,332
832
70
397
36
127

18
773

982,776
167.407

3,058,982


552-02.3

552-02.4
552-02.5
552-03

561-01
561-02
561-0)3
561-09
599-03.1
632-03.2
655-06.2

656-01
661-02

662-01.1
662-01.2
691-02.1

691-02.4
841-01

851-02
851-03
863-01

899-01.1
899-01.2


899-02
899-14
921-01.
9214-01.2
921-01.3
921-01.4

921-09.1
931--01.2












HOME CONSUMPTION

i;. STATEMENT OF ALL GOODS SUB.IIECT TO AD VALOREM RATES OF DUTY ENTERED)
FOR HOME CONSUMPTIONN DURING THE YEAR 1954.

S.I.T.C. VALUE C.I.F. )ITTY AND
No. ConMMODITY S B.W\.I. SUITAX
COLLECTIBLE'


S
013-09 Meat. Extracts and Preparations N.E.S ... ... ... ... 9.798 1.468
026- 01 Honev ..... ... ... ... ... .... 1,647 168
029-01 Dairy Products. N.E.S. ... ... .. .. ... .. 25.049 2.635
032-01 Fish. Canned etc. ... ... ... ... ... 386.555 47.730
047-09 Meal and Flour of Cereals, N.E.S. ... ..... ... 1,096 66
048-01 Cereals-Prepared Breakfast Foods .. ... ... ... ... 103.507 8310
616
048- 02 Malt ... ... ... ... ... 570 6i
04S-03 Macaroni. Spaghetti, etc. ... ... ... ... ... 41.732 2.971
048-09.2 All Other Preparations of Cereals. N.E.S.... ... ... 1.770 232
051-07 1 Groundnuts (Peanuts) ... ..... .. .. .. .. 93.26 14.668
051-07.9 Other Edible Nuts ... ... ... ... ... .. ... 5.206 647
052-01 Dried Fruit ... ... ... .. ... ... 41,064 8.335
053-01.1 Preserved Fruit-Canned ... ... .. ... ... 43026 5501
053-01.2 Preserved Fruit-Not Canned ... .. ... ... .. 2,852 563
053-02 Fruit and Fruit Peel Candied or Crystallized ... ... ... 4,676 577
053-03 Jams. Jellies. Marmalades-Canned or not ... ... ... ... 28.838 2,884
053-04.9 All Other Fruit Juices ... ... ..... .... .. ... 61.749 8,668
1.041 -
055-02.1 All Soups and Vegetable Juices-Canned ... ... ... 38.813 4.805
134 -
055-04.2 Sago and Tapioca ... ... ... ... ... 23.344 1.497
061-09 Other Sugars and Syrups. N.E.S. ... ... ... 18.149 2.264
349 -
062-01.1 Sugar Confectionery ... ... ... ... ... 134.688 18,875
062--01.2 Other Sugar Preparations ... .. ... .. ... ... 7.539 913
071-03 Coffee Extracts and Essences ... .. ...... ... 1.743 209
072-03 Cocoa Butter ... ...... .. .... 62 7
073-01.1 Chocolate Confectionery ... ... .. ... ... ... 72,786 8.740
073-01.2 Other Chocolate and chocolate Preparations ... .. ... 86.782 10,797
*275 -
075- 01 Spices ... ... ... ... ... ... 27.237 3.277
099)-09 Food Preparations N.E.S. ... ... ... ... .. .. 26s.597 34,040
*1.022 -
111--l Other Non-Alcoholic Beverages ... .. ... ... ... 3.296 396
242-09 Poles Piling Posts etc. ... ... ...... ... ... 18.851 2,262
*10.701
263-02 Cotton Mill Waste ctc. ... ... ... ... .. ... 7.990 1,00)1
*729 -
264-01 Jute. including lute Cuttings and Waste ... ... ... ... 88) 1)06
265-01 Vegetable Fibres of Flax. Hemp. Ramie etc. ... ... ... 1.226 292
265- 09. 1 Coconut Fibre ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 13.269 1,592
265-09.9 Other Vegetable Textile Fibres and Wastes ... .. ... 748 90
*34 -
272-05.3 Salt. Table ... ... .. .. ... .. ... ... 1.027 124
272- 06 Sulphur ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 53 6
272-07 Other Crude Minerals N.E.S. ... .... ...... ... 7.671 96)
292-02 Natural Gums etc. ... ...... .... .. ... 11.917 2.488
*10 -
292-03 Vegetable. Materials, for Plaiting ... ... ... ... ... 8,577 1.201
292-07 Cut Flowers and Foliage ... .. .. ....... ... 1.374 264
292-09 Vegetable Saps. Juices, and Extracts N.E.S. ... ... ... 622 110
313-04.2 Lubricating Greases ... ... ... ... ... .. ... 23,884 3.751
*325
313-05 Mineral Jelly and Waxes ... ..... ...... ... 10.387 2.483
313-049.1 Petroleum Asphalt N.E.S. ... ... .... .... ... 125,27 15294
3.229-


*Free of Duty for Sprcial IPurposrs.










11

HOME CONSUMPTION

16. STATEMENT OF ALL GOODS SUlBJIECT TO AD VALOREM RATES OF DUTY ,ENTEIREDI
FOR HOME CONSUMPTION DURING THE YEAR 1954.


VALlE C.1.F. DUTY AND
S VB.W.T. SURTAX
COLLECTIBLE

S4


All Other Petroleum Products


S.I.T.C.
No.



313-09.2


411-01

412-11
413-04
511--01 .9

512-01.1

512-01.3
512-01.9

521-01
532-01
533-01.1
533 -- 3.1

533-03.4

541-01

551-0- 02
552-01.1
552-4) .9
552-02.2
552-02.6

552-03

591-01.1

591-01.2
591-01.3
591-01 .4
591-02
591 -03
599-01

599-02

599-03.2

611-01
612-01.1

612-01.2

612-01.3

621 -01

629-01.2


Waxes and Polishes ... ...

Loaded Cartridges ... .

Lead Shot. Buck Shot. and Bullets
Dynamite .
Other Explosives ...
Fuses. Primers anll Detonators
Fireworks ... ...
Synthetic Plastic Materials

Insecticides. Fungicides etc. ...

Other Chemical Products N.E.S.

Leather .
Machine Leather. Belting etc.

Saddlery and Harness ... ...

Leather Manufactures N.E.S.

Rubber, Pastes. Plates, Sheets etc.

Outer Casings for Motor Cars


629-01.3 Outer Casings for Trucks. Buses etc.
629-01.4.01 Outer Casings for Motorcycles etc. ...


.. ~ ~ .. .. .

.. .. .. .. .


. .. .. . .. .
.. . .. .. .. .



. .... .. ...

... . .. .. I



. .... ... ... ,


Fish Oils etc. ... ... ... .

Castor Oil ... ...
W axes ... ... .
Other Inorganic Chemicals ... .. .

Glvcerine ... ..

Saccha rine .. .....
Other Organic Chemicals ... ...

Mineral Tar etc. ... .. .
Dyeing and Tanning Extracts etc.
Blue Laundry ... ... ... .
Wood Preservatives ... ..

All Other Prepared Paints, Enamels etc..

Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Products ...

Essential Oils. Perfume and Flavour Materials
Bay Rum and Similar Preparations ...
Otlier Perfumery. Cosmetics etc.. except Soaps
Toilet Soaps ... .. ... .. .
Cleansing Preparations without Soap (Detcer:ents)


1 .543


I


*Free of )Dty for Special Purposes.


--------------------------


Co(MMA()ITY


12.063
*139

19.1S3
*479
13.692
213)
141.947
*7.840
1,645
*219
599
26.947
*2.205
3.085
2.080
6.754
12.920
*185
*IS5
24.491
(159*
465.775
*104.-o00
4.274
46.206i
215.745
95.219
59.,534
*213
39.107
*189
*1 (S9

*745
805
6.312
13.648
3.153
5.204
"> +'4


*18,893
38.953
*2,373
49.557
6,320
*22()
3.816
*323
5,(;83
*26:3
9,6204
*326
121.26i9
*59
195.890
3.1 SS


2.321

1.,643
25
18.2SI

242

72
3.789

370
250
1.017
1.55C
















-I'
2.984

59.164















i->
611
6.4 03
25.277
11.585
7.144

4,97

112

97
47
1.643
37S
918
2.814

8.39S

4 .13S

677

-iS


682

].:i03

16.161


5_S8


... .











12

HOME CONSUMPTION

16. STATEMENT OF ALL (:0ODS SUB.TIECT TO AD VALOREM RATES OF DUTY ENTERED
FOR HOME (CONSUMIION DI)URING THE YEAR 1954-(('Cotinted)


S. .T.C.
N)o.



629-01.4.02
629-01.5
629-01.6

629-01.7
629-01.8.01
629-01. 8.02
629-01.9
629-02

631-01

632-01

632-02

632-03.1
632-03.3
632-03.9

633-01.2

633-01.3
633-01.4
641-04

642-01.2
642-02

651-01

651-02
651-03

651-04
651-07
652-01.1

652-01.2

653-01
653-02

653-03.1

653-05
653-09
654-01

655-01
655-06.1
655-06.3

655-09

656-02


Outer Casings for Bicycles
Outer Casings for other Vehicles
Inner Tubes for Motor Cars ... ...

Inner Tubes for Trucks, Buses etc....
Inner Tubes for Motorcycles etc.
Inner Tubes for Bicycles ... ..
Inner Tubes for Other Bicycles .
Rubber M1 .....l .!. N.E.S. ...

Veneers. Plywood Boards etc. ...

Boxes. Cases and Crates ...

Cooperage Products ... ... ..

Builders Woodwork ... ... ..
Beadings and Mouldings ... .
Manufactures of Wood N.E.S.

Cork Materials for Building ... ...

Bottle Corks ... ... ... ...
Cork Manufactures N.E.S....
Papers and Paperboards N.E.S. ...

Cardboard Boxes etc. ... ...
Paper Manufactures N.E.S.. ...

Silk Thread ... ...

Yarn of Wool and Hair ...
Cotton Yarn ... ... ... .

Cotton Thread ... ...
Yarn of Textile Fibres N. E.S.
Cotton Piece Goods ... ... ..

Other Cotton Fabrics ... ...

Silk Fabrics ... ...
Woollen and Worsted Fabrics ...

Linen Fabrics ... ...

Fabrics of Synthetic Fibres and Spun Glass
Fabrics N.E.S. ... ...
Tulle Lace, Embroidery, etc. ... ...

Special Textile Fabrics ... ..
Twines ... ...
Manufactures of Cordage N.E.S. ...

Special Products of Textile Materials N.E.S.

Made up Articles of Textile Materials N.E.S.


*Free of Duty for Special Purposes.


COMMODITY


Value
C.I.F.
8 B.W.I.


38,978
456
11.429
*7
10.4,s6
W000

91
76.112
*2.774
20.117
*1407
13.731
*l51
47.955
*279
7.451
:3.221
51.799
*755
11. 109




*20.368
152.213
144.742
*12.251
112
*86
8.508
77.827
*487
105.172
4.574
943.378
*12.261
40.002
1.046
6.033
244,215
*7.641
26.782
*75
1.244.547
5.615
35.902
*417
39,995
19,662
147
*18
25,178
*11,863
167,187
*4.473


I


Duty and
Surtax Col-
lectible






1.503
86
1,998
11
12.323

3,611

3.265

10,422

1(016
452
10.943

2.570

1.474
5.750
27.574

22.776
18,533

13

1,021
5,907

13.554
548
127.680

5,622

912
29,513

3.284

200,822
674
4,817

5,281
2,419
18

3,294

23,200










13

HOME CONSUMPTION

16. STATEMENT OF ALL GOODS S B. EC'T TO AD) VALOREM RATES OF DUTY
FOR H1OMIE CONSSl.IPTION D)URiNG THE YEAR 1954- (r'aotin il)


(COMMOi)rTY


Flor Coverings and Tapestries ...

Linoleum and Similar products ... ..
Lim e ... ... .. ...
Building Materials of Non-Metallic Minerals X.E.S.

Other Refractory Construction Materials ...


S. .T. C
No.


657--01

657-04
661-01
661-03

662-01.3

663-01

664-01

665-01

665-02

665--09

666-(01

671-01
673-01
673-02
6S1-04)

681-05
681-06
681-07

681-12

681-13

681-15

682-0 1

683-01
684-01

685-01

686-01
687-01

689-02
691-02.2
691-03

699-01

699-02

699-03


Zinc .
Tin .

Non-Ferrous Base Metals
Sporting Firearms ...
Ammunition ... ...


Finished Structural Parts of Iron and Steel

Finished Structural Parts of Aluminium ...


Wire Cables. Ropes etc.


*Free of 1)tl jfor Special Purposr.o'.


Mineral Manufactures N.E.S. ...

Glass in Sheets etc. ... ..

Bottles ...

(;I. ... Tableware etc.

Articles of Glass N.E.S.

China. Porcelain etc ...

Silver and Platinum ...
.Tewellery etc. ...
Imitation Jewellery ..
Joists Girders. Angles etc. .

Plates and Sheets uncoated ...
Hoop and Strip ...
Plates and Sheets Coated ...

Wire Rods and Wire ... ...

Pipes. Tubes and Fittings ...

Castings and Forgings ... ...

Copper ... ... ...

Nickel ...
Aluminium ... ... .

Lead ...


Vu iuc
C. .F.
8 B.W.I.


32.5S i
*240
37.083
8.498
91.1004
*8.035
3.192
*29
37.172
*S6(
56.S840
*C4
493.50S
*49
60.669
*130
11,545
1,306
106,198
*523
86
21,:319
15.077
129.70W)
3
50.49:3
6.2009
354.686
*1.149
1,103
*1.638
142.694
*81.837
1.096
*615
22,956
*2.3SS
294
27.437
*:,S
S.622
*24.353
7.383
7,467
*4.672
336
891
1,732
*S8,58
157.012
*50.409
4.807
*4,197
4,.75
*90


ENTI ERI)



Duty and
Surtax
Collectible


4.091

5.136
1.020
11.162

316

5.,-<41

4,711

34,865

7,-47

1.358

12,074

11
3,260
3.23S
15.769

6.0)59
1.394
43.:3166

1358

19.S43

132

2.84

35
3.865

1.0506

SS6
896

41
214
221
1-1

19,142

833

655


: I











14

HOME CONSUMPTION

16. STATE-IENT OF ALL, (OOI)S SUBJECT TO AD VALOREM RATES OF I)TY ENTERED


FOR HOME CONSUMPTION DURINGG THE YEAR 19)54


(C MOD1uITY


S.I.T.C.
No.


699-05

6(99-07

i69--08
699--11

699-12.9

699i-13

699-16

699- 18

699-21

711-01

712-01

713-01.1

713-01.2
714-01

715-01
716-01

716-03

716-04
716-07
716-08
716-12

716-13.9

716(-14

721-01

721-02

721-03

721-04.2
721-04.9

721-05

732-01

732-02

732-03


*Free of Duty for Special Purposes.


-(Continued)


Wire Netting, Wire Fencing etc. ...

Nails. Bolts. Nuts. etc. ...

Needles and Pins ... .
Safes etc. ... ... ...

Other Tools ... ... ... ..

Houseliold Utensils of Iron and Steel ...

Cutlery ... ... ... ... ...

Hardware of Metal ... .. ...

Manufactures of Metals N.E.S ...

Power (Generating Machinery ... ...

Agricultural Machinery etc. ... ...

Tractors other than Steam ... ...

Tractor Parts ... ...
Office Machinery ... .

Metal Working Machinery ... ...
Pumps for Liquids ... ...

C-.i. iln. Hoisting etc. Machinery ... ...

Woo(dworking Machinery ... ..
Bookbinding Machinery ..
Textile Machinery ... ...
Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Equipment

Otler Machinery and Appliances ...

Machine Parts and Accessories N.E.S. ...

Electric Generators, Motors etc. ...

Electric Batteries ... ...

Electric Bulbs ... ...

Radio Receivers etc ... ...
Other Radio Apparatus etc.... ...

Electrical Machinery, Apparatus N.E.S...

Motor Cars ... ... ...

Motorcycles ... ... ..

Trucks Lorries, Vans, Buses ... ...


Value
C.I.F.
S B.W.I.


73.6(66
*2.910
71,341
*1,113
6.520
10.631
*978
53.992
*1.697
181.247
*91S
53.14S
*67
74.3;63

634.40 4
*11.290
30.764
*131.5-24
7.346
*873
47.566
*5.606(
22,269
99,007
*11.677
20,087
70.523
*22,154
30.374
*26,581
529
1.)S89
22S
34,429
*17.561
225.038
*15.192
19,131
*1.943
34.538
*3),530
18,453
1.' 26
38.655
1.550
93.027
57.9S8
*103.244
384.028
*327,115
836.314
*9.903
48.730
*636
316.213
*22.632


Duty and
Surtax
Collectible

S
9,293

9,451

914
1.169

7.065

23.341

8.149

10.982

84.572

4.862

1.121

5.708

3.641
17.512

2.948
13,385

3,760

86
130
I--
57
4.82-

30,364

2,450

4,625

2,206

5.546

14.771
6,989

44,034

114,138

5.848

42,564


~









15

HOME CONSUMPTION

16. STATEMENT OF ALL GOODS SUBJECT TO AD) VALOHEM RATES OF )UTY ENTERED
FOR HOME CONSUMPTION DURING THE YEAR 1954--(Continued)


('COMMIOIITY


S.I.T.C.
No.


732-06

732-07
733-01
733-02
733-09

734-01

735-01
811-01
812-01

812-02

812-04.1
812-04.2

821-01

821-02

821-09
831-01.1

831-01.2
841-02

841-06

841-08

841-12

851-02

851--03

861-01

862-01

864-01

891-01.1

891-01.2

891-01.3

892-03.2

899-03
899-08

899-11
899-12


Phot oguraphiie Supplies

Watches and ('locks ...

Gramophones and Records

Pianos and organs ...

Musical Instruments N.E.S.

All other Printed Matter

Umbrellas, walking sticks etc.
Refrigerators and Parts

Plastic articles ... .
Basketware etc. ...


Parts foi' Roadl Motor Vehicles ...

Mot Bicycles-not motor ... ... ...
Bicyvcle Parts ... .. ...
Other IRoa( Vehicles and parts .

A ircraf ... ... ..

Ships and BoHuts N.1E.S. ... .
Prcfa lri(eated Buildin s ... ...
Cent al HeatingL A apparatus ...

Sinks, W\asllasins. Bidets .etc. ...

Oil Lamp Chimneys et ... .
All Other LiUhlting Fixtures tc. ...

Wood Furniture ... ... ...

Metal Furnitire ... ..

Furniture and Fixtures N.E.S. ...
Travel (Goods ... ... ..

Handbags. Wallets. Purses etc. ...
Apparel ... ... ... ...

Leather Clothing ... ...

Hats and Caps ... ... ..

Clothing N.E.S. ...

Footwear Wholly or Mainly of Leather

Hubber FIootwear etc. ...

Scientific Instru cents ... ...


Value
C.I.F.
8 B.W.I.


322,633
*138
2,754
81.190
44.081
37.578
*62S
98
.945
:.0:17
16.191
2.139
*1 1
72.342
*4.103
3(6.281
42.614
*427
3(.1:0


*15.717
18,654
45,721
*1.014
21,942
597.942
*4.661
7.(653
*1.110
69.949
*1.650
68.507
*959
806,733
*5,027
184.791
*7(50
43.210
*65 S39
9.403
*11.025
61.664
*118
43,715
*67
l1,241
*436
3.098
*933
74,209
*15.767
59 031
188.086
*193
15.098
1.870
*213


*Free of Duty for Special P'urposes.


Duty and
Surtax Col-
lectible

8
47,049

330
9,743
5.290
4.573

12

499
1,943
257

8.529

6.764
7,876

6.738

12.022

2.284
7,105

2.783
83,217

997

8.936

9.758

119.093

28.991

6.393

1.476

13.571

6,426

1,373

580

9,146

9.827
28.014

2,076
224


I


... . ..
.. .. ...














16

HOME CONSUMPTION

16. STATEMENT OF ALL GOODS SUBJECT TO AD VALOREM RATES OF DUTY ENTERED
FOR HOME CONSUMPTION DURINGG THE YEAR 1954- (Concluded)


COMMODITY


Brooms alnd Brushes ...

Sports Goods etc. ...

Office Supplies n.e.s.

Manufactured articles n.e.s.

Parcel Post
Goods return ... ...
Personal Effects ...
Other Special Cases ...

TOTAL ...


Value
C.I.F.
8 B.W.I.


61.625
*27()
83.355
*187
43,862
*4,495
116,050
*618
2.017.070
4,452
43.501
*- n;


Duty and
Surtax
Collectible


7,541

12.468

6,997

16.321

299,590
694
10,486
2,542

2.508.567


*Fre of Duty for Special Purposcns.


S.J.T.C.
No.


899-13

899-14

899-16

899-18

911-01
931-01.1
931-01.2
931-01.3




















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19

EXCISE

STILLS

19. There were ten (10) licensed stills in operation during the year namely:-

Nos. 60, 62, 67 and 72 West India Rum Refinery Ltd.. Black Hock. St. Michael. District "A".

Nos. 63, 64. 65 and 66 Fairfield and Mount Gay Company Ltd.. Mount Gay. St. Lucy. I)istrict 'E".

Nos. 58 and 68 Barbados Distilleries Ltd., Black Rock, St. Michael. District "A".


REVENUE

Excise Duty
20. The Excise Duty collected on Rum in the year 1954 amounted to Sl.456.763 as against S1.419.491
in 1953 an increase of 837.272.

Distillers' License
21. The Distillers' License amounted to S61.449 as against S(0.802 an increased ( S410.647.

Total Revenue
22. The total Revenue from Rum made in the Island during. the year xwas 81 .518.212 as comlpalred with
$1,470,293 in the previous year, an increase of 847.919.

The following Statement shows the Revenue collected on lRum made in the Island (drinig the years
1950-1954.


HEADS 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954


8 s 8 8

Excise Duty ... ... ... ... 932,364 990,092 1.050,471 1.419,491 1,456.763
Distiller's License ... ... ... 47,486 66,918 45,229 50,802 61.449
License Duty ... ... .. ... 22,022 23.384 18.116 -

TOTALS ... .. .. ... 1,001,872 1,080,394 1,113,816 1,470.293 1,518.212



RUM MANUFACTURED

23. The quantity of Rum made during the year was 1,762,360 proof wine gallons being 172,004 gallons
more than in 1953.

The following Statement shows the quantity of Runm made during the years 1950-1954.


1950) 1951 1952 1953 1954



Proof Wine Gallons ... ... ... 1,153.937 1.775.624 1,722.868 1.590.356 1,762,360



DISTRIBUTION OF RUM

Duty Paid Rumn
24. The Rum duty paid for Home Consumption ex the Government Spirit Bonds was 72,651 proof
wine gallons and ex Distilleries 300,900 gallons making a total of 37:3551 proof wine gallons, an increase of 9,421
proof wine gallons as compared with the year 1953.

Exported
25. The Rum exported was 846,358 proof wine gallons and the amount for Ships' Stores 7,429 gallons
making a total of 853.607 proof wine gallons, an increase of 168.984 proof wine gallons as compared with 1935.


I












]Dldy Fre Ruinm
26. Melthyl ted Spirits manufactured at the Distilleries amounted to 12.342 proof wine gallons being
1.896 gallons more than in 1953. 1,823 proof wine gallons were permitted free for the use of the Government.

Rumn for Articles requiring Rtum in their Manufacture or Preparation
27. 3,236 proof wine gallons were used during the year as against 4.071 in 1953. a decrease of 835
gallons.

28. The following Statement shows the distribution of Rum during the years 1950-1954.


Proof WVine Proof Wine Proof Wine Proof Wine Proof Wine
HEADS Gallons Gallons Ga llons Gallons Gallons
1950 1951 1952 1953 1954



Distilleries-Home Consumiplion ... 151.300 161.741 139.027 236.390 300.900
Bond-Home Consumption ... ... 215.763 228,061 236,525 127.740 72,651
Bonded ... ... ... ... 1,018.742 1.450.80S 1.0)03,607 1.017.3130 1.216.908
Govern ent ... .. ... 2.0 29 1.S28 1.763 1.S14 1.823
Methy lated Spirits ... ... ... 6.688 7.966 8.386 10.445,1 12.342
Exported ... .. ... ... 903.515 1.371.932 781.517 678.691 846.358
For Articles reiqiring Ilum in their
manufacture or preparation ... 8.413 10,710 7,949 4.071 3.236
Ships' Stores ... ... .. ... 8.596 7.052 6.132 5.932 7.249


Rum in Bioud
29. The Stock of ullm in Bond and at the Distilleries on the 31st December, 1954 was 1,916.102 proof
wine gallons. In 1953 it was 1,725,828 proof wine gallons an increase of 190.273 proof wine gallons.

NUMBER OF ENTRIES PASSED BY THE CLERICAL STAFF FOR IMPORTS. EXPORTS AND EXCISE

30. The following statement shows the number of each different kind of entry passed by the Staff
of the Long Room for the three years 1952-1954.


1952 1953 1954



Entries passed through ('ash Book ... ..... ... ... 41.226 40.212 41.883
Import Warehouse Entries ... ... .. ... ....... 2,312 2.391 2,481
Export Warehouse Entries ... ..... ...... .. 8.643 8.268 9.643
Export Free Entries ... ... ... ... ... 8,782 9.415 8,917
Excise Warehouse Entries ... .. ... ... 14,800 15,973 19.532
Excise Duty Entries ... ... .. ... .. ... 499 418 262
Transhipment Entries ......... .. ... ... 632 872 1,034


LEGISLATION

31. The following Acts affecting the Customs department were passed during the year 1954:-

The Customs Tariff (Amendment) Act. 1954-6.
The Esso St-nd- Oil S.A. (P!trvoeumi Oil Stora'g Station) Act, 1954-14.
Public wnhavrve. (Control) Act, 1954-24.
The Rum iDluty (Amendment) Act, 1954-39.
The Customs Tariff (Amendment) Act. 1954 No. 2-42.

BREACHES OF THE TRADE ACT

32. (i) There v ore 35 breacl.es of the Trade Act, detected during the year 1954 and fines imposed
;..m(,unting to S51.,,0.

(ii) During the year under review auction sales of goods seized and forfeited realise:l $804.31. Want
of entry goods x (e:( also s, !d at auction and realized $608.04.












LICENSED PRIVATE WA I.EHOUSES

33. At the end of the year 1954. there were in existence 54 liccnsed private warchou se,. an increase of
1 as compared with the figure for the previous year.


PIONEER INDUSTRIES

34. During the year 1954. 2 additional industries wcrel declared tol be pioneer industries. These include
the Canning of Fish and fish products and the manufacture of oxygen. hyIdrogen. gaseous compounds of carbon,
acetylene and other gases. The total number of industries declared nicer the pioneer Industries (encourage-
ment) Act, 1951 at the end of the year 1954 was 15.

Two new manufacturers n ere declared to be pioneer manufacturers.

The total number of pioneer manufacturers at the end of the year 1954 was 15.

MERCHANT SHIPPING

35. (i) The Comptroller of Customs performs certain duties and responsibilities under the Merchant
Shipping Act. 1S94.

(ii) During the year 1954, 2 vessels were registered locally.

(iii) At the end of the year there were on the register 25 vessels of which 9 of a total net tonnage of
837 tons were sailing vessels and 16 of a total net tonnage of 2.119 tons were steam or motor driven.

PERSONNEL

36. The approved establishment for the department was 98 incluidng 48 Officers, I Secretary, 1
Female Searcher. 26 Guards, 14 Porters and in addition 6 Temporary Clerks and 2 Messengers.

37. Promotions of various members of the staff included the following:-

Mr C. D. Evelyn. Supervisor to Comptroller.
Mr. C. E. King. Supervisor to Assistant Comptroller.
Messrs. V. B. A. Fields and G. A. Ashby. Assistant Supervisors to Supervisors.
Messrs. H. S. Eastmond. P. N. Green and L. C. Donovan, Long Grade Clerks to Assistant Super-
visors.
Messrs N. W. Marshall and G. L. Austin, Temporary Clerks to Long Grade Clerks.

38. Mr. G. F. Barker was still (on secondment to the Public Works Department.

39. Messrs. R. W. B. Belt. Comptroller of Customs and il. S. Sainsbury. Assistant Coimptroller of
Customs retired from the Service on 29th October. 1954 and 24th December, 1954 respectively. Messrs. S.
Watts, Porter and W. St.C. Browne. Messenger. also retired on 23rd October. 1954 and 4th November, 1954
respectively.

40. The Staff performed their duties willingly and on the whole efficiently and 1 desire to record my
appreciation of their co-operation.

I also wish to place on record my appreciation of the assistance and co-operation given by the Com-
missioner of Police and his Officers in the detection of offences and the prosecution of offenders against the Customs
and Excise Laws.
C. D. EVELYN,
Comptroller of Customs.













REVIEW OF THE YEAR'S TRAI)E

B(alinc of I'ixible 'Trade
During the vear 1954 the Colony showed an unfavorable trade balance of S..323,446. Total Imports
amounted to S48.7(i3.353 and Total Exports to S40.439,907.

The follow in: table shows the visible trade balance, oi' the Coloiin for tie years 1950 to 1954. The
Imports iniluie parcel post but exclude liullion and Coin and intr asit trade. The exports include Ships' Stores
andl bunkers Ibut (h no()t include parcel post. for which no figures are available. bullion and coin and intransit
trade.

BALANCE OF VISIBLE TRADE IN o000 B.W.1.


1950 1951 1952 1953 1954



Impnorts ... ... ... ... 38717 51.894 54,194 45,524 4S,763
Domestic Exports ... ... 25.924 32.952 36.900 38,15 37.555
Re-exports ... .. ... ... 1.719 2.512 3.050 2.986 2.885
Total Exuorls ... ... ... ... 27,(43 35.464 39,950 41,13: 40,440


Imports
The total value of olu ()ds imporll e during 1954 \\s 848S.763,353 (including imports by parcel post of
82.031,618). The lotal value )of goods imported for home consumption during 1954 w\as $47,150,428 and for
1953 $42,256.156.

Comparing 1954 with 1953. the most significant changes occurred in the following items:-


Inicreass


Meat, all kinds ... ... ...
B utter ... ... ... ... ...
Fertilizers
Paper. paperhoard and Manufactures thereof
Fish, all kinds ... ... ... ... ...
Motor Trucks and Vans ... .. ..
Animal Feeding stuff ... ... ...
Paints and Colours ... ... ... ...
Apparel. all kinds .. .. ... ...
Tea ...
(;I Bottles ...
Tvres and Tubes for Motor Cars, Trucks and Vans
Cheese ... ... ... ...
Cement ...... ...


Decreases


IUnit



Ib.

ton


No.,
lb.
lb.
Ib.




lb.
brls. of
400 lbs.


Quantity



2,622,6(81
353.325
3.316


64
2.608.840
407.300

79.837


21 6,243

12.134


Value


S
1,176,711
301,440
295.319
266,591
227,792
186,162
179.063
165,888
133,410
124.913
115,344
115,259
114,912

107,748


Nuts, edible other than coconuts
Rice... ...
Cotton Piece Goods ...


Unit Quantity




lb. 5,568,158
sq. yd. 386,710


Value


S
1,399,361
610,997
251,484











23

A detailed list of all Commodities imported during 1954 is given in Table S of the Statistical Appendix.

Distribution of Tra(d
Table 3 of the Statistical Appendix rives details of the trade recorded with the principal Countries alnt
(urrenc\ areas ioi the years 1949 to 1954.

The following is a Summary of the percentage distribution according to Currency Areas for the years
1952 to 1954.


IMPORTS FROM EACH AREA EXPORTS TO EACH AREA

CURRENCY AREA
1952 1953 1954 1952 1953 1954


0 0 %U 0 0
'0 o PP O/0 (P

Sterling Area ... ...... ... ... 4.5 62.6 61.3 62.0 85.8 70.7
U.S.A. and Canada ... ... ... ... 23.4 24.0 24. 36.6 12.9 27.5
Other American Account Countries ... ... ... 0.7 1.3 1.5 0.0 0.1 0.1
Xon-dollar W .H. Countries ... ... .. ... 1.7 1.3 1. -
O.E.E.C.Countries ... ... ... ... ... 7.7 S S 9.5 9 .6 0.
Rest of the World ... .. ... .. ... 2.0 2.0 1 .3

TOTAL ALL CO;INTRIES ... ... ... 1.0 100. 100.0 99.5 994 99.2
Ships' Stores and Bunkers ... ... ... ... -0.5 0.6 .


Table 7 of the Statistical Appendix shows the Countries of origin of all Imports and Countries of
Destination of Exports !Ny \Va u distinguishing exports of Domestic Produce and Re-Exp)orts.

Imports
The United Kingdom maintained its position as the leading supplier with 40.1(", of the total value
from all countries. (anada occupied second position with 18.20,.

Exports of Domestic Produce
The Value of Domestic Produce exported during the yea 195-i was 837.555,051 and in 1953 838,149,893,
a decrease of $594.842.

The Value of exports of Domestic Produce shipped directly to Countries was 837.528.874 and the value
shipped as Stores and BunerU To Ships and Aircraft was 826.177. The corresponding Value< for 1953 were
S38.12S.781 and 821.112 respectively.

The United Kingdom was the largest purchaser of the Colony's D)mestic Produce taking 61.2",, of the
total value supplied to all countries. Canada occupied second position taking 27.9".

Re-exports
The total value of goods re-exported during 1954 was S2.SS4.S56 of which .-'- .'. Nl. .1' represented the
value of goods shipped directly to Countries and 8291.767 the value of goods supplied as Stores and Bunkers
for ships and aircraft.

A detailed list of all Commodities exported during 1954 distinguishing Domestic and re-exports will
be found in Table 9 of the statistical appendix.













TradP with Briti.s'h C'ril ran Territorioru
Details of the trade between the Colony and other British Carihbbean territories are given in tables 10
andl 11 of the Statistical Appendix. The total value of all goods imported from these territories during 1954
was S6,801.484. Tihe total value of the exports was S5.071.557 of which -:. 1.,i 343 represents the value of
exports of domestic produce and 82.015,214 the value of Igoods re-exported. The following table shows the
values of Imports and Exports from and to each territory for the years 1953 and 1954.


Anayilla ...
Antigua ...
Bahamas ...
British Giiana ...
British Honduras
Domini(ca ...
Grenada ...
Jamaica ...
Montserrat ...
St. Kitts Nevis ...
St. Lucia ...
St. Vincent
Tortola ...
Trinidad ...
Turks Islands ...

TOTAL ...


IMPORTs (8 C.I.F.)


1953



9.292
19.054
2,994.(i65
44.459)
333.594
109,129
184,947
3.433,
43.23!)
569.421
582.112
301
2,248.585
1.733

7,143,964


1954


1.S<60
197
55.492
2,272.303
51,197
35S.468S
113.816
170,020
3.051
48.2306
591.274
646.625
172
2,4S8.773


6,801.484


EXPORTS ($ F.O.B.)

1953 1954


S.190)
297.010
155,994
564,283
3,554
516,303
415,827
379,1S1
97.419
58S.940
422.090
279.961
4.222
1,112.649
5.23S8

4.,S50,961


16.985
345,383
171.792
782,750
962
487.321
389.369
26,064
96.656
501,235
419,070
263.768
4,633
1,562,896
2,673

5,071,557


r















EXPLANATORY NOTES

1. System of Trade ( ,. I'. ......r
The Standard International Trade Classification List issued by the United Nations Economic and
Social Council has been adopted for the Classification of all merchandise with effect from 1st January, 1954.

2. System of Trade
The tabulations are prepared on the basis of the "General Trade" of the Colony.

(a) Imports relate to all goods (except transshipment goods) imported into the Country whether
entered for Home Consumption or warehousing or subsequently exported.

(b) Domestic exports relate to goods which are the growth, produce or manufacture of the Colony.

(c) Re-exports relate to goods which had been imported and subsequently exported (other than
transshipment goods).

(d) Imports by Parcel Post are not classified a nd are entered according to value.

(e) Exports hb Parcel Post are not recorded.

3. Quantities ad 1V'ales
(a) All quantities and values are based upon tie declaration of Importers and Exporters which are
subject to verification by Customs Officials.

(b) All values are shown in the British West Indian dollar which is linked to sterling at four shillings
and two pence (4'2d). Imports are valued C.I.F. and exports including re-exports F.O.B.

The C.I. F. Valuation is the open market value of the goods at the time of importation including
insurance and freight.

The F.O.B. Value is the cost of the goods to the purchaser abroad, including all charges up to
the time of the delivery to the exporting ship but not including sea and air freight or marine and
air insurance.

(c) Articles imported into the Country for repair are not valued on importation and only the costs of
repairs (plus any other appropriate charges) are shown on re-exportation.

Articles exported from the Country for repair are not valued on exportation and only the costs of
repairs (plus any other appropriate charges) are shown on re-importation.

4. Definition of Countries and Areas
(a) Imports are ascribed to the Countries of origin of the goods.

(b) Exports are ascribed to the Country of final destination.

5. Exclusions
The following items are excluded from the Trade Statistics:-
(a) Gold Coin and bullion, issued Coinage and issued Bank notes.

(b) Goods on lease such as Cinematograph films.

6. Period Covered
The figures of Imports and Exports represent the totals shown on all Customs Documents brought to
account during the calendar year.

7. Units of quantity with their abbreviations

Abbreviations Meaning
No. Number
Ton Ton Avoirdupois
Cwt. 112 lbs. Avoirdupois
* Lb. Pound Avoirdupois
Gal. or Gln. Old Wine Gallon
Sq. Yd. Square Yard
Ft. Foot
Cub. Ft. Cubic Foot
Sup Ft. Superficial Foot
Doz. Dozen (12)
Oz. Ounce
Pr. Pair











26

Table 1.


TOTAL TRADE-193S, 1948 TO 1954.

$ B.W.I.


EXPORTS (F.O.B.)

Imports |Balan'ce of
PERIOD (C. .F.) Domestic Visible TIrlde
Produce Re-Exports Total


193S ... .. 3.,.10o 5.84S.200 62S.200 (.476.4 0 3.461,700

1948 ... ... ... 30,461.900 13.310.400 1,315.400 14.625.S00 I5.830.100

1949 .... .. ... 33,911.900 20,923.300 1.418.500 22.341.800 11.570,100

1950 ... ... ... 38,716,500 25,924,000 1.719,100 27.643,100 11.073.400

1951 ... .. ... 51.S93,700 32,952.000 2,512,200 35,464.200 -16.429.500

1952 ... ... ... 54,193.900 36.900. 10 .050.000 39.950.100 -14,243.800

1953 ... ... ... 45,524,300 38.149.900 2.986.000 41,135.900 4.388.400

1954 ... ... ... 4S.763.400 37.555.00 2,SS4,900 40.439.00 8,323.500




I


ANALYSIS BY SECTIONS OF THE STANDARD INTERNATIONAL TRADE CLASSIFICATION-1954


()0004 B.W.I.

S.I.T.C. SECTIONS


4





Animal
and
cal(l
Vegetable
Oils andl
Fats


Manufac-
I tured
Goods
Chemicals Classified
(Dyes. byv
PI)an la- materials
ceuti(als (Manufae-
Fertilizers turles of
&c.) wood. of
leather. of
glass. &c.)


IMPORTS (C.I.F.)


15.304.S 1.257.0 3.3S8( .S


2.435.4


1.097.7


3.9(01.8


10(.030.1


5).635.7 3.391.4 2.322.7 4-S.7( 3.4


EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC PRODUCE (F.O.B.)


... 34.769. 1


2.158.8S


134.4


88. o


198.2


103.5


2.4


99.3


1.3 :37.5.55 .


RE-EXIPOITS (F.O.B.)


4.6 166.5 15.3 293.0 1.255.0 431.4 226.0) 11.4 2.,S4.9


Table 2.


PERTOD


Beverages
aind
Tobacco


3


Mineral
fuels. lubri-
cants aund
related
materials


Crude
(Raw)
materials
other than
Fuels


1954 ...


Machinery
alnd
Transport
Equipment


8



Mliscel-
nllneol tc-
tured
articles
(furniture.
Travel
.r0( I s
clothin.,
&ec.)


.Miscel-
laneous
transac-
tions
(Postal
packages.
liie(
animals
&c.)


1954 ...


...


1954 ...


361.4 120.3


S ( (") B.\V.I.

S.I.T.C. 8 :("rloss


EXPORTS OF I)OMESTIC PRODUCE (F.O.B.)


I


-~-----


-~-~-~--


TOTAL TRADE


.=.


... ... ...


S8. o











DIRECTION OF TRADE-1949-1954

ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITHIN AREAS AND DISTINGUISHING COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES


I _(C.I.F.) _IT$ B.W.I.
IMPORTS (C.L.F.) ...I ~


AREA AND COUNTRY


COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES
Commonwealth Countries within
the Sterling Area
United Kingdom ......
Australia ... ...
New Zealand ......
Bermuda ......
British Guiana ......
India... ...
Union of South Africa ...
British West Indies ...
Hong Kong ... ...
Other Commonwealth Countries
within the Sterling Area ...

Commonwealth Countries outside
the Sterling Area
Canada ... ...

TOTAL ALL COMMONWEALTH
COUNTRIES ... ...

TOTAL STERLING AREA ...
TOTAL NORTH AMERICA
(CANADA AND U.S.A.) ...

FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Foreign Countries within the
Sterling Area ... ...
United States of America ... .

Other American Account Countries
Venezuela ... ...
Other Countries ... ... ...
TOTAL OTHER AMERICAN
ACCOUNT COUNTRIES ...

Non-Dollar Western Hemisphere
Countries
Argentina ......
Other Countries ..
TOTAL NON-DOLLAR WESTERN
HEMISPHERE COUNTRIES ...

O.E.E.C. Countries and Possessions
(excluding United Kingdom)
Belgium-Luxembourg and
Possessions ... ...
Sweden ... ...
Norway ... ...
Germany (Western) ...
France and Possessions ...
Netherlands and Possessions ...
Portugal and Possessions ... .
Other O.E.E.C. Countries ...
TOTAL O.E.E.C. COUNTRIES

Rest of World
Czechoslovakia ......
Japan. ... .
Spain and Possessions ...
Other Countries ... ...
TOTAL REST OF WORLD ...

TOTAL ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES

TOTAL ALL COUNTRIES ...
Ships' Stores and Bunkers ...

GRAND TOTAL


1949


1950


I. i I


13,800,253
882,555
71,877
548
1,498,523
1,041,894
54,402
2,620,125
142,033

203,179



7,287,117


18,033,142
1,280,978
288,506
797
1,874,774
648,492
210,155
3,410,031
118,307

397,113



5,588,959


1951




23,554,540
1,602,288
219,319
18,554
1,820,893,
1,095,477
308,820
4,093,531
237,491

464,755



8,374,894


1952


1953


1954


1949


1950


TOTAL ExIonRs (F.O.B.)
'I( I T-L- -


I I -- ---I i .1


21,927,006
919,835
1,358,319
13,813
2,498,945
1,997,545
442,393
5,281,575
1.10,047

308,336



8,199,569


18,555,632
396,494
823,801
24,195
2,994,665
596,414
270,520
4,228,044
133,687

388,942


19,529,448
414,629
1,510,901
24,580
2,272,303
459,002
455,326
4,601,612
277,0117

147,189


7,659,305 8,875,341


10,555,717
12

74,236
364,313


2,113,940


11,420,418


61,879
313,221


2,619,098


122


13,996,970


134,011
483,136


3,493,288


3,402


1952


19,751,372

84,174
126,215
512,851

76
4,285,016
2

5,943


8,643,852 112,286,268 15,979,592 14,398,602


1953


30,256,310
376
27
185,630
564,283

471
4,283,024


5,292


1954


23,296,906
864

213,541
782,750


4,287,845


1,542


4,353,085 10,490,499


27,602,506 31,851,254 41,790,562 43,057,383 36,071,699 38,567,348 21,752,070 26,701,006 34,090,399 39,164,251 39,648,498 39,073,947

20,347,553 26,333,003 33,484,922 34,972,842 28,470,615 29,897,682 13,108,218 14,414,738 18,110,807 24,765,649 35,295,413 28,583,448

11,527,672 8,162,782 11,209,771 12,681,903 10,942,701 12,102,163 8,914,910 12,933,661 16,830,762 14,632,683 5,285,337 11,134,272



32,164 70,708 69,254 115,028 58,221 205,675 -
4,240,555 2,573,823 2,834,877 4,482,334 3,283,396 3,226,822 271,058 647,393 851,170 234,081 932,252 643,773


321,438 313,146 556,346 328,399 573,557 567,184 5,254 6,369 3,509 2,674 29,321 8,478
18,674 639 8,123 77,262 5,369 169,136 101,215 18,718 10,176 9,621 35,173 50,549

340,112 313,785 564,469 405,661 578,926 736,320 106,469 25,087 13,685 12,295 64,494 59,027



348,029 586,864 762,722 408,685 490,112 675,608 -
245,900 407,884 199,173 493,636 113,541 91,639 1,170 -

593,929 994,748 961,895 902,321 603,653 767,247 1,170 -




211,375 222,975 894,019 387,188 42,507 35,467 14,338 5,671 76
61,459 160,993 306,930 174,067 117,122 166,639 20,012
49,198 58,034 109,884 120,711 352,772 678,605 -
50,603 316,870 965,638 733,504 346.110 1,082,518 12,917 6 1,235 5,242 2,490 16,709
56,245 543,759 489,158 138,602 191,274 180,746 13,241 5,220 96,711 128,090 82,381 96,846
327,574 910,518 1,622,712 2,111,604 1,575,859 1,805,174 56,195 156,583 218,970 204,643 160,442 170,831
51,295 45,441 102,750 63,566 349,158 121,564 494 -
171,359 396,794 581,940 413,799 1,023,708 560,758 38 13 3,473 40,742
979,108 2,655,384 5,028,031 4,143,041 3,998,510 4,631,471 82,353 162,303 331,292 337,988 254,457 345,216


21,779 86,012 150,219 83,072 46,029 90,911 -
76,465 146,158 420,223 255,010 44,205 328,069 -
4,900 8,993 17,445 663,548 741,526 32,685 -
20,425 15,667 56,742 86,520 98,170 176,805 50 -
123,569 256,830 644,629 1,088,150 929,930 628,470 50 -


6,309,437

33,911,943


6,865,278


38,716,532


10,103,155


51,893,717


33,911,943 138,716,532 151,893,717


11,136,535


9,452,636 10,196,005


54,193,918 45,524,335 48,763,353


54,193,918 45,524,335 48,763,353


459,880


22,211,950
129,825

22,341,775


834,783 1,197,367


27,535,789
107,293

27,643,082


584,364


35,287,766 39,748,615
176,400 201,447


1,251,203


40,899,701
236,200


35,464,166 139,950,062 141,135,901


1,048,016

40,121,963
317,944

40,439,907


AREA AND COUNTRY


COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES
Commonwealth Countries within
the Sterling Area
United Kingdom
Australia
New Zealand
Bermuda
British Guiana
India
SUnion of South Africa
British West Indies
Hong Kong
Other Commonwealth Countries
within the Sterling Area

Commonwealth Countries out-
side the Sterling Area
Canada

TOTAL ALL COMMONWEALTH
COUNTRIES

TOTAL STERLING AREA
TOTAL NORTH AMERICA (Canada
and U.S.A.)

FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Foreign Countries within the
Sterling Area
United States of America

Other American Account Countries
Venezuela
Other Countries
TOTAL OTHER AMERICAN ACCOUNT
COUNTRIES

Non-Dollar Western Hemisphere
Countries
Argentina
Other Countries
TOTAL NON-DOLLAR WESTERN
HEMISPHERE COUNTRIES

O.E.E.C. Countries and Possessions
(excluding United Kingdom)
Belgium-Luxembourg and
Possessions
Sweden
Norway
Germany (Western)
France and Possessions
Netherlands and Possessions
Portugal and Possessions
Other O.E.E.C. Countries
TOTAL O.E.E.C. COUNTRIES

Rest of World
Czechoslovakia
Japan
Spain and Possessions
Other Countries
TOTAL REST OF WORLD

TOTAL ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES

TOTAL ALL COUNTRIES
Ships' Stores and Bunkers

GRAND TOTAL


Table 3


--------- \-------I I_


-1


-I-


-I-


-- I- l-


--~-


I-




4N 11


DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954-Continued.
Table 4a.-Continued.

ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITHIN AREAS AND BY SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.

8 B.W.I.


IMPORTS (C.I.F.)-Continued.


SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.


AREA OR COUNTRY 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 TOTAL ALL
SECTIONS
Crude Mineral Animal and
Beverages Materials Fuels, Vegetable Manufac- Machinery Miscellaneous
Food and inedible Lubricants Oils and ('1., ii. .1- lured and Mainufaetured MIiscellaneous
Tobacco except and related Fats Goods Transport Articles Transactions
Fuels Materials Equiplment

Commonwealth
Countries Outside
the Sterling Area
(an-:la ... ... 5,781.490 316,235 1,198,629 230 7,842 151,19, 753.384 184.236 347.890 134.210 8.875.341

TOTAL ALL
COMMONWEALTH
COUNTRIES ... 11,706,906 6 118,206 2,992,840 1,701,206 443,843 3,259,033 8,440.70 4.344.611 2,751.324 1,908,509 38.567,348

TOTAL STERLING
AREA ... ... 6,123,046 708,132 1,794,211 1,700,976 436,001 3.107,838 7,687,486 4.160.375 2.405.318 1.774.299 29.897.682

TOTAL NORTH
AMERICA (Canada
and U.S.A.) ... 6,567,610 321,517 1,416,167 167,222 103,619 235,893 1.217.851 1,182.747 534.844 354.693 12,102.163

FOREIGN COUN-
TRIES
Foreign Countries
within the Sterling
Area ... ... 197,630 6,161 1,884 205,675
United States of
America ... ... 786,120 5,282 217,538 166,992 95,777 84,698 464,467 998,511 186.954 220.483 3,226,822







Table 4a.


DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954

ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITHIN AREAS AND BY SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.

$ B.W.I.

IMPORTS (C.I.F.)


SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.


0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 TOTAL ALL
AREA OR COUNTRY ------ --- SECTIONS

Crude Mineral Animal and Machinery
Beverages Materials Fuels, Vcgetable Manufac- and Miscellaneous
Food and ineldible Lubricants Oils and ('h, .. i. .1 tnred Transl-port Manufactured M1. i..
Tobacco except and related Fats Goods Equipment Articles Transactions
Fuels .\I i l,


COMMON HEALTH
COUNTRIES

Commonwealth
Countries within
the Sterling Area
United Kingdom ... 1.266.363 635.455 131.707 101.S16 74.1S6 2,909.841 6.956.067 4.143.22S 1.776.4Sl 1.534.304 19,529,448
Australia ... ... 390.576 3.572 14i 34S7 10.003 4.859 1 .S! 114,629
New Zealand ... 1.5110.160 741 1.510,901
Bermuda ... ... 22.497 1,267 47 231 S 24580
British (uiana ... 1.842.050 315.621 4.823 7S.833 4.935 (32 20.989 4,420 2 272303
India ... ... 73.567 9.262 203 11,661 677 314.649 48.983 459.002
Union of South
Africa .. ... 311,716 15,221 310 108.627 3.403 16.049 455,326
British West Indies 428,512 34.943 1.283.440 1.599.160 345.1S5 112.662 279.164 6,928 276.043 235.575 4.601,612
Hong Kong ... 7.47S -- -674 13.720 780 254.365 277.017
Other Commoun-
wealth Countries
within the Sterling
Area ... ... 79.975 2.251 55.762 126 545 S.530 147,189


1








Table 4a.


DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954-Continued

ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITHIN AREAS AND BY SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.

$ B.W.I.


IMPORTS (C.I.F.)-Continued


SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.


AREA OR COUNTRY









Other American
Account Countries
Venezuela ... ...
Other (Countries ...
Tou.A OTiiiR
AIM ER1CAn Ac\('(c' IT
CoUNTRIT E ... ...

Non-Dollar Western
Hemisphere
Countries
Argentina ... ...
Other Countries ..
TOTAL NON-DOLLAR
WIw:STrERx HEMIS-
PHERE C(OrNTRIES


Food






154



154




674.0134
90.365


704.399


Be% eVra es

Toke-co





l
41


41


2


Crude
Materials
inedible
except
Fuels




40
159,517


159.557


3





;0111( 1 i tc((
Fuels.

and related,
Materials


5(166733


4


Animal and(1
Veg(_etable
Oils aind
Fats















1.574


1.574


5






















-I)
7i)


6



lainufie-
tured
Goods
















174


7



;1011
Mac(h inorV
and
Tran sport
Equipment,





150
5,849


5.999


8



Miscellaneo us
Manufactured
Articles





107
56S


675





1,021


1.021


9




Misc 1ellaineous
Transactions


TOTAL ALL
SECTIONS











567.18S4
169.136


175.i18s
9) 1.639


7G7.247











Table 4a.--Continued.


DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954-Continued.

ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITHIN AREAS AND BY SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.
8 B.W.I.


IMPORTS (C.I.F.)-Continued.


SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.

TOTAL

AREA OR COUNTRY 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ALL
-- SECTIONS
Crude Mineral Animal and Machinery
Beverages Materials Fuels, Vegetable Manufac- and Miscellaneous
Food and inedible Lubricants Oils and Chemicals turned Transport Manufactured Miscellaneous
Tobacco except and related Fats Goods Equipment Articles Transactions
Fuels Materials Articles

O.E.E.C. Countries
and Possessions
(excluding
United Kingdom)
Belgium-Luxem-
bourg and
Possessions ... 5,618 595 1,268 27,648 20 318 35,467
Sweden ... ... 679 .. -- 1.110 135.445 18.028 10,008 1,369 166.639
Norway ... ... 170,624 439,095 68.286 600 678,605
Germany (Western) 4,901 2,401 -79,908 469,389 130,287 159,878 168,345 67,409 1,082,518
France and
Possessions ... 4,639 48,467 156 5,640 56,751 24,390 6.122 3,843 30,738 180,746
Netherlands and
Possessions ... 1,301,188 148,040 4,137 424 12,745 22,863 158,167 53,093 98,062 6,455 1,805,174
Portugal and
Possessions ... 97.735 2,741 133 489 8,702 2,386 9,378 121,564
Other O.E.E.C.
Countries ... ... 152,731 14,916 10,792 17,115 3.836 193.719 49.385 49689 68,575 560,758
TOTAL O.E.E.C.
COUNTRIES ... 1,738,115 216,565 15,813 424 554,992 555,217 746,644 286,506 332,953 184,242 4,631,471







DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954-Continued.
Table 4a.-Continued.
ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITHIN AREAS AND BY SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.


$ B.W.I.


IMPORTS (C.I.F.)-Continued.


SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.


AREA OR COUNTRY


Rest of World
Czecho-Slovakia ...
Japan
Spain and
Possessions ...
Other Countries
TOTAL REST OF THE
WORLD ... .

TOTAL ALL FOR-
EIGN COUNTRIES

TOTAL ALL
COUNTRIES ...


Food


230

17,208
94,032

111,470


3,597,888


15,304,794


1



Beverages
and
Tobacco


10,523
193

10,716


238,765


1,256,971


Crude
Materials
inedible
except
Fuels


1,100
1,100
1.100


394,008


3,386,848


3


Mineral
Fuels,
Lubricants
and related
Materials


734,149


2,435,355


Animal and
Vegetable
Oils and
Fats


437
1,027

1,464


653,807


1.097.650


Chemicals


1,372


46
1,328

2,746


642,740


3.901.773


Machinery
and I
Transport
Equipment


62


1.201,078


5.635,689


Miscellaneous
Manufactured
Articles


64,625
15,390


36,616

116,631


640.118


3.391,442


Miscellaneous
Transactions




9,291


26
184

9,501


414.226


2,322,735


TOTAL
ALL
SECTIONS


90,911
328,069

32,685
176,805

628,470


10,196,005


48,763,353











Table 4b.


DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954-Continued.

ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITHIN AREAS AND BY SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.
$ B.W.I.


EXPORTS (F.O.B.)


SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.
TOTAL

ARF.A OR CorUINTY 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ALE
SECTIONS
Crude Mineral
Beverages Materials Fuels. Animal and Mannfac- Machinery Miscellaneous
Food and Inedible Lubricants Vegetables Chemicals turned and Manufactured Miscellaneous
Tobacco except and related Oils aml Goods Transport Articles Transactions
Fuels Materials Fats Equipment


COMMONWEALTH
COUNTRIES
Commonwealth
Countries within
the Sterling Area
United indo ... 23,095,505 46519 30.820 760 36116 32.080 33.482 15524 100 23.296.906
Australia ... ... 864 864
Bermuda ... ... 4,112 202.188 4,953 7 553 1,67 13.541
British Guiana 400,757 1,54 220 6204 342.987 11.113 17.524 2.381 782.750
British West Indies 863.447 1,491.888 5 222 12.156 100.612 436,827 787.077 324.692 255.825 10.099 4.287.845
Other Commoniwealth
Countries within .
the Sterling Area 1,536 -

Commonwealth
Countries Outside
the Sterling Area
Canada ... 10.129.380 353.149 48 -1.494 314 791 .323 10.490.499









DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954-Continued.


Table 4b.-Continued.


ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITHIN AREAS AND BY SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.


$ B.W.I.


EXPORTS (F.O.B.)-Continued.


SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.


AREA OR COUNTRY


TOTAL ALL
COMMONWEALTH
COUNTRIES ...

TOTAL STERLING
AREA ...

TOTAL NORTH
AMERICA (Canada
and U.S.A.) ...
FOREIGN COUN-
TRIES
Foreign Countries
within the Sterling
Area
United States of
America ... .


0




Food


34,493.201


24,363,821



10.723.902


1 2


Crude
Beverages Materials
o n, i dil,


Tobacco


2,097.708


1.744,559



359,538


except
Fuels


42,310


42.262



8,282


Mineral
Fuels,
Lubricants
and related
Materials


12,156


12,156


Animal and
Vegetable
Oils and
Fats


102,866


101,372



1,894


Chemicals







484,100


484.100


6



l ... -
lured
Goods






1,1 2.,53(


1,162,222



4.176


7 8 9


Machinery
and
all(l
Transport
Equipment






370.637


3(9,846(



24,157


Miscellaneous
Malnu factiured
Articles


295,853


12.323


Miscellaneous
Transactions






12.58O


12.580
12,580


6,389


TOTAL
ALL
SECTIONS












39.073,947


28,583,448



11.134,272


594.522


8,234


3.862


23.366


7.000


643,773
















Table 4b.-Continued.


DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954 (Continued)

ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITHIN AREAS AND BY SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.
$ B.W.I.


EXPORTS (F.O.B.)-Continued.


SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.


AREA OR COUNTRY









Other American
Account Countries
Venezuela ... .
Other Countries ...
TOTAL ALL OTHER
AMERICAN ACCOUNT
COUNTRIES ...

Non-Dollar Western
Hemisphere
Countries
TOTAL NON-DOLLAR
WESTERN HEMIS-
PHERE COUNTRIES


0




Food


28.827


28.832


1



Beverages
andc
Tobacco


155
10.095


2


Crude
Materials
Inedible
except
Fuels




500



500(


3


Mineral
Fuels,
Lubricants
and related
Materials


4


Animal and
Vegetal lh
Oils and
Fats


Chemicals


383


383


6 7 8 9


Manufac-
turedl
Goods0


3.677
2,355


6.032


Machinery
and
Transport
E quipincnt


2.430
598


3,028


Miscellaneous
Manufactured
Articles


1,586
8.291


9.877


Miscellaneous
Transactions


125



125


TOTAL
ALL
SECTIONS


8,478
50,549


59.027


L~I








Table 4b.-Continued.
DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954 (Continued)

ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITH IN AREAS AND BY SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.

$ B.W.I.


EXPORTS (F.O.B.)-Continued.


SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.

TOTAL
AREA OR COUNTRY 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ALL
--- --- --- ECTIO)NS
Crude ineral Animal n l and Mac hiitne
Beverages Materials Fuels, Ve-etalhle Manuaufc- anlt M\iscellaneous
Food and Inedible Lubricants Oils and C(hemicals tiled Transplort Mamlact ure Misccllan;ie
Tobacco except and related Fats Goods Equiiiment Articles T'asactio
Fuels Materials


O.E.E.C. Countries
and Possessions
(excluding United
Kingdom)
Belgium-Luxem-
bourg and
Possessions ... 76 -- 7 -
Sweden ... .. 19.700 31 2 0.012
Germany (Western) 12,000 787 .922 -- I709
France and
Possessions ... 4.642 24,769 96 1 7 35.348 2:1.37 7.537 -96.846
Netherlands and ...
Possessions ... 5,326 32.426 14.303 1.S02 1 10.890 1.125 4.959 1 70.831
Other O.E.E.C.
Countries ... ... 40,742 40, 74

TOTAL O.E.E.C.
COUNTRIES ... 9.968 57,271 86.745 96 -2,819 147.025 28.796 12.496 345.216










Table 4b.-Continued
DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954 (Continued)

ANALYSIS BY CURRENCY AREAS AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES WITHIN AREAS AND BY SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.
$ B.W.I.


EXPORTS (F.O.B.)-Continued.


SECTIONS OF THE S.I.T.C.


AREA OR COUNTRY


Rest of World
TOTAL REST OF
WORLD ... .

TOTAL ALL FOREIGN
COUNTRIES ...

TOTAL ALL COTTN-
TRIES ...

Ships' Stores and
Bunkers ...

GRAND TOTAL ...


0



Food


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


Beverages
and
Tobacco


Crude
Materials
Inedible
except
Fuels


Mineral
Fuels,
Lubricants
and related
Materials


Animal and
Vegetable
Oils and
Fats


Chemicals


_______________________II I I


633,322


35,126,523


3,981

35,130,504


73,910


2,171,618


107,447

2,279,065


95,479


137.789


1,237

139.026


96


12,252


154.208

166,460


400


103,266


4

103.270


3,202


487,302


3,973

491.275


Manufac-
tured
Goods


156,919


1,319,458


39.091

1.358,546


Machinery
and
Transport
Equipment


55,190


425,827


8.002

433.829


Miscellaneous
Manufactured
Articles


29,373


325,226


1

325,227


Miscellaneous
Transactions








125


12.705


12.705


TOTAL
ALL
SECTIONS


1,048,016


40,121,963


317,944

40,439.907












Table 5

SUMMARY OF IMPORTS (C.I.F.) BY SECTIONS AND DIVISIONS OF THE STANDARD
INTERNATIONAL TRADE CLASSIFICATION LIST 1954
$000 B.W.I.


SECTIONS AND DIVISIONS 1954

SECTION 0-FOOD 15,304.8

DIVISION
00- Live Animals chieflv for food ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 13.9
01-Meat and Meat Preparations ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 2,809.8
02-Dairy Products, (eggs and honey ... ...... ... ... .. ... 2.198.6
03- Fish and Fish Preparations ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. ... 1,143.6
04-Cereal and Cereal Preparations ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 4,359.9
05- Fruits and Vegetables ... ... ...... ... ... ... .. .. ... 1,500.1
06-Sugar and Sugar Preparations ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 211.8
07-Coffee, tea. cocoa, species and manufactures thereof ... ... ... ... ... 805.8
08-Feeding Stuff for Animals (not including unfilled cereals) ... ... ... ... 1,978.9
09-Miscellaneous food preparations ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 282.4

SECTION 1-BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1,257.0

DIVISION
11- Beverages ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 833.9
12-Tobacco and tobacco manufactures ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 423.1

SECTION 2-CRUDE MATERIALS, INEDIBLE EXCEPT FUELS .. ... 3,386.8

DIVISION
21-Hides, Skins and fur skins, undressed ... ... ... ... ... ... ... -
22- Oil seeds, oil nuts and oil kernels ... ... ... ... ...... ... 1,132.6
23-Crude rubber, including synthetic and reclaimed ... ... ... ...... -
24-Wood. lumber and cork ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. 2,019.3
25- Pulp and waste paper ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. ... -
26-Textile fibres, not manufactured into yarn, thread or fabrics, and waste ... .. 64.0
27-Crude fertilizers and crude minerals. excluding coal, petroleum and precious stones ... 131.2
28-Metalliferous ores and metal scrap ... .. ... ... ... ... ... -
29-Animal and Vegatable Crude Materials, N.E.S. ... ... ... ... ... ... 39.7

SECTION 3-M MINERAL FUELS, LUBRICANTS AND RELATED MATERIALS 2,435.4

DIVISION
31-Mineral fuels. lubricants and related materials ... .. ... ... ... ... 2,435.4

SECTION 4-ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE OILS AND FATS ... ... ... 1,097.7

DIVISION
41-Animal and vegetable oils (not essential oils), fats, greases and derivatives ... ... 1,097.7

SECTION 5--CIEMICALS ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 3,901.8

DIVISION
51-Chemical elements and compounds ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 223.1
52-Mineral tar and crude chemicals from coal petroleum and natural gas ... ... ... 3.6
53-Dyeing, taming and colouring materials ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 556.5
54---Medicinal and pharmaceutical products ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 750.2
55-Essential oils and perfume materials, toilet. polishing and cleansing preparations ... 554.2
56- Fertilizers, manufactured ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1,559.8
59-Explosives and miscellaneous chemical materials and products ... ... ... ... 254.4

SECTION 6-MANUFACTURED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL ... 10,030.1

DIVISION
61-LeaLeathe Lather manufactures. N.E.S. and dressed furs ... .. ... ... ... 67.2
62-Rubber manufactures, N.E.S. ... ... ... ... ... ...... 499.8
63-W\ood and Cork manufactures (excluding furniture) ... .. .. ... ... 342.4
64-Paper, paperboard and manufactures thereof .. ... ... ... ... ... 1,054.8
65-Textile yarn, fabrics and made-up articles and related products ... ... ... ... 4,040.9
66-Non-metallic mineral manufactures, N.E.S. ... ... ... ... .. .. ... 1,454.2
67-Silver, platinum, gems and jewellery ... .... ... ... ... ... ... 53.0
68- Base metals ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 1,006.8
69-Manufactures of metals ... ... ........ ... ... ... ... 1,511.0










42

Table 5-(Coftino.d)

SUMMARY OF IMPORTS (C.I.F.) BY SECTIONS AND DIVISIONS OF THE STANDARD
INTERNATIONAL TRADE CLASSIFICATION LIST 1954

$000 B.W.I.


SECTIONS AND DIVISIONs 1954



SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT ... ... ... ... 5,635.7

DIVISION
71--Machinery other than electric ... ...... ..... ... ... ... 2.621.6
72- Electric machinery. apparatus itnd appliances ... ... ... ... .. ... 1.264.5
73- Transport equipment ... ... ... ... ... .. ..... . ... 1,749.6

SECTION 8--MISCELLANEOUS ARTICLES MANUFACTURED ... ... ... ... 3.391.4

DIVISION
81-P1refabricated buildings, sanitary plumbing heating and lighting fixtures and fittings ... 171.3
82- Furniture and fixtures .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 180.5
83-Travel goods and handbags anl similar articles ... ... ... ... .. ... 69.6
84- lothin ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... 832.5
8 Footwear ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. ... 1,000.9
86-Professional scientific and cont rolling instruments: phot graphic and optical goods
watches and clocks ... ... ... ... ... .. ... .. ... ... 200.5
89-Miscellaneous and manufactured articles N.E.S. ... ..... ... ... ... 936.1

SECTION 9--MISCELLANEOUS TRANSACTIONS AND COMMODITIES N.E.S. ... 2.322.7

DIVISION
91- Postal packages ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2,031.6
92-Live animals other than for food ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 96.4
93-Returned goods and special transactions ... ... ... ... ... .. ... 194.7

TOTAL OF ALL SECTI(ONS ... ..... .. ... .. ... ... 48,763.4










43

Table 6

SUMMAIRY OF TOTAL EXPORTS (I)OMESTIC AN1D E-EXPORTS) (F.O.B., BY SECTIONS
ANI DIVISIONS OF TIHE STANDARD INTERNATIONAL TRADE CLASSIFICATION LIST-1954

$000 B.W.I.


SI:CTI )Ns AND\ D[V[Sr) s -s


SE(CTON 0-FOOD .

DIVISION
00- Live Animals chily l or 'food ... .. ... ..
01-Meat and Meat preparations .... ..
02- D)airy Products, eigs and hione ... ... ... ...
03- Fish anish ish pri separation ... ... ... .. ...
04--(ereal and cereal- prepartions ... .. .. ..
05- Fruits and vegeta les ... .. ... ... ... ... ... ...
06-S-iu ar and sugar wprepealiins ... ... ... .. ... ...
07--Co('ff i t. tea n. c spis es .and iimma it;l turos I hereof ... ... ..
08-Feeding stuff for animals (ni1it inicl(uin unmilledl cereals) ... ... ..
09- Aliscellaneous food aa ins ... ... ... ... ...

SECTION I-BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO .

DIVISION
11- Bc es. ... ... ... ... ... ...
12--T baco. alll tob c laul facttures ... ... ...

SECTION 2--C'RLI)E MA TERIIALS. NEDIB1LE EXCEPT FUELS

DIVISION
21 --Hlides. skins andi iur skins undressed ... ... ... ... ...
22-Oil-Seeds. oil mils and oil kernels
23- (Crud e i-ruhler. including synthetic and reclaimlled ... .. .
24 ---.Wood. luhmer and cork .. ... ... ..
:5- u lll and \ sl .a r ...... ... ... .. .
21 --Textile tilres nt)i jainuflactured intIo arn. thread or ilbres and uaste ..
27--(Crud(e tertilizors alnd clude minerals, excluldin coal, petroleum and precious
28-- Aletalliferrous ores and metal scrap ... ... ... ..
29-Animal and vegetable materials .o.s. ... ... ... ... ...


stones


SECTION 3-MINERAL FUELS, LUBRICANTS AND RELATED MATERIALS

DIVISION
31-Mineral fuels, lubricants iland related materials ... .

SECTION 4-AN[IMAL AN!) VEGETABLE OILS AND FATS

DIVISION
41-Animal and vegetable oils (not essential oils), fats, vreases and derivatives


SECTION 5-CHEMICALS ...


DIVISION
51-Chemical elements and compounds ... ... ... .. ...
52-Mineral Tar and crude chemicals from (co-' petroleum and natural gas ... .
53-Dyeing, tanning and colouring materials ... ... ... ...
54--Medicinal and pharmaceutical products ... ... ... ..
55-Essential oils and perfume material, toilet, polishing. and cleansingt preparations
56-Fertilizers, manufactured ... ... .. ... ...
59-Explosives and miscellaneous chemical materials and products ... ... .


SECTION 6-MANUFACTURED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL

DIVISION
61-Leather, leather manufactures, n.e.s. and dressed furs ... ...
62-Rubber manufactures, n.e.s. ... .. .
63-Wood and Cork manufactures (excluding furniture) ... .. .
64-Paper, paperboard and manufactures thereof ... ..... .
65--Textile yarni. fabrics andl made up articles and related products ... ...
66-Non-Metallic mineral manufactures, n.e.s..... ... ... ..
67-Silver, platinum.m gems and jewellery ... ... .. ....
68-Base Metals ... ... ... ...
69-Manufactures of Metals ... ...


1954


35,130.5


4.1
41.0
15.5
1.1
43.
345.5
33,816.7
47.9
15.2
799.7

2.279. 1


2.279.4
7

139.0


9.6
2.9
117.0
.5


166.5


... ... 166.5


103.3


103.3


...... 491.3


31.6
.3
7.S
205.8
233.0
5.5
7.3

1,35S.5


1.2
7.1
2.4
40.7
1,096.6
119.4
7.8
19.7
63.6


- I












Table 6-(Continued)

SUMMARYY OF TOTAL EXPORTS (DOMESTIC AND RE-EXPORTS) (F.O.B.) BY SECTIONS
AND DIVISIONS OF THE STANDARD INTERNATIONAL TRADE CLASSIFICATION LIST-1954
-CONTINUED

$000 B.W.I.

SECTIONS AND DIVISIONS 1954



SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT ... ... ... ... 433.8

DIVISION
71-Machinery other than electric ... ..... ... .. ... ... ... 283.2
72-Electrical Machinery, apparatus and appliances ... ... .. .. ... ... 91.5
73-Transport Equipment ... ... ... ...... ... ... ... ... ... 59.1

SECTION 8-MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES ... ... ... ... 325.2

DIVISION
81-Prefabricated building, sanitary plumbing, heating and lighting fixtures and fittings ... 10.5
82- Furniture and Fixtures ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 4.2
83-Travel goods and hand bags and similar articles ... ... ... ... ... ... 2.9
84- Clothing ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 187.9
85- Footwear ... .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 28.2
86-Professional, scientific and controlling instruments, photographic and optical goods,
watches and clocks ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ... 6.0
89-Miscellaneous manufactured articles. n.e.s. ... .. ...... ... ... ... 85.5

SECTION 9-MISCELLANEOUS TRANSACTIONS AND COMMODITIES N.E.S ... ... 12.7

DIVISION
91- Postal Packages ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... -
92- Live Animals other than food ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2.0
93-Returned Goods and Special transactions .. .. ... ... ... ... ... 10.7

TOTAL OF ALL SECTIONS ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 40,439.9


I












Table 7

DIRECTION OF TRADE-1954

ANALYSIS BY GEOGRAPHICAL AREAS AND INDIVIDUAL TRADING PARTNERS
WITHIN AREAS
$000 B.W.I.


Expo|rs (F.O.B.)
Imports
COUNTRIES (C.I.F.)
Domestic Re-Exports Total
Produce

North America
Canada ... ... ... ... ... 8,875.3 10,484.0 6.5 10.490.5
Mexico ... ... ... ... ... 3.2
United States of America ... ... ... 3,226.8 610.8 33.0 643.8

Central America and Antilles
Anguilla ... ... ... ... ... 1.9 1.2 15.8 17.0
Antigua ... ... ... ... ... 0.2 152.5 192.9 345.4
Bahamas ... ..... ... ... 55.5 171.6 0.2 171.8
Bermuda ... ... ... ... ... 24.6 208.2 5.3 213.5
British Honduras ... ...... ... 51.2 0.9 0.9
Cuba ... ... ... .. ... 0.5 -
Dominica ... ... ... ... .. 358.5 324.5 162.8 487.3
Grenada ... ... ... ... ... 113.8 224.4 164.9 389.3
French West Indies ... ... ... ... 0.1 31.6 65.1 96.7
Haiti ... ... ... ... ... 0.3 -
Jamaica ... ... ... ... ... 170.0 3.8 22.3 26.1
Montscrrat ... ... ... .. ... 3.1 42.9 53. 96.7
Netherlands West Indies ... .. ... 2.6 23.2 87.2 110.4
Nicaragua ... ... ... ... ... 158.5 0.4 0.4
Puerto Rico ... ... ... ... ... 5.4 29.1 29.1
St. Kitts-Nevis ... ... ... ... 48.2 350.3 151.0 501.3
St. Lucia ... ... ... ... ... 591.3 221.0 198.1 419.1
St. Vincent ... ... ... ... ... 646.6 62.5 201.3 263.8
Tortola .. ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.1 4.5 4.6
Trinidad ... ... ... ... ... 2,488.8 994.0 568.9 1,562.9
Turks Islands .. ... ... .. 2.3 0.4 2.7
Virgin Islands ... ... ... ... ... 0.5 11.9 9.1 21.0
Parcel Post (B.W.I.) ... ... .. ... 123.6 -

South America
Argentina ... ... ... ... ... 675.6 -
Brazil ... ... ... ... .. 8.2 -
British Guiana ... ... .. ... 2,272.3 504.3 278.5 782.8
Chile ... ... ... .. .. 0.1 -
French Guiana ... ... ... .. 0.1 0.1
Netherlands Guiana ... ... ... ... 10.1 0.2 28.9 29.1
Peru ... ... ... ... .. 0.2 -
Uruguay ... ... ... ... ... 83.2 -
Venezuela ... ... ... ... 567.2 1.0 7.4 8.4

Western Europe
Austria ... .. ... ... 29.1 -
Belgium-Luxembourg ... ... ... 35.5 0.1 0.1
Denmark .. ... ...... 222.7 10.4 10.4
Eire ... ... ... ... ... 200.9 -
France ... ... ... ... ... 180.7 -
Germany (Western) ... ... ... ... 1,082.5 12.0 4.7 16.7
Netherlands ... ... ... ... ... 1,792.4 31.3 31.3
Norway ... ... ... ... ... 67 .6 -
Sweden ... ... ... ... ... 166.6 19.7 0.3 20.0
Switz:rland ... ... ... ... ... I S11 -
United Kingdom ... .. ... 19.529.4 22.996.3 30.6 23,296.9

Southern Europe
Greece ... ... ... ... ... 23. -
It-ly ... ... ... ... ... 166.9 30.4 30.4
Maderia ... ... ... ... ... 24. I -
Portugal ... ..... ... ... 97.4 -
Spain ... ... .. ... ... 32.7 -
Turkey ... .... 0.3 -













Table 7-(Continued)

DIRECTION OF TRADE 1954

ANALYSIS BY GEOGRAPHICAL AREAS AND INDIVIDUAL TRADING PARTNERS
WITHIN AREAS

.000 B.W.I.


EXPORTS (F.O.B.)


Imports
COUNTIES (..F.)




Eastern Europe
Czecrho-Slovakii ... .. ... ... 90.9
Hungary ........ ... 24.3
Poilnd .. .. ... ... ... 35.6
Rumania ... ... ... ... ... 3.2
Russia (U..S.S.R ) ... ... ... ... 0.2
YuIoslavia ... .. ... ... ... 12.4

Middle East
Anglo-Egyptian Sudan ... ... ... 0.4
Cyprus ... ... ... ... ... 9.6
Egypt ... ... ... ... ... 66.8
Ethiopia ... ... ... ... ... 0.1
Iran ... ... ... ... 0.1
Iraq ... ... ... ... ... 1.3
Israel ... .. ... ... .. 5.
M alta ... ... ... .. ... 0.1

Other Asia
Coylon ... ... ... ... ... 47.5
China ... ... ... ... 2.5
Hong Kon .. .. ... ... ... ... 277.0
India ... .. ... ... 459.0
Japajn ... ... ... ... ... 328S.1
Malaya and Singapore ... ... ... 32.5
Philippines ... ... ... ... ... 0.7
Sarawak ... ... ... ... .. 6.2
Thailand ... ... ... .. 3.3

Oceania
Australia .. ... .. ... ... 414.6
Fiji Islands ... .. ... .. -
New xealand ... ... ... ... ... 1,510.9

Other Africa
British West Africa ... ... ... ... 0.2
Libya ... ... ... ... ... 3.4
M orocco ... ... ... ... ... 0.2
Sudan ... ... ... .. ... 20.2
Union of South Africa ... ... ... 455.3

TOTAL ALL COUNTRIES ... ... 48,763.4
SHTIS' STORES AND BUNKERS ...

GRAND TOTAL ... ... ... ... 48,763.4


Domestic Re-Exports Total
Produce


0.9 0.9
0.2 0.2
-


0.4 0.4





37,528.9 2,593.1 40,122.0
26.2 291.8 317.9

37,555.1 2,884.9 40,439.9


I










47
Table 8

IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954

ANALYSIS OF COMMODITIES IMPORTED BY COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN


S.I.T.C. COMMODITY VALUE
CODE ORIGIN UNIT QUANTITY $ B.W.I.



0 SECTION-FOOD

00 DIVISION-LIVE ANIMALS

001 Group-Live Animals Chiefly for Food

001-01.2 CALVES FOR REARING AND BREEDING
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ... No. 2 700

TOTAL ... ... .. ... ... ... No. 2 700



001-03.1 SWINE FOR REARING AND BREEDING
United Kingdom ... ... ... ... ... No. 1 569

TOTAL ... ... ... ... ... ... No. 1 569(



001-03.2 OTHER SWINE FOR SLAUGHTER
St. Vincent ... ... ... ... ... ... No. 1 24

TOTAL ... ... ... ... ... No. 24


001-04.1 BABY CHICKS FOR REARING AND BREEDING
United Kingdom ... ... ... .. ... No. 3S9 490
Canada .. .. ... .. ... ... .. .. 19072 8,2S
Bermuda ... ... .. ... .. .. 2 IS
British Guiana ... .. .. ... .. 7 14
Janlaica ... ... .. ... ... .. 3(i 12
St. Kitts-Nevis ... ... ... ... ... ... 237 334
United States of America ... ... ... .. 2.S15 2 05

TO L ... ... ........ .. .. 22.5SS 12.501


Live Animals (chiefly for Food) N.E.S.

001-090. ( GOATS AN1D KIDS FoR HEARING AND BREEI)ING
St. K itts-Nevis ... .. .. ... ... ... Ni | (i()

TOTAL ... ... ... ... ... ... N ,. I (i6



01 DIVISION-MEAT AND MEAT PREPARATIONS

011 Group-Meat: Fresh, Chilled or Frozen.

011--0 MEAT OF BOVINE CATTLE (BEIF V.EAL)
Ca lada ... ... ... ... ... ... I '2 9:(
A ustralia ... ... ... ... ... ... .. 43.2.-)( 2o l. i2
New Zealand ... ... ... ... ... ... 1.44S.455 401. 932
United States of America ... ... ... .. 46 14

TOTAL ... ... ... ... .. ... lb. 1 .49)2.273 422,944


011-02 MEAT OF SHEEP OR LAMBS (MUTTON, LAMB)
New Zealand .. ...... ... ... lb. 181.541 7(i.065

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb. 1 1.541 7(i.065


I













Table 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


S.I.T.C
CODE


011-03 MEAT OF SWINE (Pork)
Canada ......
New Zealand ... ...

TOTAL .



01il-04 POULTRY, KILLED on DRESSED
Canada ......
Australia... .. ......
United States of America ... .. .
Argentina ...
Denmark ... ...
Holland ...

T'IT AL .. .




011-09 OTHER FRESH. CHILLED OR FROZEN MEAT (INCLUDING
EDIBLE OFFALS, HORSE-MEAT AND GAME)
Canada ... ... ... ......
New Zealand ... ... .
United States of Amrica ... ...

TOTAL ... .....




012 Group-Meat: Dried, Salted, Smoked or Cooked, not Canned.

SMOKED. DRIED, SALTED PORK.


012-01.1 BACON
Canada. ... .. .. ...
New Zealand .. .. .... .
United States of America ... ...
Denmark ... ... ... ..


TOTAL


012-01.2 HAM
United Kingdom ... ...
Canada ... ... ...
Australia ... ... ..
New Zealand ... ... ... .
Denmark ... ... ...

TOTAL ...





012-01.9 OTHER SALTED PORK
Canadah ... ... ...
Australia ... ..

T-OTAL .


UNIT QUANTITY


lb.















11).









l1.

lIb.


... I b.


162
10.541

10.703




24.304
1,837
1.314
286
470
441

2S.652






705
37.358
90

38.153











517
42.264
86
S.108

50,975





112
19,445
2.500
101.553
912

124,522


VALUE
$ B.W.I.


163
6,129

6.292




22,793
1,S71
1.324
275
395
421

27.079






1,365
17.324
50

18,739











626
38,500
97
8,560

47,783





187
25,096
3,050
84,216
1.049

113,598


1). 3,734.730 943,861
24.400 6,996

lb. 3,759,130 950,857












Table 8-(Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


012-02 SMOKED. DRIED OR SALTED BEEF OR
Canada ...
Australia ...
New Zealand ... ...
united d States of America ...


VEAL


TOTAL


013 Group-Meat Canned and Meat Preparations, Canned and
not Canned


013-01 SALUSA(.ES OF ALL KINDS NOT IN
United Kingdom ...
Canada ...
New Zealand ... ...


AIRTIGHT CONTAINERS


TOTAL ... ...


MEAT CANNED AND MEAT PREPARATIONS IN AIRTIGHT
CONTAINERS

013-02.1 HAMS
Canada... ... .....
Union of South Africa ... ... ...
Belgium ... ...
Denmark ... .. ...
Germany (Western) ... ... ..
Holland ... ... .. .

TOTAL ... ... ..


013-02.2 SAUSAGES
United Kingdom ...
Australia ...
New Zealand ... ...
Union of South Africa ...
United States of America
Argentina ...
Denmark ...
Holland ...

TOTAL


UNIT QUANTITY


634,070
51 ,280
60.7504
233.000

979.100






1.300
4.556I
S,561

14,4171


.. lb. 63
.. ,. 120
I.. 1,200
48.491
.. .. 3.647
15.115

.. >. 68,636


...... lb. 11.17
.. 8.136
S 96
... ... ... ... 594
... ... ... ... 1.1 0
..... .52.264
... ...... .. S,856
... ... .. ... .. 1.562

... ... 83.867


013-02.9 MEAT AND MEAT PREPARATIONS IN AllTIGHT


CONTAINERS OTHER THAN
United Kingdom
Canada ..
Australia ...
New Zealand
Union of South Africa
Argentina ...
Brazil
Denmark ...
France ..
Holland ...
Sudan ..
Uruguay ...


II aIs


TOTAL


lb. 858
.8.002
I 4S.144
578.001
74.135
253.434
10.800)
8.121
4.680
3.493
28,800
36.10 )

lb. 1,054.578


S.I.T.C.
CODE


VALUE
$ B.W.I.


245.621
19,592
18.598
82.3 1

366,202






994
4.086
4.599

9.679






66
123
1.584
56.379
4,562
17,372

80.086



7.139
4.743
SO
355
962
33,910
5.338
1,444

54,001


620
6.873
27.770
325.278
44.517
161.615
6.750
6.585
2.868
3.030
17.664
23.126

626,696












Table 8-(Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
CODE


013-09 MEAT EXTRACTS AND
(INCLUDING NATURAL
United Kingdom
Canada
Australia
Argentina
Denmark
France


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


PREPARATIONS OF MEAT, N.E.S.
SAUSAGE CASINGS)


TOTAL ... ...


02 DIVISION-DAIRY PRODUCTS, EGGS AND HONEY.

022 Group-Milk and Cream; Evaporated, Condensed or Dried.

MILK AND CREAM EVAPORATED OR CONDENSED


022-01.1 CONTAINING NOT LESS THAN
United Kingdom
Canada ...
Australia ...
New Zealand ...
Denmark ...
Holland ...


8 PER CENT OF BUTTER FAT


TOTAL


022-01.2 CONTAINING LESS
Belgium
Denmark


THAN 8 PER


CENT OF


BUTTER FAT


TOTAL ... ..


MILK AND CREAM (INCLUDING BUTTERMILK, SKIM-MILK
AND WHEY), DRY (IN SOLID FORM, SUCH AS BLOCKS
AND POWDER)


022-02.1 CONTAINING NOT LESS THAN 8
FAT
United Kingdom ...
Canada ...
Australia ...
Eire
New Zealand
United States of America
Denmark ... ...
Holland ... ...


PER CENT OF BUTTER


TOTAL


022-02.2 CONTAINING LESS
Canada
Australia
New Zealand
United States
Denmark
Holland
Sweden


TIAN S PER



of America


CENT OF


BUTTER FAT


UNIT


QUANTITY


5,655
280
5
3.096
428
16

9,480










110.240
42,335
1,620
54,300
11,363
3,229,768

3,449,626



400
560

960









15,015
100,530
30,072
2,025
15,750
1,323
19,778
35,640

220,133



23,438
4.480
176,930
296
28.000
54,624
1.448

289.216


TOTAL 70,609


VALUE
$ B.W.I.


6,435
930
5
1,966
388
74

9,798










22,107
10,333
1,182
14,398
4,057
736,539

788,616



139
151

290









15,139
98,865
23,290
2.277
9,756
1,277
13.935
26,579

191,118



6,730
1,422
39,330
204
6,240
16,004
679


_ 1i i1


TOTAL


70,609













Table 8-(Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C. COMMODITY VALUE
CODE ORIGIN UNIT QUANTITY $ B.W.I.


023 Group-Butter

023-01 BUTTER, FRESH, WHETHER SALTED OR NOT, INCLUDING
MELTED.
Canada ... ... .....
Australia ... ... ...
E ire ... ... ... ... ... ...
New Zealand ... ... ...
Union of South Africa ... ...
Norway ... ... ......

TOTAL ......



024 Group-Cheese

024-01 CHEESE
United Kingdom ... ......
Canada ... ... ...
Australia ... ... ......
New Zealand ... ... ...
United States of America ... .
Argentina ... ... ...
Denmark ... ... ...
Holland ... ... ......


TOTAL


025 Group Eggs


025-01 EGGS IN THE SHELL
Canada
Holland


TOTAL


025-02 EGGS NOT IN THE SHELL, LIQUID, FROZEN OR DRIED.
Australia ... .... ...
United States of America ...
Denmark ... ... ...


TOTAL


026 Group-Natural Honey

026-01 NATURAL HONEY
United Kingdom
Dominica
St. Lucia
Denmark
-Holland


lb.







Ib.







lb.


... ... ... I b .


...... ... N o.
. . .... ... ... I ,


...I No.


lb.


... ... ... lb .


lb.






lb.


1,250
277,023
229,150
284,771
25
222.076

1,014,295







850
7,476
38.195
497.534
27
650
4,594
10,049

559.375








115,600
14.400

130.000






6,200
350
4.957

11.507








1.253
1.495
4,327
20
48


1,516
229,167
190,570
223,635
14
164,862

809,764







445
7,443
23,958
250,117
20
240
3,642
6,841

292,706








7,624
1,167

8,791






4,852
760
3.610

9,222








717
192
706
10
.) *)


7,143 1.647


I


. .... ...
... .. .
. ... ... ..
... .. .
... .. .


TOTAL













Table 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


VALUE
UNIT QUANTITY S B.W.I.


029 Group-Dairy Products, n.e.s.


029-01 DAIRY PRODUCTS, N.E.S. (ICE CREAM. ICE CREAM POW-
DERS. MALTED MILK, COMPOUNDS AND MIXTURES,


DEHYDRATED PRODUCTS, ETC.)
United Kingdom ...
Canada ..
Australia ... ... ...
Bahamas ...
United States of America
Denmark ...
Holland ...


... ... ... b .







lb.
... ~ ~ ... .. .


TOTAL


14,429
744
11.175
1,200
66
1 5;30


13.571
539
9,870
636
82
1 4.550


326 122

29.470 25,870


03 DIVISION-FISH & FISH PREPARATIONS.

031 Group-Fish: Fresh or simply preserved

031-01 FISH: FRESH. KILLEDD OR FROZEN.
United Kingdom ... ...
Canada ... ... .. .
United States of America ... ..

TOTAL ...


FISH: SALTED. DRIED OR SMOKED BUT NOT
FURTHER PREPARED.


031-02.1 CODFISH AND FISH COMMONLY KNOWN
United Kingdom ...
Canada ... ...


... ... lb.


TOTAL


031-02.2 SALMON ANi) TROUT.
United Kingdomi
Canada


TOTAL


031-02.9 OTHER FISH. SALTED. DRIED OR S
FURTHER PREPARED.
United Kingdom ...
Canada ... ...
Holland ... ... ...
Norway ... ...

TOTAL


Ib.


lb.







MOKED BUT NOT

... ... .. ... lb .
... ... ... ... b .


4.30S
5.043
502


1.995
5,079
668


9,853 7,742


8.106
2.935.314


3,144
698.038


2.943.420 701,182


40
29,420

29.460


110.408
79.525
2,300
Z.ZI tP*t


25
10.092

10.117


19.5S7
13.342
390


232.- 3.16.I

215,513 37,086


S.I.T.C.
CODE













Table 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
CODE


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


UNIT


032 Group-Fish and Fish Preparations, Canned or not N.E.S.

032-01 FISHq. FISH PRODUCTS, AND FISH PREPARATIONS IN
AIRTIGHT CONTAINERSS INCLUDINGG CRUSTACEA
AND MOLLUSCS)
United Kingdomi ... ... ... ... ... b.
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ... ,
A ustralia ...... ... ... ... ... ,
Union of South Africa ... ... ... ... ...
United 'r of America ... ... ... ...
Denmark ... ... .. ...
France ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ,,
Germany (Western) .. .. .. ..
Italy ... ... ... .. ... .. ...
N orw ay ... ... ... .. ... .. ...
Portugal ... ... ... ... .. ... ,,

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb.





04 DIVISION-CEREALS & CEREAL PREPARATIONS

041 Group-Wheat unmilled

041-01 WHEAT AND SPELT (INCLUDING MESLIN) UNMILLED
Canada ... ... ..... ... ... b.
United States of America ... ....

TOTAL ... ... ... ... b.





,042 Group-Rice

RICE NOT IN THE HUSK, INCLUDING POLISHED AND
BROKEN RICE

042-02.1 RICE IN SMALL PACKETS FOR RETAIL SALE
British Guiana ... ... ... ... ... ... b.

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb.




042-02.9 OTHER RICE
British Guiana ... ... ... ... ... ... b.

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb.


043 Group-Barley, Unmilled

043-01 BARLEY. UNMILLED
Holland ...


TO )TAL


QUANTITY


6.294
532,283
552
256.704
55
982
68
75
197
3,355
920

S0I _4.5i


60,300
19,044

79 344












51.000

51,000





15.75.8926

15.758,926







119,390

199.390


VALUE
$ B.W.I.





a


3,694
292,116
337
85.739
191
1,592
129
203
525
1.995
965

387 486


5,648
762

6,410












8,807

8,807





1,767,923

1,767.923







13,375

13.375













Table 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


UNIT QUANTITY


-I I


044 Group-Maize (Corn) Unmilled

044-01 MAIZE (CORN) UNMILLED
Montserrat ... ......
St. Vincent ... .
Union of South Africa ... ...
Argentina ... ... ...


TOTAL


lb.
',


... ... ... I ).


045 Group-Cereals Unmilled other than Wheat, Rice, Barley
and Maize.

045-01.2 OATS, UNMILLED
United Kingdom ... ..... ..
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
H olland ... ... ... ...


TOTAL


lb
|,


...... ... I b .


046 Group-Wheat Flour

046-01 AMEAL AND FLOUR O(F WHEAT AND SPELT
([N('LrUl)N I MSLIN)
United Kingdom ... ...
tCan adaS ... ... .. ... ... ..
Australia ... ... ... ...
tUnited States of America ... ... ... ...


II).


TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb.







047 Group-Cereals milled except Wheat Flour

047 -f02 MEA.L AND Fl.(wi (OF MAIZIE (COlN)


( C !1u m da ....... ... ... ... ...
Uniin o)f' South Alfrica ... ... ... ... ...
United States of America ... ... ... ...

T4TAL ... ...







047-01 31EAL AND FLOwR OF C(,MREALS. N.E.S.
Uniited Kiniuidoiim ... ... ... ... ...


II,.


400
8,950
80.375
53,120

142.845


171.390
2.378.570
82S.266

3,378.226


224
16.801,355
56
4.121.610

20.923.245









2.699.75S
2.240
1.920 182

4.622. 180


.. ... I 1 .


S.I.T.C.
CODE


VALUE
$ B.W.I.


30
616
5,538
4,518

10,702


12,030
158,801
52,757

223.588


30
1,441,481
6
312,682

1,754.199









220.523
267
156.213


1.096


~


3.004


T( )TA L













Table 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
CODE


COMMODITY
ORIt;-N


048 Group-Cereal preparations including preparations from
Flour and Fecula of Fruits and Vegetables.

048-i-01 (GROATS AND (EREALS: FLAKED. PEARLED OR PREPARED
IN A MANNER NOT ELSEWIIERE SPECIFIED ("PREPARED


BREAKFAST' FOODS")
United Kingdom ...
Cana(da ... ... ...
Australia ... .
United States of Amorica
Denmark ... ... .
Holland ... ...


TOTAL


048-02 MALT
United Kingdom


TOTAL


UAN TITYI B.W.1.


99.192 36.895
72,419 28.939
S11,50 3,460
1,609 1,231
110 32
241,536 33.927

426.716 104.484


lb. 2,240 467

lb. 2.240 467


048-03 ALIMENTARY PASTES: MACARONI. SPA
VERMICELLI ETC.
United Kingdom ... ...
Canada ... ... .
Trinidad ... ...
Holland ... ... ..

TOTAL





048-04.1 BISCUrTS-SWEETENED
United Kingdom
Canada ... ..
Denmark ... ... ..
Holland ... ...

TOTAL



"I -1. 1 .3 BISCUITS-UNSWEETENED IN TINS OR
United Kingdom ...
Canada
United 'r ii. of America
Denmark ... ...

TOTA ...



048-09.1 COnN (MAIZE) CANNED
New Zealand
Union of South Africa
United States of America ...

TOTAL ... ...


(HETTT. NOODLES.

























SMALL PACKAGES
...... ... ,
I










1


60.745
71.759
1,728
34,165

168.397


lb. 32,828
443
140
2,922

lb. 36.333


14,336
19.381
428
7,907
t ju


27,351
445
101
1,412

29.309


11. 18.037 17,337
S240 268
323 259
63 41

lb. 18,663 17,905





lb. 495 185
68 16
750 414

lb. 1,313 615


__~


... ... ... ... 1 .
... ~ ~ ... .. .
11).


... ... ... ...
... .. ... ...
... ... ... ...
... ... ... ...


.. ... .. .













Table 8 continuedd )


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


COMMODITY
OIlGIN


VALUE E
UNIT QUANTITY B.WV.I.


048-09.2 ALL OTHER PREPARATIONS OF CEREALS. FLOUR AND FECULA
Fvo FOOD. N.E.S. (INCLUDING MALT FLOUR)
United Kingdom ... ... .. .. .. lb.
Canat da ... ... ... .. .. ... ...
Trinidad ...... ... ... ...
United States of America ... ... ... ...


TOTAL


05 DIVISION-FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.

051 Group-Fruits and Nuts, Fresh (not
including Oilnuts)


051-04 APPLES.
United Kingdom
Canada ......
United States of America
Holland ... ... ...


TOTAL


051-06.9 (a) FRESH FRUIT, N.E.S.
United Kingdom
Canada ... ... ...
British Guiana ... ...
Dominica ... ... ..
Grenada ...
Montserrat ...
St. Lucia ... ...
St. Vincent ...
Trinidad ...
United States of America
Holland ... ... ...


TOTAL


... .. ... ... b .


5,189 1,261
975 332
215 139
780 240

7,159 1,972
- 1)


25,994 8,073
225 16
14.816 3,812

lb. 41,061 11,911




428
178
.. 428
... 42,089
... 287
..... 20
... 63,171
... 1,540
... 65,933
37
... 1,942

176.053


EDIBLE NUTS, OTHER THAN NUTS CHIEFLY USED FOR
EXTRACTING OIL.

GROUNDNUTS (PEANUTS)
United Kingdom ... .....
Canada ... ... ... ... ...
Grenada ... ...... .. ... ...
St. Lucia ... ... ... ... ...
St. Vincent ... ... ... ... ... ...
Trinidad ... ... ......
Union of South Africa ... ... ... ... ...
United States of America ......
B razil ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
H olland ... ... ..... ... ...
Italy ... ... ...
Libya ... ...... ... ...
Spain ......
Sudan ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Thailand ... ... ... ... ... ... ...


TOTAL ...


(a) This includes S.I.T.C. Items 051-01 to 051-03 and 051-05 to 051-06.


S.I.T.C.
CODE


051-07.1


3,356
8.385
1,380
761
222,459
580
357
480
2,168
5,500
2,014
11.317
88,800
8,960
16,500

373,017


2.717
5,988
331
174
55,551
139
82
540
434
1,466
1,062
3,444
16.863
1.882
3.277

93,950


_____~_


... ... ... ...
... ... ... ...
... ... .. .


... ... ... ..


... ... ...



... ... ...
... ... .. .












Table 8-(Contiaued)

IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C. COMMODITY VALUE
CODE ORIGIN I[NiT QUANTITY S B.W.I.



051-07.2 COCONUTS. WHOLE
D)o inica ... ... .. .... No. 76.910 4,615
lb. 84.600
(renada ... ... ... ... ... ... ... No. 19.725 1,184
I). 21.690
St. Lucia ... ... ... ... ... ... ... No. 140.861 8.452
lb. 154,900
St. Vincent ... ... ... ... ... ... N 71.366 4.282
,1). 78.490
Trinidad ... ... ... ... ... ... ... No 4450 267
lb. 4.890

TOTAL ... ... .. ... No. 313.312 18,800)
lb. 344.570



051-07.9 OTHER EDIBLE NUTS
United Kingdom ... ... ... ... ... lb. 3.460 4,251
lortugal ... ... .. .. ... ... .. .. 35.76: 30.307

TOTA ... ... ... ... lb. 39,223 34.558



052 Group-Dried Fruits, including Artificially Dehydrated.

052-01 DRIED FRUITS, INCLUDING ARTIFICIALLY
DEHYDRATED FRUITS.
United Kingdom ... ... ... ... ... lb. 2.658 1,240
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ,, 1,950 738
Australia ... ... ... ... ... ... .. 4.112 1.660
Cyprus ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ,. 4.4(80 1.056
Union of South Africa ... ... ... ...... ,, 3,51 1,663
United States of America ... ... ..... 26.062 9.1(50
(rcee .. .. ... ... .. ... ... ., 116.922 23.557
IHollandl ..... ... ..... ... ... ,, 13,598 2,472
Iraq ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ,, 7,243 1,339
SPort.ugal ... ... .. ,, 732 154
Spain ... ... ... ... .. .. ... .. 1 .646 345
Turkey ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ,, 720 264

TOT.AL .. ... ... b. 183.641 43.638



053 Group-Fruits Preserved and Fruit Preparations.

1IRESERVEDl FRUITS. WHOLE OR IN 'IECi :., WITH ON
WITHOUT ADDED S,['AR. AWIlETIIER IN AIRTIIGHT CONT .\N-
ERS OR NOT (INCLUDING FRUIT FROZEN OR IN TEMPORARY
PRESERVATIVE E.I,.. IIVRNE)

053-01.1 PRESERVED FRUIT IN AIRTIGHT CONTAINERS
United Kingl dom ... ... ... ... ... lb. 9.122 5.436
Canada ...... .. ..... ... .. 11.748 7.310
Australia ... ... ... ... ... .. ... 19 183 7.086
Union of South Africa ... .... ... ... 44,44 13.621
United States of America .. ... .. ... ., 14.847 5,922
Denmark ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ,, 313 138
France ... ... ... ... ... ... 30 13
H olland ... .. ... ... ... ... ... ,, 2,239 771
Italy .. ... ... .. ... ... ... ,, 302 135

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb. 102,252 40.432












Table 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1!)54


S. .T.C. COMMODITY VALUE
CODE ORIGIN UNIT QUANTrITY B.V..


053--01.2 PRESERVED FRUITr NOT IN AIRTIGHT CONTAINERS
United Kingdom ... ..
Canada ... ... ...
United States of America ... ...
Yugoslavia ... ...

TOTAL ... ...



053--02 FRmIT AND FRUIT PEEL, PARTS OF PLANTS. DRAINED.
PLACED OR CRYSTALLIZED, FLAV(OURED OR NOT.
UnitTi ed Kingdom ... ...... ...
(CanaI a ... ... .. ..
Dominica ... ...
St. Vincen ... ... ...
lnion of South Africa ... ... ...

TOTAI.


053-0:3 JAMS. MIARMALADES. FIlUITI JELLIES. FRUIT PULPS AND
PASTES WHIETHIER IN AIRTIGHT CONTAINERS (OR NOT.
United King o ... ... ... ... ...
Canada ..... ... ... ... ...
Union of South Africa. ... ... .

TOTAL ... ... ... ...


FRUIT JUICES. UNFEIIMENT'D. WHETHER FROZEN OR
NOT, rNCILUI)[N(l SYRUPS AND) NATURAL FRUIT FLAVORS.

0)53--04.6 LIME J.tIC'E
Dominica ..

TO TAL ... ... ... ...


053-04.9 ALL OTHER FRUIT JUICES INCLUDING SYRUPS AND
NATURAL FRUIT FLAVOIURS.
United Kingdom ... ... ...
Camada ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Dom inlica ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
T rinidad ...... ... ... ...
Unionj of South Afr'ica ... ... ... ... ...
United States of America ... ... .
Holland ... .. .

TOTAL ... ...


054 Group-Vegetables fresh and dry, Roots and Tubers not
including artificially dehydrated.


054--01 POTATOES. NOT INCLUDING,
United Kingdom
Canada ... ..
Belgium ... ...
Denmark ... ...
Holland ... ...
Italy ... ..
Portugal ... ...


SWEET POTATOES


TOTAL


986
1S9
1,750
4,1S3

7,10S





1.9SS
34
755
201
12,359

15.156




56.753
1.081
50.232

1(1S.066


2,272

2.273




131
89
S47
37.460
2.514
2,286
62

43.389


lb. 508.760
4.320.648
.. 97.570
S 302.280
2,957.181
.440
9,020

lb. 8,195.899


900
119
1.2S7
1.209

3.515





1 .0S4
36
196
5
3.490

4.S11




15 942
231
10.969

27,142






2,951

2.951




S29
223
1,059
44.164
4.776
10,375
111

61,537


19.635
150,515
3.895
10.908
135.206
41
496

320.696













Table 8 (Continuld)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
CODE


COMAI)ODITY


054-02 BEANs. PEAS. LENTILS AND OTHER LEGOUMES (PULSES)
DaY. INCLUDIL+ SPLIT
United Kingdom ......
(' ada ...... ... ..
Australia ... ...
St. Lucia ... .. ... ... ...
St. V incent ... ... ... ... ... ...
T rini ad ... .. ... ... ...
H lla d ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Po-itugal ... ... .

TOTAL ...... ...





VEGETABLES CHIEFLY IF(R )I MAN F)OID, FlESlRI O1R
FRozE N N.E.S.

054-09. I GARLIC
Cyprus ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
H olland ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Italy ... ... ... ... ... ... ...


TOTAL


054-09.2 ONIONs
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ...
Cyprus ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Union of South Africa ... ... ... ...

H olland ... .. ... .. ...
M adeira ... ... ... ... ...

TOTAL ... ... ...




054-09.4 TOMAOEr(S s
M onltserrat ... ... ... ... ... ...
St. Lucia ... ... ... ...

TO(TA ... .





054-09.9 OTIIER VEGETABLES
United Kingdom ... ... ...
Bermuda .....
D om inica ... ... ... ... ... ...
M ontserrat ... ...... ...
St. Lucia ... ... ... ...
St. Vincent ... ...... ...
Trinidad ... ... ..
United States of America ... ...
H olland ... ... ... ... ...


TOTAL


\VALI IE
'NIT I QUAN TI'TY B.W .


li. 7 6.247 12,609
S70.099 92.864
I.6SO0 197
1.55) 218
43.:342 7.002
5.7li0 76(>
I 1.277.S7 1 172.166
225,005 42.630


11. 2.051,554 328,451










lb. 1i.10 264
50 12
.. 555 1,433

lb. (6.70 1.709


lb. 3.850
SS1
12.3169
17.28S
2.59(0
|, 1,615
1.7)00
.. (62
21 .393

Hi. 61.743


;2,12s
slO
3.1 i6
66.799
33.S57
23.183

209.937






80
4


2.1i
162
1,484
2,921
332
218
204
107
2.11-

10.143


~_~ ~


... ... ... ... I










60

Table 8 continuedd )

IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.1.T.C. COMMODITY VALUE
CODE ORIG [N UNIT QUANTITY S B.W.I.



055 Group-Vegetables Preserved and Vegetable Preparations

VEGETABLES PRESERVED OR PREPARED (EXCEPT DEHY-
DRATED) IN AIRTIGHT CONTAINERS (INCLUDING SOUPS
AND VEGETABLE JUICES)

055-02.1 ALL SOUPS AND VEGETABLE JUICES IN AIRTIGHT
CONTAINERS
United Kingdom ... ... ... ... b. 30.292 9.564
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ... .. 66.406 26.369
Bahamas ... ..... ... ... ... ,826 402
Jamaica ... ... .. ... .. ... ... ., 1,954 351
Union of South Africa ... ... ,, 1.379 310
United States of America ... ... ...... .. ,, 3,827 1,101
H olland ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 531 122

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb. 106.215 38,219


055-02.9 VEGETABLES PRESERVED AND PREPARED IN
AIRTIGHT CONTAINERS
United Kingdom ....... .. ... .. lb. 53.380 15,326
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 29.657 10,163
Bahamas ... ... .. ... ..,, 8,550 1,805
Jamaica ... ... ... .. .. ... .. ,, 1,200 236
Union of South Africa ... ...... ... ,, 7,490 1,901
United States of America ... ... ... ,, 5,901 1,944
Denmark ... .. ... ... ... ... ... 71 109
France ... .. .. .. .. ... ... ... ,, 2,281 1,485
Holland ... ... ... .. ...... 17.575 5.041
Italy ... ... ... ... .. ... ... .. 2.318 616

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb. 12 .423 38,626

FLOUR AND FLAKES OF POTATOES, FRUITS AND VEGE-
TABLES INCLUDING SAGO, TAPIOCA AND ALL OTHER
STARCHES PREPARED FOR USE AS FOOD

055-04.1 ARROWROOT
St. Vincent ... ... ... ... .. ... 45,228 9.413

OTA ... ... ... .. 45.22 9.413


OTHEr FLOURS AND FLAKES OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

055-04.2 SAGO AND TAPIOCA
United Kingdom ... ... ... .. .. l. 28 204 3.388
Canada ... .. ... ... 240 215
British Malava ... ........ ... 60.857 7.392
Sarawak ... ... .............. 9.707 1165
Singapore ... .. ... ...... 81.128 9 736
Holland ... ... ... ... ... ... 9.952 1.634

TOTAL ... ... ... ... .. l. 190,088 23,530

06 DIVISION-SUGAR AND SUGAR PREPARATIONS

061 Group-Sugar

I II; --12 SUGAR REFINED
United Kingdom ... .. ........ cwt. 3.008 38,590
Union of South Africa ... .. ... 6 137


___ ~ .


TOTAL


C t.










61

Table 8 continueded )

IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.1.T.C. COMMODITY VALUE
CODE OnIGIN UNIT QUANTITY 8 B.W.I.



061-09 OTHER SUGARS AND SYRUPS, N.E.S. (E.G. LACTOSE.
MIALTOSE, GLUCOSE, MAPLE SUGAR AND MAPLE SYRUP.
INVERT SUGARS AND LEVULOSE, ARTIFICIAL HONEY,
CARAMEL)
United Kingdom ... ... ... .. ... ewt. 314 12,219
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 383
British Guiana ... ... ... .. ... ... 2. 72
Trinidad ... ... .. .... ... ... 6 243
Union of South Africa ... ... ... ... ... ,, 478 6,108
United States of America ... ...... ... ,, 2 81
Denmark ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ,, 16
Holland ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 17

TOTAL ... ... ... ... cwt. 805 19,139

062 Group-Sugar Confectionery and other Sugar Preparations

062-01.1 SUGAR CONFECTIONERY
United Kingdom ... ... ... ... ... lb. 311,704 125,045
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ... ,, 3,311 3,465
Cyprus ... ... ... .. .. .. ,, 1,644 750
Jamaica ... ... ... ... ... .. ,, 1,848 618
Trinidad ... .. ... .. ... ,, 536 161
Denmark ... ... ... ... ... ... 249 227
Germany (Western) ... ... ... ... ... ,, 277 111
Holland ... ... ... ... .... ... 8,240 13,096
Venezuela, ... ..... .. 106 53

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb. 327,915 143,526



062-01.2 OTHER SUGAR PREPARATIONS (EXCEPT CHOCOLATE
CONFECTIONERY)
United Kingdom ... ... ... ... ... lb. 10.377 4.181
Canada ... .. ......... ... ,, 2,672 2,438
Union of South Africa ... ... ... ... 7,436 3.208
Holland ... ... ... ... .... .. 2.200 599

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb. 22.685 10,426


07 DIVISION-COFFEE, TEA, COCOA, SPICES, AND
MANUFACTURES THEREOF

071 Group-Coffee

071-01 COFFEE NOT ROASTED
Jamaica ... ... ... ... ... ... lb. 15,568 14,806
Trinidad ... ... ... ... ... ... ., 12,768 11,760

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb. 28,336 26,566




071-02 COFFEE ROASTED, INCLUDING GROUND
United Kingdom ... ... ... ... ... lb. 35.262 77.920
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ... 1,590 2,966
Jamaica ... ... ... .. .... ... 23.380 21,788
Trinidad ... ... .. ... ... ... 275 336
Venezuela ... .. ... ........ 33 28

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb. 60.540 103,038













Table 8-(('ontin Id)


IMPORTS C.T.F. 1954


COMMODITY


S.I.T.C.
CO(DE


UNIT


071-03 COFFEE EXTRACTS, COFFEE ESSENCES AND S~l.\LAR
PREPARATIONS CONTAINING COFFEE
United Kingdom ... ... .. ... ... ib.
Canada ..


TOTAL


072 Group-Cocoa

072-01 CocoA BEANS
St. Vincent ... .. ...

TOTAL ... ..

072--02 COCOA POWDER
United Kindom ... ... ... ...
United States of America ... ... ...

TOTAL ... ... ...






(72-03 COCOA BUTTER AND COCOA PASTE
United Kingdom ... ... ......

TOTAL ... ... ... ...




073 Group-Chocolate and Chocolate Preparations

073-01.1 CHOCOLATE CONFECTIONERY
United Kingdom ... ... ... ... ...
Canada ... ... ... ... ... ...
Germany (Western) ... ... ... .

TOTAL ...




073-01.2 OTHER CHOCOLATE AND CHOCOLATE PREPARATIONS
United Kingdom ... ......
Canada ... ... ... ... ..
United States of America ... ...
H olland ... ... ... ......


TOTAL


074 Group-Tea and Mate

074-01 TEA
United Kingdom
Ceylon
India
Japan


TOTAL


VALUE
QUANTITY i B.W.I.






16 16
750 1.727

766 1.743


62,172
4,974
25

67,171






106,139
750
2.103
2,003

110,995







122.876
40.333
73,710
484

237,403


191

191


18 9.566
162

189.728







62

62








68,909
5,788
25

74,722






87.312
1,001
1,617
541

90,471
I -).5i


171.613
47,515
71,546
230

290,904


... .. .
... .. .
.. .. ..
... .. .


... ... .. ... ,













Table 8-(Continve!d)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
Coi


COMMODITY
O()imrx


075 Group-Spices

1'nited Kingdom ... ... ... ... ...
( llCanadal ..
Bril ish Malava ... ... ... ...
I)om inica ... ... ...
Grenada ... ... .. ..
In d ia ... ... ... ... ... ...
St. ucia ... ...
St. Vincent ... .
Sarawak ... ... ... ..
Sin a e ... ... ... ... .. ...
Trinidad... ... ... ...
Union of South Africa ... ... ...
French West Indies ... ... .. ..

TOTAL






08 DIVISION-FEEDING STUFF FOR ANIMALS (NOT
INCLUDING UNFILLED CEREALS)

081 Group-Feeding Stuff for Animals (not including
Unmilled Cereals)

081-01.1 HAY AND FODDER
Canada ... ... ...

TOTAL ...... ...






081-01.2 BRAN, POLLARD, SHARPS AND OTHER BY-PRODUCTS
FROM THE PREPARATION OF CEREALS
Canada ... ... ... ...
British Guiana ... ... ..
Union of South Africa ... ...
A rgentina ... ... ... ... ... ...
H olland ... ... ... ... ... ...

TOTAL ... ... ...







081-03 OIL-SEED CAKE AND MEAL AND OTHER V EGETA BLE
OIL REISIDUES
Canada ... ... ... ... ..
British Guiana ... ... ...
St. Lucia ... ... ...
United States of America ... ...
Argentina ... ... ......
Uruguay ... ... ... ...


lb.

11.


lb,.


33.830

33.830(









1,147,356
279.278
1.894.513
2.001,120
22.430


Ib. 5.344.697


11).


TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb.


1.327.100
919.500
24.300
1,093,600
5,769,178
893.200

10.026.878


VALUE


14.2(14
193
3,320
111
901
515
530
194
5.002
2.965
90
167
70


2,649

2.649


91l,i600
11.254
102.785
55,300
1.264

262,212


123,341
43,019
1,088
100,121
349.558
60.055

677,182













Table 8-(Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C. COMMODITY VALUE
CODE ORIGIN UNIT QUANTITY $ B.W.I.


081-04 (a) MEAT AND FISH MEAL, FOOD-WASTES AND
PREPARED ANIMAL FEEDS
United Kingdom ......
Canada ........ ...
British Guiana ... ... ...
Trinidad ... ..
United States of America ... ...
Argentina ... ... ......
H olland ... ... ... ..... ...
M orocco ... ... ... ......
Roumania ... ... ...


TOTAL


09 DIVISION-MISCELLANEOUS FOOD PREPARATIONS

091 Group-Margarine and Shortenings

091-01 MARGARINE, ANIMAL, VEGETABLE OR MIXED
Trinidad .. ......


TOTAL


091-02 SHORTENINGS: LARD OR LARD SUBSTITUTE AND
SIMILAR PREPARED EDIBLE FATS
New Zealand ... ... ..... ...
United States of America ... ... ...

TOTAL ... ...

099 Group-Food Preparations n.e.s.

United Kingdom ... ...
Canada ... ... ...
Bermuda ... ... ... ..
British Guiana ... ... ...
India ..
Jamaica ... ... ...
St. Kitts-Nevis ... ... ... ...
Trinidad ... ...
Union of South Africa ... ...
United States of America ... ..
Argentina ... ... ...
Denmark... ... ...
Dutch West Indies ... ...
Holland ... ... ...
Italy ... ... ... ... .. ...
Venezuela ... ... ...

TOTAL ... .


Ib.


;;
,,
.>
3;


... ... ... .. I lb .


lb.


... ... ... ... I lb .


lb.


lb.


373,864
10.132.035
129.230
840
802,040
1.244.560
100.081
776
54,203

12,837.629








20

20





56
36

92


20.865
852,250
10.141
66
78,932
65,908
5.370
171
3,201

1,036,904








9

9





18
26

44


- 152,180
- 19.051
- 22,317
392
- 1,506
748
21
49,829
22,770
12,056
714
10
-- 125
141
364
73

- 282,297


(a) This includes R.I.T.(. Items OS1-014 to o8 1-09.













Table 8-(C'ontinued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
CODE


COMMON DITY
Om~arn


1 SECTION--BEVERAGES ANI) TOBACCO

11 DIVISION-BEVERAGES

111 Group-Non-Alcoholic Beverages

11--01 NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES (NOT INCLUDING FRUIT
OR VEGETABLE JUICE)
United Kinigdo om ...

TOTAL

112 Group-Alcoholic Beverages

112-01.1 SPARKLING WINE
Union of South Africa ... ...
France .
Germany (Western) ...

TOTAL ...

112--01.2 STILL WINE IN BOTTLES
United Kingdom ..... ...
Australia ...... ...
Cyprus ... ... ...
Union of South Africa
France .. ...
Germany (Western) ... ..
Hungry ...
Ital ... ... ... ... ...
Portugal .. ...
Spain ...

TOTAL ... ... ...


112-01.3 STILL WINE IN \OOD
United Kingdom ... ..
Cyprus ... ...
E ire ...... ... ...
Union of South Africa ... ... .
France .. ..
Spain

TOTA ... ..

112-01 .4 MEDICINAL VINE
United Kingdom ...

TOTAL ...

112-()2 CIDER ANI) FERMENTED FRUIT .JU'lES N.E.S.
United Kingdom ... ... ...

TOTAl. ... ... ...

112-03.1 BEER AND ALE
United Kingdom ... ... ..
Canada ... ... ... ... ...
Trinidad ... ... ... ... ...
Denmark ... .. ...
(ermanv (Western) ... ..
Holland ... ...

TOTA... ... ...


UN-IT QUAN'rITY


gal.


1.S19

1,819




125
736
51

912


22S
690
14
603
1.37S
l.iti
15 6
16
392
3S7
861

4.725



1.440
902
1.135
6,394
6
394

10,271


1.200

1 .201


394

394


65,195
938
1,831
5,656
108
78.975

152.703


VALUE
$ B.W.I.


6.306

6,306




1.00S
12,137
525

13.670


849
3,572
108
2.378
10.321
1,623
193
1.95S
2.741
8,S36

32.579



6.432
2.143
6.161
10.355
44
1.687

26.822


9.421

9.421


1,285

I .2S5


128,037
1,990
3,355
11,995
253
142,537

288,167












Table 8-(Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
CO),E


COM MODITY
Om01N


UNIT


I. ___________ I


112-03.2 ST)UT AND PORTER
Ignited Kingdom
Trinidad


I )cnmark
ol land


TOTAL

DISTILLED ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

112-04.2 WHISKY
United Kingdom
Canada
United States of America


TOTAL


112-04.3 GIN


United Kingdonm
I)enmark
Holland


TOTAL


112-04.4 BRANDY
Union of South Africa ...
France ...


TOTAL


112-04.5 BITTERS
United Kingdom


Trinildad
Italy


TOTAL


112-04.9 DISTILLED ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES N .E.S. CORDIALS
LIQUEURS. MIXTURES AND OTHER PREPARATIONS
CONTAINING SPIRIT
United Kingdom ... ... ... ...
ermuda ... ... ...
Trinidad ... ... ...
Denmark ... ... ...
France ... ... ...
Holland ... .

TOTAL ...



12 DIVISION-TOBACCO AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURES

121 Group-Tobacco Unmanufactured

191-01 1 TOBACCO UTNMANUFACTURED-LEAF. UNSTEMMED


QUANTITY


107,499
11,189
14
152

118,854




12,549
724
18

13,291



7,708
23
318

8,049



251
1,071

1.322



14
387
1


VALUE
SB.W.I.



219.564
19.757
31
314

239,666




110,983
6,606
219

117,808



44,533
146
1 588

46,267



1,480
18,653

20,133



139
3,609
25


gal.




gal.




gal.



gal.



gal.



gal.




gal.





gal.



gal.





gal.



gal.


Canada ... ... ... ... ... ... lb. 270,000
India ... .. ... ... .. ... 22,000
United States of America ... ... ... ... 2,742

TOTAL ... ... ... ... lb. 294,742


7,187
1,267
7,813
761
7,312
3,601

27,941


307,639
9,262
4,527

321,428


I


402 3,773


425
43
377
61
488
319

1,713


.. .. ... .
... ... ... ...


::: ::)











fable 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C. COMMODITY
CODE ORa iN



122 Group-Tobacco Manufactures

122-01 CIGARS AND CHEROOTS
Jamaica ... ... ...
Trinidad ... ... .. .
United States of America .. .
Cuba ... ..


TOTAL


122-02 CIGARETTES
United Kingdom ...... ...
United States of America ... ...

TOTAL ... ...




122-03.1 TOBACCO MANUFACTURED FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION
(SMOKING, CHEWING)
United Kingdom ......
United States of America ...

TOTAL ......




122-03.2 SNUFF
United Kingdom ... ......
United States of America ...


...A ... ... I lb.


... l11b.


VALUE
S B.W.T.


385
24
106
41

556


82,718
174

82,892


10,418
15

10,433


lb.


lb.






lb.


lb.


lb.


7,824


TOTAL













Table 8 (C'ontiuw-d)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
CODE


COMMODITY
0111(I-'


2 SECTION-(C UTI)E MATERIALS INEIIBLE EXCEPT FUELS

22 DIVISION-OIL SEEDS, OIL NUTS AND OIL KERNELS

221 Group-Oil Seeds, Oil Nuts and Oil Kernels


221-02 Co(lPA
I)o nin<'a ...
(renahda ...
St. Kitts-Nevis
St. Lucia ...
St. Vincent


TOTAL ...... ...




221-03 (a) OTHER OIL SEEDS. OIL NUTS AND OIL KERNELS
Cyprus ... ... ... ...... ...

TOTA ...... ...

24 DIVISION-WOOD, LUMBER AND CORK

241 Group-Fuel Wood and Charcoal

241-01 Fl ELWOOD) (INCLUDING( SAWDUST)
British Guiana ... .. ...... ...
Do)minica ... ... .
St. Lucia ... ... .

TOTAL ... ... ...



241-02 CH \RCoAL
Britisl Guiana ... ... ...... ...
D om inica ... ... ... ... ... ...
St. Lulcia ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

TOTAL,



242 Group-Wood in the Round or Roughly Squared

242-09 POL,. PILIN.. POSTS ANI OTHER \OOD1 IN THE
lOUN I) EX('CET PITPIiOPS
Britishl Guiana ... ... ...
S t. L ia ... ... ... .. ... ... ...






243 Group-Wood Shaped or Simply Worked

LUMiBER. SAWN. PLANED. GROOVEI, TONGUED ETC.-
CONIFER

243--02.1 Dl)oUGLAS FIR
Canada ... ..... ... ...


TOTAL


UI rIT IQ IA-TI'TY


cwt.





cwt.






cwt.

cwt.







tonl









toil



tolll


sulp. ft.

sup. ft.


I S.425
3,6019
2.4SS
12.514
35.254

72,29(1






219

219







5).594
126
162

5.SS2




2.634
2)
331

2.967























3.329,458

3,329.458


I


VALI E
S 3.WJ..











284.754
56.355
39.480
194.157
553.432

1,128,178






4.410

4,41(1







7S.316
1,260
1,620

S1,196




15S.040
120
191,860

17s.D20








2773


29..552










562,191

562,191


(:,i This includes S.I.T.C. Items "21--0: to '221-0













Table 8-((Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
CODE


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


243-02.2 PITCH PINE
Bahamas ... ...
British Honduras ...
United States of America,
Nicaragua ...


TOTAL


243-02.9 OTHER LUMBER, SAWN, PLANED, GROOVED, TONGUED
TC II


E I-.--V.-^Jl O lFlR
Canada ..


TOTAL


LUMBER SAWN. PLANED, GROOVED.
NON-CONIFER


TONGUED ETC.-


243-03.1 CARIBBEAN CEDAR
St. Lucia ... ... ... ......
Trinidad ... ... ...

TOTAL. ......





243-03.2 HARDWOOD
British Guiana ... ... ... .

TOTAL ... ..






243-03.3 OTHER LUMBER, SAWN. PLANED, (GROOVED, TONGUED


ETC. NON-CONIFER
British Guiana
British Honduras
Dominica ...
Grenada ...
St. Lucia ...
St. Vincent
Trinidad ...


TOTAL ......





26 DIVISION-TEXTILE FIBRES (not Manufactured into
Yarn, Thread or Fabrics) AND WASTE

263 Group-Cotton

263-01 COTTON, RAW
Grenada ... ... ..


TOTAL


UNIT


sup. ft.


sup. ft.

sup. ft.









sup. ft.


sup. ft.






sup. ft.

sup. ft.


sup. ft.












lb.


... .. .. .

... .. .. .
... ... .. ..


42.374

42.374


VALUE
8 B.W.I.


QUANTITY





304.695
305.242
801.843
681,706

2,093,486







3,013.115

3.013.115









8,697
104.619

113,316






172.248

172.248








7,477
137
500
61
9,865
500
844

19,384


49,768
51,125
189,893
158,545

449,331







635,613

635,613









2,061
29,203

31.264






48,720

48,720








1,550
72
72
12
1,423
100
208

3.437












27,889

27,889


... .. .
... .. .

... .. .
... .. .
... .. .
... .. .













Table 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


263-02 (a) OTHER COTTON NOT MANUFACTURED INTO YARN,
THREAD OR FABRICS INCLUDING WASTE
United Kingdom .... ...
Trinidad ... ... ... ... ... ...
United States of America ...

TOTAL ... .. ... ...




264 Group-Jute
264-01 JUTE, INCLUDING JUTE CUTTINGS AND WASTE
United Kingdom ...

TOTA ... ....



265 Group-Vegetable Fibres other than Cotton and Jute

265-01 (b) VEGETABLE FIBRES OF FLAX, HEMP, RAMIE, SISAL
AND MANILLA
United Kingdom ... ..... ...
Holland ... ......


TOTAL


VEGETABLE TEXTILE FIBRES,
SUCH FIBRES
265-09.1 COCONUT FIBRE
Trinidad
United States of America


N.E.S. AND WASTE OF


TOTAL


265-09.9 OTHER VEGETABLE TEXTILE FIB]
United Kingdom ...


TOTAL



266 Group-Synthetic Fibres

266-01 SYNTHETIC FIBRES IN STAPLE
SPINNING AND WASTE
Switzerland ... .

TOTAL


LI


RES AND WASTES









LENGTHS SUITABLE FOR




1


267 Group-Waste Materials

267-01 WASTE MATERIALS FROM TEXTILE FABRICS
INCLUDING RAGS
United Kingdom ... ..

TOTAL ...


(i) This includes 8 1 T C items 26:;-02 to 263-04.
(b) This includes S I T ( Items 2.'i-(01 to 2(i6--t


UNIT


lb.



lb.







lb.

lb.








lb.


lb.







lb.


lb.





lb.

lb.








lb.

lb.








lb.

lb.


S.I.T.C.
CODE


QUANTITY


-I-


VALUE
$ B.W.I.


16,271
11,913
1,067

29,251







2,040

2.040








17
5,776

5,793







161,234
457

161,691





2.107

2,107


9,981

9,981


99

99


5.796
2,976
344

9.116







880

880








19
1,683

1,702







13,269
312

13,581





782

782


20.019

20,019








336

336


~1~1 I


L













Table 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
CODE


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


27 DIVISION-CRUDE FERTILIZERS AND CRUDE
MINERALS, EXCLUDING COAL, PETROLEUM
AND PRECIOUS STONES

272 Group-Crude Minerals, excluding Coal, Petroleum, Fertilizer
materials and Precious Stones


272--02 (a) SAND. GRAVEL, CLAY AND
INCLUDING TARRED MACADAM
United Kingdom ...
British Guiana ...
Dominica ... ...
Trinidad ...
United States of America

TOTAL






272-05.1 SALT, COARSE AND ROCK
United Kingdom ...
Anguilla ... ...

TOTAL.


CRUSHED STONE,


272-05.2 SALT, FINE
United Kingdom
Holland ...


TOTAL


272-05.3 SALT, TABLE
United Kingdom
Canada ... ..

TOTAL






272-06 SULPHUR
United Kingdom ... .... ...

TOTAL ....






272-07 (b) OTHER CRUI)E MINEIRALS EXCLUDING COAL. PETROLEUM
FERTILIZER MATERIALS AND PIiECTO)US STONES N.E.S.
Unitedl Kilngdom .... ...
tHolland ... ...
Italy ..... ...... ...

T](TAI. ... .


UNIT QUANTITY


cwt.


cwt.









cwt.






cwt.






CWt.
cwt.













cwt.
Nv t.


50
1.689

1.739


41.069
703

41,772






46
6

52







3

3








500
4
21

5. -


(a) Includes SITC Items 272-02 to 272-04
(b) Includes SITC Items 272-07 to 272-19.


VALUE
$ B.W.I.


2,696
216
20
624
7.140

10,696


192
1,860

2.052


107,064
1,589

108,653





751
276

1,027







53

53








7,837
97
811

8,745


------












IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


Table 8-(Continued)


S .I.T.C. COMMODITY VALUE
CODE ORIGIN UNIT QUANTITY $ B.W.I.


29 DIVISION-ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE CRUDE
MATERIALS, INEDIBLE, N.E.S.

292 Group-Crude Vegetable Materials, Inedible, n.e.s.

292- 02 NATURAL GUMS, RESINS AND BALSAM
United Kingdom ...
Anglo-Egyptian Sudan ......
British West Africa
India .. .. .
United States of America ... ..
Abyssinia ...
France ... ..
Iran ... ... ... ... ...
Portugal ... ...
Sudan .. ... .. .

TOTAL


292-03 VEGETABLE MATERIALS FOR PLAITING
BASKETS, PLAITED RUGS), INCLUDING
United Kingdom ...
Dominica ... ...
Hong Kong ... ...
Jamaica ...


(E.G. FOR
BAMBOO


TOTAL


292-04 (a) PLANTS, SEEDS, FLOWERS AND
N.E.S.
United Kingdom ...
St. Lucia ... ...
Trinidad
United States of America
Belgium ...
Hawaii ...
Venezuela ... ..


PARTS OF PLANTS,


TOTAL .....



292-07 CUT FLOWERS AND FOLIAGE
Canada ... ..
United States of America ...
Holland ... .... ...

TOTAL



292-09 VEGETABLE SAPS, JUICES AND EXTRACTS, N.E.S.
(EXCEPT DYEING AND TANNING EXTRACTS) AND VEGE-
TABLE MATERIALS INCLUDING PECTIN, ALGAE AND
KAPOK. N.E.S.
India ...
Tortola ... ...
Haiti .....

TOTAL ... ... ... ...


28,051
1,104
448
35
43 465
118
672
5
1,568
2,170

77,636





1,487
130
6,376
130

8,123


1,016
1,100
2,300

4.416


2,170
380
155
51
7.742
68
156
8
133
644

11,507





1,695
109
7,478
117

9,399


1,673
1,650
96
12,050
595
674
40

16,778




549
57
768

1,374







152
172
298

622


(a) Includes SIT(C Items 292-1)4 to 292-06.













Table 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S .I.T.C.
CODE


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


3 SECTION-MINERAL FUELS, LUBRICANTS AND RELATED
MATERIALS

31 DIVISION-MINERAL FUELS, LUBRICANTS AND
RELATED MATERIALS

311 Group-Coal, Coke and Briquettes

311-01 (a) COAL. COKE AND BRIQUETTES OF COAL. LIGNITE, ETC.
United Kingdom ... ...... ...
United States of America ... ..

TOTAL ... ..


312-Group-Petroleum, Crude and Partly Refined for further
Refining (including Natural Gasoline)

312-01 PETROLEUM, CRUDE
Venezuela ... ...

TOTAL ......

313 Group-Petroleum Products

MOTOR SPIRIT INCLUDING GASOLINE ANI) BLENDING
AG ENTS

313-01. AVIATION SPIRIT
Trinidad .. ...


TOTAL


313-01.9 OTHER MOTOR SPIRIT AND BLENDING
United Kingdom ...
Canada ... .
Trinidad ... ... ...


AG ENTS


TOTAL. ...


LAMP OIL AND WHITE SPIRIT

313-02.1 POWER KEROSENE
Trinidad ...

TOTAL ...



313-02.9 OTHER KEILROSENE, ILLUMINATING OILS
Trinidad
Dutch West Indies

TOTAL



313-03 GAS OIL. DIESEL OIL AND OTHER FIU,:L 1OI-A
Trinidad .
Venezuela

TOTAL ..

(a) Includes SITC Items 311-01 to 311-03.


UNIT


I I~


ton


ton






ton

ton








gal.

gal.




gal.



Pal.






gal.

gal.


QUANTITY


15
1,119

1,134







8.338

8.338








382.996
382.996


108
6
3.286.216

2'"


VALUE
$ B.W.I.


1,532
48,921

50,453


345,162

345,162


143,131

143,131




794
88
742,626

743.508


322.959













Table 8 (Continued)


IMPORTS C.I.F. 1954


S.I.T.C.
CODE


COMMODITY
ORIGIN


313-04-1 LUBRICATING OILS
United Kingdom ... ...... .
Trinidad ... ... ...
United States of America ... .....

TOTAL ... ... ...



313-04.2 LUBRICATING GREASES
United Kingdom .........
Trinidad ... ......
United States of America ... ...

TOTAL ... ...



313-05 MINERAL JELLY AND WAXES
(INCLUDING PETROLATUM)
Canada ... ... ... ....
United States of America .. ... ...

TOTAL ... ...



PITCH, RESIN, PETROLEUM, ASPHALT, COKE OF PETRO-
LEUM AND OTHER BY-PRODUCTS OF COAL, LIGNITE,
PETROLEUM AND OIL SHALE INCLUDING MIXTURES
WITH ASPHALT, N.E.S. NOT CHEMICALS
313-09.1 ROAD OIL
United Kingdom ... ... ...
Trinidad ... ... ...... ... ...
Dutch Guiana ... ... ... ... ...
H olland ...... ... ......

TOTAL ...... ...



313-09.2 ALL OTHER BY-PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM
United Kingdom ... ... ......
Canada ......... ... ...
Trinidad ... ... ... ...
United States of America ... ......


TOTAL


UNIT QUANTITY


I-


gal.




gal.



lb.



lb.





lb.


lb.









ton




ton


79,047
1,378
69,836

150,261


20,753
145,755
47,818

214,326


90
89,200

89,290


VALUE
$ B.W.I.


87,404
822
93,918

182,144


4,107
8,608
9,132

21,847





67
14,206

14,273


11 1,918
2,169 127,542
1 129
1 215

2,182 129,804




S 6,061
... 75
... 5,335
815

S 12,286


I -




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