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Group Title: Antigua, Montserrat and Virgin Islands gazette.
Title: The Antigua, Montserrat and Virgin Islands gazette
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076853/00023
 Material Information
Title: The Antigua, Montserrat and Virgin Islands gazette
Physical Description: 12 v. : ; 25-35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Antigua
Montserrat
British Virgin Islands
Publisher: Govt. Printer.
Place of Publication: St. John's? Antigua
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Law -- Periodicals -- Antigua and Barbuda   ( lcsh )
Law -- Periodicals -- Montserrat   ( lcsh )
Law -- Periodicals -- British Virgin Islands   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Antigua and Barbuda   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Montserrat   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- British Virgin Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
legislation   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 18; July 5, 1956-Mar. 30, 1967.
General Note: Includes supplements consisting of bills, ordinances, statutory rules & orders, etc.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076853
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001667609
oclc - 17270322
notis - AHX9420
lccn - 58045856
 Related Items
Preceded by: Leeward Islands gazette
Succeeded by: Antigua official gazette
Succeeded by: Montserrat official gazette
Succeeded by: Virgin Islands official gazette

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Montserrat, Ordinance, no. 17 of 1956: Registration of Clubs (Amendment) Ordinance, 1956
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
    Montserrat, Ordinance, no. 18 of 1956: Indictments Act (Amendment) Ordinance, 1956
        Page B-1
    Montserrat, Ordinance, no. 20 of 1956: Road (Amendment) Ordinance, 1956
        Page C-1
    Antigua, Statutory Rules and Orders, no. 69 of 1956: Proclamation dated November 18,1956, bringing into operation the Education Ordinance, 1956 (No. 11/1956)
        Page D-1
Full Text







THE

ANTIGUA, MONTHS
AND

VIRGIN ISLANDS GAZETTE.

3Published by c4uthority.


THURSDAY, 22ND NOVEMBER, 1956.


No. 23.


Notices.

Owing to indisposition, His Excel-
lency the Acting Governor will not
now be visiting the British Virgin
Islands from the 21st to the 28th
November, 1956, as previously an-
nounced.
ChiefSecretary's Ofice,
Antigua.
20th November, 1956.
Ref. 80/00048.
Consequent upon the departure
from the Colony of Antigua of His
Honour Lt.-Col. ALEC LOVELACE,
M.B.E., M.C., Administrator, on the
15th November, 1956, the Hon.
E. A. THOMPSON, Financial Secre-
tary, has been appointed Acting
Administrator of the Colony.
Administrator's Office,
Antigua.
21st November, 1956.
Ref. No. A 65/7-IV

The Acting Administrator of Anti-
gua has appointed the undermentioned
Marriage Officer for the Colony of
.Antigua:

Reverend John Stewart.
Administrator's Office,
Antigua.
16th November, 1956.
Ref. No. A. 8/4


Windward Islands & Leeward
Islands Court of Appeal.
With reference to the Notice pub-
lished in the Antigua, Montserrat and
Virgin Islands Gazette of the 15th
November, 1956, concerning a sitting
of the Court of Appeal for the Wind-
ward Islands and Leeward Islands,
it is notified for general information
that His Lordship the Chief Justice
has directed that the date of the sit-
ting of the said Court should be
changed from Monday the 10th
December to Wednesday the 12th
December, 1956.
All persons concerned should
govern themselves accordingly.
By Order,
CECIL 0. BYRON,
Registrar.
Registrar's Office,
St. John's,
19th November, 1956.
X
f2-. 72-7

4 kzy


ANTIGUA.

The Registration of United
Kingdom Patents Act, 1925.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that BIOCHEMIE GESELLSCHAFT
mit BESCHRANKTER HAFTUNG
of Kundl, Tyrol, Austria, have applied
for registration of United Kingdom
Patent No. 734232 dated the 22nd
day of April, 1953, and issued the
16th November, 1955, and have filed
at the Registrar's Office, at the Court
House, St. John's, Antigua, a com-
plete copy of the specifications and
the Certificate of the Comptroller
General of the United Kingdom
Patent Office giving full particulars
of this Patent which will be open to
public inspection at the said office at
any time between the hours of 9.00
a.m. and 3.30 p.m. on working days
except on Saturdays when the hours
will be from 9.00 a.m. to 12 noon.

Any person may within two months
from the date of this advertisement
give notice to the Registrar of opposi-
tion to the issue of a certificate of
registration upon any of the grounds
prescribed in Section 10 of the
Patents Act, 1906, for opposition to
the grant of Letters Patent.

Dated the 15th day of November,
1956.
Cecil 0. Byron,
Registrar.
Registrar's Office,
Court House,
St. John's, Antigua.


ANTIGU PA.


The Registration of United Kingdom
Patents Act, 1925
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
PFIZER CORPORATION of Avenida
Central 14.132, Colon, Republic of
Panama, have applied for registration
in Antigua of United Kingdom Patent
No, 747,779 dated the 6th day of
October, 1953, and issued on the 1st
day of August, 1956, and have filed at
the Registrar's Office at the Court
House, St. John's, Antigua, a complete
copy of the specifications and the Cer-
tificate of the Comptroller General of
the United Kingdom Patent Office
giving full particulars of this patent


which will be open to public inspec-
tion at the said office at any time
between the hours of 9.00 a. m. and
3.30 p. m. on working days except
on Saturday when the hours will be
from 9.00 a.m. to 12.00 noon.
Any person may within two months
from the date of this advertisement
give notice to the Register of opposi-
tion to the issue of a Certificate of
registration upon any of the grounds
prescribed in Section 10 of the Patents
Act, 1906, for opposition to the grant
of Letters Patent.

Dated the 8th day of November,
1956.

CECIL O. BYRON,
Registrar,
Registrar's Ofice,
Court House,
St. John's, Antigua.


It is notified for general informa-
tion that, arising out of the recom-
mendations of the London Confer-
ence in February 1956 on British
Caribbean Federation, the Commis-
sion on Trade and Tariffs under the
Chairmanship of Sir William Dawson
Croft, K.C.B., arrived in Barbados on
the 3rd November, 1956 and immedi-
ately commenced its deliberations.
Their terms of reference are:-
"to examine and report to the
Federal Government on the
economic, fiscal and other tech-
nical problems involved in the
establishment of a Customs
Union for the Federal area, bear-
ing in mind the possible acces-
sion of British Guiana and Brit-
ish Honduras, and to work out a
scheme for a Customs Union, to
be implemented, if necessary, by
stages."
At a Conference of Liaison Officers
to the Commission appointed by the
Unit Governments to represent their
respective territories, held at Hastings
House on 12th November, a draft
itinerary was agreed for the visit of
the Commission to the various terri-
tories of the area. The Commission
propose to visit Antigua as from
December 11 to December 16 in order
to obtain first hand knowledge of
local conditions, to hold preliminary
discussions with interested parties and
to stimulate general interest in the


VOL. I.


1










90 THE ANTIGUA, MONTSERRAT AND VIRGIN ISLANDS GAZETTE. [November 22, 1956


subject of a Customs Union, including
internal free trade.

Immediately on arrival in each
territory the Commission will take
such steps as are necessary to approach
interested parties whom they would
wish to see in order to initiate discus-
sions in the matter. Their desire is
that as far as possible material bear-
ing upon the subject should be avail-
able for their consideration not later
than 28th February, 1957.
Any interested party or organisation
who may wish to make written repre-
sentation to them are requested to
send memoranda to the Secretary to
the Commission at Hastings House,
Barbados, by that date.

Administrator's Ofice,
Antigua.


STATUTORY RULES & ORDERS.

Antigua.

No. 69 of 1956, "Proclamation
dated November 18, 1956, bringing
into operation the Education Ordi-
nance, 1956 (No. 11/1956).
1 pp. Price 3 cts.


TRADE MARKS OFFICE,
ANTIGUA, 29th October, 1956.

BRITISH-AMERICAN TOBACCO
COMPANY LIMITED of Westmins-
ter House, 7, Millbank, London, S.W.,
Englandhave applied for Registration
of four Trade Marks consisting of
the following:-
(1)


No. 44.


Appointments and transfers etc.,
in the public service, with effect from
the dates stated, are published for
general information:-
Ref. No. 36100010.

Adair, D., to be Chemist, Antigua,
(C. D. & W. Scheme D.2472).
Oct. 18

Challenger, E. G., Senior Clerk,
Peasantr Development Services, to
ba Principal, Treasury, Antigua.
June 14

Foote, J. F., to be Headmaster, Antigua
Grammar School attached to the
Education Department, Antigua.
Jan. 1

Hughes, J. H., Junior Clerk, Magis-
trate's Department, to be Senior
Clerk, Audit, Antigua. Nov. 12

Martin, Miss E., Junior Clerk, Admiln-
istration Antigua, probationary ap-
pointment terminated. Dec, 31

Piper, Miss C., Junior Clerk, Customs,
Antigua. confirmed in appointment.
Nov. 1

Simon, E, Petty Officer Class III,
Audit Office, to be Petty Officer,
Class II, Administration, Antigua.
Nov. 1


No. 45.

The following Ordinances and
Statutory Rules and Orders are circu-
lated with this Gazette and form part
thereof:-
ORDINANCES.

Montaerrat.

No. 17 of 1956, The Registration
of Clubs (Amendment) Ordinance,
1956." 2 pp. Price 4 cts.

No. 18 of 1956, The Indictments
Act (Amendment) Ordinance, 1956."
1 pp. Price 3 ots.
No. 20 of 1956, The Road (Amend-
ment) Ordinance, 1956."
1 pp. Price 3 cts.


(3)





(4)








VGHAM Cr

in Class 45 that is to say: Tobacco
whether manufactured or unmanu-
factured.

The Applicants claim that they
have used the said Trade Marks 1, 2,
3 & 4 in respect of the said goods
for 53, 53, 48 & 53 years respec-
tively before the date of their said
Application.

Any person may within three
months from the date of the first
appearance of this Advertisement in
the Antigua, Mintserrat & Virgin
Islands Gazette, give notice in dupli-
cate at the Trade Marks Office,
Antigua, of opposition to registration
of the said Trade Mark.
CECIL O. BYRON,
Registrar of Trade Marke.


TRADE MARKS OFFICE,
ANTIGUA, 29th October, 1956.

E. R. HOWARD LIMITED of
76/77 Gamage Buildings, 118 Holborn,
London, E.C., have applied for Regis-
tration of Two Trade Marks con-
sisting of the following:-

(1)

TO PPS

(2)






FurituPe Gream1


in Class 50 that is to say: Cleaning
and polishing preparations.

The Applicants claim that they
have used the said Trade Marks
in respect of the said goods for
2 years before the date of their said
Application.

Any person may within three
months from the date of the first
appearance of this Advertisement in
the Antigua, Montserrat & Virgin
Islands Gazette, give notice in dupli-
cate at the Trade Marks Office,
Antigua, of opposition to registration
of the said Trade Mark.

CECIL O. BYRON,
Registrar of Trade Marks.


RAINFALL FIGURES.
Central Experiment Station,
A ntigua.


Month. 1952.
Jan. 2.41
Feb. 1.60
Mar. 1.62
April 3.14
May 3.07
June 5.74
July 8.88
August 8.43
Sept. 5.55
October 5.19
To17thNov., 2.03


195 .
3.04
2.45
1.08
.49
3.83
3.32
8.47
5.93
9.91
4.62
.76


5.15
1.23
1.40
3.83
2.68
5.72
4.29
5.57
2.10
6.58
2.74


47.16 24.16 38.90 32.82 41.19


TRAFFIC NOTICE.
The Vehicles & Road Traffic
Ordinance, 1946.

By virtue of the powers conferred
on me in Section 2 of the Vehicles
and Road Traffic Ordinance 1946
(No. 5 of 1946), I hereby fix the
period hereunder for the lighting of
vehicles.
Until further notice the lighting
period of vehicles shall be from 5.40
p.m. to 5.55 a.m.

20th Nov. 1956. E. M. V. JAMES,
Traffic Commissioner.
Ref. No. 36/00007









November 22, 1956] THE ANTIGUA, MONTSERRAT AND VIRGIN ISLANDS GAZETTE 91


PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE,
ANTIGUA.
8th November, 1956.
Notice is hereby given that there
will be sold on the various premises
in the City of Saint John hereafter
named on Thursday the (th day of
December, 1956 at 12 o'clock noon,
the lands and tenements belonging to
the persons whose names are set out
hereundrr, the said premises having
been levied upon to satisfy the City
Rate due thereon for the year 1956:
BISHOPGATE STREET.
Leslie Chambers, Dulc Vann, James
Mapp. Centilia Simon. Estate of John
Mason. James B. Hart, Josephine
Edwards, Heirs of George Potter,
Florence Ramsey, John Dowe, Zellin
McGilvery.
NORTH STREET.
Mary Samuel, Heirs of S. Daniel,
Ferdinand Martin, Grace Ann Pelle,
Alfred Hunte, Ernest Gilead, Estate
of Thomas Foey, Alice Horsford,
John Sebastian, Titus Simon.
THE POINT.
Walter Sweeney, Eileen C. and G.
Reynolds, Mrs. P. Derrick, Heirs of
Jos. Samuel. Joseph Mathurin, Alice
M. King, Henrietta Graham, Peter
Derrick, Elmere G. Aska, Abraham
Samuel.

MARINERS LANE.
Isaline Perry, Ebenezer Christo-
pher, Irene Walker, Martha Finch.
WILKINSON STREET.
Morris Destin, Alice Jarvis, Neville
Bridges, Andrew Emanuel, Geo. W.
B. Bryson & Co. Ltd.
NEWGATE LANE.
Heirs of Willock.

LONG STREET.
Antoinetta Reid.

REDCLIFFE STREET.
Antigua O. F. Lodge.
NEVIS STREET.
Brown Brothers, Morrison and
Camacho, Elma Potter, Estate of
Thomas Byam, Heirs of Eliza Ben-
nett, Bertha Buckley.

TANNER STREET.
Estate of F. O'Harro.

SOUTH STREET.
Estate of John Chalmers, Tryphina
Joseph, Florence Sowerby.
TEMPLE STREET.
Ravely N. Murrain, Bertha Har-
rigan.
CHURCH LANE.
Estate of D. Horsford, Wycliffe
Broodie, Mary Richards, Randolph
Michael.
CROSS STREET.
Ruby Hughes, O. St. A. Duke.

OTTOS LANE.
David E. Joseph, George Farley,
Elvina Edmund (2).


NELSON STREET.
Albertha Parker, Cox Coates.
MITCHELL MICHAEL AVE.
Georgiana DeFreitas.
CECIL O. BYRON,
Provost Marshal.

PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE
ANTIGUA,
15th November, 1956.
NOTICE is hereby given that there
will be sold on the various premises in
the City of Saint John hereafter named
on Thursday the 13th day of December,
1956 at 12 o'clock noon, the lands and
tenements belonging to the persons whose
names are set hereunder, the said premises
having been levied upon to satisfy the
City Rate due thereon for the year
1956:-
Hamiltons Road No. 2.
David Anthony, Alphonso Hamilton,
Alphonso Hamilton.
Bennett Street.
Eliza Jeffery, Ursula Matthew, 0. K.
Dowe, J. A. Charity.
Pigott Street.
Sarah Mason, Iris Mussington, Doris
Ffloyd, Nathaniel Anthony.
Alfred Peters Street.
John Brown, Phyllis De Silvia, Mildred
Orr, Montague Richards, Irene Roberts,
Ernest Perry, Christopher Francis (2).
Dickensonbay Street.
Josiah Tittle, Edward Townsend, Nehe-
miah Knight, Peter Philip, Eileen Hay-
wood, Edmund Simon, Neville Bridges,
Rosaline Morgan, Ickford Winter (3),
Mary Richardson.
St. Georges Street.

Ickford Winter, Mary Wells, Doris
Allen, Edward Lloyd, Isabella Davis,
William Terry, Alice M. Smith, Neville
Bridges & others.
St. Johns Street.
Neville Bridges & others, Gladys B.
Winter, Igal Winter, (4), Edward
Townsend, Gaston G. L Jehelman,
Thomas O'Brien, E. H. Lake and A.
Webber, Martha Byam, lola Manderson,
Edmund H. Lake.
High Street.
Mary T. Camacho.
St. Marys Street

James Pigott, Annie Auchinleck.
Tanner Street
Heirs of Barton, Richard Benjamin.

Nevis Street
Annie Sahalie.


Church Lane.
Heirs of Edward King.
Rodney Street.
Elvina Edmund.

Nelson Street.

Deloris Jarvis, Amelia Lawrence, Ethel
Richardson.

Factory Road.

Frank Henzel.

CECIL O. BYRON,
Provost Marshal.


PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE,
ANTIGUA,
22nd November, 1956.

Notice is hereby given that there
will be sold on the various premises
in the City of Saint John hereafter
named on Thursday the 20th day of
December, 1956 at 12 o'clock noon,
the lands and tenements belonging to
the persons whose names are set out
hereunder, the said premises having
been levied upon to satisfy the City
Rate due thereon for the year 1956:-

Dickensonbay Street.
Alfred Simon, John Lucas, Kenneth
Murdoch, Ickford Winter.
St. George's Street.
Albertha Philip.
St. John's Street.
Est. of Henrietta Brown, Ann
Martin, Charles Isaac, Ellen John,
Nathaniel James, Charlotte Mathurin,
Victoria James, Audrey Roberts,
Howard O'Neal, Alfred Simon, John
Harris, Est. of D. Benjamin, Wilfred
Weathland, George James.
Bishopgate Street
George H. Joseph, Selina Billing-
hurst, Leonard Thompson, Henrietta
John, William H. John, Heirs of
Albert Barnard, Jane Ann Wilson,
Ellen Gurnes, Theophilus Bird.
North Street.
Heirs of David Peters, Henry
Edwards.
Newgate Street.
Samuel A. Joseph, Iola Mannix,
Walter Matthew.
Wapping Street.
Ernest Martin, Henry Edwards.
Chlrci Street.
Gwen & P. Jordan, Est. of J. H.
Moore.
Wapping Lane.
Albertha Philip, Samuel Lavis-
count, Benjamin Lowen.
Popeshead Street.
Adolphus Reynolds, Ellen Gumes,
George Samuel.
Bishopgate Alley.
Est. of Thomas Foey, Thomas
Augustine.
St. John's Lane.
Est. of Sarah James.
Hawkins Street









92 THE ANTIGUA, MONTSERRAT AND VIRGIN ISLANDS GAZETTE. [November 22, 1956.


George Alexander, Theo Mannix.
Hood Street.
Agnes Matthew, Brunella Benjamin,
Joshua Thomas, James H. King.

Fort Road.
Arthur Roberts, Joseph Thomas,
Neville Weston, Basil Saunders, Pearl
Hutchinson, Cecil Kendall, Charles
Brown, Edna May Hurst, Ernie
Romeo, M. O'Mard.
Long Street.
George McAndrew.
Redcliffe Street.
Benjamin Lowen.
South Street.
Joseph H. Martin.
Cecil 0. Byron,
Provost Marshal.


TENDER
Tenders are invited for the making
of uniforms for Petty Officers for the
year 1957 as follows:-
In Khaki drill for petty officers-
(a) Tunic and trousers


(b) Khaki shirt with short sleeves
and pocket of each breast
with flap to button.
(c) Khaki trousers
(d) Khaki shorts
(e) Khaki Overalls
In blue serge and cotton duck for
boatmen-
(a) Blue serge jumper and trous-
ers
(b) Blue serge trousers only
(c) Cotton duck jumper and
trousers
Tender should also make quota-
tions for-
(a) Bine Denim Overalls
(b) Blue Denim Trousers
(c) Blue Denim Shirts
The Government will supply the
necessary drill, serge, or duck, also
badges and official buttons for tunics.
All other materials are to be supplied
by the contractor. Prices are to in-
clude the cost of affixing badges to
tunics or jumpers.
Tenders should be in sealed envel-
opes addressed to His Honour the
Administrator and marked Tender


for Uniforms ". Tenders should
reach this Office by 4 p.m. on Friday
the 14th December, 1956.

The Government does not bind it-
self to accept the lowest or any
tender.

If the delivery of uniforms is
delayed for a period exceeding four
weeks after the date of receipt of the
material, or uniforms are unsatisfac-
torily tailored, Government reserves
the right to cancel the contract on
giving one week's notice in writing.

By Order,

BRUCE GLOADE,
for Clerk to the Administrator.


Administrator's Office,
Antigua.
20th November, 1956.
Ref. No. A. 41/32


VIRGIN ISLANDS.

Adaptation of Laws Regulations, 1956
(S. R. & 0. 1956, No. 22)

Correction of Typographical Errors

The following typographical errors in the copies of the Adaptation of Laws Regulations, 1956
(S. R. & 0. 1956, No. 22) published with Gazette No. 29 of Thursday 26th June, 1956, require to be noted and the
Regulations corrected as hereunder:-


Cap. or No. & Year
Cap. 56


Cap. 64


Short Title
Jury Act


Obeah Act


Section



3


Correction
for the number "6" in the third
column the number "8" should be
substituted.
for the words "a district" in the
amendment substitute the words
"a District ".


Ref. 47/00399-II









November 22, 1956] THE ANTIGUA, MONTSERRAT AND VIRGIN ISLANDS GAZETTE. 93


ADDRESS by His Excellency the Governor to
the Legislative Council of Antigua, 5th
November, 1956.

Mr. President, Honourable Members of the Legislative
Council,

I am indeed glad that circumstances have made it
possible for me to be present at the opening session of
the new Legislative Council-the second occasion of this
kind which I have been privileged to attend.
My first pleasant duty is to welcome back to the
Council those members who have served on the last
Council, and also to extend a warm welcome to the two
new nominated members who join the Council for the
first time to-day.
This new Council meets in the middle of what is
probably the most important and exciting time in the
history of Antigua, and of the British Caribbean. During
the period of five years of the life of the last Council,
we have seen great changes and developments; but
during the next five years the members of this new
Council will be called upon to consider and to settle
issues even greater than those faced by the last Council-
issues which will help to determine the rate of progress
of the new British Caribbean Federation and of the
British Caribbean nation.
As I see it, the past five years have been years
of preparation for the greater problems which lie ahead.
In order to prepare for the establishment of the British
Caribbean Federation it has been necessary for us to
proceed apace with political changes here in Antigua.
During the life of the last Council we have seen the
introduction of the Ministerial system of Government-
which brings Antigua more closely into line with the
larger territories; and we have seen the de-federation of
the Leeward Islands, which will permit Antigua-as well
as St. Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla and Montserrat-to enter the
Federation in the only possible way, as separate and
independent units.
During the next five years it will be for the present
Council to prove that Antigua can enter this great new
Federation as a worthy partner with the other territories
in the area. Yours is no easy task, because Antigua is
still one of the "debtor" units of the Caribbean-one of
the units which depends to a large extent on help from
outside in order to build up and maintain the basic
:services which its people are entitled to expect.
During the regime of the last Council I think that
it can fairly be said that it has been proved that the
Ministerial system of government can operate as well in
Antigua as anywhere else in the Caribbean. During
that regime, too, there have been notable improvements
in the basic services provided for the community. All
of us who were in Antigua when the last Council was
opened five years ago can remember the conditions
under which the people of this Island were then living.
We can remember the trickle of muddy water which
emerged intermittently and reluctantly from our clogged
pipes; the frequent recourse to oil lamps when our lights
failed; the appalling state of our main roads, when
a journey to English Harbour involved bumping at
10 miles an hour over unnilhd and pot-holed tracks; when
the children in most of our schools could not sit down
together because of lad: ol ro on: when we saw right
here in St. John's rows 4f filthy hovels in which human
beings were living in indscriib,ld, condition; and when
our gallant firemen had to sit on holes in their fire-hose
to secure a trickle of water it the end. These facts were
recognized, both by the last Council and by Her Majesty's
Government; and, although there have been some mistakes,
and although there is still a vast amount to be done, I do
not think that anyone can deny that there has been some
solid improvement in basic conditions during the life of
the last Council. I should like, therefore, to say a word
of appreciation to those who have made this progress
possible. I suggest that they fall into five groups.


The first group is the last Legislative Council, both
the elected members and the nominated members.
I know that there have been times when the nominated
members may have felt a certain sense of frustration; but
they have provided the criticism and stimulus which in
other places is provided by an opposition party; and the
Council has certainly been united in its desire to further
the development of Antigua. I think particularly in this
connection of the way in which the Council stood stead-
fastly by its policy of water-drilling in the face of constant
criticism from certain quarters. They can now reflect
with satisfaction that, because they refused to be deflected
from their policy, Antigua is already able to draw
100,000,000 gallons of new water a year from wells-
with more to come.

My second group consists of the Ministers-and of the
Chairmen of Committees as they were in the early stages
of the last Council. They have done a tremendous
amount of work, and they have speeded up the tempo of
government activity; but above all they have realized that
the results they seek can only be achieved by close and
friendly co-operation with the men who do the work in
the field and carry out their plans-the men in the
Administration and in the Government Departments.

My third group is the Administration, and in that
term I include the Civil Service as a whole. I am afraid
that we still have in our midst a few people who-to use
a deplorable and appropriate term "could'nt care less ",
and do the minimum of work with the minimum of
interest in it. But I think that most people will agree
that Antigua has been lucky in recent years to have had
a team of men and women-from heads of departments
down to the most humble workers-who have put their
backs into their work and have made a notable contribu-
tion to the well-being of the Island. With the aid of the
Public Service Commission, which has already done
sterling work, I think that we can look for steady
improvement in the public service in the future.

My fourth group is one which seldom receives the
credit which is due to it-Her Majesty's Government in
the United Kingdom. Without the co-operation and
financial help of Her Majesty's Government over the past
five years, the work of the Council, of the Ministers, and
of the Administration would be valueless. We would
still be in the hopeless state of a few years ago of grumb-
ling because nothing ever happened-because there was
no money.

My fifth and last group consists of the people of
Antigua. I know that it is a popular cry to say in
Antigua-just as we say in England-that the modern
generation does no work and takes no interest. But
I think that everyone will agree that there are many
notable exceptions to these sweeping assertions. We all
know-and we all have met-people in Antigua who are
among the salt of the earth-people, often in humble
circumstances, who have done and are doing a tremendous
amount to help themselves. We all know too that there
are the "spivs"-who do the minimum of work and
expect the maximum of return. But to-day I wish to
pay tribute to those whom I have seen-and whom you
a've seen-who are determined to help themselves and
help Antigna. I hope that their example will be followed,
because there is no doubt that the long-term prosperity of
A;\!ign; depends not on temporary financial grants, but
(o nothing else than hard work by everyone. I feel,
there, re, that we can look to the past five years as
a period of pr.p;aratory work when the basic services were
improved, and when real progress was made as a r-sult
of close co-operation by all those concerned with the
management of public affairs.

Bnt this is only a start. As I have said, Antigua is
still a debtor" unit in the new Caribbean Federation;
and there is an urgent need for the new Council to build
on the foundations laid by the last Council and to improve
the economic and financial position of this Island.










94 THE ANTIGUA, MONTSERRAT AND VIRGIN ISLANDS GAZETTE [November 22, 1956


We all know that the majority party in this Council
have plans to that end-some of which have already been
translated to action and have begun to bear fruit-
increased peasant production, and secondary industries.
These can indeed help substantially; but I venture to
stress to-day two other matters which received attention
from the last Council and also can, I believe, receive with
advantage still further attention in the next few years.
I think of the continued need for financial prudence and
the need to attract outside capital for tourist and other
development.
There has, I believe, been fear expressed in some
quarters lest the development measures taken during the
past few years should have impaired still further the
financial position of Antigna. The question has been
asked in this connection-" What will happen to Antigna
if and when Development and Welfare funds are no
longer available?" I think that there may be some
genuine misunderstanding on this matter; and so I hope
that Honourable Members. most of whom already know
the position, will bear with me for a few moments while
I endeavour to set forth the facts.
There are three sources of funds available to the
Government of Antigna-grants under the Colonial
Development and Welfare Acts; loans; and funds provided
in the budget with the assistance of grants-in-aid from the
United Kingdom.
The first source of funds has been provided because
of the recognition by Her Majesty's Government of her
responsibility for improving the social and economic
conditions in the colonial territories. An amount of
140,000.000 was voted by the British Parli:ament in 1946
and 1950 for this purpose, and a further amount of
80,000,000 in 1955. From these amounts the Secretary
of State allocated specifically to Antigna 699.000 to be
spent between 1946 and 1955, and 680,000 to be spent
between 1956 and 1960.
These large sums of money were provided by Her
Majesty's Government to enable the colonial territories
to improve their social and economic conditions; and to
en;lble them the better to stand on their own feet when
they attained the right to run their own affairs. In fact,
the years since 1946 have been a period of carefully
planned political and capital development proceeding
hand in hand not only in Antigua but also elsewhere
in the Commonwealth. The last Council would, there-
fore, have been failing in its duty to Antigua and Barbuda
if it had not taken full advantage of the funds made
available for development: and I do not consider that
anyone should feel that the Government of Antigna has
recklessly been squandering the money of the British
taxpayer.
The last Council wisely decided that nearly the whole
of the money provided under the Colonial Development
and Welfare Act should be devoted to capital development
to the development of water supplies, to agricultural
development, to the improvement of communications and
the construction of permanent buildings. The net result
of the help given by Her Majesty's Government in this
way will, therefore be the improvement of the basic ser-
vices of Antigua, with some improvement in her economy,
but with only a small increase in rceurrent expenditure.
I cannot see that anything but good can come from this
expenditure; and the answer to those who enquire what
will happen if Development and Welfare funds are not
available after 1960 when the present Act expires is simply
that capital development will be slowed up-though by
that time I hope that most of the major needs of Antigua
in the field of capital development will have been met.
During the life of the last Council extensive use was
made of loan funds. Loans totalling 312,000 were ap-
proved for the cotton ginnery and oil expressing plant,
for the purchase of land settlements, for housing, for the
new telephone service, and for the electricity conversion
scheme. In each case the project was carefully examined
to ensure that the loan charges---interest plus repayment
of the loan-would be met by revenue to be earned by the
project; and in three of the five cases-the cotton ginnery,
the housing and the land settlement loans -the figures to


date confirm that the estimates were correct, and that no
future burden should fall on taxpayers of Antigna on
account of the loans. The electricity loan has had a more-
melancholy history but even here the present indications
are that the electricity undertaking should before long be
able to pay its current expenses, to pay off the old loan and
to finance from its resources the future development
which is now urgently needed. Here again, as in the case
of Development and Welfare funds, I can see no threat to
the future financial stability of Antigua, provided that
loans are only approved when they can pay for themselves,
and provided that the Minister concerned ensures that pay-
ment is in fact being made from the proceeds of the
undertaking.
It is in the last field of finance that I foresee danger
and difficulty-which will have to be tackled and over-
come by your new Council. During the past five years
it has been necessary for Her Majesty's Government to
pay grants-in-aid of substantial amounts to enable Antigua
to balance its budget. Over $1,250,000 was paid in this
way in 1955; though the last Council managed to reduce
the figure to $750,000 in 1956. A considerably larger
amount will be required in 1957. Until the end of 1958
these grants-in-aid will continue to come direct from Her
Majesty's Government, but thereafter the grant-in-aid will
be channelled through the Federal Government of the
British Caribbean which will allocate the funds available
between the needy territories; and there will be some
element of competition. For this reason it would seem
prudent for your new Council to scrutinize with even in-
creasing care the permanent commitments which are taken
on your budget. I know that the Ministers are fully alive
to the position, and I mention it here only because it is
desirable that a wider public should be aware of the facts.
In short, Honourable Members, I would suggest that
the financial policy of the new Council should be-first,
to spend the Development and Welfare allocation wisely
and quickly; to watch the loan position with care; and to
direct the major part of your attention to the framing of
the budget on economical lines.
The other matter which might, I suggest, receive the
continuing attention of the Council is the need to attract
new capital to Antigua for tourist and other development.
None of us who have had the joy of living in this delight-
ful Island can doubt that it offers attractions to many
people from overseas on the grounds of its climate and its
natural characteristics. But the outside investor also needs
security; he needs to know that he will receive fair treat-
ment and reasonable support if he conforms with the
requirements and with the customs of Antigua. That
security was noticeable by its absence a few years ago;
but the position has been transformed in recent years-
largely through the instrumentality of the Antigua Trades
and Labour Union and of the Antigua Employers''
Federation. May I, as one who is about to go away and
as one who has developed a deep affectionn for Antigua and
its people, venture to suggest that this Council--and indeed
everyone in the community should take steps to see-
that the good name of Antigua as a place of friendliness,
a place of tolerance, and a place of fair-dealing is main-
tained in the future as it has been in recent years, so that
the people of Antigua can receive the stimulus of
development with capital from outside which they so
badly need.
I apologise for taking up so much of your time at
your first meeting of this new Council. It is, as you
know, the last occasion on which I shall have the privi-
lege of addressing you; and I felt that I should take this
opportunity of saying some of the things which I feel may
be of help to you in the great task which faces you in the
coming years.
Yours is a bigger task than that which has faced any
previous Council-to guide Antigua and its people into the-
new Federation, and to ensure that Antiguans are able to
take their place proudly alongside their brothers as full
partners in the new nation which will soon emerge. I
wish you all good fortune in this great task, and I pray
that God's blessing may be with you in your work.










November 22, 1956 THE ANTIGUA, MONTrSERRAT AN D VIRGIN ISLANDS GAZETTE. 95


Farewell Address to His Excellency the Gover-
nor, Sir Kenneth W. Blackburne, K.O.M.G.,
O.B.E., by the Legislative Council of
Antigua.

Your Excellency,

It is with mixed feelings that we reply to your
address of welcome today at the opening of this new
Legislative Council-feelings of pleasure in that we have
in our midst two new members on the Nominated side
of the House, and once again the same old familiar
Elected faces chosen by the people to carry on the
business of our Colony, and feelings of sorrow in that
this is possibly your last appearance in this Council and
that your association with us in the Government of this
Colony is drawing to its close.

We thank you sincerely for your words of welcome,
for your kind expressions of pleasure in working with us
and of the happy years you have spent in our midst. We
'can assure you that the pleasure is mutual and that we are
richer for the experience we have shared with you.

You came here at a time when we had the unfortu-
mate experience of two fires and two disastrous hurricanes
that brought suffering to thousands. You approached the
task before you with confidence, enterprise and keenness
which were an inspiration to all of us. Your perception
.and your new approach to matters, your determined effort
to keep an even balance and to provide an opportunity for
.a fair hearing of different points of view have at all times
-contributed to lessening the many sectional strifes for
which these parts had become renowned and generally to
the welfare of the community. This we regard as being
the outstanding characteristic of your term of office here
and you have thereby indeed won our admiration and the
.confidence and respect of our people.

The Hurricane Rehousing Programme, the first of its
kind these territories have ever witnessed, was possible
through your energetic effort in assisting us to improve
the standard of housing. The Slum Clearance Scheme at
'Garlings Land, the development at Ottos, the new Villa
Development Programme and the various village exten-
sions have a s o become possible through y ou r strong
support and your desire to help the lowly and humble
among us in the same miner as you would seek for a fair
deal to the more fortunate.

But of all the developments during your time--new
hospital, better roads, better village amenities, lands for
-development of a flourishing peasantry, new factories and
a host of other things-the one that can never be forgotten
is the provision of adequate supplies of water throughout
the island for our people. This, Sir, has been one of the
most outstanding achievements in Antigna in all its long
and chequered history; andl your contribution to this work
will ever receive the grateful memory of the people of
this Colony. Antigua is no longer the waterless island as
has been recorded through the ages but with us you exert-
ed all your efforts to see that what had hitherto seemed


impossible became a reality, and we have specially to thank
you for the part you played.

The Homes, Families and Gardens Festival has taken
a grip on the community and this, too, has had its origin
through yourself and Lady Blackburne who has also
displayed very keen and active interest in the social and
cultural advancement of our people. We shall endeavour
to see that the Festival remains a permanent part of our
life and institutions and you need have no fear of its
fading into oblivion.

We repeat, Sir, we have taken positive strides of
progress in almost every field of endeavour and your term
of office is noteworthy for the forward march we have
made and for the opening of a richer and fuller age for our
people. Your wisdom and intuition have made you sup-
port our request for constitutional advancement. Without
this support Antigua, contrary to her history, would have
been trailing behind other territories and be less able to
shoulder her share of the greater responsibilities imposed
by federation. But today we stand in close constitutional
relationship with the other Colonies of the British Carib-
bean and we are confident you are satisfied your judgment
was right. For most of the developments that have taken
place in the past years have been due to a large measure to
the constitutional changes that have come about and to the
direct association Members of Council, and as such the peo-
ple, have had with the functions of Government.

The job of restoring the Dockyard at English Harbour
is yours and indeed the credit must go to you. You met
us with a relic of the past; you are leaving us with a going
job and a monument for the future. The manner in which
you flung yourself into the work of restoration and your
energetic effort in launching the various appeals for help
and the organising and establishment of the Society of
Friends of English Harbour are all worthy of praise and
indeed we are grateful for what you have done. We can
only show our appreciation by endeavouring to see that the
preservation of this monument continues through our day
and is passed on to posterity.

We are now on the threshold of a great venture-
Caribbean Federation-and we are aware of your sympa-
thies and good wishes for us in making a success of our
efforts in this field. We assure you that Antigua will play
a full part in the shaping of the nation and will make her
contribution to the task of bringing greater prosperity and
happiness to our people. But in Federation there are
prospects for men of your high calibre and permit us to
hope at some future date you may return to represent Her
Majesty in the highest Offical post of the British Caribbean
Federation.

On behalf of the people of Antigua we wish yourself,
Lady Blackburne and Family God speed. May your
memories of Antigua and of our people linger with you as
yours will with us, and may God's blessings ever be upon
your future efforts.
V. C. BIRD,
Deputy President.


Printed at the Government Printing Office, Antigua. Leeward Islands, by E. M. BLACKMAN, M.B.E,
Government Printer.-By Authority.
1956.
[Price 22 cents.]








No. 17 of 1956. Reist, ati,,u of Clubs
(Amendment).

[L.S.]


- ASSENT


K. W. BLACKBURNE,
Governor.
7th November, 1956.


MONTSERRAT.

No. 17 of 1956.

An Ordinance to amend the Registration of Clubs
Ordinance 1955.

[7th November, 1956.]

ENACTED by the Legislature of the Colony
of Montserrat as follows:-

1. This Ordinance may be cited as the
Registration of Clubs (Amendment) Ordinance,
1956 and shall be read as one with the Registration
of Clubs Ordinance, 1955 hereinafter called the
Principal Ordinance.

2. Paragraph (e) of subsection (1) of section
11 of the Principal Ordinance is hereby amended
by deleting the comma therein.


8. Subsection (3) of section 14 of the
Principal Ordinance is hereby amended by sub-
stituting the words "forty-eight dollars for the
words forty-eighty dollars "

4. Section 15 of the Principal Ordinance is
hereby amended by substituting the words
"Magistrate's Code of Procedure Act" for the
words Magistrate's Code of Procedure "


:2 ?-7i'


O. E. HENLY.
President.


Commence.
ment.


Shot title.

5[1956.


Amendment
of paragraph
(e) of subsec-
tion (1) of
of section 11
of the Princi-
pal Ordinance.
Amendment
of section 14
of the Princi-
pal Ordinance.


Amendment
of section 15
of the Princi-
pal Ordinance.








Registration of Clubs
(Am..I,. , nt).


Passed the Legislative Council this 10th day of
October, 1956.

JAs. H. CARROTT,
/ Clerk of the Council.









































Printed at the Government Printing Offios, Antigua, Leeward Islands,
by EARL PIGOTT. Acting Government Printer.-By Authority.
195i6.


MONTSERRAT, 2


47/00372--500-11.56.iC


Price 4 cents.


No. 17 of 1956.







No. 18 of 1956. Indictments Act (Amendment). MONTSEREAT.

[L.S.]



I ASSENT,

K. W. BLACKBURNE,
Governor.
7th November, 1956.


MONTSERRAT.

No. 18 of 1956.

An Ordinance to amend the Indictments Act.
[7th November, 195(6.] Commence-
ment.
ENACTED by the Legislature of tie Colony
of Montserrat as follows:-
1. This Ordinance may be cited as the Short title
Indictments Act (Amendment) Ordinance, 1956,
and shall be read as one with the Indictments Act, L, Is. Act
as amended, hereinafter called the Principal Act. Cap, 3
195;' No. 22.
2. Subsection (1) of section 3 of the Princi- Aiendi ent
pal Act is hereby amended by tho substitution of ft PriCi-
the words such persons as the Chief Justice may pal At.
appoint for the words "the .l ih:f Justice, the
Puisne Judge, the Attorney General and the
Chief Registrar "
0. E. HENRY,
President.
Passed the Legislative Council this 10th day
of October, 1956.
Js. H. CARROT,
Cl erk of the (Council,

SPrinted at the Government Printing Office, Antigua. Leeward Inlands,
by EArL PImOrT, Acting Government Printer- By Authority.
47/00436-500-11.56. -I'rie 3 cets.]
S 73

4.4* M








No. 20 of 1956. Road (Amendment).


[L.S.]

I ASSENT,

K. W. BLACKBURNE,
Governor.
7th November, 1956.

MONTSERRAT.

No. 20 of 1956.

An Ordinance to amend further the Road Ordi-
nance, 1907.

[By Proclamation]

ENACTED by the Legislature of the Colony
of Montserrat as follows:-

1. This Ordinance may be cited as the Road
(Amendment) Ordinance, 1956, and shall be read
as one with the Road Ordinance, 1907, as amended,
hereinafter called the Principal Ordinance.

2. Section 3 of the Principal Ordinance is
hereby amended by the deletion therefrom of the
definition of the term The Board ".

3. Part VI section 26 of the Principal
Ordinance is hereby repealed.

4. This Ordinance shall come into operation
on a day' to be fixed by the Governor by
Proclanat ion.

0. E. HENRY,
President.

Passed the Legislative Council the 10th day
of October, 1956.

JAS. H. CARROTT,
Clerk of the Council.


Short title,

7/1907.
8/1937.
9/1939.


Amendment
of section 3 of
the Principal
Ordinance.

Repeal of
Part VI of the
Principal
Ordinance.
Commence-
ment.


l'Pited at the Government Printing Offoie, Antigua, Leeward Islands,
by EARL PIGOTT, Acting Government Printer.-By Authority.
1956.


MONTMBART.


47/ 'nr,. S -- 11.56.
]2. 72 47


[Price 3 cents]








ANTIGUA.


STATUTORY RULES AND ORDERS.

1956, No. 69.


PROCLAMATION
OPERATION
11/1956).


DATED NOVEMBER 19, 1956, BRINGING INTO
THI EDUCATION- ORDINANCE, 1956 (No.


BY THE GOVERNOR.
A PROCLAMATION

EDWIN A. THOMPSON,
Acting Administrator.
WHEREAS by section 31 of the Education Ordinance,
1956 (No. 11/1956) it is provided that the said Ordinance shall
come into operation on such day as the Governor may appoint
by proclamation published in the Gazette.


NOW, THEREFORE, 1, EDWIN ARCHIBALD
Acting Administrator of the Colony of Antigua,
my proclamation declare that the said Ordinance
into operation on the 1st day of January, 1957.


THaOMPSON,
do by this
shall come


AND all Her Majesty's loving subjects in the Colony
of Antigua and all others whom it may concern are hereby
required to take due notice hereof and to give their ready
accordingly.

GIVEN at the Administrator's Ofice, Antiq'pi, this
19th day of November, 1956, in the fifth year of
Her Majesty's reign.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN!




Printed at the Governmnet Printing Office, Antigua, Leeward Islands,
by EAR~. PIt'rTr, Aeting Government Printer.-By Authority.
SA. 47/125- 48(-- 11.56 [Prie 3 cents]
3 2k 7.i

ALyi




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