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PS
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00051
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1969
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00051

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18-19
        Page 20-21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24-25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40-41
        Page 42-43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52-53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60-61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text





















, C
Al'sA
te^


,`i









TROGR AD

Your dictionary tells you that retro-
grade means "To go back." You're in
favor of that right? Been wanting to
ever since you got over here.
Now, retrograde movement of your
equipment does not mean PM comes to
a screeching halt. Far from it. As long as
you are with your equipment, you've got
Preventive Maintenance to do to keep it
in good shape.
In the event your equipment is to be
turned in for packing up and shipping
back, you keep your PM up to snuff till
your support unit takes it. You might even
be called on to help prepare your gear
for shipment. And this gets mighty im-
portant, 'cause there's a lot of salty water
between where you are and where the
gear is going.
You'll get the word on how to clean
your gear, what kinds of preservatives,
packaging material, boxes and the like
to use in packing it. Every item has to be
marked and identified with FSN,
nomenclature, quantity and unit of issue,
where it can be read loud and clear. That
Sway the equipment can be identified and
made ready for use when it gets to where
It's going.
So. Air's PM ... all the way.


!!soma ai. Z04 lyalrarriw
Wt TOMS USUE111


GROUND MOBILITY 2-17
spec.ll ut'e. Wtsrl MaMinenance




FIREPOWER 2-27
Small Arms Tips I Airi lack Cover 2
M7IPM 242, s uis 16 f
M2 41Wle 27



CaSMmtWCATlWNS- 37-SL5

on t r A- '' IM "D

Aaie'5 '



Seep so Look s0k4 55


COMBAT SUPPORT EQUIPMENT
Fuell Care 8 Armior Vst 1. 1
MI32 PFlanse Commercalls 20 62-
h1roeel M2W Burner El
MIl Don I Bridge Launcher 94
Imnersion Heater 59 NelPublications 28
Supiy 7. 1. 12. 20, 24. 2% 5 .. 37., ,
41, 4. 50 53. 55 l 58

Urs of Funs for printiUng oa thi phublic-
tlsn has been apprnovd by Heairters.
Departlmet o the Army. 26 February lsi.
DISTRIBUTION: In accordance with re-
quirmeints submitted on DA Forn 12-4.


i-mimT-J' *^'^M.21






WINTER MAINTENANoE:

GRW MNOBLITY







STAND YOU
HERE, I DEOSWEN AT CU CHI ... AT LEAST THERE IT
I T'S THI FOR I WOULD DRAW AND YOUrRE WAS AtRFUL AILT..
ro t








It's usually taken for granted that equipment in areas that dip to -10 F can
A5 get along with just ordinary care. Don't believe it! Your equipment can be
stopped cold when hit with zero temperatures, blankets of snow and freezing
sludge. There's only one way to ease the freeze and stay ahead of a frigid catas-
.t. rophe ... put special heat on your PM.
P-' Zero Weather Effects
_1- ___"_ ^^sDA

-NO Winter weather between 0O and -10 F is on the inner fringe of the special-
SME\ ized maintenance treatment required by your TM's and the various winterization
STHIS AIN'T I m ) I manuals. At these temperatures many of the cold weather conditions exist. Maybe
THE ARCTIC '50 FOM not for long periods like in the "arctic" regions but long enough to be just as
I FIGGERED iT ALA5 DIDN'T NEED
S V NY THIN& / of the operating and maintenance techniques spelled out in the cold-weather
SPECIAL. manuals.


S1. Lubricants 2. Plastic and hard rubber T
become stiff parts become brittle, a
and hard to hard knock or sharp bend
work with. may snap them.
When the subject of cold-weather maintenance pops up, the mind conjures up
visions of places that have extreme cold conditions--like the arctic, polar and
sub-arctic areas. But, fact of the matter is, any area that has freezing temperatures 3. Gages and dials stick 4. Brakes t -
and give wrong readings. freeze to drums
and snow becomes a candidate for cold-weather maintenance practices. A gentle tp usually res if left standing
Nothing frosts equipment quicker than ice and snow. Ask any trooper who's them. when wet.
doing a hitch in a location that's not considered an "arctic" region but still has
temperature drops down to -10 F.







5. Fuel tanks and lines -
freeze tight or ice up from
condensation.


9. Batteries efficiency is
cut, they freeze and crack
when discharged.


11. Machined surfaces rust
and corrode quickly




13. Power train breathers and
vents clog and freeze
closed from slush.



15 Personnel efficiency -
gets lousy


6. Linkages--get stiff caus-
ing hard operation or de-
layed response.


8. Crankcases sludge up
from condensation caused
by short runs.


10. Engines hard to start
many are ruined by hydro.
static lock.


1? Drain cocks and plug --
Iittze light discouraging
daily or periodic draining


14. Windshields -crack easily
when hit by a blast of hot
air when being defrosted.

16. Time "ordinary" serv-
ices take longer to do.


'* TAKE IT FROM
ME, A LITTLE PRIOR P
PLANNING CAN GO
A LONG WAYS COME
WINTER


oa
Qi


4----






Plan Ahead

As you can see, trying to get through a cold winter with ordinary maintenance
just won't cut it... operating in the cold calls for something extra. And that some-
thing starts with good maintenance habits.
This is simply orienting yourself for conditions that will actually exist-con-
ditions that can frustrate the best mechanics and operators in any crack outfit if
they're not ready to meet the hazards head on.
To start off on the right track, adopt, use and stick with these basic zero


weather rules:


1. Be acquainted with the Cold-Weather
Operation portion of your operator's TM.
51. Ekhmer a Mlil h Mel* im L

S.lhe tUie rquied to wrm p a v ehicle
so ta t Ia oppesble at temperatures as lo
ua -50l. mly approach two bour. Vehicles
14 poor mnaalunal condition probably wll
not tart at al, or only after many hour of
labaorJs maintenan and heetig.Complete

3. Arm your outfit with the necessary special
winterization equipment that's authorized
for the average temperature range of
your area. Area climatic conditions are
determined by the average temperature
range of the season's coldest month.
AIR BRAKE
PURGE SYSTEM
INSTALLED?


5. Keep vital spots or portions of your equip-
ment under cover, or out of the weather
altogether.




7. Try no short cuts, altera-
tions or repairs that're be-
yond your MOS know.how

9. Protect your fuel and lubri.
cants from winters (ton
taminating elements


2. Lubricate according to the temperature
range on your equipment's LO.
EXPECTED TEMp -WRO
abo..32or .rto'rs5- -05to9roo1
IO

GOo 0080 co



4. Keep your extreme cold-weather TM's,
TB's, FM's and other cold-weather pubs
within reach for quick reference. Look 'em
over before the cold blast hits to offset
any trouble due to lock of know-how.





6. Always remember you're working
under unusual conditions so give your
equipment that type of attention and
service.

8. Never force a cold,stiff or
frozen piece of equipment.

A \x



10. When in doubt whether
winterization treatments
apply, check with someone
who knows before skipping
the therapy.


OR







MUSH! Special Winter Equipment
Outfits wintering in the +5" to
-10 F temperature zones are entitled YOU'RE NOT GOING
to some help too. The authorization for TO BE LEFT OUT IN
heaters, closure kits and cold-weather THE COLD ALTOGETHER.
starting aids-including the M40 CHECK WITH SUPPORT,
Starting Kit--is given in SB 9-16 (Feb THEY'LLU MET WHATEVER.
65). Y M
Assemblies like personnel heaters,
closure kits, primer pumps, slave recep- -a M i
tackle kits and other special cold-weather
aids are listed in your equipment's -35P
parts manual. So check out your climatic
zone with your support unit and get
whatever winter aids that're needed to
offset the winter's damaging effects on
your equipment.
Tire chains for tactical vehicles are
listed in TM 9-2300-223-20P. The
swivel-type hook for securing cross
chains is listed in TB 9-2300-282-12
(Nov 65). Chains are not usually items
of initial issue- they ha'e to be requi-
sitioned when your local weather con- S
ditions require 'em. i (GI I Ei


All fuel -gasoline and die-
sel-should get a dose of al-
cohol to prevent freezing. Once
water freezes in your fuel lines,
fuel pump or filter it's no-go.
Keeping water out of fuel's not
Seasy-much of it comes from
DAIIY condensation. The best you can
do is to keep the water to a
minimum by draining the fil-
ters daily, and the fuel tank
weekly. Then saturate the rest
with alcohol.





Use 1/2-pint of denatured alcohol for
every 10 gallons of fuel. And use Grade
III,Fed.O-E-760B. FSN6810-543-7415
gets 1-gallon, FSN6810-201-0907 gets
5 gallons, and FSN 6810-201-0904 gets
55 gallons.:
Always pour the alcohol on top of the
fuel. It mixes better that way.
Extra effort should be taken to wipe
away snow or ice from fuel tank filler
openings, filler cans and hose nozzles
before refueling.


10 GALLONS
Bulk fuel containers should be stored
with their openings tight or protected.
And keep open cans under cover. A little
care here goes a long way.


In cold weather, staic'electriciri is
easily generated -so make certain all
your tiller nozzles are grounded before
pumping any fuel. And keep fuel tanks
full to hold down the condensation.


I


w






Batteries WOULP YA
Z BELIEVE 40%-?
I'M NOT
HALF THE
BATTERY I
USE TO BE.


Keeping a battery at its peak efli-
ciency and charge in zero weather is as Electrolyte Reading Freezing Point
easy as getting a date with Racquel (Corrected to 80F) (0F)
Welch. You've got to watch its specific 1.280 -90o
gravity like a hawk. Even at its best a 1.250 -620
battery has only 40 per cent of its crank- 1.200 160
ing ability when fully charged. And at 1.1 +1
zero temperature it'll freeze and break +
when reading 1.160.
If your vehicle is not putting on enough miles to keep the battery charged
up, you'll have to keep switching batteries and get 'em charged by your shop.
Before adding water to a battery be sure you're going on a long haul to give it
a chance to mix with the electrolyte ... it'll need about an hour's running time.
Never add water to a cold battery. Add it only if the battery's ready to be charged
or when the electrolyte's about +40' F, if the battery is to be left standing.
If a battery freezes, get it indoors and let it thaw out slowly. And anybody
who thaws out a battery with a torch or open flame is off his rocker-it can
blow like a grenade.
Another thing. When checking its gravity, subtract 4 points
for every 100 the electrolyte is below 80 F. For example, if
the electrolyte's temperature is 0 F, and you get a float read-
ing of 1.280, the actual charge is 1.248. Remember it's the
battery-solution (electrolyte) temperature that counts-not
the ambient temperature.




For the whole rundown on battery care read your copy of TM 9-6140-200-15,
Storage Batteries, Lead Acid Type. It may not be fun but you will be a walking
authority on batteries. And that's not to be slighted.
Dry-cell batteries are very finicky .. the colder they are the less they put
out. So keep 'em warm until ready to use. If you're not using cold-weather dry-
cell batteries (those in the 2000-series) see your support about getting some.
They have a lot more oomph in zero weather.







Cooling Systems
Your bible for antifreeze for
liquid cooling systems is TB 750-
651 (Nov 68). It spells out proce-
dures for cleaning and conditioning
cooling systems and gives the type
and amount of antifreeze needed
for various degrees of protection.


i This TB applies to
ment.
To make certain your cooling system pro-
tection is OK, check its antifreeze content
against this general guide:
Pints of Ethylene
Protection Glycol needed in
Desired each gallon of water.
+20F. ..................... ....... 11/2
+ 1O F ................................... 2
O'F ................................. 2 /4
10 F................................. 31/4
20 F ................................... 3
-30F................................. 4
-40'F ............................... 4/4


all Army equip- j *


Don't forget to include 6 ounces of
corrosion inhibitor, FSN 6850-753-
4967, to each 12 quarts (3 gallons) of
water in your cooling system. Do not
pour unmixed powder directly into the
radiator; dissolve it in hot water first,
then add it. The powder can cake in the
radiator cores and cause clogging.

IT
MIXN
HOT
WATER
FIRST


For good operation, a cooling system should heat up to 160" to 180 F regard-
less of the cold weather. If it doesn't, have the engine's thermostat checked; it
could be stuck open and need replacing. Cooling systems that constantly go over
200' also need attention. Again it could be a bad thermostat, a cogged radiator,
a bad radiator cap or filthy coolant. Or maybe the flow of air is blocked.
Air cooled systems don't need too much attention. All they need is a good flow
of air with all the air-flow shrouds in place. To speed up heating in zero weather,
you can partially cover the air intake grills with canvas when starting. Just be
sure to remove it after the engine reaches operating temperature.






Lubrication


Crankcase oil can go to pot much quicker in winter and may need changing
oftener than the LO specifies. Sludge from condensation and dilution from fuel
are the main reasons. After every daily oil-level check, use your nose to sniff out
fuel contamination by smelling the dipstick. And use your eyes and fingers to
detect sludge. Moisture dilution is hard to detect unless it's really bad. If you
suspect it, draw a sample and let it stand in a glass jar. Water will show by sepa-
rating from the oil.
When contamination is found change the oil and oil filters.


DON'T OVER
LUBE OR IT'LL
LOCK UP LIKE
PEANUT BUTTER.



a


If you're using OES, check your level
often because an engine will consume
more OES than OE. Keep an eye on the
oil-pressure gage; a drop can indicate
low oil. If you're on a long run, check
it several times a day. And never over-
fill to cut or skip oil checks. Overfilling
causes other troubles, so don't push
your luck.
Same goes for the rest of the chassis
-don't over-lube. Globs of grease can
cause parts to bind and lock.


Condensation is always looking for
a place to happen. So in between your
regular periodic lube services check one
or 2 of your gear cases; like a differen-
tial, transmission or transfer. Any evi-
dence of water contamination is the sig-
nal for an oil change. And never mix
grades of oil-use the right stuff for
the temperature range.
10














One thing is for sure, zero weather makes it tougher to start your engine. The
best way to help yourself and the engine is to be familiar with the equipment's
cold-weather starting procedure. Usually there're a few extras that have to be
done-so bone up on that section of the -10 TM.


First off, keep your batteries
at peak charge for good crank-
ing power. Then turn off all ac-
cessories and crank the engine
no longer than 20 to 30 sec-
onds. Longer periods can bum
up the starter. /


Many operators over-prime. This leads to hydrostatic lock and
and crankcase oil dilution. Before turning the engine over prime
2 or 3 slow strokes no more. Then turn over the engine and prime
slowly and sparingly until the engine'll run on the choke and throttle
settings alone.


Idling under 800 RPM for long periods causes many prob-
lems. If you're required to run the engine to keep your radio
in net or to operate some auxiliary equipment off the vehicle's
power train, then run the engine at high idle between 1,000
and 1,200 RPM. But never idle the engine unless it's for a
useful purpose. When on a stop-and-go mission it's best to
let the engine run at high idle.
11 E-


Ep!


gimes






Diesel engines should be kept run-
ning during short stops or waits--here
again at 1,000 to 1,200 RPM.
Always bring the engine up to its
normal operating temperature before
moving out. And before shutting it
down make sure you run it at least 5
minutes at 180.
Manifold heat control valves are im-
portant in zero weather. The automatic
type should work freely; the vacuum
control linkage and spring must be in
good working order. On the manual
type, it's up to the operator to set it in
the "winter" or "cold" position. Your
-10 TM will tell you which type is on
your equipment.


Spark plugs foul like crazy and can
give you a lot of grief. Cold engines
running at slow speeds and low RPM's
are the greatest cause.
Zero weather calls for extra atten-
tion; don't wait until the next periodic
S-service to clean and reset 'em.
There's a spark-plug cleaner and
tester within reach of every unit. It's
found in the No. 1 Supplemental and
No. 2 Common Tool Sets. If you're new
at plug cleaning, dig up a copy of TM
9-4910-422-12. The cleaning instruc-
tions in this TM can be applied to all
makes of spark plug cleaners.


Slave Starting


Starting aids are the grooviest in zero
weather. Especially the M40 Cold Start-
ing Aid Kit. An outfit that has at least
25 vehicles and operates in an average
ambient temperature that's down to at
least +5 F during the coldest month
can get one-FSN is 2540-570-1354.






TB Ord 390 (Jul 52) tells all about its capabilities, operation and maintenance.
The M40 kit can be adjusted for 6, 12 or 24-volt systems. The heater throws out
100,000 BTU in case you need to warm up the equipment with a blast of hot air
before you're going to slave-start.
I DON'T THINK COME ON
THEY'LL GO FOR YO 10 0













When using the kit, slave according to the TM for the particular vehicle or
> THIS AT I HOPE YOU 100,00
HEADQUARTERS. HE KNOWS 3TU'S.
HE'5 HOLDING
UP A WHOLE l
CONVOY.

-.d






When using the kit, slave according to the TM for the particular vehicle or
piece of equipment being slaved and use the M40 the way you would a slaving
vehicle.
It's always a good idea to try to keep one vehicle in a semi-warm shelter, its
batteries fully charged. You use it to slave-start the others.
Before doing any slaving, dig out a copy of TB Ord 537 (Sep 56). It gives the
A, B, C's of slaving wheeled and track vehicles. This TB along with the vehicle's
TM will give you the rules of the slaving game.
Stay awake and take an extra look when hooking up your jumper connec-
tions. The hook-up must always be positive to positive and negative to negative.
On AC systems, even a slight flash on a wrong post will burn out a component.
One thing you can be sure of is that all tactical and combat vehicles have a nega-
tive ground. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. POS TO POS

HE r THAT'-
v0'ITI4t
fJEGATI j E Ti, -
riEGAtIVE '

NEG TO NEG
A last word .. while slaving keep the live vehicle running at 1,800 RPM and
always pair up vehicles that have a similar battery configuration. Or to be exact,
don't try to slave a tank that has four 6TN batteries with a 1/4-ton truck that
only has two 2HN batteries. If you do you're just asking for more trouble.
13 W i>






Tires

LESS
AIR GIVES Zero weather requires no tire pres-
THE GRIP sure adjustment unless you're operating
YOU NEED in deep loose snow.Your -10 TM gives
IN DEEP
SNOW. the low tire pressure that works best.
But after the snow's gone get those tires
--back to their normal highway pressure.

Tires can freeze tight to the ground and tear when you move out. During
sleet or freezing rain move your vehicle every so often and avoid parking in
puddles. Park on timbers, brush or whatever's available.
If you happen to get a flat spot frozen into a tire, move out slow like and let
it round out easily.
Every valve stem should be capped or else the stems'll ice up and freeze solid.
Then adjusting tire pressure won't exactly be a ball.


Water accumulates in an air brake
system even in fair weather, but during
low winter temperatures it accumulates
like mad.


several days is OK when the vehicle's
not going to be used. And never move
out until the air has built up to the
right pressure. On equipment that's
equipped with a buzzer, don't move
until it stops buzzing.
When towing a G754-series 1-1/2-
ton trailer, drain its air line filter 'cause
it loads up with water too. TM 9-2330-
213-14 (Jan 64), para 73, tells how to
do it. No drain, no trailer brakes.
/2f\ CHECK YOUR FILTER


DRAIN 'EM UP TO TWICE DAILY









First thing next morning close filled with alcohol. Use the same alcohol
the petcocks. Leaving them open for that you're winterizing the fuel with.
14


., '' -






The air compressor's unloader valve
shouldn't be frozen or stuck. To check
it out, build the air pressure to its rated
maximum, apply the brakes and hold
'em, then stop the engine. The pressure
should not drop within one minute.


HOLD ONE MINUTE


Air Cleaners


CHECK THAT WET
Air-good clean air and lots of it is needed to TYPE AIR FILTER
keep an engine alive and healthy. It's the air cleaner's EVER DA CDENTION
job to make sure that air's clean, and it can't do this CAUSE A LOSS OF
if it's choked up by ice. POWER.
SHIELD INTAKE


i nw 0 ICE AND SLUSH
KEEP 'EM RAISE THE OIL
C LEAN LEVEL AND CUT
OFF AIR FLOW

The air cleaner intake must be protected so the
engine can get its needed supply of air. The best way
to assure this is to position or shield the intake so the
snow and sleet can't get to it. And keep the area
around it free of ice and snow.


Under Cover
parts and equipment under cover. The
/ first item that comes to mind is wind-
shields. Especially when the truck's
parked overnight in sleet.
A piece of canvas or hardboard cut to
-, '. '', size and fitted on the windshield during
Maintaining equipment in cold mis- times like that really pays off.
erable weather can be a lesser pain in This same technique can be used on
the end when you keep vital or delicate many items that're left out in the
15







weather all night-like exposed instru- --
ment panels, winches, sighting and fire- OVER
control equipment, operating levers,
etc.
Many of these items already may
have their own cover. If so, an extra
minute putting it on pays big profits. "
Ask any operator who's spent half an OVER
hour chipping and scraping ice to get at WRECKER
his winch cable. CONTROLS

Heaters


In weather that'll make a brass
monkey twitch and groan, a little heat
can save many a delicate situation. Par-
ticularly a warm vehicle compartment.
And no compartment is going to be
warm unless you know how to keep
your personnel heater putting out.
Keeping a stream of heat flowing
from a heater depends on exact opera-
tion and constant maintenance. Espe-
cially on gasoline heaters. Knowing the
starting and stopping technique of a
gasoline heater is mighty important.
Since there're several types and models
being used, be certain you know how
to operate the one you have before you
start flipping switches.


DON'T TURN OFF THE MASTER SWITCH
UNTIL THE HEATER GOES OFF
When most of the gasoline heaters
are turned off, they'll stop burning but
the blowers will keep running. This is
to cool the heater and purge it of un-
burned gases. It'll stop automatically
when it's ready. So never turn off a mas-
ter switch when shutting down a ve-
hicle until your heater stops.


I,4.A
9HEAlER)
~REPAIR/
kKI


When a gasoline heater goes kaput, it's usually in
one of these areas ... igniter fouled, burned or loose;
flame switch out of adjustment; loose electrical con-
nections; or clogged or leaking fuel lines. Most
heaters have a parts repair kit that includes a replace-
ment igniter. Know which kit your heater gets and
have one handy for quick repairs.


YAH BUT I'VE
GOT A DIFFERENT
HEATER. MY KIT WON'T
WORK ON YOURS.


HEATER OK?


LL-qjCa(






When defrosting a windshield with your heater... careful. A sudden blast of
hot air against frozen glass will crack it for sure. Always warm up your cab first
then start the defrosters on LOW. After a few minutes of this then go to HIGH.

A Big NO-NO

Operating equipment or pulling maintenance in a closed
area with an engine or gasoline heater going can put you to
sleep for a long time. Carbon monoxide is not to be fooled
with-and nobody is tough enough to withstand its sneaky
and deadly consequences.
Regardless of where you're holed up-driving in a closed
cab or tuning an engine in a dosed shop-you're a candidate
for the deep 6. E
In vehicles, keep a window or hatch cracked open-and 4M u a04C
even with that, never take a nap while the engine or heater's wrm wi wiow~s s ur
running. W 4// Ly PIED "
In a work bay or shop, pipe the exhaust to the outside or J
keep the doors wide open. \ -
Keep all gasoline heater exhausts and their couplings tight Z ia
and leakproof. Don't take any chances-it's not worth it. "a


Cold Weeather Library

To keep your equipment ready to shoot, scoot and communicate, the -
best bet is to scan through all the extreme cold weather publications for
the portions that pertain to your climatic operations. Then work up a local
SOP on their application. The publications you'll want to read up on are:

TM 9-207 Operation and Maintenance in SNLG249 Winterization Equipment
Extreme Cold Weather series*
TB Eng 347 Winterization Techniques for TM 9-8662 Fuel Burning Heaters (vehicles)
Engineer Equipment TM 9-247 Materials and Chemicals used
TB 750-651 Use of Anti-freeze and Cooling For Cleaning
System Cleaning FM 31-70 Basic Cold Weather Manual
SB 9-16 Winterization Kits and Aids SB 38-100 Preservation, Packing and
(authorization) Marking Supplies
SB 11-576 Cold Weather Batteries for
AN/PRC Radio Sets TM 9-6140- 200-15
TB Ord 390 Cold Weather Aid Kit M40 Lead-acid Batteries
TB 9-2855 Winterization Kits TM 9-8638 Spark Plugs
series*
*See your DA Pamphlet 310-4 for complete listing.

17






~7~-Y -i:cf


~~(UWa- W,. L


MII`i&tq 1
I.. _i E:


DON'T LET YOUR SMALL
ARMS CATCH PNEUMONIA...

A frigid dame named Njture. decep-
tively pure in snow-white. I, problem
enough. But it's the man-made nccather
you tote along in your shelter that
makes life real tough for .our small
arms when the thermometer so-\o',
around zero.
Kee-reck!
The sudden change in temperature
from the warm inside to the cold out
side can give your shooter the sweatf
and chills ... and these can be taial for
the rifle or machine gun or "hatc.tr
other jewel you've got.
So, let's run through some mainte-
nance and operating cautions hat' II
help you and your weapon -tas health
when the sap flees and the snuo flits.
Most of the dope will go for all small
arms, with the M16A1 rifle as an ex.
ample. But there'll be special pminrrs
for specific weapons where nccissarn.


,Jr;


I-ff


,.


r EXTRA i'P. IS BLST h,

Light nirh the right lube and h-ea.
Sixth the cleaning hat's the first
prescription for inter e"apon PM.
Reason An) carbon or gook .ou
lease in there will hold moisture and
cause freezing. Same thing if Iou use
the % wrong lube or cr\n too much of the
right lube. The wrong lube %-ill get
sluggish on trp o'dhat.
A well-clean.d and lubed NlI6Al.
frinstance. alas has more built-in
resihta:nc to cold. weather alilme.nt


UR'. h. -I .-,)It
''1 II 1


I


I fir, ..11 1w,-I 1- W --i .1 1. it. i,. W .ll I

I I t 1, l,1.111 1 o r i 13 pi faji0 I
,ii nd 0-1% 111,11 'T- 'iI1II1I liljlll


CLEANING AND LUBING -
1. Let your weapon stand in your warm shel-
ter for an hour or two before PM-ing it.
This'll let it sweat out the frozen conden-
sation, snow, ice, and so on.,


11)11'
d


L~sl


*M OR E






LOOK AHEAD.,. HAVE
YOUR UNIT SUPPLY KEEP EXTRA
PARTS ON HAND LIKE
EXTRACTORS, EJECTORS,
SPRINGS ... STUFF LIKELY TO
GO KAPUT IN TH'COLD.

6. Apply a light film of the right lube.
LAW'S regulation for all weapons in below
zero weather, but in a pinch you can use
LSA on your M16A1 down to -35 degrees.
Never use any other lube, except what
your TM or CO says.


Speaking of the M16A1, be sure you
lube the inside of the lower receiver ex-
tension and if your armorer's handy get
him to lube the outside. This is a trouble
spot.

7. Reassemble your weapon and function-
check it. Make sure all parts work.


LU
C


Light film: Put some lube on a clean
rag or swab, squeeze the cloth dry, and
then wipe all parts and surfaces with it.
Don't miss any areas. And no generous
doses anywhere in freezing weather, savvy?










LAW (Lube Oil, Weapons, MIL-L-14107B)
comes in a 1-qt can under FSN 9150-292-
9689.


GIVE YOUR
MAGAZINE THE SAME
KIND OF TREATMENT-
ISASSEMBLY, CLEANING,
IBE (THE SPRING ONLY 0'
COURSE) AND WIPE OFF
YOUR AMMO TOO...
BUT NO LUBE HERE,
PLEASE!


As soon as you're through with the PM, get your weapon outside, if you pos-
sibly can-and try to keep it there. Remember, it's the quick change from warm
to cold that causes most trouble. But the fresh application of lube will hold the
trouble down.

i WATCH THAT FLUFFY STUFF

b Some hep units locate cold-storage
V& boxes outside their warm-up bunkers
Sfor guys to leave their rifles in while the
0 riflemen thaw out. Any type of box or
SFLE unheated shelter will do as long as it
IK oa protects the weapons from snow.
00Y O'course, these weapon boxes or shel-
ters are kept guarded ... natch!
> ''"*4 __ G 20
""" -*.. *^-


You can't keep your weapon from freezing, but you'd darned well better do
all you can to keep the freeze from putting you out of action. What you do, of
course, depends on your tactical situation.


First and foremost, natch, is to try to keep snow and ice out of your weapon
... out of your magazine ... and off your ammo. Use your head on this: Handle
your weapon carefully when moving through snow-covered woods and espe-
cially in deep snow so that you don't let the stuff into the working parts, sights
and barrel. Keep your ammo in your pouch or covered with a tarp or something,
if you can. 6" ,
ANYBODY I
SEE MY 1.ILI
RIFLE.I LAIP






Incidentally, if you do get a misfire on the first shot with any weapon in freez-
ing weather, the first couple steps of immediate action will usually clear it. So,
know ahead of time what you're supposed to do.
On any weapon, try to fire at a slow rate at first to let your shooter warm up
gradually. This'll help prevent parts breakage as the weapon's temperature
suddenly shoots up.
EXERCISING'S NECESSARY





Just like you flap your arms and stamp your feet to keep loose, so your weapon
needs exercising to keep the freeze out of its bones.
Again, however, you have to use your head and adapt to the tactical situation.
One thing's for certain, though: Exercise your weapon gently no slamming or
banging or forcing. You'll for-sure bust frozen parts that way.
Anyhow, maybe these tips for M16A1 zappers will help your thinking, no
matter what weapon you've got:

If You Have Only A Couple Of Seconds Put the selector lever on SAFE ... chamber and
eject a few rounds... then put the lever back on SEMI or AUTO.
This will exercise the fighting parts of your weapon, especially the bolt, which is most likely
to freeze up on you.
If Time's No Problem Remove the
magazine ... then, making sure no round's
chambered, exercise the charging handle, for-
ward assist, selector lever, dust cover, and the EXERCISE
front and rear sights. (Use the nose of a
cartridge on the sights.)
Lastly, press the top round in your maga-
zine up and down a few times to keep the
spring loose. "
This'll do it... till next time.

SPECIAL HINTS ON OTHER WEAPONS

M14 Rifle--Add the gas cylinder to
the items that need special cleaning at- :
tention in cold weather. Winter trigger
components should be dried, cleaned
and lubed lightly in all pivot areas.
Cycle the rifle, if there's time, to make
sure movement's free. WINER ER









* Lu... U \ W W4 B I -Y IMOW
SPistols, Revolvers In below freezing temperatures, all moving parts of the
.45-cal pistol must be kept free of moisture. Clean 'em with dry cleaning sol-
vent or mineral spirits and lube metal parts lightly with PL Special lubricating
oil. You'll get less condensation if these weapons are kept near temperature of
air around 'em. If you bring 'em in from the cold, let 'em reach room tempera-
ture before cleaning.
M79 Grenade Launchers-
Launcher has winter-type trigger guard.
It can be moved (right or left) by press-
ing detent assembly to permit firing
while wearing gloves or mittens. Keep
free of moisture or excess oil in cold cli-
mates. Remove excess oil with dry
cleaning solvent. Lubricate lightly with
PL Special. Keep down condensation
moisture by maintaining launcher at
outside-air temperature. Indoors let it
WINTER warm to room temperature before
TRIGGER
nIADn cleaning.


3.5-In Rocket Launchers
-Lube lightly the electrical
contactor latch group with PL
Special in all pivot areas, in-
cluding the firing mechanism.
As time permits, exercise all
moving parts periodically to
make sure they move freely.
WEAPON MOUNTS
'Twon't do a-tall to have a perfectly functioning weapon on a mount that's
frozen. So, every time you PM your weapon-if time and conditions allow-
do a job on the mount, too. This won't be a problem usually for bipods and
tripods, but it will be for mounts installed in bunkers and on vehicles.
Once more, all you can do is your best. Do your best to protect 'em from
snow, clean and lube 'em every chance you get, and keep 'em lightly lubed.
23


I




























Mention the M79 40-MM grenade
launcher to a grenadier and he proudly
thinks of a rugged little weapon with a
wicked punch. But if his second
thought's not about careful handling,
he's out of action already just that
easy.
It doesn't take much to bend or break
off that delicate shaft holding the re-
tainer lock nut onto the sight carrier.

SHAFT I


And it only takes about 2 complete
counterclockwise turns of the lock nut
to unlock the sight carrier from the
elevation scale.
Not quite as delicate, the front sight
also suffers from rough handling. A
good rap on the nose can snap off the
dovetail on the launcher barrel, making
it impossible to replace the sight.


So whenever you can't stack your
launcher securely in an upright posi-
tion, rest it gently on its right side to
prevent damage to the retainer lock nut.
And don't park any other weapons or
ANP BE ._ heavy objects on top.
AREFUL WITH Sometimes the shaft on the sight car-
THAT STOCK AND \ i *
SCREW ON rier loses its companion-the retainer
WOOD ANP lock nut. Once it's gone, there's not
FIBERGLASS much you can do but ask supply support
STOCKS, for another nut, FSN 1010-440-3355.

TIGHT SCREW?

Another rear end problem is where the stock joins the receiver group. As
every grenadier worth his powder knows, the M79 launcher has both wooden
and plastic stocks ... depending which area of the world you've got your sights
zeroed in on.

PLASTIC STOCK- If you're shouldering a
WOOD STOCK If you own a wooden stock fiberglass stock launcher, it's got another type
weapon, the stock screw takes 2 washers. And of stock screw (externally relieved body
you never overtighten or you might split screw) with just one lockwasher and it wants
the stock when the weapon's fired. So just an extra 1/s-turn of the screw after you run it
run down the screw until it's barely snug. down to snug. But don't do any more than
\ that or you'll freeze the screw in place.


WAsitKi / I COMBINATION
SCREW TOOL


And if you're using a screwdriver instead of the combina-
tion screwdriver-wrench tool, please see that the tip is the
right size to fit the slot in the screw head.
If you're going to be a grenadier, be a good one!
25







GOOD COVER UP


Dear Editor, If
Your outfit's miles ahead PM-wise if you
can keep rain, snow, dust and dirt out of FLOOR MAKES
your weapons, right? HANDY TRAY
That's why we came up with the idea of
putting floors in our transportable small
arms racks and then capping 'em with
fitted canvas covers every time they head
for the firing ranges.
Maybe other units might want to adopt
this idea even for indoor use.
For the floors we used either 3-inch ply- The friendly Omars at the post canvas
wood or 16-gage metal sheets, nailing or shop made the covers, using a live rack of
screwing 'em into place. Besides keeping each type we have as a model. They used
dust from blowing up into the weapons, 3 cuts on each cover a big one across
these floors make fine trays for holding the top and 2 smaller ones at each end. The
magazines and cleaning equipment and covers are loose, but have drawstrings
accessories. sewed into the I-inch bottom seam.















(Ed Note-Good thinking! However, don't keep the drawstring tight indoors
unless you've got a real ad dust condition otherwise you might end up
with a condensation problem.)Kentucky
33" 7'


48"



39" AT BOTTOM

(Ed Note--Good thinking! However, don't keep the drawstring tight indoors
unless you've got a real bad dust condition otherwise you might end up
with a condensation problema.)






WHO NEEDS REMINDING? ATC


,i.,* .EAVP....

Dear Half-Mast,
What's the scoop on DA Label 19, the decal that reminded you to check FM 23-65 be-
fore headspacing your 50-cal M2 machine gun? Is this label still in effect, or what?
SSG H. L.
Dear Sergeant H. L.,
Nope, it was washed out by TM 9-1005-213-10 (12 Jul 68) and some vehicle
-10 pubs.
Headspacing's as important as ever, however. So,remind yourself every time
you go to use your M2 that you have to headspace it according to your vehicle's
TM or FM 23-65 -or even PS 197 -whichever is handiest.


SNUG PLUG, REMEMBER?













twal 4w~~LI wrZ


ht irs a lectedd IA of recnt pubs
of interea to organizational maiae-
aana pemonnel This is co plamed
froe recent AG Disribufio Coaner
Butidafrl For compile dWeal e- DA
Pof 3104 (May 68), oad C 5 (Apr
69), TM's, T's, f.;, DA Poa 310.6
(Jul 69), SC and SM'., DA Par 310-7
(Jun 69), MWO's and DA Par 310-9
(Apr 6), COMSEC Publ.

ESCS
TM 3-1040-202-ESC, Apr, ABC-M3A3
Paols Jet Mdec Smoke Gen.
TM 3.1040-204-ESC. Apr. M2AI-7
Ponable Flanm Thro.r
TM 3-4130-200-ESC. Apr. MSA3 Trk
Mid Power Drvn Doaon App.
TM 5-3600 200-ESC. Ma. arhn
Moai g Equip loaders
TM S-4300-TI-ESC, 600 CFM Air
Comproiaors.
TM 5-4610-224-E5C, May, Wolor
Pr.l.tcaTlon Eq.lp
IM 5-5420-204-[5C, May, Mobile
Fery Asiaill Bridge IMOfAB).
TM 5.410-207-TSC, May. Bridge
Iaunc h., IAVLI.
TM S-6100.208-RSC May. I -KW 60
Cyn G.n So..
IM -56100-.09-EC. May 30 KW 60
CycElc Gen Sll.
TM 5-6100-210-ESC. May. 45 KW
400 Cyc Ele Go. Sets
IM 5-6100-512-ESC, May. 5 KW 400
Cyr Ele Gin Sa.l
TM S-400.21.-ESC. M.y. 100 KW
'0 Cyc Elec Gin Sai
rM S-6100 220 ESC. May. 15 KW 60
Cyc Erng Drn Gen 5els
TM i-6100-223-ESC. May jO0 K%
45 KW 00 Clc Elec Gen Sa
rM 9-1005-257-ESC, May. ArIar.e.n
Pod XnMI XM18EI.
TM 9-1005-2627ESC May Armamenl
Subly.anm XM423,24 and XM4


TM 9-1005-298-ESC, May,
Armament Subsystems.
TM 9-1005-304-ESC, Jul, DoS
Wt XM23/24 7.62-MM.
TM 9-1010-207-ESC, May, A
Subsystem MS.
TM 9-1055-205-ESC, May,
John.
TM 9-1055-208-ESC, May,
John.
TM 9-1090-202-ESC, May, A
Subsystem XM21.
TM 9-1090-203-E5C, Apr, A
Subiyl.m XM28.
TM 9-1450-501-ESC, May. X
Hawk Carrier.
TM 9-2320-205-ESC, May,
Carrier.
TM 9-2320-206-ESC, May,
Tractor Truck and M 25 Carg
TM 9-2320-213-ESC, May
M274AI 1 Ton Utility Plalo
Truck (Mule).
TM 9-2320-223-ESC, May,
Carrier.
TM 9-2320-238-ESC, May, I
Recovery Vehcieo.
TM 9-2320-246-ESC, May,
M274A1 1 Ton Platform Tn
(Mule).
TM 9-2350-242-ESC, Apr, M
TM 10-3900-203-ESC, May.
Terrain Forklift Truck.
TM 11-284-ESC, May, AN/C
5, 6, 7, 8 Radios.
TM 11-1510-203-ESC, Apr.
TM 11-1510-203-ESC-1, Apr
TM 11-1510-204-ESC, May,
IB-1C.
TM 11-1520-202-ESC, Apr.
CH-34C.
TM 11-15020203-ESC, May,
TM 11-1520-210-ESC, Apr
IC-1D.
TM 11-2643-ESC, May, AN
44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49 Radios
TM 11-5820-222-ESC/1, M


XM27EI VRC-24 Radio,
TM 11-5820-401-ESC/4, Apr, AN/
or Mid Lt VRC-47 Radio.
TM 11-5820-401-ESC/5, Apr, AN/
rmament VRC-49 Radio.
TM 11-5820-401-ESC/7, May, AN/
Honest VRC-54 Radio.
TM 11-3820-453-E5C, May, AN/
Honot GRC-87, AN/VRC-34 Rodiol.
TM 11-5820-469-ESC, May, AN/TRC-
Armament 80 Radio.
TM 11-5820-498-BSC/1, May. AN/
.mrmenl GRC-125 Radio.
TM 11-5R20-498.ESC/3, May, AN/
M727 VRC-53 Radio.
TM 11-5820498-ESC/4, May, AN/
M76 PRC-77 Radio.
TM 11-5820-667-ESC, May, AN/PRC-
M123 77 Radio.
o Truck. TM 11-5840-201-ESC May, AN/FPS-
M274/ 36,AN/FPS-75.
rm TM 11-5840-335-ESC, Jun, Nik.-Herc.
S TM 11-5895-208-ESC, May, Interro-
16 Raotor 5.S AN/TPX-27.
M578 TM 11-5895-284-ESC, May, OV-1A.
*78 1B.IC
TM 11-6660-204-ESC, May. Radio-
M274/ sonde Recordor AN/TMQ-5, AN/
uck TMQ.5A, AN/TM.-5S, AN/TMQ-SC.

88. TM 55S1510-201-ESC, Jul, U-8.
Rough TM 55-1510-202-ESC, Jul, 0-1.
TM 55-1510-203-ESC, Jul, U-6.
GRC-3, 4, TM 55-1510-204-ESC, Jul, OV-1.
TM 55-1510-205-ESC, Jul, U-l.
U'6A. TM 55-1510-209-ESC, Jul, U-21
U.6A. TM 55-15020202-ESC, Jul, CH-34.
OV-A- TM 55-1520-203-ESC, Jul, CH-37.
TM 55-1520-204-ESC, Jul, OH-13.
CH-34A, TM 55-1520-206-ESC, Jul, OH-23.
TM 55-1520-209.ESC, Jul, CH-47.
CH-378. TM 55-1520-0-210-ESC, Jul, UH-1A--
UH-1B- IC-ID.
TM 55-1520-214-ESC, Jul, OH.6.
/VRC-43, TM 55-1520-217-ESC, Jul, CH-54.
S TM 55-1520-221-ESC, Jul, AH-1G.
ay, AN/ TM 55-1520-228-ESC, Jul, OH-58.


SCRATCH DA 2408-3

More PM time, less paperwork. That's how it stacks up for Organizational

maintenance in DA Msg DCSLOG-LOG/MP-PB to major commands eliminat-

ing use of DA Form 2408-3 effective 1 Oct 69. After that all aircraft maintenance

will be reported on DA Form 2407 each calendar month. For other equipment,

DA 2407 at unit level will report only MWO's and installation of combat vehicle

engines and track, odometers, gun tubes, hourmeters and tachometers at the

time of these maintenance actions.



































SO, YOU'RE GOING
UP TO JOIN OPERATION
RUNNYNOSE, CONNIE?
WHY DON'TCHA HITCH A
RIPE WITH THOSE
TROOPERS!"? THEY'RE
HAUIN' A LOAD OF ELECTRONIC
6TUFF UP THERE!

HOW 'BOUT IT'S A
SOME GOOD ROUGH HAUl-
TIPG ON AHEAD.
WINTER
DRIVING!


LET'S START
WITH THE. "F-NEMYU
FORCES YOU'RE
UP AGAINST.


29









THESE ARE THE
"ENEMY"FORCES
IN ACTION...


I YOU MUST BE IN CONTROL Of TRACTION AND MOMENTUM ALWAYS


MOMENTUM... TOO S
_ TOO SLOW ,
FOR WHEEL
"^SPEE D 1
BREAKS TRACTION




WHEELS SPIN


MOMENTUM

l ,uTOO FAST FOR
Z::-H-_L DLWHEEI SPEED
BREAKS TRACTION




I VEHICLE SKIDS


MOMENTUM
SIN TUNE
C M WITH
* WHEEL SPEED
GOOD TRACTION
mwmmmb9-==:-


EASY SPEED CHANGES AND AS1
FROM CANCELNG TRACTION...A











































F NOW THAT uU TrMT Um lIUAT
YOU'RE
ROLLING a
HOW FAk V 0 o'
AHEAD CAI on *
YOU SEE? o

I ESPOAULY IF YOUR
VISIBILITY IS LIMIIE, UKE
IN A SNOWSTORM.


N


'2







/ 0 GO INTO A CURVE SLOWLY
/ OR CENTRIFUGAL FORCE
WILL PUSH YOU OVER
-


8 8 i aI



These 'Forces" can be friend or foe
When y1ou drive on ice and in snow--
To stca in control,
Whenever Lou roll
Take it easy-keep traction-go slow!


WIEEl DRIVIG..


'THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, LIFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.


DOWN
HILL


nr-


IF YOU WANT TO DII
(^


~CcCC~~191L~8~2










KEEP YOUR EYES
MOVING BE READY TO
STOP AT ALL TIMES. EASE
UP TO A HALT, 20 TO 30
FEET SORT THAT EXTRA
,ROOM IS FOR UNEXPECTEPD J
TROUBLE. JJ


* *. L.f. -,o *, : : ..: .. ... '. ." ; .

REMEMBER... IN CLIMBING A HILL
WE'VE ONLY TWO BIG FORCES
TO HELP.. MOJMENTUM AND
1TRACION C6RIP)... THE MORE
MOMENTUM YOU HAVE THE
LESS TRACTION
YOU'LL NEED.

Good idea to lay back
and let the trucks ?
ahead make it first to
avoid getting STOPPED
halfway up... AND... *


Hit the foot of the hill as I d q
fast as you can safely go,
so when you reach the
peak you've got enough
momentum left to get you
over.


S ? Watch that shift particularly the
downshift. It can break your grip on the
road. Make each shift as smooth as
S"possible.


Slick spots form at hill ,
bottoms, bridges and shady r h l ,..
spots. Roll thru 'em -
smoothly, -


-.9WITH A CONVENTIONAL
T TRANSMISSION, YOU
MIGHT EVEN LUG A BIT AND
GET OVER THE. TOP OF THE
GRAPE IN OWE OR TWO
GEARS HIGHER THAN
YOU'D USE IN DRY
WEATHER.








50, 6ET TO THE TOP OF
THE HILL IN ONE SMOOTH
UNINTERRUPTED FLOW OF
POWER... JUST MAKING
THE CREST... -


DOWN
HILL arT SPE

STARTING DOWN


When you're on a dry road you can shift down to as low a gear as you like,
going down in that gear using your engine as a brake... But on ICE re-
member that the engine holding back your wheels is applying force to 'em
just as brakes do. If this holding force exceeds your road grip, you'll skid.
If you feel your truck start to slide-
speed up your engine until your
wheels are not sliding ... and if you I'
have to use your brakes ... Tap, Tap
Tap' em. 61J/


GOING INTO CURVES -







STOPPING...


UNDER ICY CONDITIONS
TA 1 TlIUE AC CAD TA Cm


LET THE POWER-TRAIN1
SLOW YOU POWNI...




o


L OK, CONNIE,
WE'RE READY
STO ROLL.
SANY MORE
TIPS


CON I
NEVER SLAM OWi
THE BRAKES!! TAP-TAP
'EM so You DON'T LOSE
YOUR TRACTION. FRONT
WHEELS LOCK WITH HEAVY
BRAKING, AND YOU HAVE
NO STEERING,



TIPS... EAH
[KEEP HANDS
ON THE STEERING WHEEL
I. 'LL DO THE SHIFTING.


WeN~D;pept9
'01YORA414


- Am~~~ Yj7~




















When it's as frigid as a well-digger's
ankles, that's the time cold-weather
batteries tangle with Jack Frost for con-
trol of your communications system.
You'll naturally want to give lotsa
warm-and-loving consideration to your
squad radio, AN/PRC-88 (AN/PRT-4,
AN/PRR-9), your man-pack radios,
AN/PRC-25, AN/PRC-77, AN/PRC-
28, AN/PRC-6 and AN/PRC-8
through -10.
And you'll want a few licks of that
ever-loving to rain down on the AN/
GRC-125 and AN/GRC-160 if you're
usin' 'em man-pack style.
That means warm-and-loving bat-
teries to keep your radio set communi-
catin' past the snowflakes.
You'll get that cold-weather power
for your AN/PRC-8 through -10 by
using BA-377/U low temperature bat-
tery, FSN 6135-823-2728, and the MX-
3568/PRC adapter, FSN 5820-856-
3574.
For the AN/PRC-25 and -77 radio
sets, you need the BA-398/PRC-25,FSN
6135-926-3503, battery for low tem-
peratures. To hook up the BA-398 to
the RT-505/PRC-25 and RT-841/PRC-
77 receiver-transmitter, you want CX-
37






8808/G, FSN 5995-901-3647, special
purpose cable assembly. The BA-398 BATTERY
consists of battery units within a carry-
ing vest.
It takes the vest-type BA-376/U bat-
tery to power AN/PRC-6 radio set, plus
the CX-8281/U special purpose cable
assembly to make the connection. This
battery is FSN 6135-823-2727; the TRANSM
cable assembly is FSN 5995-889-1113.
There's no cold-weather battery re-
yOU'LL placement for the AN/PRT-4's BA-
HAVE To 399/U dry battery FSN 6135-926-0845
KEEP THE -and it's the same deal on the BA-
505 UNDER
YOUR COAT 505/U battery FSN 6135-926-0844 for
-A the AN/PRR-9 receiver. There are spe-
IMF cial cable kits, though, CX-11990/PRR-
a9 (FSN 5995-179-8256) and CX-
;,.Si" 11991/PRT-4 (FSN 5995-179-8257).


CABLE



BA-505


What you do with these 2 squad
radio set batteries is pre-heat 'em in a
S--f2. I warm room or hold 'em against your
S' body to unchill 'em. Carry some spares
REPLACE BA-4386 MAG BATTERY / inside your clothing, too.
FOR COLD WEATHER In case you're usin' the new mag-
AN/PRC-25 nesium battery on the AN/PRC-6 (BA-
/ 4270/U, FSN 6135-930-0031) or AN/
PRC-25 and -77, AN/GRC-125, and
0 -160 (BA-4386/PRC-25, FSN 6135-
926-8322), you still switch to cold-
I T clime batteries for matching weather,
even though the magnesium units are
gung-ho for low temperatures.
38












They'll translate that warmth to op-
erational oomph, when it's time to give
their all. Matter o' fact, these vest-type
power pods have been developed to take
advantage of body heat by keeping' dry
cells above 50 degrees F in sub-freezing
areas.
Your authority to order the cold-
weather batteries and accessories is SB
11-576 (Apr 69).


AUTHORrITY








Installation instructions for the bat-
teries are in Ch 5 (Jun 68) to TM 11-
296, AN/PRC-6; Ch 2 (May 63) to TM
11-5820-292-10, AN/PRC-8 through
-10a, AN/PRC-28, TM 11-5820-398-
12, AN/PRC-25, TM 11-5820-667-12,
AN/PRC-77 and TM 11-5820-498-12,
AN/GRC-125, -160.
Cable assemblies 38 inches long con-
nect the AN/PRC-88 radio units and
the batteries when the batteries are car-
ried or worn for warm-up.
You can get instructions in upcoming
changes to TM 11-5820-549-12 on
special purpose electrical cable assembly
(CX-11990/PRR-9, FSN 5995-179-
8256), used with BA-505/U or BA-
4505/U (FSN 6135-935-8630) on the


AN/PRR-9 receiver, and on CX-
11991/PRT-4 cable assembly (FSN
5995-179-8257), used with BA-399/U
on AN/PRT-4 transmitter. A parka
harness and accessories are spelled out
in Ch 5 (Jul 69) to TM 11-5820-549-12.
The 4 in front of the 4505 and other
portable set batteries is the magnesium
version.
You can get instructions on CX-8281
cable assembly, FSN 5995-889-1113,
used with BA-376/U battery on the
AN/PRC-6, in Ch 5 (Jun 68) to TM 11-
296.
In Ch 2 to TM 11-5820-292-10 there
are instructions on the MX-3568/PRC
battery adapter used with BA-377/U on
the AN/PRC-8, -8a, -9, -9a, -10, -10a
nndl .S .


TM 11-5820-398-12 gives the info on
the CX-8808, used with BA-398/PRC
on the AN/PRC-25 and AN/PRC-77.
TM 11-5820-498-12 gives info for the
AN/GRC-125 and AN/GRC-160.
Be sure to match the BA-376/U with
the AN/PRC-6 radio and the CX-8281
cable assembly, because the CX-8281
plug also fits the BA-377/U battery, and
you could damage your radio set using
the wrong battery.
9






While you're taking care of your
cold-time batteries--and vice versa--
bear in mind that your radio set needs
a helping hand, too... in other depart-
ments. Cold departments.
The help it needs is heat, external.
If you're set up in a shelter, or a tent,
and you're equipped with a heater, no
problem. Just keep the set warm and
dry.
For the last gasp in protection from
icy air, make use of a tarpaulin or
blanket as a shield against wintry
blasts when the door is opened. Same
thing goes for a radio set mounted in
a cosed and heated vehicle; the only
problem's the icy blast from the door.


MAN, 1 CATCH
A COLD AND I'M
NEVER THE SAME.








One thing to remember: In low-
degree weather you can't trust your
set's ON-OFF switches.
Which means that merely turning off
your radio set for your engine start may
not hold back power surge.
What you do in such a case is discon-
nect the set from the power supply until
the engine of your vehicle is running.
Remember that everything-yes,
everything-on or in your radio set
can be mighty brittle and vulnerable in
cold, cold weather.
Handle the situation warmly.


FR I_ .-.----- -


Twice as good as anything before it
is a lot better than it ever was.
How's that again?
Well, actually, twice as good is
modest when you're talking about the
BA-4386/PRC-25 magnesium batteries,
now in hard action SEA way.
In certain circumstances, they're a lot
gooder. Like storage ... or hot weather
performance.
Anyway, they're coming everybody's
way eventually, so here's for a hard
look.


The BA-4386 (FSN 6135-926-8322)
replaces the BA-386, which powered
the PRC-25 series sets from way back.
The average life of the BA-4386 is
twice as long as the BA-386, or 55
hours. Actually, in a lot of cases, it's
lasted much longer in field use.
Which is your clue not to toss it when
it racks up only 25 or 30 hours use.
And this dude'll give good perform-
ance anywhere from 0 to 160 degrees F.
Compare that to the "poor" to "fair"
rating of the -386.
Why, man, you can store the -4386
for a year at 130 degrees F and still get
more than 80 percent of its capacity.


I R"

Tn that ith the -386 and you'd kill it
in little more than a week.
\\ which is another point. The -4386
does not need and does not get refriger-
ation in storage or in transit.
You get the idea, so the point won't
be belabored.
SEA has preference on magnesium
batteries, but increased production will
make 'em available all over.
The BA-4505 has already made the
scene for the AN/PRR-9 squad radio
receiver, replacing the BA-505.
Likewise, or on the way, is the mag-
nesium battery for the AN/PRC-6 radio
set, the BA-4270/U, FSN 6135-930-
0031.
Performance is about comparable to
that of the BA-4386 vs the BA-386.
When shipping batteries, keep 'em in
their sealed plastic bags and individual
cardboard boxes. Helps protect against
moisture.
There's a little clue over the recep-
tacle on the BA-4386 which reads:
"TWICE THE LIFE OF BA-386/
PRC-25."
So let it.







PIPSy.5 fI WTR
Considering all the things your AN/
PPS-5 radar set does for you, the things
you have to do for it are small indeed.
Trying to do something you're not
qualified to do can cause a heap of dam-
age. I


IT'S WHAT YOU


While we're with the waveguide horn, re-
member that those aperture windows on
each end have gotta be intact. First, because
they allow RF energy to pass, and second,
they keep out dirt and moisture.
Treat 'em with TC, but if you accidentally
break one, get it replaced.
WINDOW WINDOW


/ SO THE BIGGEST FAVOR
YOU CAN PO IT 15 STAY OUT OF IT
UNLESS YOU ARE AUTHORIZED AND
KNOW WHAT YOU'RE DOING, <
SO, HERE ARE SOME
HOW-TO-DO-ITS.

When you're about to rig the tripod as-
sembly (MT-2958) open the tripod legs
slightly before you remove the AS-2024
waveguide horn and the telescope. There isn't
enough room to get 'em out otherwise.


SWAvGUIDE HORN

Now, easy with the tripod legs when you
spread'em.
Like, you can bust up the rivets if you
spread 'em too much... or you can bend 'em.

RIVET,




Either way the damage makes it hard to
retract or extend the legs and you get
limited operation.


coI


-I
C


-A


Be sure the column assembly (MX-7565)
and tripod leg gear teeth mesh as you insert
the column and before you tighten the wing
screws. Otherwise, you can damage the gear
train.
A c--- // I/-, I


Since the set is top-heavy, ballast the
tripod legs with sandbags or whatever to keep
it firm. If she topples, bet that the waveguide
horn II get hurt. \


When it comes to the pins on the male
connector of the CX-8666 cable, line 'em
up straight, slip 'em in straight.


Be extra caielul when you aline the an-
tenna while it's in motion. Keep your hand
away from the area of the fast slew switch
and the mounting and levelling assembly.
[4 w '


A








S, y e rs

ng mtig n yucnrlx elnteaty


*So, sty a y fm t








ANI typ rue nee mov th e icl


e e r s t is m o i t i

Takeit own


F 7-






'N te tig yo a


BATTERY GENTLE


-----




: -. CI .,


You can keep your Pipsy perkin' when you get its bat'ry working .
A step-by-step poop sheet is packed with each BB-6220/U zinc-silver battery
for your AN/PPS-5 radar set.
If you try your own short cuts chances are great your batteries will make
salvage long before they're due to die.
Following are a few pointers on getting your battery to put out like the pro
it is:
KNOW YOUR BATTERY
All models of the BB-622 have an operating voltage of 6. End of charge volt-
age is 8.1, and end of discharge is 5.2V.
Cost is more than $200 per battery (which makes it no two-bit toy).
The BB-622 plain model has 60-amp-hr capacity and can be charged and dis-
charged 25 times (or, like they say in the trade, it has a life of 25 cycles).
The BB-622A and -B can be charged and discharged 100 times each (cycles,
baby). The A model rates 65-amp-hr and the B goes 80-amp-hr. That amp-hr
bizz, in simple steps, means that the B model f'rinstance'll operate 8 hours at a 10-
amp draw.
45



















The barrern's electrolyte is a corro-
sive solution of potassium hydroxide.
For iou. thar means watch iour skin.
You gorta protect sour etes and skin
when you're senricing the batery .
and know where the medics are if you're
the careless type.
An alkali-proof apron, rubber gloves
and splash-proof goggles or face mask
are the servicing uniform
If you should splash the electrolyte
on sour skin flush it off right now ith
lots of n after. Then. rinse the skin v ith
s negar. lemon juice or a mild acetic
acid mi\ and re-flush nith warer. If
burns develop get to a medic.



Meialad sa ut fyo pls temi n


F' TPIP
DAy



1C





PAI


BETTER
DO A LITTLE
PM ON YOUR
PROTECTIVE
GEAR BEFORE
YOU START.



i,-


STORE THEM DRY
If you're not going to use the bat-
teries for a month or more, don't fill
'em or charge 'em. Store 'em dry. They
last a lot longer, and it's the easiest way
to store 'em since they come to you dry.
Each battery comes with a kit which
has 4 bottles containing the exact
amount of electrolyte you need.





I SPILLED THE NO, NO, N, N If you don't spill the fluid during the
SGOT O OREN... WE ING Bi TE first servicing, the batteries never need
HOW ABOUT I STUFF YOU GET IN another drop during their lifetimes.
MIX A BATCH THE KIT... OR If you do spill some, you can't get
...OR MAYBE YOU KILL IT!! another kit but you can get the electro-
DISTILLED
WATER OR lyte solution (31 percent potassium hy-
SU LFURIC ACID, droxide) with FSN 6810-543-4041.
HUH'??

Well, anyway, the filler kit that comes with the A model battery includes
four 6-oz bottles of electrolyte, a filler cap for said bottles, 2 electrolyte vent
traps, 4 vent cleaners, absorbent cotton, a pair of tweezers, 4 spare sponge
rubber plugs, a battery record card and operating instructions. The B model
has a screw type vent cap with no rubber plug spares or vent traps.
Keep those electrolyte bottles closed till you're ready to use 'em.




FILLING KI

AND, AWAY WE GO
So you're ready to use 'em. Remove the vent trap and sponge rubber plug or
the screw vent cap from each cell. Set 'em aside, because you'll use 'em again.



-eonct the c


W>






If the liquid repeatedly is drawn back into the bottle, wait for the level in the
cell to drop and try again. It could take a couple' extra minutes. Just remember
to keep the bottle in the cell until all the electrolyte is transferred.















Note: You get only two filler cops, so take 'em off before you toss the empty electrolyte
bottle. You can fill 2 cells at once.





When the fill'n-soak operation is fin-
ished, connect the battery to the PP- MAKE A
4127 charger... which supplies a con- NOTE OF
STARTING TIME
stant 6 amps and stops when the full AFTER YOU
charge voltage of 8.1 is reached. Never MAKE SURE
use anything else to charge your BB- YOUR
622's and keep the cover off the battery CHARGING
CURRENT IS
so you can see gassing and smoke. AT 6 AMPS.
"I I I It | ,1'1 I' "1 i~iiT~










To carg fuly he irs tie, ormor
hor r eee ha' h ount h
starting time.r
Whnte P42 ct f, ee t.I h
batr' fly(are tllso ganwti
severalminutes


VENT CAP


Should charging time exceed 16 hours on the plain and A models, suspect a
short. The B model may take 24 hours. Heavy gassing in any of the 4 cells, with
the charger operating, is a good clue that a cell's shorted "
Turn in shorted batteries. .

IN-SERVICE CHARGING
Instructions on the charger itself clue you on re-charging the battery once you
put it in service. Just remember to reset the charger once it kicks off, to be sure
you've fully re-charged the battery.
Just like on the initial charge, it'll kick off in a couple' minutes if the battery's
up. In-service charging should take a minimum of 6 hours. Otherwise, turn
it in.
SERVICEABILITY


49


If the charger stops in less than 8 hours and
keeps cutting out when you reset it, clean the
cell tops and terminals; be sure the vent holes
aren't clogged, and replace any sponge rub-
bet plug which might've become too saturated
with electrolyte. You (an also wash, dry and
replace the same plug. Check the top terminal
nuts for tightness.
If the battery still doesn't charge properly,
turn it in.






The storage life of the battery is in-
definite. If it can put out 50 percent or
more of original capacity, it's alive.
Dry storage (which is preferred)
should give up to 5 years' shelf life, de-
pending on whether you can keep
the storage temperature below 90
degrees F.
Storing batteries with electrolyte and
in the charged condition knocks them
in the head. At 5 percent per month de-
terioration, you can kill a battery in 10
months .. the time it takes to reduce
them to 50 percent of original capacity.


5 YEAR I IWET STORAGE
STORAGE LIFE I ijl" 18 MONTH
STORAGE LIFE

If you've gotta store 'em wet, store
em discharged. If you can keep the
temperature below 75 degrees F you
can store 'em that way for up to 18
months and still have a usable battery.


I I I10 IV III il
Check the top terminal nuts periodically. They should have 30 to 40 in-lbs
of torque on them.
The nut on the base of each cell terminal is preset. Forget it.




2 o fl," to' f the Iie f baIttery.






HANDY HANDLE HANGUP


Look sharp now, man! You may find a slight overhang on one or both sides
of some of the new handles you've installed on your RT-524 or RT-246 receiver-
transmitter per MWO 11-5820-401-20/1 (Jan 69).
That's what's goofin' up the fit between the R-T and the MT-1029 mount. On
some of the modified components you can't push the R-T all the way back on the
MT-1029 after you've installed the handles.


HANDLES


SSOLUTION: FILE DOWN HANDLES

Take these R-T units with handles installed to your DS and have them lightly
file the outside edges of the lower portion of the handles until the R-T unit slides
snugly into the mount.


ANTENNA ALERT
Lower whip sections for the AT-912 and AS-1729 antennas are not inter-
changeable, in case you're trying the big switch. The AT-1096 (for AT-912) and
AS-1730 sections have different threads. If your requisition for an AT-1096 was
kicked back as "out of stock," try again. New stock has been procured.
51












KEEP THE FLUID FLOWING


Before the temperature drops and the
snow flies give the center frame of your
old reliable Sioux (OH-13) the big look.
You know what happens when water
collects in the hollow tube and it
freezes? Pow!! The tube splits and your
bird is in big trouble.
So, when you go over the frame look
for any signs of corrosion which could
mean you have an un-sealed frame.
If holes were drilled for attachment
of fittings or brackets, focus on the
retaining rivets.


A frame that's not sealed at the rivets
will let moisture into the tubing. When
a bird with an un-sealed frame has been
on the scene as long as the Sioux has it's
bound to collect water.
Be a doubting Thomas if you suspect
the frame is faulty. Contact your sup-
port. They have X-ray, compressed air
and other equipment to really give it a
good going over.
To keep the frame bone-dry follow
this poop in para 4-25 of TM 55-1520-
204-20 (Jun 66). Never, but Never,
drill any holes in the center frame.

ATTHE FIRST SIGN OF A BAD
FRAME GET THE BIRD BACK
TO SUPPORT,.


f~-


SAME WEAR LIMITS


Dear Specialist E.C.G.. S
Right you are!
The exhaust manifold limits given for the 0-435 also apply
to your 0-335 engine.
To plug a gas leak when flange warpage is within 0.010-in,
use gasket, P/N 17545, FSN 2810-118-1734, listed in Fig 62
of TM 55-1520-204-20P (Nov 68).


The only thing worse than low hydraulic pressure
is none at all!!
Which is just what'll happen to your Sioux (OH-
13E, G ) if you put on a wrong replacement pump.
Pump, FSN 1650-945-3957, shown in Fig 125 of
TM 55-1520-204-20P (Nov 68) rotates clockwise
and is listed as a replacement for FSN 1650-524-
9430... 'taint so.
The E and G model engines have a counterclock-
wise accessory drive which means that only counter-
clockwise rotating pump, FSN 1650-524-9430, will
deliver the fluid.
So, be sure "no substitute acceptable" goes on your
pump requisition.


OUS FSN 1650-524- 43M
ON E, G MODELS














One good way to save wear, tear and damage to U-6A Beaver seat slides and
bungee cords is to clean and graphite the seat slides every periodic.
Just takes a jog of the memory cells and a few minutes time.
And, since we're on the lube kick, a simple tightening of the piston gasket
nut is all you need to heal any prop oil leak or drip that develops.


TIGHTEN
GRAPHITE THE
THE PISTON
SEAT l GASKET
SUDES NUT
(INSIDE)


BRACE AGAINST BELLY PAIN

OH
MY ACHIN'
BELLY!

Seems some fly-types are forgetting' to
put the support tube brace on their UH-
1C helicopter's external stores rack.
SAnd, without it that weighty arma-
ment can give the bird a belly-ache.
The brace helps carry the load and
keeps the rack from cracking the hard
BRACE points.
So, when the armament is hooked up
make sure the brace is in place on both
sides of the chopper.
O'course, the brace should never be
used for a step 'cause an Army-type is
making himself ready for a mean
mishap.
54









LEAK 5EEP

SEEP
Dear Windy, SEEP?
Some aircraft maintenance manuals I;
say that oil and hydraulic leakage is
not acceptable but seepage is OK.
The trouble is, the TM 55-405-series
engineering manuals don't cave any
standard seepage limits.
Do you, Windy?
SP5 P.A.B. LEAK?

Dear Specialist P.A.B.,
You really know how to put a guy on the spot!!
A leak, of course, is a continuous flow. A seep is a now-and-then deal and limits
are sometimes given in a maintenance pub.
Take the collective pitch control hydraulic cylinders on the Huey D and H
Model. TM 55-1520-210-20 (May 69) para 6-63G says that seepage around the
piston rod seals is permissible but should not exceed 1 drop for every 25 cycles.
When you consider that bird manufacturers use different engines, transmis-
sions, gear boxes and hydraulic components it's nigh-on to impossible to come
up with standard seepage limits.
The usage factor has a bearing on seepage. Idle birds with dry seals have been
known to leak like a sieve when cranked up. Even contraction of a cold gear box
can give up seepage while expansion of a heated gear box will seal the seep.
If you find yourself wiping up a little too often -or a sight gage goes from
FULL to ADD OIL after every flight, chances are some seals need changing.
So, deciding when a drip-drip-drip has to be stopped is up to you, backed
up by your maintenance officer. /4)



A NALYZER OUT TESTER IN
If you birdmen have an ignition analyzer collecting dust in Tool Set, Aircraft
Organizational Maintenance, Set B or Set C, you can turn it in.
The analyzer, FSN 4920-930-3569, has been replaced by ignition coil tester,
FSN 4920-111-0036, for use on recip engines. SC 4920-99-CL-A71 (4 Feb 69)
has the new word.
Just like the analyzer, tho, the tester doesn't come with a new tool set. The
word authorizing one has to come from the Overseas or CONARC commander.
55






(MM7hK


NO TAG NEEDED


Dear Mr. A.R.C.,
The governing pub for tagging first aid kits and fire extinguishers in aircraft
is TB 750-126 (May 67) on materiel condition tags and labels for aeronautical
equipment.
Para 4h says that when serviceable items are placed in service the tag may be
removed and destroyed unless the tag is required by technical pubs or directives
to stay with the item until used or the condition of the item changes. Aircraft first
aid kits and fire extinguishers are given as examples.
TB 55-1500-308-25 (Aug 67) put out by the Aviation Systems Command, re-
quired a tag for the first aid kit.
AVSCOM has never published anything calling for a tag on aircraft fire extin-
guishers.
'Course the purpose of a tag is to record inspections.
Para 152 of TM 55-405-3 (Jul 66) calls for a weight check of the CF3BR cyl-
inder every six months and replacement if the weight loss is 4 ounces or more. This
inspection is recorded on the log book DA Form 2408-18. ,)


STOPS COVER CHAFING





Don't fret if your Huey or HueyCobra is suffering from a case of driveshaft
cover chafing. Get rub strip, P/N 209-030-203-43, FSN 9330-851-5379, for the
tail rotor driveshaft access cover. You want anti-chafe tape, P/N 549, FSN 8135-
923-0591, for the vertical fin access cover.






MIXING LUBES IS OUT)









Keeping )our Hue Cobra (AH.-IG purring like a cat bird is the most. So,
leave off with the mixing of lubricants.
When the temp's -320 C (-250 F) or above, feed the bird MIL-L-23699 oil
in the engine, transmission, gearboxes and rotor hubs.
When the temp's below -32 C, change it to MIL-L-7808-type.
After making the necessary oil change, do like it says in the U.S. Army Avi-
ation Systems Command TWX AMSAV-R-EOP-4-1339 (18 Apr 69) and change
decals or stencils to read:
MIL-L-23699 oil ABOVE 32 C ambient temp
MILL-7808 oil BELOW 32 C ambient temp

CHOKING CHOCTAW

FULL OF FUEL- BUT OUT
A stuck fuel selector valve in the con-
S U RP trol pulley assembly for that Choctaw
I-- (CH-34) can run the bird outta gas
4 '. faster than a run down a drag strip.
That's how it is when the assembly
gets damaged from dripping BB-433
battery electrolyte.
During the Intermediate or Periodic
when that powdery or crusty corrosion
(HECK is spotted around the battery caps,
DEEPER! whisk it away... then, look deeper into
IS THE the bird, like, at the pulley assembly.
PULLEY 'Cause electrolyte seepage through the
ASSEMBLY battery's vent hoses will botch 'er up.
FREE OF When it's time to switch to the aft
CORROSION? fuel tank the pitted pulley won't make
it, leaving that CH-34 with a full-but-
empty feeling.









F HE'D P The oil breather cap on the AN-M4/
WROTE'OIL0 B & AN-M4/C flame thrower compres-
ON THIS COVER sors looks like a gas tank cap-big and
T NEVER WOULD
HAPPENEP. round and easy to get off .., and guess
TSK, TSK, TK. what?
Right! Some Joe's have poured gas
into it.
Gasoline in crankcases smears en-
gines. Conn rods fuse to crankshafts,
engines freeze-and the whole bucket
can go Ba-Roo-OO-OOM!
So, in white letters at least a half-inch
high, paint "OIL" on the cap with white
semi-gloss paint (TT-E-508). It'll keep
-somebody from fuelin' around the
S wrong hole.

TRIM THE OVERHANG
~ OVERH HEY WHO BROKE
0 1;* OVERHANG THE PLATE ON THE
FIRE CONTROL BOX?






On some M132 and M132A1 SP *
flame throwers, there's a slight over-
hang on the name plate on the fire con-
trol box. Hooking the overhang can
gash your clothes or hide, and it'll also TRIM
damage the plate. OVERHANG
Some plates are made of light alumi- NAME PLATL
num, others of plastic, so you can even
things up easy enough by filing or cut- Check your flame thrower soonest
ting back the overhang. Just trim the and start trimming, if needed. Replac-
plate back even with the sides of the ing a damaged fire control box name
box wherever there's overhang. plate is a job for support.






M11 DECON CAUTION
You're to use only one nitrogen cyl-
USE OY inder to pressurize the Ml1 portable
OF decon. That goes at all temps.
The warning note on page 8, and on
the inside front cover of TM 3-4230-
204-12 (Nov 68) mentions 2 cylinders
for a load ... but, that's not 2 cylinders
back-to-back.
In cold weather (- 10* F), for exam-
ple, if one nitrogen cylinder doesn't
H empty the container, then you can re-
pressurize the M 1 with a second cylin-
der. But, using 2 cylinders back-to-back
may deform the container.


USE NUT AND BOLT


Dear Half-Mast, ---
We got some immersion heaters,
FSN 4540-266-6835, without the stud
and nut for the draft gate, FSN 4540-
555-8530. Are there FSN's for these
items so we can order them?
SFC D. H. F.

.&&-. =-~E


Dear Sergeant D. H. F.,
That stud and nut are no longer
furnished with the draft gate and
they do not have FSN's. As a substi-
tute you can use a bolt, FSN 5305-
012-0628, and a nut, FSN 5310-
013-1395.
The heaters with draft gates are
being phased out, to be replaced
with heaters with cup-type lighters.

-#-llAat











THERE ARE TWO WAYS TO
CLEAN YOUR ARMOR VEST
1 THE SHOWER BATH WAY.,
AND BY HANP WASH/
BUT IP THE VINYL IS
'f' -. U PUNCTURED--TURN IT IN.

.t %"y','J --SeOW
, 0 P j METI
d --


THEN TAKE YOUR
CLOTHES OFF AND
PUT ON YOUR
VEST

NEXT GET IN A STREAM OR UNDER
A SHOWER TO WET IT THOROUGHLY


t-


OPEN SIDE TINI UK
FLAPS BUILDING
TIPS
* When adjusting those side laces be sure you
leave space for ventilation ... and don't lace
em too light.
* Use those protective flaps to cover the opening
under the side laces
* If vinyl envelope around the ballistic filler is
punctured-turn the vest in.


~:r r ~


'- TO HAND WASH

h@ .V TO HAND WASH






THOSE COMMERCIAL PUBS... I
-IL[ MEANWHILE, I
NO. I PON'T HAVE GOT Six PIECES OF
THE EQUIPMENT... I EQUIPMENT ON
JUST ENJOY READING PEAPLINE FOR
MANUALS. LACK OF INFO!




-'






When you "borrow" a pub from a piece of equipment, you could cause it to be
deadline for lack of maintenance information or lack of parts.
Each piece of equipment is supposed to have one copy of the equipment
manual shipped with it. Sometimes it's a TM, and sometimes it's a manufac-
turer's manual.
Those manufacturer's manuals are often printed in just the number needed
to go with the equipment-and no spares. So, you can't order another copy from
the St. Louis AG Pubs Center like you do your Army TM's.
You may get several pieces of equipment that are alike and you may not need
all of the manuals. Store the extras so you'll know where they are, because
you turn in the manuals when you exchange the equipment for other models.
When you send your equipment to support for repair, lend them a copy of the
manual too, but keep track of it.
If you need a manufacturer's manual for your equipment, better order a copy.

MANUFACTURER'S PUBS

Here're the addresses you use to ask for manufacturer's manuals on your equip-
ment-if there're no Army TM's.
S" Order From:
Typical Equipment
Generators DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
Compressors DEPARTMENT OF T E ARMY
Tractors Commanding General
Cranes OFFICIAl BUSINESS U.S. Army Mobility Equipment Command
Watercraft ATTN: AMSME-RTR-R
Refrigeration 4300 Goodfellow Boulevard
Air Conditioning St. Louis, Mo. 63120






Tools ommandini
Weapons U S Army W
Test Equipment ATIN AMSW
lock Island
Command
Aircraft U.S. Arm
Ground-Handling ATTN: A
Equipment P.O. Box
Energizers St. Louis,

Con
Missiles and U.S.
Related Equipment ATT
Red
Comn
Communications Equipment U.S. A
Radar ATTN
Test Equipment Fort ,
"Con
Ammunition U.S
Chemical Equipment ATT
Dov

Trucks
Trailers
Tracked Vehicles


Check DA Pamphlet 310-4, Tech Pubs Index first to be sure there's no Army
TM on your equipment. If not, fire off a request.


O USE THE RIGHT PUB


Your M2 burner unit, FSN 7310-842-9247, was designed to fit the M1937
range cabinet or the M1959 cabinet. But when you're ordering parts for your
M2 burner, make sure you use TM 10-7360-204-12 (Feb 68). The parts for the
old type burner (the one with the three valves in a row) are not interchangeable
with the M2 burner, and neither are the operating instructions. So if you have
an M2 burner, stick to your TM dated Feb 68.


g General Y 'I: OU SURE
weapons Command I~~ IWITHERE'S NO
,rSMM a II~l~~S ARMY TM
111 61701 j ON THAT
ding GeneralITM
y Aviation Systems Command
ISAV-R-MC
209 -- Main Station
Mo. 63166
maonding General
Army Missile Command
N:AMSMI-SMP (NMP)
stone Arsenal, Ala. 35809
landing General
irmy Electronics Command 1
:AMSEL-ME-NMP-AD
lonmouth, N.J. 07703
nmanding General
Army Munitions Command
'N: AMSMU-SM-M(
rer, N.J. 07801






BRIDGE LAUNCHER NUMBER

WHEN YOU MEAN, A
ISATANK TANK-LIKE VEHICLE
A ...OR A TANK?
VTAN 4BIG DIFFERENCE.











A tank is a tank.
But a tank-like vehicle that transports and launches a bridge goes by another
name--and number.
That's the story on all the items classed as Launcher, AVL, Bridge on category
line 720310 in TM 38-750.
The tracked vehicle chassis plus hydraulic and launching components make up
a bridge launcher. And the launcher should be identified on all equipment rec-
ords and reports by the name and serial number of the launcher. Do not use the
name and serial number of the vehicle chassis-which is just a component-or
the USA registration number.
The launcher serial number is on a data plate at the left side of the boom mount.
Make sure its DA forms say so in the serial number blocks.


(HECK THE DATA PLATE







-K ':,:.-Y
















auew Rie t?7 Battery 7

To prevent important TAERS info from
going down the drain make sure your
aircraft's serial number on the side of
the fuselage, in col b of the DA Form
1352 and in block 4 of the DA Form
2408-8 is the same. If not, DA Cir No.
750-31 (4 Sep 69) will clue you on how
to get the correct number.
Inhto 7r
Remember to use corrosion inhibitor
FSN 6850-753-4967 when you add
antifreeze (ethylene glycol) to your
equipment's cooling system. The only
time you can skip the inhibitor is when
your equipment is protected with arctic
grade antifreeze. Para 5 of TB 750-651
(Nov 68) has the word.


Your vehicle-mounted radio set have
a mini-box MX-7778(A)/GRC electrical
transient suppressor? TM 11-5915-223-
12 (Jan 69) has the PM story.

Get 74e atest
You aircraft types can get the low-
down on repairman MOS structure, and
lots more, by running your peepers over
Ch 2 (4 Apr 69) to FM 1-10 on Army
aviation organizational maintenance.
Don't miss it!


Battery choices for your AN/PSM-6A
and -6B multimeter got you puzzled?
What you need is 1 BA-1326 (FSN
6135-577-8309) and 1 BA-1328 (FSN
6135-274-4035) drop-in battery to
power your meter. The plain model,
AN/PSM-6, takes 1 BA-1085 battery,
FSN 6135-295-2613, soldered in.
Peaoate&ed PVt
Aircrewmen take care of your
armor vest and it'll take care of you.
Maintain the body armor according to
the info in DA Pam 750-12 (10 Mar 69).

97S5 7T S5ee y
To replace light bulbs in your electric
floodlight sets, FSN 6230-299-5879,
order lamp, incandescent, FSN 6240-
155-7772. Those electric floodlight sets
are part of your aircraft ground han-
dling and servicing shop set, SC 1730-
99-CL-A04.

Cap 7Te Oae
When you air types pack one of
those T-53 engine fuel controls, be sure
you use high-pressure caps to retain
the preservative oil. Aluminum foil, tape
or paper won't hack it. Bird organiza-
tional maintenance pubs tell you where
to use the caps.


Would You Stake Your Life 'on
the Condition of Your Equipment?


-Se








BEFORE
YOU
SHIFT
~ .GEARS
Prevent
Gutted
^^^^HHliHBH