<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Main
 Back Cover














PS
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00050
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1969
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00050

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8-9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12-13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18-19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22-23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26-27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38-39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44-45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60-61
        Page 62-63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text









.,,ER,
SIR... Att,
0 ER ... HOW
1969 Series SooN DOYou
REALLY NEEP
THE PATA
ON THE
FIRE MISSION
Y'JUST GAVE
US?
















B



I

L. 6I




I, U










Half-Mast just got back from dropping in on
a lot of outfits in Southeast Asia. And did he
run into power generator problems! Every unit
he jawed with had generator maintenance
problems out the gazoo ... until he got to one
little ol' towed 105-MM howitzer battery.
"Generator problems?" the Man said.
"None here. You see, we do PM on our gener-
ators like this and haven't had a generator go
out in the 8 months I've been here:"


FULL-TIME
OPERATOR...
that's all
he does.


IN THIS ISSUE

FIREPOWER 2-21
FlC 24 M63 Fuz Stter II
FDAC-Testln 2&11 FADAC Generator 12-28
MA240-10 21


GROUND MOBILITY 22-27
MO17. -11 22- M551 Sheridan 25-
Traoed Fording MI16. M06MA]
Tips 24 Carder "2I27


DIRT... keep it cleaned
off constantly. Blow out
control box with com-
pressed air to prevent
build-up that catches
moisture and sets up a
~ short.

STRAIN FUEL.

DRAIN SEDIMENT BOWL
DAILY. CHANGE OIL PER
THE LO... on the small
generators that's 25
hours when in the real I
dusty dry season. And
make sure all oil con-
tainers and utensils are
absolutely clean. Oil
level is checked every 5
hours.


GROUND ROD DOWN DEEP
... at least 9 feet long
and all connections kept
tight.


ALTERNATE GENERATORS
... to spread the load
and allow time for PM.


Maybe that list will give some other
units on idea ... or two.


COMMUNICATIONS 37-48
OB attenes 37 SHrhlSeh mi i 4445
A 61ORC-IO6 3840 Pipsy- 48
eno Search- Squa Radio
liiht 41-43 Part 47148




AIR MOBILITY 49-61
AlrcaLTTool Kit 49-5 Control Tube 5U
Meuscalro eo1




COMBAT SUPPORT/EQUIPMENT
MI Std Engines 6B2. New Publlcatloni 28
M2 Burner 64 Supply 9.1.,4559.61


tsea f fends for PlrintingO tl i 111 pa1iv11
ise bas bsen approved by Heanqaarten.
.iqtsuet ol theAry. 21 rsbrwye 1 .18
* .1ISTBUTIDN: In aeterdncde wttb eM
qbj ftnet subritted en DA es or124 .,


44 : K 40.f-]r
*W2 1


Thi Ouf *


ir






FADAC FIELD ARTILLERY
DIGITAL AUTOMATIC COMPUTER- P

Your M18 gun direction computer (FADAC) is
due some fairly simple PM checks. But, don't be
misled ... the easy stuff is the kind of PM that pro-
tects the computer's guts, keeps it ready to compute
firing data at the flip of a switch, and guards the
costly gear against unusual near and damage. So, .
you ha1e to stay alert to its daili PM needs.



,IRE -.-- -- ..
FIREPOWER1


EY


K>


-.' 1,


LIKE-CLEAN AND DRY
In fact, when you're out in the open, you'll more'n
likely have to set up a barrier of some kind to ward
off the dust and dampness. You'll need soft, clean
rags and a clean, stiff-bristled brush to keep things
dust free and dry.
When temps change fast and frequently, you've
got to be extra careful about drying the equipment.


S"KC C
...KEEP00
LL In damp weather or a moist climate run
TimES the computer at least a couple of hours a
da to dry up the moisture that ma: collect ''
inside. If you forget the daily warm-up, the
moisture will damage the computer or short
it out. and then where'll \ou be?
"2.
'p,,a .' ""


I'3


-as


ouT
* HERE
I WHERE
WEAT iER
CHANGES
FAST
PROTECT
IN FFCM,
CAr.PNESS,
AND


4-f


A FRONT


S


I "


7 7.~T~


I PROTECT


M18 UN
DIRECTION
COMPUTER


-*,MORE






Brush and wipe the console panels
daily and pay special attention to the
switches, buttons and keys. If the matrix
buttons stick or bind, clean them good
and then give them a dab of alcohol to
clean out the sticky grime around them.
Never force sticky buttons or keys.
Have them checked by the organiza-
tional maintenance types. Watch your
muscle power on knobs and switches.
You'll bust 'em for sure if you force
them past their normal stops.


FILTER CARE


HERE'S HOW
TO REMOVE THE
FRONT FILTER.


Cleaning the air filters daily protects
the memory as well as the rest of
the computer. Clogged air filters block
the air intake and the memory will
overheat.
When you're in a real dusty, sandy
area you may have to clean the filters
3, 4 or more times a day.
Clogged filters keep dust blowing
through the computer. It builds up and
interferes with cooling and causes
shorts and wear. Dust'll also get into
the board sockets and keep the circuit
boards from making good contact.
That's why you have to keep a spare
set of good filters on hand... so you can
keep operating while the dirty set gets
cleaned and dried.


Just grab its edge easy
like and pull straight out.







Slide the smaller filters, which run across
the bottom of the computer, out the sides of
the case.






You an easily clean the filters by swishing them around in clean, soapy water
... but be sure they're good and dry before you use them.

SYEAH... YOU
o -CAN USE AIR
P Z TO BLOW THE DIRT
S. OUT... BUT TH E
ALUMINUM MESH
TYPE FILTERS ARE
PROTEIN YOUR C D AE... So,
I eE VERY
EYECAREFUL.


Replace a filter if the element is GROUND
crushed or the filter's damaged in any ROD BACKO
(ASE
way.
The extra set of filters is stored inside
the computer's back cover. When you
remove the back cover fasten it to the
front cover that'll box in the filters SPARE
and also keep both covers clean inside. FILTERS

AIR CONDITIONING

CHECK THE
AIR INTAKE!












Make sure the ventilation blowers keep working. To check the steady air
intake, just place a hand under the front edge of the console, near the filters, or
check the exhaust vents on the back of the computer case.
Take care the air intake's not blocked by anything outside the computer.
Remember, when the temperature light (on the trouble indicator panel) is on,
the temp is OK, but when the light starts blinking it's telling you the computer
is overheating.






You always remove the back cover
when you're operating the computer...
except when the temperature is 220 F.,
or colder-then the cover stays on.
With the back cover removed the BACK COVER


The hot sun will increase the com-
puter's heating problems and it can
hurt the memory, so always shade the
computer from the direct blast of the
sun.

IN COLD AREAS KEEP
BACK COVERS ON SO THE WARMED
AIR WILL RECIRCULATE INSIDE THE
CASE ... AND BY THE WAY, ONLY ONE
BLOWER RUNS WHEN THE COVER ISN0

HANDS OFF

You never, ever remove panels, connectors, fasteners, screws, bolts or any-
thing else on the computer that you're not authorized to monkey with. Likewise,
you never get into the computer case.

HOLD IT...
NEVER GO INTO
THE CASE OR
MESS WITH SCREWS
OR CONNECTORS.













GROUND

Knobs, switches, keys, windows, nixies, panels and assemblies, connectors, re-
ceptacles, etc., are tested, repaired and replaced by your organizational mechanics.






You're authorized to change indicator lamps on the control panel, though, so
keep an eye out for burned-out bulbs and put in good ones. To swap lamps,
unscrew the lens from the panel carefully, pull out the bad lamp, slip a good
one into the lens, and screw the lens back into the panel easy like.


LATCHES/CONNECTORS/ CAPS/CABLES


Keep cops on all cable connectors you
don't use to protect 'em from dust, damp-
ness and damage.
Brush or dean the connectors, receptacles
and caps as needed and keep the cables from
getting kinked or crushed.


Take it easy with the computer case latches.
Snap 'em open and shut carefully or you'll
bust 'em. Keep them fastened down right
when the covers are on, and press the latch
catch back out of the way when the covers are
off. Same goes with the computer hold-down
clamps on the table.


DID YOU COMPUTER GROUND
SINK THAT
GROUND ROD
L PEEP ENOUGH?


Be sure the ground jack is inserted
into the computer ground connector,
and drive the ground-strap rod into the
ground under, or near, the table,






GENERATOR POWER
The transient light on the trouble indicator panel
stays on when the generator is working right and
the power output is right (208 volts, 3-phase at 400
cycles). If the light goes to blinking, and pressing
the reset button doesn't check the flashing, then
you've got power line troubles or the computer's
being robbed somehow. So, turn the computer OFF
and start troubleshooting the power hook-up. See
page 12, for generator care, hook-up and operation.


When you move from one location to another, handle the computer carefully.
And, if you're moving in a vehicle lash the computer case down real good.
Some outfits use a salvage mattress under their FADAC's case to help prevent
damage on real rough roads.
To pull up stakes you disconnect the I
power cable from the generator and
from the computer. Wind the cable on OMPUTER
its reel and replace all caps on the con- POWER
nectors and receptacles. C
Disconnect the table's cable from the
computer and pull out the computer's
ground.
Unhook the table hold-down clamps to release the computer. Put on the
front and back covers (easy-like) and remove the computer carefully from the
table.
Cap all the receptacles and connectors and anchor the table's cable in its
storage clips under the table. Retract the table legs and fold 'em up like for
storage.
The table, cable and reel assembly and the generator, of course, also need
careful loading and transporting care. That way, everything will arrive safe
and ready to go to work when you get to your new location.
PUBS
Your FADAC's covered by TM 9-1220-221-10 (Sep 64), TM 9-1220-221-
20/1 (Nov 65), TM 9-1220-221-20/2 (Jan 64) and the -20P (Jan 69).
FM 6-3-1 (Jun 68) and FM 6-3-2 (Oct 67) give you the scoop on operating
the computer.


/A L-nKI IV/ k y I U Iu w y'uV u U- uV- I--
GUIDE YOU! computer tape reader by testing it with
the FSN 1220-179-6122 mechanical
reader diagnostic routine with cannon
and rocket program tapes!





NIXIE TESTING

1. Press the PROG ITEST 2. Push the "3" button
button... and the key- ... and the automatic
board IN/OUT lamp testing of nixies be-
goes on. gins.






CHECKING THE TAPE READER


1. Put the tape in the
reader.


2. Push the "E" and "5" 3. Press the "SM" (sam- 4. Push the "0" button 3 times
matrix buttons, pie matrix) key. and then press the "Enter"
l '"' key.

0. ;...1 -..2..3_



The tape reader will start reading the tape.




at the tape in the reader.

sh the "H" and 3. Press th "SM" (sam 4. Push the "0" button, 5. Finally press the
atrix buttons. pe matrix) key. then the "8" button ter" key.
and then the 0 but-
ton again.
.-





REA ER VV.ILL
START READING
THE TAPE.






SPOTTING THE ERRORS ON BOTH
If your cannon or rocket program tape doesn't read right at any stage of the
game, you'll know in a flash.
If the reader goofs on the first part of the tape, the reader will stop and the
ERROR lamp will flash on the front panel.

ERROR





0 c


If the reader goofs on the second part of the tape, the reader will stop and
the NO SOLUTION light will flash.
But, no stops and no flashes means your tape reader goes to the head of the
class.
You'll find more on this business in the FM's on the M18 gun direction com-
puter-FM 6-3-1 (14 Jun 68) for cannon application, and FM 6-3-2 (19 Oct
67) for rocket application.


Some M63 fuze setters hit the field with a
couple of loose screws. So check yours
soonest if it's giving you problems.
The screws must be good and tight, or
else the handle will come loose or the clutch
inside the fuze setter will turn, and the fuze
setter won't work right.














rs


~ I:~c~c~j~
~r- ~


*1
'' ''

'PSmts, ~~-I: I JJ)



3c~
Ti


'7-


rt^.- ~i
Ah- &


SIT'S
Z SET
UP,
SARGE


NOW,
7 LET'S
DO IT BY
THE
NUMBERS.


It most definitely means rotating your 2 generators on a regular scneauile t
spread the work load and give you and the maintenance types time to do right
by both generators.
Let's take a close look at the kind of care that'll keep your generators in top
shape and your FADAC working for you.
Maintenance and operations scoop for the power end of the generator is in
TM 5-6115-271-15 and its -20P. The engine is covered by TM 5-2805-203-14,
its companion LO and -24P. Basic operating instructions are given on the data
plate on top of the power control box.
The generator takes log book forms 2408-3, -7, -8 and 2409. Use DA Form
2404 for PM checks and 2407 to request maintenance.
13


EWV FACE IT- N
FAPAC TYPES!
WITHOUT A GO-GO
GENERATOR YOU'LL BE
COMPUTING FIRE DATA THE
HARD WAY WHILE A
COSTLY FAPAC SITS
THERE DOING NOTHIlNG.'
i GlVE THE 3 KW 400 Hz
GENERATOR
A LITTLE SPECIAL
SCARE-- IT'LL PAY f
OFF!!
' THAT MEANS...





GENERATOR SET-UP


Set the generator up so it stays level
and anchor it so it won't slide away.
The right engine oil level is critical for
engine safety and proper operation. If
the generator's on a slant, it can't get
the lube it needs.
The air-cooled engine needs good
ventilation from all sides at all times.
It relies on the flywheel fan and the
normal circulation of air around it for
cooling, so don't crowd it... ever. Give
it air. Keep your sandbag revetment
and roof at least 2 feet away.
Keep the generator site clear of
trash, dry grass, leaves and anything
else that'll blow about and pile up on
the generator. Keep a fire extinguisher
handy.
Do your best to shield the generator
from sand, dust and dampness. Dust
and sand will damage the stator, the
rotor and fan assemblies, grind away at
the flywheel assembly and other mov-
ing parts, clog the engine air filter,
breathers, vents and cylinder cooling
fins.


ON THE WIRING
INSIDE THE GENERATOR'S
CONTROL BOX... IF THE GRIME
THAT COLLECTS GETS PAMP, THE
COMBINATION'LL CAUSE SHORTS
THAT'LL KILL YOUR GENERATOR
\ -AND THERE GOES YOUR
FAVAC/ TOO!


To keep thgnrao
fro eain it ow dus

n sucin up ditrih






To ground the generator use a 9-foot, 5/8-in solid rod (or
3/4-in pipe), sunk some 8 feet into the ground. Use No. 6
AWG copper wire from the generator ground terminal to
the rod. Page 105 of TM 5-6115-271-15 lists grounding (ONNECT
material. GROUND
rl-t. IF YOU HAVE
70 IMPROVISE
A AROUND ...USE
WHAT'S HANDY, BUT,
USE ONE... IT'S
A MUST FOR 1
BOTH YOU ANP
YOUR GENERATOR.




IRENGINE AIR-OI1-FUEL


AIR--You just can't rely solely on
the air filter service signal to warn you
when the filter's clogged. It may not
always pop out at the right time. If it's
real dusty in your area you have to
check and clean the air filter daily. Just
keep in mind that the air filter screens
the air the engine lives on. The engine (HE(K
must have all the clean air it needs to FILR
DAILY
run right and give you the strong,
steady power you need for operating
FADAC.
To clean the air filter, use low pressure air to blow out the dirt; direct the
air flow from the inside out (from clean side toward dirty side). Never clean
the element with solvent.

USE LOW NEVER USE
PRESSURE AIR ANY SOLVENT



Wipe out the air cleaner cover and housing and be sure to put the element
back in so the arrows point up and' the nib on the element nests into its lock in
the filter housing.








SOLL


OIL Always keep oil level up to snuff. It pays
big to check the oil every 5 hours at least. In real
dirty areas, change the oil real often .. When
you change the oil remember to clean the oil filter
housing. Always dean around the oil filler cap
before checking the oil level. Install a new oil filter DRAIN PLUG
as needed.
.AND KEEP AN EYE OPEN
FOR OIL LEAKS.


S-CHECK CHANCEm
THE Oil OIL PER THE
EVERY LO....MORE
5 HOURS OFTEN UNDER
REAL DIRTY,
DUSTY CONDITIONS.


THE FILTER
HOUSING.
EVERY OIL
CHANGE -
REPLACE
FLTER AS
NECESSARY


.Never, ever add oil past the full mark on the dipstick. To make sure you
don't overfill, it's best to add oil a little at a time. If you overfill, you have to
drain off the excess ri ht then and there


For supply info on engine oil, eyeball Sect III, Maintenance and Operating
Supplies, TM 5-2805-203-14, and the LO.
Whatever you're lubing on the engine, always clean the lube point before you
give it fresh lube ... keeps dirt out of working parts.






IFU EL FUEL FILTER
FUEL
Rif-Always dean the fuel sediment bowl before you
fire-up .the generator. If you neglect the bowl even once,
you'll be out of business fast. Water and dirt will get into
the fuel lines and the carburetor. Once the engine starts, GASKET
spittin' and sputterin', it's too late and, there goes your
FADAC power.
Replace the fuel filter if it's dogged or damaged. Also the
sediment bowl gasket, if it's bad. Wipe off the fuel filter FILTER
head while you're working the sediment bowl. Remove the
strainer in the gas filler neck and tap it clean. You can use
cleaning solvent to dean the strainer, but be sure it's dry
before you replace it. BOWL
Keep your fuel containers dean and sealed. Take time to
clean around the tank cap before refueling. Straining your
gas supply is one sure way to beat fuel system problems that
can deadline your generator.
FEEDING FADAC
To power the FADAC system safely the generator must be set for 120/208
volts, 3-phase and 400-hz. No other output will do for FADAC.
The output selector switch is inside the control box, so you have to remove
the box cover (it's held by 4 quarter-turn screws) to check the setting.
While you're in the control box take time to wipe off any dust or dampness
there. Replace the cover good and tight.
FADAC CABLE BRACKET
FADAC's cable-adap- REMEMBER...TAKE OFF THE
rer bracket comes with CABLE ADAPTER AND KEEP IT
WITH THE- FADAC
its own attaching hard- WHENEVER THE
ware. When you install GENERATORs IS
it, be sure the bracket OUT FOR
has a good grip on the IEPAIRS!
top and bottom brace of
the generator frame. DATA
The cable hook-up in- L PLATE
structions are listed on a
data plate on the gen-
erator's terminal box.
17





POWB ADJUSTMENTS
Remember for FADAC operation you keep the generator on 120/208 volts,
3-phase and 400-hz. To make the power adjustments you work like this:
I fNisjR I'


te I a5 55 I
ISte whl th ote-duttegvro
.qoajs h oenryufrtloe h

govrno mu ihawec. hnyutr h



To d S

g r .5 5 s c S
h ISa


Careful stopping is also important generator PM. So. by the numbers here:


- k
I(I MO R Ef>






dGenerator level and
on a firm platform
out of dust and sand.

SGenerator ocean.
Dust, sand, dampness
wiped off.


Output selector
switch on 120/208
volts, 3-phase
position.

Engine oil checked.
Not over full mark.
Change oil according
to LO... more often
when it's real dusty
and dirty.


GENERATOR PM CHECK-UST
deGas tank or con-
tainer full, and extra
gas supply handy.
Strain gas for best
results.
oAir intake lever set
for proper temp.
Summer for above
32 degrees. Winter

temp.
iVAir filter clean.


/


i(FADAC-cable/gen-
erator load-terminals
hooked-up right.
From top to bottom:
White-Red-Black-
Green.


aFuel sediment bowl
clean.
CNo oil or gas leaks.


dDaily DA Form 2404
completed.
SLog book on hand.
Needed entries
recorded. -
OfTM 5-6115-271-15, H
TM 5-2805-203-14
and its LO on hand.
I'Good ventilation for
generator on all
sides. Generator area
clean and fire
extinguisher handy.


4


P







TOA R OUNS FIE ON0
Da^^.A 240: iI310







*^^^BIB^^ T l


If you want today safe around artil-
lery you've got to do more than keep
away from its mua endc You've got
so know the stress and slain it's been
through!
So .. .a ecrdsl renI; ret for gun
tubes -and.the g ns hjey're a.pan of
-are cihaging with a supe bang!
That bang comes from TB 750-231
(3 Dec 68) coupled-with DA Msg
896763 (!0 Fb .69). Bo& should've
cOme to you .tbrmo f.jyib owp pubs
apd-comdiid chaels
Both call for a trord of gun tube
changes on DA i2408;10in the equip-
ment log deleting the reception
that's now in para 4-llb(l)(a) 2 of
TM 38-750 for gun tubes.
TB 750-231 goes a couple of steps
further.


-.- _. ------. --
It sets up control of overhaul of artil-
lery on the basis of miles traveled (if
self-propelled) or total equivalent full
charge (EFC) rounds fired by the weap-
on (EPC rounds are defined in Appendix
A ofthe TB and in TM 9-1000-202-35).
Miles traveled are available for self-
propelled weapon on it DA 2408-1 i
the log or on the weapon's odometer.
(DA 2408-1 monthly should bedacdred
in all cases since there may have been
an odometer change recorded there. :.
. (Even though total rounds fired now
are listed on DA 2408-3, chances afr
these are for the tube currently installed
only from the current DA 2408-4).
These entries on DA 2408-10 are
used so the Army can keep track of the
tubes used on an end item.


REAOING ISI DI~ 1 'E
X.OME L L '>.* -- T --- T -------- -------------------


"T7 M1 9JAN 69 7 APR 69 :1 JUL 69
TUBE M137 9976

READING *r E 'E
Mo*'- LI." ...- --- --0 mm----- ------------ -m ---------
S11NOV 68 6 JUL 69 18 JUL69
TUBE 155MM 1742 8891 2173 2427 1 4173
DA ore 2080


1


























Cracked fuel tank or beat-up rear
roadwheels a problem on your M107
or M110 vehicles?
Here's what you can do ...
Keep the fuel tanks as full as you
can. When you fire, fuel slaps against
the side of a partly-empty tank. In time
this hammering can crack the tank.
With the tank full there is less strain
on it.
IF I DON'T GET SOME
MORE FUEL, I'LL CRACK.







Fire as close to the center of traverse
as you can. The hull twists when you
shoot at a big angle from the centerline
and this puts added strain on the tank.
Unless there is an emergency, move the
vehicle when you have a big azimuth
change.


Firing with the hull bottomed strains
the fuel tank and, in fact, the whole
hull. The suspension system in the
LOCKED position was made to take
most of the shock of firing. With the
hull bottomed the suspension can't do
its job.


DON'T IRE F


The rear roadwheels (trailing idlers)
take more strain than the other road-
wheels and are more likely to fail be-
cause the track is wrapped around
them.
Correct track tension cuts down on
failures. Adjust the track like it shows
on pages 3-34 to 3-38 in your TM 9-
2300-216-10 (Sep 68).
Wrong mounting bolt torque is hard
on the roadwheels. Torque should be
350-375 lb-ft.


TORQUE
MOUNTING
BOLT
ro
350-375
LB-FT.


DIG OUT MUD SAND
DIG OUT MUD & SAND


Mud and sand packed between roadwheels wear them out. Dig out mud and
sand buildup between the idler wheel discs as a regular part of both before and
after preventive maintenance checks, and any other time it builds up.
23


I :-






WITH UPTIGHT LUBING...


YOU CAN AFFORD TO FORD


You wouldn't buy an insurance
policy without reading the fine print.
Right?
So why not read the fine print in your
tank's lube order? It's a life insurance
policy for both you and your tank.
LO's for all M48- and M60-series
tanks, M728 (T118E1) CEV's and
AVLB's have something like this in the
fine print: Relube after fording.
'Course when you're chasing the Bad
Guys you're not going to stop and re-
lube every time you splash across a
shallow stream. You've got a good
reason.
Only thing, the wheel bearings on a
tank are too dumb to understand
reasons. All they understand is lube.
What to do?
Just make sure your lube is in good
shape before you start chasing those
slippery rascals through the wet. At the
quarterly lube service push in the grease


until you can see (or feel) it coming out
where it's supposed to.
A good lube job wraps your support
roller and road wheel bearings in a pro-
tective coat of grease. That way you can
keep going when you have to.
If a soupy mission is coming up and
you're near the end of a lube quarter,
lube before you go.
This means a good lube job, with
GAA pumped into the support roller
grease fittings until you can feel it when
you put your hand in the access slot
behind the roller. Grease the road
wheels until the GAA comes out the
relief valve, and the road wheel arms
until clean lube shows between the arm
retainer and the arm.
If you're not sure whether to grease
or not, always remember that grease is
cheaper than bearings- and lots easier
to get.







M551 SHOCK ABSORBERS
The shock absorbers on your M551
can let you down real sudden-like if
you torque 'em up too tight. This is real
easy to do unless you follow the poop
on page 9-82 of your TM 9-2350-230-
12 (Jun 66).
If the castellated nuts on each end of
the shocks get tightened to over 140 lb- C(KTHK THE TORUE
ft torque, they swell the spherical bear- ON CASTELLATED NUTS
ings. When the bearings can't move
freely this puts a strain on the whole
shock absorber and the piston rod as-
sembly is likely to break.
Be a good idea to have your shocks
checked right away to make sure torque
on the castellated nuts is within 100-
140 lb-ft.


On some M551's the -4 retaining
screws on the rraierse gear box hase
been coming loose. \ hen this happens
you could get a little play in azimuth.
Sure! Sure! You can tighten the 4
retaining screws. bur the 'll come loose
again-and real quick, roo.
Thing to do is call sour support, and
they'll do the job the a ay u says under
Installation Notes on pages 5-7 of Ch 1
to TM 9-2350-230-35/2 (Jul 66).
It has to be done just so, torqued and
shimmed for a backlash between 8 and
13 thousandths of an inch No job
for a crewman or even a talented com-
pany mechanic.


Support can do it in a flash, though,
and they'll put sealing compound on
the threads so the screws stay put and
don't give you any more trouble.
So check the traverse gear and if the
mounting screws are loose, have 'em
attended to.
25








FYOU WANT YOUR'
MORTAR
CARRIER TO
BE A REAL-
GO-GO VEHICLE?
THEN YOU'VE
6OT TO KNOW
ALL
YOUR
STOP-
STOPS!/


' If you fire without
the traverse stops in
place you could
wreck the
equipment
and maybe TRAVERSE
get somebody STOP
killed. -
Here's why ... The stops let
you traverse everywhere it's
safe from 825 mils right to 775
mils left-but they keep you
from traversing where the
notches in the turntable can
line up with the notches in the
indexing gear.
If the traverse stops have
been removed allowing the
turntable and indexing gear
notches to line up, the turn-
table won't be secured. After
you fire, the counter recoil can
make the whole mortar jump
around inside the vehicle.
More important, you could
shoot part of the vehicle.
Another thing-also firing
past the position of the stops
will cave-in the turntable and
hull.
STOP ---'

BRIDGE NOTCH GEAR NOTCH
Dangerous?
You'd better believe it!
So make sure you have tra-
verse stops.


While you're checking the traverse
stops, see if the index gear has a light
coat of GAA grease on its top and inside
bearing surfaces-not on the teeth!
Some M106/M106Al's have been
neglected and the turntable and the
index gear have gotten so corroded
together the mortar can't be traversed.


LUBE METAL RUBBING
SURFACES QUARTERLY -MORE
OFTEN IN SUNNY SEA!
The LO says to lube the indexing
gear quarterly. It also says to give the
surfaces of the mortar socket that con-
tact the bridge turntable a quarterly
greasing.
Fine! But in the sloshy SEA weather,
quarterly may not be often enough.


The recoil stop clamp is another kind
of stop you need to have in place before
you fire your mortar. It'll keep the
round from hitting your vehicle even if
the shock absorber on the mortar won't
work. In case you gotta get a new
recoil stop clamp for your M106, it's
FSN 1015-508-0175 (8731426) on page
418 of TM 9-2300-224-20P/3 (Nov64)
PART THREE. If all you need are
parts, they're on page 417. If you have
a M106A1 you'll get your parts from
TM 9-2300-257-20P (Mar 69) and the
clamp is listed there on page 3-351 with
a drawing on page 3-590.

RECOIL
CLAMP
SECURE?


By the way, if you've still got a de-
pression stop assembly (8732403), take
it off your mortar and turn it in to
supply. With the M84 mortar carrier
you needed it, but with an M106/
M106A1 it does nothing useful.


LUBE HERE -
LIIIWF.


-I-

























hi Is a smld Et df n r pah.
of safmerd o orga s MaJsom mnaolsl
ma peroAneL h fA is cd nepied
rom re n AG Didebetho CaenIs
aBllui F ro. plite deal" -s DA
Pam 3104 (Meay 6l, and Ch 5 iApr
69), TM'., I 1. ek., DA Pass 310-6 Jul
61., and Ch J TAp. 69;, SC and SM's
DA PaN 3107 lMar 69), MWO'I and
DA Pao 3109 (Apr 681. COM(EC Purbt


TECHNICAL MANUALS
TM I-CH54-S C3, luna. 0154
TM I-OH23C-6 C6. Imn, OH-23
TM 5-2010-200-25P CI, ein, 165 HP
Outboard Propllting Uani.
TM 5-2410-20 10 Cl. an. Mad
1Trcked TIacdorn
FM S-2410-210-15 C4, ay. Med
Tracked Traors.
TM 5-2410-229-12 Cl, May, Med
Irckhd Traders.
TM 5-3805-232-12 CI, May, Earth
Moving Equip Loaders.
TM 6-3105-232-20P, May, Piar Shill
& se.r Hyd FWD DED koop Type
Loeadr. I% Cu Yd Slrad Mlll.Pulpols
luall If C. d SAE Cap
TM 5-3110-202-20, Apr. 20 Ten ir
Mid Crane Shonl.
IM 5-3110-206-20P. Ap,. 40 Ton
Cawle. Clana-Shoela
TM S-3110-222.12. Ap. WhI Mid
Csal .Shovels.
1M 5-2193-226-20P, May, 3 Cao 2
Wbl GED BIliu Hertar
TM 5-3g95-2a3-20P, Apr. 3.10 IPH
WhI Mid Bilim Der.MLise
TM 5-4110-203-T5 C2, Api, 9,000
BTU Panel Type Rair.g Unit.
TM 5-4110-202-10 C3, May. Fil
igtllng Equip.
TM 5-4120-261-19. May. Floor Mid
36.000 BrU Air Condioianen.
TM 1-4120-215-15. Apr. 18.000 BTU
Air Condtionin
TM 5-4120-292-15, May, 60.000 BTU
Skid Mid Air Conditloers.
TM 5-4120-309-15. Apr. Ele MIr
6,000 IU Air Condilllonis.
TM S-4310-725-25P. May, 100 PSI
GOD SS CFM Air Compn sorns.
TM 5-4310-241-20P, May. Hand Trk
Mid 175 PSI 1 CPM Atl RWJp Com.
pruesr.
TM 5-4310- 50-1 5. C2, Jun. 250 ClM
Air Coprleor s.
TM 5-111420-20P, Apr. 60 KW 60
Cyo Gae Sak.
TM 1-611-238-10 C2, May 60 JCW
60 Cy1 G0e Shli.


TM 9-2320-245-20P, May, M113 Car- 1M I1-1510-202-SC, Apr. 0-IA*
river XM706, XM706EI, XM706E2 .0-E.
Light Armored Car. TM 11-5820-401-UC/i, Apt. AN/
TM 9-2320-247-20P, May, M548 VIC. -I lRdio St.
Corgo Carrier. TM 11it520-401-MSC/l, Apr, AN/
TM 9-2350-215-10 C6, May, M60/ VRC-43 Iadle Sa.
M60AI Tank.. TM 11-5840-208-ESC. Apr. AN/MFO.
TM 9-2350-242-20P Cl, Apr. MI1 4A Radar Se.
VTR. TM 11- 5840-2524C, Jin.
TM 9-3064 C6, Jun, M29EI 81-MM AN/FPS-71.
Mortar. TM 11-5140-263.SC. Jan,
TM 9-4931-334-14P, May, XM163 AN/FPA.16.
20-MM Gun. TM II-5840-296-SC. Jun.
TM 9-4931-334-14/2, May, XMI63 AN/FPS-69.
20-MM Gun. TM 11-5893-2744-C, in,.
TM 10-3930-233-20P, May, Gas ANIOSG-S.
Forklift Truck.
TM 10-3930-242-12 Cl, Jun. Rough MODIFICATION WOEC ODml a
Terrain Forklift Truck. MWO 9.2320-214-.0/10. Ju
TM 11-6625-502-10/1, Apr, AN/FSQ. M1 4/MI 4AI Carrier.
34, AN/MSG-4, AN/MSQ-18, AN/ MWO 9-2330-27240/1. Jun.
MSQ-40, AN/MSQ-56 & AN/TSQ-3l MI31iAC Foel Sera Tonk Sali irllr.
Test S.et. MWO 10-1670-206-40/5. Jon, I.-
TM 11-6625-555-15, Mar, AN/USM. pli Quldck-l Type Connedac Link
182A Oscilloscope, A ANFSA-25, AN/ AUis on 24 FI DIa Prs Pnaralhu usd.
GSA-37, AN/GSG.5, AN/GSG.6, AN/ i/MlK.J5 Eile Saes.
MSO-18, AN/MSQ-28, AN/MSQ-56 MWOr,1-3930-242.20/1. lun, lough
& AN/TS0-38. Trrain Forklilfl Truckl Intll PeIl Pi.
TM 11-6665-209-15 CS, May, AN/ :ire S*llch Magnelcl Swllh Silrtr
PDR-27, AN/PDR-27J Radiac Equip. BultRp Swllth.
TM 55-1520-218-20PMD C1, May,
UH-1A-lB. MISCElANEOUS
TM 55-1520-219-20PMD Cl, May, D Clr 2-10-0, Jun. MIl Pe b.
UH-1A-1B. :FTOS-1h-6-WC. Apr. M52/MS2AI
TM 55-1925-201-20P, May, 45 Ft 200 15-.MM Heowir r
HP Dsl D.lign 320 Tug. FT20.-.6-WC, Apr, M101I/M101A:'
TM 55-1930-205-20 C2, May, LARC.V Towed r.-sll'a..
Lighter. LO -4930-227-12, Apr. LIq DlpiOn
TM 55-6605-261-15, Mar, Mark 27 Tank & P.mp Unil Far Trusk MWg High.
24 V Gyro Compass. land led 2000 sr/WIe REg MKIgND.
TM 750-145, May, ENTAC Retrograde. LO -115-425.12, May 45 400
TM 750-146, May, M22 & SS-tI I C. 0 n Equip Gn ll. -c.=- 5W4
Retrograde. '5-1930-206-12-1 2, Sl 4 5.
TM DPSC 6525-260, Jun, Med Met D 3gn 8D 2 004 6r1 XvY Ught r
Repair Paris Pam No. 260. 2'1-62, "May. Mainly Caincipt:
.;4w'a&jfling Leg Apt far
ESC'S ;,.Y. 1,'
TM 3-4230-203-ESC, Apr, M9 D.con J.5" 02 >-C11 Apr. 600 CrM:.
App. j p o opl. .
TM 5-6100-214-ESC, May, 60 KW 60 1k4. ^ l .A4,yA..4 ., .ti I
Ha Gan Sol. A IrT"dl. TI. -
TM 9-1005-247-ESC, May, M2 Hell. TSi24a1,.1'l06, M.P, 2.000'1:'
copter Armament Subsystem. sI.tillSipc leT 8lcabl.e'aD AdtlgVl'j a
TM 9-1015-234-ESC, Mar 69, MI02 ..E-M W >.''' i .-':St l
Howitzer. tgjf 'ld4 LJ022l, Apre FPntl4g(
TM 9-1430-560-ESC, Mar 69, Air De- 5 lbjo l t T'hkrai igkTrun'.eel .i!
fense FDS AN/TSQ1St. I(dtfltl. I
TM 9-2320-21I-ESC, Jon 69,5-Ton ,209 .97. l ,-Apr Ai,1
Traucks.. '
TMI 9-2320-230-ESC, Dec 68, 8xa
Trucks.





















KILLERS Iy E.T.C.H*

HEM
THE TIME HAS
COME TO UNLEASH
THE ULTIMATE
WEAPON.
RHE






THE UMPTEENTH TRUE!! THE COMMON
PNISION HAS JUST WHAT'S THE KILLERS!
RECEIVED THE BEST ULTIMATE
MAINTENANCE RECORD \ WEAPON?
AWARD,.,THINGS ARE
GETTING OUT OF
HANP, NEXT THING
Y'KNOW FOUL-UPS
WILL DISAPPEAR!!


* VI'ltn (lllers, villains, Inemesa, erriale onlecllon oI 2umanus
29










BATTERIES CORRODE AND RUIN GEAR
...AS YOU KNOW BATTERIES
TEND TO LEAK AND SWEAT
WHEN THEY'RE NOT
USED FOR A WHILE.


WHEN THEY'RE
ENCASED IN A
PIECE OF EQUIPMENT
...T JUST SPEEDS
UP THE PROCESS /


HE'S ALSO SENSATIONAL I
ABOUT NEGLECTING DON'T
SILERgS! SEE HOW)
SF5LTERS!I THAT
ii HURTS'/


SHEH,HEH,HEH,
THAT CORROSIVE
- SWEAT SURE BEATS
UP COMMON EQUIPMENT
A/ FAST.
C^. --^J


pr COMMON GEAR
NEEDS AIR I
TO KEEP DOWN THE
HEAT BUILD-UPINSIDE
'EM... HEAT RUINS
AND BURNS 'EM OUT
SIN NO TIME!







STARTS UP HIS ENGINE
jI!/ wrrH THE RAPDOS ON-
I- .7PS5 OUT RADIOS
BY THE TON.

MMMAM


NEXT IS
6NASHI
A MUSCLE-
MAN. HE
DESTROYS







HE'S ALL THUMBS WHEN HE HANDLES
DELICATE EQUIPMENT

r f, /


HE SHIPS FRAGILE
ELECTRONIC STUFF
UN PROTECTED.


THIS IS
ORK...
HE'S
50 SMART
HE'S
IGNORANT









e


NEGLECT AND ROUGH
HANDLING CAN LEAD
TO EQUIPMENT THAT'S
SORRY INDEEP...
50, BE SURE WHAT
YOU'RE DOING AND
YOU'LL SOO START
ACCRUING THE
CARED- FOR
EQUIPMENT YOU NEED!


FS


WS BI0TWRwS iAo S
LESLwEG C'I
Lws @w : ii


IF YOU WANT TO DISPLAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, LIFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.


ATh@MY -BEDWlP IO1


u
o
/I

~
run;li~T









CONNIE RODW,
HAVE COME
TO SAVE
THE PAY." C,:


BY JUST PAYING
A LITTLE ATTENTION
To YOUR POWER
SOURCE YOU
CAN AVOID
TROUBLE!
I-


WHEN EQUIPMENT IS GOING
TO BE IDLE FOR A PAY OR MORE )F
REMOVE PRY BATTERIES
UNTIL NEEPEP.'"






3 ~ I


I TOLD
YOU I HEARD
A TAPPING
NOISE


SAND KEEP FILTERS
"CLEAN ESPECIALLY IN
HOT, DUSTY... OR VERY
HUMIP AREAS... PO IT
OFTEN.' USE COMMON
SENSE SCHEDULES









PROTECT YOUR
COMMON GEAR WHEN
YOU MOVE IT OR
SENP IT BACK FOR
REPIR


IMOIORANCE
P',;WER PAMAGE...WOW.,
TURN OFF THE RAPIOS IN YOUR
VEHICLE BEFORE YOU START
l^->^ .fZAP-


USE OLP BATTING,
PUNNAGE.., SALVAGE
FOAM OR AN OLP .
MATTRESS IF YOU
CAN SCROUNGE ONE.
A4


REVERSE POLARITY Is
A BIG KILLER... BE SURE THE
CABLE LEAPS ON HOOK-UPS
ARE RIGHT... LOOK FOR
CABLE COLORS OR THE
MARKINGS.

.-""^"'^^'






/ IF YOU'RE NOT SURE ABOUT
IA HOOK-UP... LOOK AT THE
CABLE DIAGRAMS IN DASH-IZ
ANP PASH- 20 TMtS...


...OR CHECK WITH
SUPPORT WHEN YOU
HAVE A SET WHERE THE
MARKINGS ARE NOT
CLEAR OR WORN OFF-



ALM,^^






THE STACKED
COMMUNICATIONS DECK vs TIO
HOLD) THIS FOR
SAFEKEEPING.











In SEA Big Momma shuffles the You gotta make it by her house rules,
cards, stacks the deck and invents the or you ain't gonna make it.
house rules. You got the card to win with, so let's
Try sitting' in the game with your make this hand the "dry battery pot,
own rules and you'll be humming "The no limit."
Dry Battery Blues" faster'n sweat turns Play your Big Card anytime you
salty, want. Call it TIO, uncle.
LOOK FOR LEAKS AND SWELUNG!I So wot is TIO?
rsi I^ Take It Out!



'EM
OuT!






First off, Big Momma also goes by
"Dame Nature." She makes things
grow, like corrosion. She creates things,
like moisture. She eats dry batteries like Take the battery out of your radio,
ice cream. Dry battery corrosion eats at, your test set, your 'phone set or what-
and destroys equipment unendingly. As ever else it's in ... whenever you're not
soon as the battery develops a leak, or gonna use it for a day or so.
starts to sweat, corrosion begins. So deal the cards.






Sruu ICEMI -
HER RIGHT AND
SHE'LL BE AROUND
WHEN YOU NEED


You gotta know it, operator man. You are the biggest thing going for )our
AN/GRC-106 radio set.
You can break its back ... or make it sing the good song.
Here's a thing or three that'll keep your radio set putting out like the gener-
ous and good piece of equipment it is:
When you turn on the PRIME/ R
POWER switch of the AM1-3349 ampli- .
fier, put your hand over the blower to
be sure it's operating. If it's not, shut .-' t
the set down ... quick! A stuck blower
motor burns out and makes for a lot of
work and expense.
OK. So you're sure the blower's working. Check to see that the proper
antenna (whip or doublet) is connected to the RF output.


HrEY' BAKER 12-T
LET'S GET THAT
RADIO IN OPERATION(
-A nonrC I


TAKE
OFF YOUR
7ACK, MAN...
NRO NEEDS
HIER?
I DEROS
IN
28 DAYS.


) Look over your antenna connections
for a loose one, a short, or broken leads.
So, your meters are deflecting and
you're ready to rune.


'THING, JUST
)OLING MY
TUBES.


fve


If the needles don't center in two
minutes, switch to OPERATE and
allow the final amplifier tubes to cool
for a few minutes. Then, try again.Jf
the meters still don't center, call your
repairman.
Once the meters center, check for
POWER OUT with the TEST METER.
9 rdi --\






When you get the desired scale readings, the set is ready to operate. So-o-o-o,
switch back to OPERATE mode... and make sure you've allowed about a min-
ute for the set to warm up before you transmit.
Otherwise, you'll more'n likely kiss your plate trimmer capacitor goodbye.

BEFORE YOU
SSHUT DOWN AT
PAY'5 ENP.. SET
THE SERVICE
SELECTOR OF
THE RT-662 TO
STAND BY AND
LET IT RUN FOR t SD ss. !
TWO MORE II TANDB. FSK
MINUTES! OVN(N?


That'll dissipate the heat in the final amplifier ... and thereby prevent tran-
sistor damage.
In an emergency, naturally, there's not much you can do but shut it down
quick and take your chances.
'Nother killer for the final amplifier USE ANTENNA INS
tube is voltage overload. There's not ROPE CLAMP GUARD
much you can do about it, but if your IN PLACE?
unit repairman's getting put out over
frequent replacement of your 2A1A1V1
and -V2 PA tubes, tell him to have
direct support check out your vehicle's
voltage regulator.
You should be feeding your Angry-
106 a maximum 28 volts. Higher volt-
age can shorten the expected 500-hour
lifespan of your PA tubes to less than
100.
Excess voltage is a transistor buster,
as well as a PA tube killer. The best -------
operation is when voltage is adjusted ----- -
to within .2V of 28V. Use your antenna rope clamp to tie
Coupla' other ways you can help it down. If you lose the clamp, get an-
yourself and your repairman: other. Never fasten the rope directly to
Always use a nylon or rope tie-down the antenna.
for your antenna. A wire tie-down Also, be sure the insulating guard is
shorts out your whip giving you in place. That'll keep the antenna from
obvious problems. grounding on the vehicle.
40


















Nothing like a few truck-mounted AN/GSS-14 xenon searchlights to brighten
the night while you're standing perimeter guard.
But their power to throw a lot of light on the subject-the enemy-won't
last long without your following some important PM cautions.

IT DRAWS A LOT
Basic power source for your oversize flashlight vehicle is the M151A1 1/4-
ton truck's engine. The engine has to produce a steady 5.5 HP to keep the
vehicle's 180-amp generating system charging properly.



SET THROTTLE HIGH
ENOUGH TO STAY
IN THE GREEN



So the first rule of caution is to keep the searchlight off until you adjust the
throttle setting high enough to keep the battery-generator indicator needle in
the green. If the main power switch is flipped on with the indicator outside the
green, its heavy draw can burn out the system's rectifier.

THE BLOWER KEEPS IT COOL
The blower motor circulates the cool f MAKE SURE
air that high-pressure xenon lamp needs BOTH SCREENS
to keep it from overheating and explod- l l ARE CLEAN.
ing. So both the inlet and outlet screens
must be kept clean to allow good circu-
lation and the blower motor must
be ON whenever the searchlight switch
is ON.
41





But when the searchlight has been
operating for several minutes, the ..' .,o..
blower will not stop at the same time
the searchlight power switch is placed
in the OFF position. The blower motor
will continue to operate until the xenon
lamp's excess heat has been dissipated. I .." I., DON'T TURN
So remember not to touch the main OFF THE MAIN
power switch until the blower motor SWITCH UNTIL
stops itself. THE BLOWER
STOPS
TAKE 5 FOR OVERDRIVE

PULL FOR OVERDRIVE Ao r t p
NO MORE THAN Also remember that placing the
ONCE IN 5 MINUIES. searchlight in overdrive increases the
| *n--t intensity of the light by 50 percent for
r close to 20 seconds. That really puts a
W *^ drain on the power source and the
blower motor. This is why you take at
least 5 minutes between each overdrive
S operation. You normally restrict the
Overdrive mode for use against the
'/ enemy or during maintenance work
SG periods.

DOUBLE GROUND THE OLDER MOUNT
A backup ground strap is security
against an unknown break in the power
cable running between the searchlight
and the truck's generating system. Since FLEXIBLE
the ground wire is wrapped together GROUND
with the power cable, (you don't have STRAP
to worry about this on the "A" model
SEARCHLIGHT.
mount ) an incomplete circuit would go
unnoticed until the searchlight had to
be used.
The best method of doubling up is
to use ordinary 1/2-inch wide braided
wire. Attach one end to the ground ter-
minal bolt at the base of the searchlight
pedestal. Connect the other end to the






bolt on the lower mounting bracket for
the searchlight's control box.
Use the same length of wire (about
2-1/2 feet) as the power cable in order
to allow azimuth flexibility for the
mount.


HMM ...GROUND BOLT
TO THE BOLT ON
CONTROL BOX...
THAT'S WHERE YA
J WENT WRONG.


Securing the mount before moving out to another operating site protects the
searchlight from unnecessary wear and tear during vehicle travel. So when time
permits, it's wise to follow these travel procedures.


...... mEngage
azimuth nag
the
handwheel with zi mhe.
the azimuth lever. lazkpmn


CHECK THE TM, TOO

It never hurts to spend a few spare moments with your flashlight's friend:
TM 11-6230-219-12 (Jul 67). Helps you remember a lot.











r THIS SCOPE 1
HASN'T WORKED RIGHT
SINCE I TOOK IT
L6 APART. _


Operator, stay out!
That little rule, if posted on every
AN/PVS-1 and PVS-2 starlight scope
... and minded by every reader...
could keep more scopes operating than
you and your buddies have fingers and
toes. Count 'em! Specially the fingers.
'Bout the only business an operator
has inside a night vision sight is to
replace the BA-1100/U battery.


Here's something you can pass on to
your repairman:
Intensification tubes for the PVS-1
and PVS-2 are not interchangeable.
The MX-7854 tube, FSN 5855-051-
2792, goes with the PVS-1. The tube
for the PVS-2, FSN 5855-087-2948,
has the reticle pattern on the tube
itself.
Like, if you put FSN 5855-087-2948
in the PVS-1, you get a double reticle
pattern. If you put the MX-7854 in the
PVS-2, you get nothing.
Back to you, operator ol' buddy:
The positive end of the BA-1100 bat-
tery has a raised center... for night in-
stallation ease. The raised end goes in
the scope first. Naturally, the negative
side is flat. If you accidentally switch
ends, well ... Before you decide the
battery's no good, be sure it's installed
right.

BATTERY CAP








If you've got the PVS-1, you must
unlock the locking lever before you can
use the objective lens focus knob.


STARLIGHT SCOPE -
If you're not authorized to repair it,
and the sight doesn't work right, get it
checked and repaired by a qualified re-
pairman. Good intentions to the never-
mind, you can make a little job a big
one by trying to fix it yourself.
So, with the bad news out of the way,
here're some things you can do to keep
your scope away from the repairman:


Naturally, re-lock the lever when

UNLOCK
LEVER
BEFORE
USING
KNOB

you've focused the objective lens.
If the knob binds after you've freed
the locking lever, sand, dirt or other
crud may be the bad guys. Which means
it's time for a cleaning. You can bust
up the objective lens housing by forcing
the knob, so resist the temptation.
Some quick ways to dear up the ob-
jective lens or eyepiece assembly if they
should get fogged from humidity or
temperature change: Pump the eye-
shield several times ... or take the
shield and/or lens cap off and wipe
them with a clean rag.
Here's a quickie reminder or two for
anyone who forgot previous PS tips:
Handle your scope gentle-like. It's
not a football; it won't bounce if you
drop it, and rough handling can put it
(maybe you, too) out of business.
Keep it dry, including the lens. If the
sight's cased and stored, open it regu-
larly and sop up the moisture.
Never expose the uncovered lens to
bright light (headlights, sunshine, etc.).
You can zap it back to depot with that
technique.






POWER FOR A PIPSY-4
"go dI~L


Along about this part of the century
it would seem that all AN/PPS-4 radar
sets have long since been modified and
that only the product of the modifica-
tion (MWO 11-5840-211-45/1), the
Pipsy-4A, is still around.
Not so; no, sir! Not infrequently an
unmodified Pipsy-4 shows up, and its
positive ground versus the negative
ground of the -4A poses a problem.
Said problem is compounded by two
conditions:
No. 1, you've gotta need an emer-
gency power source, and No. 2, your
power cable might still have the old
alligator clips. Couple those with the
positive ground, and big trouble can
brew. The Pipsy-4's ground lead must
go to the positive post of the power
sources.

GOT THE OLD






Now, if you've got a connector on
the end of your power cable, read some-


If you've got alligator clips and you
anticipate an extreme emergency where
you'd use something other than the
Pipsy-4 and -4A's ideal power source,
the BB-422 nickel cadmium battery,
read on:
Your emergency power source must
put out exactly 24 volts. No more, or
you'll severely damage your set.
If you're not sure whether you've
got a -4 or -4A, there are decals in easy-
to-see areas which tell you MWO 11-
5840-211-45/1 has been applied, mak-
ine it the -4A.


IS IT A -4 OR -4A?

A repeat caution: Only in an emer-
gency would you hook up your Pipsy-4
or -4A to anything other than the BB-
422. The PU-532 generator set is used
to charge batteries... not to run the set.
FYI, the MX-4765/PPS-4 cable as-
sembly set has the cables you need for
generator battery charging. SB 11-506
(3 Sep 64) tells you how to get it.


...OR A
CONNECTOR?

thing else. The connector's built to go MX-4765/PP-4 ABLE ASSY
on right.






` NEED
SQUAD
RADIO
PARTS?


'Bout the only parts you'll be getting
at unit level these days for your squad
radio, AN/PRR-9 and AN PRT-4,
-4A, are listed as follows:


Knob, Antenna
FSN 5355-933-2865


I "
Antenna Assy.
AS-1998/PRR.9
FSN 5985-926-2590


Headset, H-264/PRR 9
FSN 5965-926-2591


P-qa'


Io REV







Lanyard Assy
FSN 5985-933-2879


I I


Slide
FSN 5820-995-2261


*^* '^ '* :*' '- ..;: :, '.:-'
'- -E LAN'ARD ASSEMBLY AND
; SLIDE ARE USED ON BOTH THE
R -PRT-4 AND THE PRR.-

'. .. .



FSN 5355-933-3081

Knob, Talk
FSN 5355-933-3080




FSN 5820-997 4690


Antenna Assy AS 1999/PRT-4, -4A
FSN 5985-926 2589

You'll find 'em in SB 11-622 (29 May 69).
All other parts will be available at direct support level and above. If you've
got any other parts in stock, you gotta turn 'em in to Lexington-BlueGrass
Army Depot as per SB 11-622,which fills you in on pre-addressed "jiffy bags".
You get 'em from direct support.


*51
V,


I11







AIR MOBILITY
FOR AIRCRAFT MECH'S KIT...
USE RIGHT TOUCH
WITH RIGHT TOOL


KNOk.V WHICH
i S WORSE
HIS TOUCH OR
THE TOOL!


Before you grab your General Aircraft Mechanic's Tool Kit (FSN 5180-323-
4692) to give that airframe that tender lovin' touch with your tools, make sure
you have the right tool for the right job.
Like, keeping your tool set up to snuff takes a little extra effort with the
changing needs for tools for specialty work.
Be sure your tool kit matches up with those items listed in SC 5180-99-CL-
A01 (Mar 69).
To give you a hand on those handy tools, feast about on this spread of tool
stock number and description goodies.
If some of 'em don't look exactly like these, don't sweat it. Just be sure they'll
do the trick.
GENERAL AIRCRAFT MECHANIC'S TOOL KIT.
FSN 5180-3234692


Iv-


r 4bb~


*9>













BIT, SCREWDRIVER: Phillips type cross tip, no.
I size, in male hex drive, 1 in max Ig o 'a.


BIT, SCREWDRIVER: Phillips type cross tip, no.
2 size, '' in male hex drive, t in Ig o, a.


BIT, SCREWDRIVER: Phillips type cross tip, no.
3 size, % in male hex drive, I in Ig o 'a.


BIT, SCREWDRIVER: Phillips type cross hp. no.
4 size, % in male hex
drive, 1% in Ig o. a.
I$'I I[,[]I] ]]]:


vCi, o6 ATTACHMWi sOi aE iir
Nojriatchefing, open end type, 2 &dri r
Sgsp;jn drive, & in wrench opening. '>.
















CROWFOOT ATTACHMENT. SOCKET WRENCH
Nonrtchetin, 12-point open wall box type,
Sin size i drive, 3' in wrench opening.











CROWFOOT ATTACHMENT, SOCKET WRENCH:
Noratcheting, 2-point open wall box type.
"4 in size drive, in wrench opening.
CRDWFOOT ATTACHMENT, SOCKET WRENCH:


Nonratcheling, 12-point open wall box type,
% in size drive. in wrench opening.











MAYBE I
,OUGHTA KEEP AN
IINVENTORY PASTE
IN THE BOX.


; S 02 -9-65


FSN 51,2-321-450






EXTENSION, SOCKET WRENCH: ihsq drms, 6
EXTENSION, SOCKET WRENCH: in sq drive, 2
inIg.


EXTENSION, SOCKET WRENCH: Y in sq drive, 6
in Ig.

EXTENSION, SOCKET WRENCH: % in sq drive, 3
in Ig.
EXTENSION, SOCKET WRENCH: 3% in sq drive, 6
in Ig.
EXTENSION, SOCKET WRENCH:* in sq drive, 9
in 1g.


F l510B -,4-916P3
.._l~~l~llllI*


FS 1224169,

FS. 5102248


I


I


I


I


U


iflr r


ALL FILES
SHOULD
BE USED -
WITH A
HANDLE J


W

























U..11-6304


HANDLE, SOCKET WRENCH: Spin (screwdriver)
type, X in size drive end. 2% in mmi to 4 in
max Ig o 'a.

HANDLE, SOCKET WRENCH: Spin type, % in
size drive end, 5% in nom Ig o/a.
,,;;;; i 4


FSN 5210-221-199









53 2


HOLDER, SCREWDRIVER BIT, FEMALE SQUARE
DRIVE: Y in nom drive, in nom hex socket

HOLDER, SCREWDRIVER BIT, FEMALE SQUARE
DRIVE: % in nom drive, Y' in nom hex socket

HOLDER, SCREWDRIVER BIT, FEMALE SQUARE
DRIVE: 3 in nom drive, ,. in nom hex socket


I


A THIN
FILM OF
LUBE OR
GRAPHITE
KEEPS
MOVING
PARTS
MOVING


i1- Z-,


,1 20-595-951


FSN 5120-278-0352


lFSNlI'llt' 5120 '-247-517


FS 104825






SCREW STARTER, HAND: Rotating wedge grip.
plastic handle, X% in w tip, 1% in Ig blade.


SCREW STARTER, HAND. No SN9


I FSN5120293-509


IIL
W:IIY~i~Y4Ov



FSN 5120-222-1906A~


SCREWDRIVER, CROSS TIP: Phillips tip plastic
ihandi ; no.- size tip, 3 in Ig blade.


SCREWDRIVER, CROSS TIP Phillips ti-plastic
handle, no. 2size tip, 4 In Ig blade.

SSCREWDRIVER. CROSS TIP: Phillips tip, plastic
indBlp. s&i116, 6 In Ig blade. -

"SCREWDRIVR; CROSS TIP:Phillips tiplastc
;hiandle, -o '4ile tip, 8 in Ig blade .

-";5


FSN 5110-239-8253


FSN 5120545-426











SCREWDRIVER, FLAT TIP: Plastic handle,
wrench grip, % in w flared tip. 4 in Ig blade.


SCREWDRIVER, FLAT TIP: Plastic handle.
wrench grip X. in w flared tip, 6 in Ig blade.


SCREWDRIVER, FLAT TIP: Plastic handle,
wrench grip X in w flared tip. 8 in Ig blade.


FSN 512 -28-128


l i,,,
12-4 022


SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: Deep style, % in
sq drive,- in max OD socket end.


SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: Deep style, % in
sq drive, 12-point, K, in opening.


SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: Deep style, % in
sq drive, 12-point, 3 in opening.


SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: Deep style, % in
sq drive, 12-point, K. in opening.




SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: Deep style, % in
sq drive, 12-point, 'i in opening.
SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: Deep style, X in
sq drive. 12-point, in opening.


SOCKET. SOCKET WRENCH: Deep style, X in
sq drive, 12-peint, Y in opening.


SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: Deep style, X in
sq drive, 12-point, "% in opening, 5 in min
dia of bolt clnc hole.


SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: Deep style, '4 n
sq drive, 12-point, % in opening, % in min dia
of bolt cinc hole.







SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: Univ joint, Ci4' sq
drie, 12-ioint,r j i opening .


SOCKET, SOCKEF WRENCH: Univ joint, % in sq
-ot in opening.


SOCKE, SKET WRENCH: Univ joint, % in sq
,drve.12 -ointo in opening.


SOCKET; SOCKEtWRENCH: Univ joint; In sq



SOCKET. SOCKET WRENCH: '/ in sq drive, 12-
1point, i in opening.


SOCKET. SOCKET WRENCH. i; in sq drive, 12-
point, )( in opening.


SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH. ; in sq drive, 12-
point, in opening.


SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: in sq drive, 12-
point, ?4 in opening.
SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: 1, in sq drive, 12-
_;.11 Lt ;. --;n..- r


SOCKET, SOCKE WRENdH: Univ joint 3ii sq
dr2-pint4 i n opIning.



drive, 12-point, in opening ng. -
.-. i .". "



.I-





SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH. % in sq drive, 12-
point, %' in opening.


SOCKET, SOCKET WRENCH: in sq drive, 12-
point, % in opening.


SOCKET. SOCKET WRENCH: in sq drive, 12-
point, & in opening.






BEWARE
FoF


,FSNH.512M.3183 ,



UNIVERSAL JOINT, SOCKET WRENI
drive.


WRENCHI, OPEN END FIED q-,am

W.RENCHt OPEN-END, FIXED &4noen
Jngs; 60 deg angle.
..FSN 5120Z77-083
WRENCH, OPEN END, FIXED. -% & &In apen

SAEN C H, OPEN END FI(ED & P~ n pen-
opngeideg dngle.
FSN. I- 2D-27pz 7 .8311



S-WlRENCH; OPEN END, FIX AM d""i.
-:101 N 51M~271413b,
WRENCH,. OPEN ENDFIXED 3j p
openings 60-egang e-
WSN 5120.7783134
h~~~~~~~, ~ : &:: *n:;NCiOE ~D~XD~~na
I F* 5120-293. P 134 ~iPlB ~~


CH: % in sq


I,


UNIVERSAL JOINT, SOCKET WRENCH. 39 in sq
drive.


7


I


FSN 5210-287-3335 -11;






WRENCH, BOX: Angular offset double head, 12-
point, & 3 in openings, 4 in min Ig o/a.


WRENCH, BOX Angular offset double head, 12-
point, % & X in openings, 6Y in min, 8W, in
max Ig o/a.


WRENCH, BOX: Angular offset double head, 12-
point, % & f in openings, 7% in max Ig o 'a.


WRENCH, BOX: Angular offset double head, 12-
point, % & "% in openings, 9~ in min, 11
in max Ig o/a.


WRENCH, BOX: Angular offset double head, 12-
point, & % in openings.


WRENCH, BOX: Angular offset double head, 12-
point, %' & I in openings, 11% in min,
14 i max Ig o/a.


WRENCH, BOX. Angular offset double head, 12-
point, & 1 in openings, 13W in min, 15I
in max Igo/a.


WRENCH BOX Chrome plated finish, angular
offset double head, 12-point % and f. in open-
ings, 7 3 in nom Ig.
wo


WONDER
WHAT
HAPPENED
TO THE
WRENCH
1 DROPPED
AROUND
N HERE?


























'4RENCH, TORQUE: Rgid frame end drive,
micrometer adjustable torque mechanism, w/
audible & slip clutch indication mechanism
4 Ip sq male Drive. 5 to 150 in-lb cap, w/case.

F 52524


WRENCH, TORQUE: Rigid frame end drive,
micrometer Adjustable torque mechanism, w/
audible 'Indication mecbamsm, K in sq male
drive, 100 to 750 in-lb cap, w.' ase.

5120i-8213441


PEEP HOLE TIP FOR TI


How much is enough?
Like, when you're scrutinizing a con-
trol tube to make sure it has a couple-
threads screwed into the clevis rod end.
One way you know the control tube's
tied in OK on that aircraft... say, may-
be an 0-1 is to see nothing but
threads in the witness hole.
If you can't aim your eyeballing
through the hole because of close quar-
ters, try sticking a piece of .032 safety
wire through it. Blocked from going
through means it's still OK.
Telling it like it is para 185c(1)
and (2) in TM 55-408 (Jun 65).


TAKE A PEE K.IF
YOU SEE NOlMING
S\ BUT THREADS C'OU'RE
IN A-1 SHAPE.


WITNESS HOLE





E-- PUT SOME
GETTING ITHE MOST
OUT OF A T-41B
DEPENDS ON WHAT
- you PUTL INTO IT.
TAKE ORGANIZATIONAL
PM F'RINSTANCE...


seat belt bracket ion the floor) so If .ou'ec just recci\ed a new oil
that it's tow ard the door. That v a) dipstick, be sure it's the same length
the belt won't hang upon the scat as the one you'ree replacing. Some
... and it'll fit a large type pilot or of the replacements have been too
passenger. The repositioning gives long. Be sure, too, that the oil level
you about 6 inches more belt. markings are the same as the old
one.



WAY
OLD
WAY
A reminder- W'hen you remoet or replace the oil dipstick. hold it in as
straight a line as possible. That way sou won't bend it ... which happens.


PM IN YOUR TANK
Try it straight 'n easy when
you'ree slipping in the APLI CON.
NECTOR. Pushing it home vith
an! thing but light, steady pressure
"a' can bung up the bracket.
Here're a few shim tips to keep Excessie nosewheel vear. on
you straight: either side of the tire, is a good sign
hr of sworn shims. Which means it's
le probably time for a re-shim on the
Strut yoke.
SHIMMY 'Nother sign that all is nor well
DAMPENER with the shims is nosewheel vibra-
e NEED
EluID, tion... or. ahem. shimmy.
FLUID"
Nosewheel shimm). too. is a
good clue that the shimmy damp-
ener needs hydraulic fuid.
And. uh. still with the shakes, excessive pla% in the steering arm assem-
bl) makes for vibration .. and clues you that .ou need shims there, too.


Wind and vibration have an appetite for the plastic strip on the outside
edge of the elevator... to the point where an additional rivet is needed.
The new rivet keeps the edge cover
Remember to lube the brake pins
from cracking at the rear rivet.
on an as-required basis. The
pins rust and could result in
CRACK BRAKE PINS
PUT EXTRA
RIVET HERE
brake freeze up. The pins go into
If rokn nd goubrelf cable rater the torque plate-- and iou can lube
broken pargin brake n cable urap r 'em ,ith Grease, molybdenum di-
ofen-go to the net size up for slide, FSN 9150-'54-2595 .
shop some here.
If the pins hase recessed I/8 inch
or so. hold the panic button.
There's still plenty, of life left in the
brake discs.


I






F THEY'RE MILITARY STANDARD...

T. AKE 'M OFF



.iiy.-. oa .. riei g
inashed-ot eqipm ent
S'' property disposal
; oice-its military Standard
SEngi (if the is one) is
nota disposal item.
The fMilii ta tndard
Engine is sent to DS
regardless of is condition.
ven if the engine' s nor
repairable, parts may be
cannibalized to repair other .
S engines- unseri'ceable-
parts get puL Baik'on the
anserviceable en inc before
you send it to ippor.
SSowhat's -ait tary
Standard Engine? Theie are 6
general groups with
horsepower ratings of 1-1/2,'
-, -3, 6, 10, 14 and 20.
Within each group there
are 1, 2 or engines-
: usually identified on -
their data plates as
Mark I, II or Ill-with a
total f 15 separate FSN' ..
Engine data plates, with
FSN's, are your clue on
;.'' engines that don't go to
the PDlO. .


,,


IM 5-2805 213 24P (28 Feb 681
14 HP 2805 017.8680. A042



20 HP 2805-776 0485, 4A084 I IMk II
(No ports manual listed)
TM 5 2805-759-24P 19 iJn 69)
20 HP 2805-952 3926, 4A084 (Mk II)
20 HP 2805-872 5972, 4A084 3 IMk IIll


IM 5 2805203 24P (23 Oct 68)
6 HP 2805-776 0483, 4A032.1 (Mk II
6 HP 2805.068 7512, 4A032-11 IMk III


TM 5-2805 256 24P (11 Sep 68)
P.'i HP 7805 601 5181, 1A08 1 (Mk 1)
I.; HP 2805-714 8552. IA08-2 (Mk II)
I HP 2805 068-7510. 1A08 3 IMk III



10 HP 2805-776-0484 7A047 I IMk II
(No parts manual Ilited)
IM 5-2805-258-24P (27 Jan 69)
10 HP 2805 957 3927, 7A042-2 (Mk II)
10 HP 2805 872 5971. 2A047.3 (Mk III



TM 5 2805.257.24P (11 Sep 681 )
3 HP 2805.601 5127. 7A016 1 IMk II
. 3 HP 2805 714 8553. 2AO1672 IMk Ill
\ 3 HP ?805-072 4871, 7A016 3 IMk I111






COOL, MAN, COOL

HE LEFT THE DOORS
CLOSED AGAIN.











Dear Editor,
There are two things I've noticed about
our M2 burner unit when it's placed in the
top or middle section of the cabinet. When
the small doors in the cabinet are closed
the pressure will build up fast.
Most cooks think the top shield is there
to help keep the rest of the unit clean. It
does that, but if it's removed and the burn-
er's lit, the fuel tanks will absorb heat and
raise the pressure into the danger zone. SLIDING
This is especially true when the unit's in DOORS
the top position.
SP5 J. L. S.
TOP










(Ed Note-Glad that you brought those two points up. The small doors were
designed so you can get to the burner controls, so you can see the pressure
gage, and last but not least, to give air circulation to keep down the temperature
around the fuel tanks. The burner should never be operated with the small doors
closed in front of the burner controls, and never without the top shield.)





I GOT A
MAINTENANCE
PROBLEM.


tec F9S7n


'About I/rd
ANGRCe-50
Oops! We dropped a line on that
AN/GRC-50(V) radio set article in PS
201. So, just before the last sentence on
page 38, add: "Then, rotate the most
to the point midway between the marks
on the base plate." You do that just be-
fore you lock the mast in position.

5A4 ,4
You supply guys will want to get ac-
quainted with SB 700-25 (Jun 69),
Consolidated Interchangeable and Sub-
stitute Item List (CISIL). It's a companion
to the Federal Supply Catalog Manage-
ment Data List (C-ML-A). Your C-ML-A
will clue you as to whether you should
look for an interchangeable or a sub-
stitute item in the CISIL by means of an
I & S indicator code.

Hot Commot T7ip
You signal types plagued by hot
weather common problems will be happy
to hear about a new, 33-minute training
film, TF 11-3963, "Preserving and Pro-
tecting Electronics Equipment in the
Tropics." Your unit can get it from your
local audio-visual support center.


The dumbbell-shaped audio cap for
your RT-505, RT-246, RT-524 and RT-841
receiver-transmitters is wearing a new
FSN these days. You can get it with:
Cover, Electrical Connector, FSN 5935-
973-1732.

Nl Scoft
Please pass the word-The MI 1 port-
able decon is for deconning equipment
only. Never aim it at human types or
clothing. The stuff in the M 1 will burn
when it's sprayed on an open flame.
So, make sure the Ml 1 is never used as
a fire extinguisher.
I7 Beaeft on 5/4
Forget what you've heard about a
breather valve bein' needed on the
transmission cover of your M715 or
M725 1 l-ton vehicle. That breather was
only on a few early models. Now your
5-quarter's transmission is vented to the
engine air cleaner.
y4mmftG (0%t4~fet
Supply-Types, note SB 725-12-2
(Jan 69) gives the scoop on reporting NX
storage and shipping containers.






Handle 'em

lik


That's the way to handle equipment
and parts going back for repair.
Use the crate it came in or use boxes
and padding you've saved ..
corrugated board, plastic foam
and such.
WHEN YOU SHIP 'EM-PROTECT 'EM.
Pack 'em well Crate 'em Ride 'em gentle on
a salvage mattress