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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00049
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1969
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00049

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4-5
        Page 6-7
        Page 8-9
        Page 10-11
        Page 12-13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24-25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28-29
        Page 30-31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40-41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54-55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66-67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74-75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Back Cover
        Page 82
Full Text



SW
STH
sPREVENTIVE
MAINTNANC
))MONTHLY


Wten


I~



as -




trXT -


S.













rHE PREVEINIVE MAUIIENANCE uON7 .L
Insue No. 202 1969 S a I
IN THIS ISSUE


CM(II in-perlors will gihe you the
word on things you may not be up-
to-.nuff on. The, help iou and
tour commander make .4ure your
equipnleitl i ready for combat.
Iour commander anls iou lo
ha\c e hebers maintained (and best
fighting) equipment in the Army.
You do. too. Riehl?


FIREPOWER 2-29
Amino Care 2 23 MI6Al
Small Ann, Rile 26-21 2-21
Chart 2 25 MI4 Rllle 27






GROUND MOBILITY 30-35
.0 amp llenaiuor 3031 I ~ Ion Truck 34.35 ,r
Brs kerFlud 35




COMMUNICATIONS 45-53
ANIGRC46 45-7 SB22tPT 5
AN/VSS-I 48 Deosiseea
Equlpmenl Cie 41 TA431PT 312/PT 52
lTeetypewrller Radio Covers 52
Soaol 49 M36 Chnrnograph y3



AIR MOBILITY 54-64
Hoses 54-5 M XMlIfl Subsystem NB
Tool Sets 58 IJi-. AHIB 11.62
ley 59 OH611A 1S
Ml34 Gun 59 Fire mErbguisher I
AH.-16 011-23 64


COMBAT SUPPORT/EQUIPMENT
Rogh leao Cran C e 65 6 000-Rb TIrn e 7I
Car o Monode ll.t 65 Weldin Booth Panl 79
D7ETractso 61-3 ImmersionHeater 71
Dat PlaleNumbers 13 Artifihoo lip Ul
WABCOGraer 1475 GroundRod a0
LAcv 71 low Publcations 36
Supply 14 24. Z5. 28, 45,47, 49., 5,
59. I.I:.65, 1 ,7 I, 7. o.
Un l Flnds If prtiUin ofl his pihlcis
tin hs b een approved by Hodiqiarten,
Departml t ol te Army. 26 FlebInry 131
DISTRIBUTIOIN In accrtance irth re-
quIreanels submitted an DA For 124.


7'0 //1'v '.j

Io/





NO SPIT AND POLISH FOR...
A&



WHETHER
IT'S SMALL ARMS
OR BIG ARTILLERY- HANDLE V(qDsN T A
AMMUNITION HANDLE YOUR AMMO 614', ; OrV U
NEEDS TO BE KEPT THAT AMMO PROPERLY AMMo Se.OP,
CLEAN, DRY, COOL AND CAREFUL PROTECT THETO PREVENT
TREATED WITH CARE AMMO FROM JAMS! E or r
E YOU ON THE RAIN UST o- 6.
RANGE OR LOADING AND HOT
l FOR REAL. suN.


THE LE.. AMMO LOT
RED ON RI. TO THE HEAD SHED -
... THEM ROUNDS
AIN'T DOING LIKE
1. THEY OUGHT. AlviMO
ERVICEAILITY AN I ITS AIR-

IT GOOD ON THE AMMO UNTIL YER




VENTNTATION.
SIRAN VENTIATIO CONTAINERS! READY TO
SAMMO TYPE IS EAH USE IT
POWN FROM PIViISON AST
STO ADVISE 0US ON INTRUDERS
SERVICEABILITY AND AN FIRE A
IDENTIFICATION. H R
; MO REUARD

SHE LL OHAVEA
A CURRENT
1-8 9 -100-386.
MAN, THE
/ ARMY 15 SURE
UPGRADING ITS
CIVILIAN TECHNICIAhSj 5

AwilSAVE BOXES AND METAL
4. CONTAINERS FOR RE-USE.
T- THEY'RE COSTLY.

MORE





CLEAN AT DON'T SCRUB
M e RA, dA ROU"NDGLU6! -OFF THE
IT'S PROTECTIVE
THAT ROUND'LL f T MUp j COATING WHEN
R K 1 0 T YOU CLEAN IT!
I DROPPED UBE OR
BY THE ROUND, OR IT ON THE J 1W AM THE PIECE l iTHE
SBY THE BOX-YOU WAY UP, BEST
PON 'r DRAG, THROWAMMO
DROP, KICK OR STEP CLEANING'
S A
ON AMMO t ITOOL
L --CLEAN
,. Rough handling can dent, crease TH
and bulge cartridge cases so they'll ELBOW
PAY not chamber in the weapon; nick or KEEP AMMO LEGAN AND READY TO USE REAE.
ATTENTlrO burr rotating bands so they'll not DON'T PUSE A 5
HEN UNLOADING, form a gas-tight seal in the bore; OILOR ANY
LOVER/ E, CLEANER-
loosen, damage or set off primers and T YPE
-X propellants or fuzes-or otherwise MATERIA






cartridge. At the very least, rough ARE IN TM 9.1300203
THERE handling will damage boxes and con-
GOES THE tainers, break seals, grommets and CLEA WASTE

PROOFING other protective material. And, then EASY ON I KNOW...OTHEY'RE YOUR. TIME
moisture, rust and corrosion will 5MALL WATERPROOFED TO SHINING UP
have a free hand. AM O. PROTECT THE PRIMER BRASS
FROM DAMPNESS! CASES.
IT'S SAFER TO
HANPLE'EM ALL
THE SAME WAY--
I HEAR SOME AMMO CAREFULLY -.
IS LESS SENSITIVE TO N 0< .
ROUGH STUFF THAN X
OTHERSA... ,,




4









THERE'RE LIMIT5I i


S-, THEY'RE VERY

.- C BY MOISTTUREHEAT,
HUMIDITY FIXE
PROTET AMMO OUTDOORS AND SHOCK- AND
0WHY NOT so EASY, MAN! FIXED
VEN[IlATION WHY NOT... AMMO
AS LONG COMES
SA T DOES THEY MUST FUZE OR i
BE SURSTORE JOB BE IN ToP UNFUZE..
SHAPE FOR SEPARATE
DUNNAGE AMMO STAYS DRY ABouT? THE AMMO LOADING

WHAT EVER IS HANDY...BUT COVER IT. UNF ZE. COM

HEY, WOO
DOI DO NOW? r KEEP
AIR- PROPELLANTS
DRY AWAY FROM
INSIDE IE WEAPON SO
OF NO FLAME OR j .
REPAK BOX SPARKS IT
-A O 'EM .
OPEN DAMP BOXES, RESEAL
TAKE OUT CONTENTS DRY AMMO
I IX isoS ...EVERYTHING CAREFULLY
AA- NEV'R COURSE, YOU TURN
ON A AMO iEY IN DAMAGED AMMO. THISKEEP 'EM
CAN'T ENIFY LOTTA BOXED AND
LOADED BQ, ... CAN'T BE USEP. DOUGH TO HOWBOXE AND
SO, BE SURE YOU WASTE DUE ABOUT HOW
E SURE MARK OR TAG IT TO LIKE HOW
-O- TRANSFER AS YOU UNPACK CARELESSNESS. IS DO WE
ALL OF THE STUFF THAT'S NOT STORE
ORIGINAL TO BE USEP FUZES
MA KINGS, RIGHT OFF! oI F
ESPECIALLY LOT -
NUMBER,ONTO
THE REPAIRED






Semi-fixed ammo has
prop charge exposed, so
you can adjust it for zone I CAN 'O, THE
firing. Keep it dry and Fuzes are never taken FIX IT USER NEVER
clean! And adjust means apart or altered in any EASY MODIFIES OR
you can remove propellant ..DaFs b anyone in the field. REPAIRS A
-you never add to a pro- FUZE.
pelling charge.
h-.If a fuze is rusti.corroded or damaged, it goes back to ammo support
STASH INCREMENTS LEAVE IT TAKES AN EXPERT .TO ADS for repairs or destruction. The warning, in fact, applies to all ammo and
YOU REMOE PRPELLAT\ ammo componens ..it is never modified or repaired by the user-
THEY WON'T BE FUZES ALONE IF YOU REPLA(E. INSTALL OR except, of course hen a fuze swap or propellant adjustment is authorized.
A FIRE HAZARD. AIN'T AN EXPERT. ". SWAP A FUZE.

.4. ". .R O T YUP... I GAVE When you unpack a fuzed
REMOVE THE
HORSESHOE ? IT TO H IN round, though, be sure to remove
ON T the horseshoe stop from the wrench
TME s THIS TRY E slots on the fuze. Firing a round
GENTLE TOLICH THE TILL OUGHTA with the horseshoe stop will dam-
1- NEEDED FOR RIGHT I LEARN IT
SFUZING. TOOL? CHECK Y EART age the gun tube. And, you never
.HE fire a round with a proximity fuze
M set on S. It'll not be set for arming.

Rotating a fuze rapidly or carelessly can cause accidental arming if
the fuze or the round is later dropped or mishandled. So, like always,
-,handle fuzes with TLC when you're setting them.
q. TURN-IN ALL ROUNDS
~DAMAGED BY RECOIL OR
'ii--KEEP RAMMED OUT OF A GUN. .
LOADING AMMO, LIFTING BAR Your best bet with any fuze or fuzing chore is to know all the specific
KEEP LIFTING LEVEL
NO, NO. PLUG ON UNTIL safety cautions. The weapon's TM and its firing tables give you the scoop
O' I ou FUZE A on your fuzes. TM 9-1300-203 (Apr 67) with changes, is loaded
OVROUND. with info on fuzes, fuzing and all other artillery ammo components. Some
THE SAFETY very special cautions, for example, on using proximity fuzes are spelled
out in the TM's para 5-72.
If prepared ammo is not fired, you have to replace the fuze safety wire
UNTIL yOU or pin immediately, and otherwise safety the ammo. Then you make sure
that ammo's used first when you fire again. While it's on the waiting line
ARE
READ TO ou have to cover it and protect it as best you can, from rain, dust, grime,
grease, oil and rough handling. If you turn in the ammo you have to
tLOA UP! repack it, date it and mark it to show the ammo's been prepared for firing.
O 9
MRE






BURRS? -J U M




NICKS
AROUND AMMO AND S T BUT
YOU ARE THE I. DENTS BE SURE IF IT THEN
ON BELTED GROMMET SCRATCHES EN'T
0 ~~~TE OR DENTS DOESN'T DON'T
AMMO WATCH I OFF BEFORE DON'T HURT SLAT RIGHT FIRE
A"RYOU LOAD. OND
THOSE LINKS. O o LOAD! THE ROUND. IN THE IT'... LET
WEAPON THE AMMO
EXPERTS






AN3P ~STRETCHED -- _
MAGAZINES" LINKS




GREEN. YELLOW, BLUE ROUNDS
SHORT OR LONG ROUNDS MAKE OR WHITE TAIN5 WITH LOOSE,
VENTS OE TN W
AN UNEVEN BELT OR CLIP WOY COULDBESERI,
CORROSION./ RUSTY OR
INSPECT CRRODED
AND CLEAN F. PROJECTILE
BEFORE THERE IS NO
LOAING. HANDLE ,FLAKING...
BELTED AMMO IN ITS CARTRIDGE/ THEN
WITH CARE NONE CASE IT COULD BE OK
0.
THAT BUT...IF

UI EYOU HAVE
CA. OUT ANY DOUBT5-
PROBLEM& DON'T FIRE IT,
-'" ROUNDS.





-1 11





I TOLD YA NOT TO FIRE
THAT RECOILLESS ROUND!/
, IT WAS DAMAGED! r-'


*-.


Recoilless
rounds with per-
forated cartridge
cases are dam-
aged if the inner
bag is punctured
...don't fire'em.
Mortar rounds
with damaged,
wet or spotty
propellant are
unserviceable.


7 BAS BLUE A STAIN '
SHOULD BE OR BROWN MAY NOT
WELL STAIN COULD BE HARMFUL-
LACED MEAN WEAK IF IT DOES
AND SPOTS IN THE NOT SMELL
FIRM. CLOTH ... OR BAD AND THE
NO WEAK CLOTH IS IN
LUMPS. PROPELLANT. GOOP SHAPE,J
SHE'S OKAY.


SV- I-


Keep in mind that ammo's not at its best when it's been exposed to extremely
high or low temps. So, put aside ammo that's been roasting or freezing. Also,
some components won't do much for you in a heavy rain storm. When specific
temp ranges or other firing restrictions apply, of course, they'll be quoted on
the ammo, its box or container, and for sure they'll be given in the weapon's TM
or the ammo pubs or firing tables.


check strip that's inside
must be violet. A faded
or grayish-white strip
may mean the propel-
lant is no good. You can
also use your nose to
check propellant, so give
a good sniff when you VHEW!
open a container. Good
propellant has a sweet-
ish, ether-like smell.
Propellant that's deteri-
orated gives off sort.of
a harsh, sour smell. 6


Same goes for rockets with
damage to fins or to the elec-
trical connections. Dropped or
damaged rockets may have un-
serviceable motors-or the
rockets may be extremely dan-
gerous to fire.
Reject blank cartridges with
loose or broken closing cup.
Handle 'em with care and
march 'em off to wherever
your support collects unserv-
iceable ammo.


S The grains of black powder in a propellant igniter
bag must move easily to your touch. If they're stuck
together or caked the charge is no good. Defective or
damp propellant, or improper ignition of propellant will
.- give you erratic flight and low or extreme pressures. And,
Sunburned or burning propellant may even spew out of
the muzzle. When you have a batch of bad prop report
it to your ammo support, or turn it in.

WHEN Propelling
LOAPING A charges have red
5EPARATE-LOAPING YOU MEAN igniter pads
CHARGE BE URE ONE'S COLORED (which contain
REAR OF THE RED, HUH? black powder)
CHAMBER. -- sewed to the
d--t breech end of
A VI X 1iS the base section.


LM 'OR 1>





PIP YOU REMOVE iu". MAKE SURE Always make sure you have the right OH,OH, I MUSTA
THE WRAPPINGS ON THERE'S NO GRIT, fuze. Unauthorized fuzes are risky. FO OT PA
THE IGNITERG ORUST OR LOOSE And, firing a round without a fuze is FUZE, HU
'e MATERIAL IN
.THE FUZE CAVITY. pointless in more ways than one. With-
S.. out a fuze in command, who knows
; : where the ammo will go or what it'll
do when it gets there. At best, the
S' round will end up a dud ... at worst it
Always remove the igniter-protec- might go off in the bore.
tion cap, data tags, barrier wrappings. $. If a fuze buzzes when you remove PLUGS SHOULD .
etc., from a propelling charge before -' the safety pin, forget it ... the fuze is BE TIGHT TO
loading the propellant. Forgetting these CLEAN IT not for you. Replace the safety pin care- KEEP MOISTURE
things may cause the propellant to mal- WITH A CLEAN ful and quick-like and put the fuze off OUT. BUT THEY
function or may leave burning junk in LINT-FREE CLOTH to itself somewhere till it's turned in SHOULD GIVE
TO A GOOD
the tube. AND A PIECE OF or reported. If possible, mark or tag it STRONG
When you're fuzing make sure WOOp, BUT... so everyone else will know it's a bum Tws5T.!
NEVER METAL!i
there's no grit, grease, rust or loose fuze.
material in the fuze cavity or in the GETROUND OUTA THE
threads. The stuff'll keep the fuze from H;T THIS AREA QUICK,
seating right.
Never use a fuze or a projectile with ICONE LIGHT
damaged threads. Fuze and pr GREASE. COAT

IF IT DOESN'T GO .
ON EASY-FORGET IT.
PON'T FORCE IT. -e"





It's usually safe to handle and transport fuzes that've buzzed (after you re-
place the safety pin), but the SOP on handling "buzzers" is something else you
' threads must mate just right, and the have to learn by heart. See your weapon's TM and TM 9-1300-203. And, you
A VERY LIGHT COAT OF SIUCONE GREASE
fuze must be fully seated. And, you turn in projectiles with frozen lifting plugs.
have to install a fuze easy-like. Never a How about fuzes on fuzed ammo? Are the fuzes loose, improperly staked;
force it. any safety devices missing? Are the safety and arming devices in the armed posi-
If you find rusty threads when you're tion? Eye the fuzes closely.
checking a lifting plug, you can coat ( Leaking exudationn) around the plug or fuze means trouble. Don't fool with
the threads with a very light coat of ,.- the leakage, it's explosive. Get leaking ammo out of the area soonest and yell
silicone compound FSN 6850-702- / for ammo support to take over.
4297, Mil-C 21567, after you clean the Never handle fuzes by the cord attached to the pull or safety wires. Pull wires
threads. stay on until you're ready to fire.
14 15 [





















Never load HE and chemical ammo
in the same vehicle, and use whatever
cushioning you can around the fuze
boxes. Never cart POL, or any other
type cargo with your load.
Spread the load evenly over the cargo
space, but keep the height of the load
well below the top sides of the cargo
compartment, and give the load air
space on all sides. You may need ridge
poles under the tarp to prevent rain
puddles.


I 7n R





Plan your loading so you don't have
to wrestle the ammo too much. In fact,
the less you man-handle your ammo, the
better. Like when you're loading a vehi-
cle, get it as close as you can to the
ammo, and use a human-chain to pass
the ammo gently. To load or unload
boxed ammo you can use smooth, clean
boards to form a slanting ramp and
slide the boxes easy-like on or off the
vehicle.


THAT'S WHY
OL' BUDDY, WE
NEVER LOAP
S HE ANO CHEMICAL
-' AMMO IN THE
\" SAME CART





-, '


Any vehicle going close to your ammo load, or totin' it,'must be in top
operating condition, especially the electrical, fuel and steering systems and
the brakes. It must be real clean. No oil, fuel, grease or any other flam-
mable stuff sticking on anything. And, it must be equipped with a flame
and spark arrestor, and good fire extinguishers must
be on board.
And, whether it's loaded or unloaded a vehicle
is never refueled anywhere near your ammo ... not
even from a portable refueling gear. A loaded vehi-
cle gets refueled way off to itself. .,
The ammo vehicle driver must know what his FRIVOLOUS FUELER EX-AMMO
cargo is, and he must be a top-notch driver. DRIVER OF THE MONTH


cv lo mqO
In passing large rounds into a com- FOR LOADING AND STORING
bat vehicle always shield both ends of AMMO, SEE YOUR TANK TM
a round from bumps and knocks. Cover
the fuze (or projectile end) with one
hand and protect the base and primer
with the other hand. That goes for
each man in the loading line-up. The
first man covers a round fore and aft
until the next man in line can slip one
hand over each end of the round. And,
ammo with the primer installed you pass fuze-end first to make sure the
base of the round doesn't get rammed or bumped as it travels into the vehicle.
17
MORE">


















Belted machine gun ammo and other small arms ammo collects lots of mois-
ture when it's stored in a combat vehicle. So, you have to keep a close check on
it, wipe it dry and air it out, or it'll be ruined in no time. You can beat the
moisture problem some, if you open the doors, ramp, hatches, etc., when you can,
to let outside air hit the ammo.
Large rounds stored in the vehicle's ammo racks also need regular attention.
They're normally inspected or unloaded for cleaning as called for by the com-
mander's SOP. And, when you clean, paint, grease, oil or wash anything inside
the vehicle, you have to protect the racked and packed ammo from whatever
you're using. Also, when you hose-down the outside of the vehicle, close it up
to keep the inside dry as possible.
r M ^If you're transporting your load in
a chopper, you have to take the ammo
to the chopper .. the bird doesn't come
to where your ammo's stashed. All
switches on the chopper must be off,
the rotor must be secured and the chop-
RIGHT per must have a good electrical ground.
IN While the loading or unloading is go-
THERE. ing on, the chopper should have explo-
S ,-/ sives warning signs attached to its sides.





The ammo boxes and containers must be in good condition (no damage,
breaks, leaks, etc.), they must be tightly sealed and show the ammo's identifica-
tion on the outside. The load must be lashed down like the aircraft commander
says.
The specifics on transporting ammo by aircraft (weights, safety requirements,
compatability of ammo types, etc.) are covered in TM 38-250 (May 68) Pack-
aging and Handling of Dangerous Materials for Transportation in Military
Aircraft.


SOUT3IDE RAGE
REGARDLESS WHERE YOU ALWAYS
AMMO'S STORED OR WOT'S USE GOOD
CARRIED ON, IT MUST THAT. 5 1fONG DUNNAGE.
BE STACKED BY TYPE,
i EIZE AND LOT NUMBER.





TIGHTEN IT 4Flft
Up SO IT WON'T
COLLECT WATER.
a

If your outfit's staying put for a spell
and the ammo's stacked outside (or, byEY HOW
some good luck, indoors), stack your DEEP 15 THIS
ammo by vehicle load and ear-mark it PRAINAGE DITCH
for the vehicle it's carried on. That'll ANYWAY?
save time and sweat if you have to
bug out. 'T
Stacking by lot number is downright "'
critical for artillery ammo that must
zero-in just right for pin-point support.
Store your load away from power L,,
lines, electric cables, towers, trees and q
anything else that may attract light-
ning. Keep it away from busy roads
and trails... and as far as possible from
airfields, gas dumps, water supplies and ---
hospital areas. ,_- '.E.



















Keep all boxes and containers in a
stack headed in the same direction and
with the identification info facing out.
Try for hard, well drained or high
ground, otherwise a good rain may
sink or drown your stacks. You'll
need at least 6 inches of strong, well-
supported dunnage under each stack.
You can use boards, logs, limbs,
stones or small arms ammo boxes filled
with sand or dirt for dunnage. If you
don't have a good storage location
you'll need drainage ditches around
the stacks so water'll not collect under
them.
7 Cover the stacks with tarps (a double
thickness, if possible), or whatever

TM 9-13A00-20 ,
rf DISTANCEE TABLES.


weather-proof material you have handy.
When rain and dampness are scarce,
you can use layers of grass or branches
to protect ammo from the sun and
grime. And, thatching or layers of palm
leaves protect even against dampness
. just let the roofing material over-
hang the stack a good bit. And, remem-
ber that stuff isn't firepoof. Also, before
you go gathering material, be sure the
stripping of trees, foliage, etc., won't
hurt your camouflage or the neighbor-
hood.
In desert-like areas you can use sand,
stones, or dirt to build roofing.
You can use sand bags, canvas,
boards, heavy cardboard, branches, etc.,
for walls.
And the covering, whatever kind it
is, must be at least 18 inches above the
stack and at least 6 inches from all sides
to give the ammo good air space all


_rY~LI C





Never lay canvas or any other covering on top of boxes or containers, 'cause
you'll just be creating a sweaty situation for the stack. And, never nail the
covering right to the stack (nailing and hammering on ammo containers is
dangerous, remember). Secure it with rope, twine or wire, or anchor the cover-
ing some other way so it'll stand up to rain, snow and wind.
In tropical climates you have to check dunnage, tarps and other covering
frequently for mildew, rot, termites, fungus, snakes, rats and the like.





CJAc-I< cL-cX CLAC( CI.ACSITY CLACKITY C-ACIUrY CLCI(



Continuous exposure to moisture and high temps will hurt all ammo even-
tually. But, pyrotechnics and primers absorb moisture like crazy, and once they
do they're done for. So you really have to try hard to keep that stuff dry. You
also have to keep it off to itself and pointing away from other stacks and your
neighbors and friends.
WP and PWP ammo also needs a clear area. You store it on its base, espe-
cially where temps go up to 111 F. The 3.5 WP rocket, though, is an exception
to the WP storing rule .. you have to keep it nose down, never on its tail or its
side, especially where it's hot.
Never store any type of rockets between stacks of other ammo. They go to the
farthest end of your storage area. Store them nose down or pointing away from
other ammo. If you can swing it, face them into an embankment or some similar
barrier.
Stash chemical ammo off to itself,too,and place it so each round can be easily
inspected and quickly removed from the stack. Locate it so it's downwind from
your tepee. GT
AMMOa OWN




Keep fuzes for separate-loading ammo off to themselves as much as you can,
in case a fuze goes off by itself. Remember, fuzes are real sensitive to high temps,
direct sun heat and high humidity.
Stack rounds with perforated cartridge cases away from all pointed objects
(nails, wire, tools, sharp rocks, twigs, etc.). Never let them lie on the bare ground,
not even at the gun site.





Mines are waterproofed for ground-laying, but like all other ammo, they have
to be kept boxed and protected from moisture and shock until they're needed.
Keep the ammo area clear of trash, dry grass, rags, broken glass, glass con-
tainers and anything else that might help start a fire. Make sure fire extinguishers
and a water supply of some kind is handy to your stored load.
Your load, of course, has to be guarded or secure around the clock. See AR
190-11 (Aug 68), Weapons and Ammunition Safety.


The word on duds is -let 'em be. Touching, moving
or bothering a dud the least bit may activate its fuze.
Report duds to the Ordnance ammo types. If there's a
malfunction, hold all material for the ammo officer.
Never toss away defective ammo, or leave behind
ammo that's not fired. Report it so whoever's responsible
will get it turned-in or taken care of. If you abandon
defective or unused ammo, someone you like may acci-
dentally stumble on it. Also, you might be throwing
away important info on a defective lot that should be
investigated so you won't get more of the same. Or the
enemy might find it and rig you up a booby trap.






-"trhe am officer, NCOIC, the supply types, or some other wheel your
outfit keep the record straight on the outfit's authorized basic load.
The needed nose-count or paper-work is set up by the CO's SOP. They use
DA Form 581, Request for Issue and Turn-in of Ammunition, like it says in
para 4-3, Ch I (May 68), AR 735-35. They follow AR 700-1300-8 and Chap 5,
TM 38-750 (May 67), plus the local ammo safety and reporting SOP, to take
care of defective ammo, malfunctions and accidents.
But, it's up to you to let them know (as soon as you can) whenever you have a
problem-and, that includes a hangfire, misfire or cook-off.


.,PMMOPUBS

Now. let's stock the ommo pubs you should The FM in the 6-, 7-, or 17-series (your outfit's
he familiar with. know about or be real TOE-series number), that covers your unit's
close to- weapons or operations.
TM 9-1300-203 (Apr 67) Artillery Ammo. T 9-AMM5 (Jun 65) Ammo FSN and DOD
Codes.
TM 9-1300-206 (Nov 64) Care, Handling, Pre-
servation and Destruction of Ammo. TB 9-1300-246/1 (Apr 64) Ammo Color Cod-
ing.
TM 91305-200(Jun 61 Small Arms Ammo. TB 9-1300-385 Restricted or Suspended Am-
TM 9-1330-200 Uun 66) Grenades, Hand and mo. (Published monthly or as needed.)
Rifle. SB 755-140-1 (Apr 67) Disposition of Used
STM 9-1345-200 Uun 64) Land Mines. Packing Material and Ammo Components.
TM 9-1370-20 ( Military Pyrotechnics. 700-20 Adopted Items of Materiel and
TM 9-1370-200 (Sep 66) Military Pyrotechni). Army Reportable hems.
TM 9-1900 (Jun 56) Ammunition, General. j B 38--100 Preservation, Packaging and Pack-
TM 9-1901-1 (Dec 57) Ammo for Airat Guns. Ing materials, Supplies and Equipment.
TM 9-1950 (Feb 58) Rockets. CTA 23-100-series for ammo allowances and
S CTA 23-101 for allowances of miscellaneous
TM 9-6920-210-14 (Oct 68) Small Arms Tar- ammo and explosives.
gets, Material, BIIL and Repair Parts. AR 190-11 (Aug68) Weapons and Amno
'i AR 190-11 (Aug68) Weapons and Ammo
FM 5-20 (May 68) Camouflage. Safety.
TM 5-200 (Apr 681 Camouflage Materials. AR 385-63 (Jun 68) Firing Ammo in Training,
FM 9-6 Uun 65) Ammo Service in the Theatre Target Practice and Combat.
Sof Operations. AR 385-65 (Apr 65) Identification of Inert
FM 23-30 (Oct 59) Grenades and Pyrotechnics Ammo and Ammo Components.
... plus the specific 23-series FM on your AR 700-1300-8 (Aug 651 Malfunctions, Ammo
weapon. and Explosives.
23 _E






E SMALL ARMS-C L EANERS,
A HANDY
CHECK (\Unis of
SHEET. /- Item 1 FSN Issue Remarks
SWAB, SMALL ARMS CLEAN- 1005-288-3565 1000 ea. All small arms except M16AI
SING: cotton 2-1/2-in sq t and other 5.56-MM weapons


SWAB, SMALL ARMS CLEAN- 1005-912-4248
SING, 1-1/4-in sq

CLEANER, TOBACCO PIPE 9920-292-9946


CLOTH, ABRASIVE CROCUS, 5350-221-0872
9x11 sheet (CA)

RAG, WIPING, COTTON 7920-205-1711
(Fed DDD-R-30)
----- $. --- CLENIN COMPUND


'CLEANING COMPOUND,
Rifle Bore MIL-C-372B
/L


CARBON REMOVING COM-
POUND, (P-C-Illb)


T DRY CLEANING SOLVENT
e f I an


6850 224-6656
6850-224-6657
6850-224-6663'


6850-965-2332


{6850-664-5685


1000 ea


36 per pkg


For M16A1 rifle and other 5.56-
MM weapons


SFor M16AI rifle and other 5 56-
MM weapons


I 50-sheet sleeve Strictly for armorer's use only


2-oz bottle
-oz can
1-gal can


For internal and external dean-
ing of all weapons after they've
S been fired


- Strictly for ormorer's use only


5-gol pail


j1-qit can


Strictly for armorer's use only


I -i r-u-uou, type I 3ou-zoi-1yo3 i-gal can
LUBRICATING OIL semi-fluid 9150-935-6597 2-oz bottle For 16A1 rifle and other 556-
Mil-L-46000A (LSA) 9150-889-3522 4-oz bottle MM weapons, crew-served ma-
9150-687-4241 1-q can chine guns, certain parts of
B 9150-753-4686 1-gal can some helicopter machine guns
(see your TM)

LUBRICATING OIL: semi- 9150-949-0323 8-oztube For certain parts of some heli-
fluid, low friction (RIAPD- copter armament machine gun
688) (LSA-T) systems (see your TM)

LUBRICATING OIL, GENERAL 9150-273-2389 4-oz can For small arms, except M16A1
PURPOSE:Preservative 9150-231-6689 1-qtcan and other 5.56-MM weapons
Special (PL-S) --800. (see your TM)
24


W jr PRESERATIVES


I


d


-- ? II IP


B


I Strictly for armorer's use only


q


I





DIRTY PICTURE WITH A MORAL:

NEVAH SHOULD HOPPIN!

BUT I LUBEP
i 4..\ IT LIKE NORMALLY.


/- (CORRODED TUBE?

Water in the stock well plus lack-o-lube
sets up galvanic corrosion on the alum-
inum tube and phooey, another
M16A1 rifle out of action!
So who goofed -Speedy or Zapper?
Or both?
The good book says you armorers have to clean the outside of the lower
receiver extension-at least once a month,but lots oftener if conditions call for
it, like in the action area.
However, you riflemen have to make sure your armorer gets a chance to do
the job. Might be he'll let you help him, but don't tackle it by your lonesome,
otherwise.
Anyhow, the moral's clear: Never neglect this part of your zap machine!
Zapper-First chance you get after coming back from a firing mission split
over to Speedy's hootch and get him on the ball.
Speedy-Take the stock off the M16 and then do your PM thing, according
to what you find. If the tube's not corroded at all:


2. Sook a clean rag with ISA and put a
generous coat on the entire outside
surface. j~ V


1. Wipe it good and dean with a dry rag.





O'c6urse, this is just part of the deal
you have to pull on the lower receiver
extension w while doing Item 6 of the PM
Checks and Services bit in Table 3-2 of
'your -12 TM.
Natch. like the book sa s, you'll also
clean and lube the decents and springs
Sfor he takedov n pin, piort pin and se-
Slector lever at the same time. And \ou'll
get a dose of LSA in the decent well. too,
like Table 3-1 sa.s. A pipe cleaner
dunked in LSA -orks fine here.
S .A All clear?





STICK TO THE BURRS
I JUST FILED
OFF THE BURRS. TO
MUCH!
YOU
COULD
GET
SLOPPY
WHY DO YOU TRIGGER
ASK?F ACTION!



Easy does it, hey, you armorers, when
you're filing down burrs on the shoulder
of the M14 rifle's trigger housing.
File the burred areas only, especially
where the raised shoulder meets the
groove in the receiver. Never mind the \
rest of the housing. And stop filing
when the burrs are gone.
Elsewise you'll change the shape of
the parts and have sloppy trigger action.
Incidentally, use a real fine file or FILE THE BURRS ONLY
stone for the job.


)


I





YOUR M16 PARTS FROZEN?
USE BORE CLEANER ONLY


I


Here's how to use it on frozen parts.


Listen. If pans, derents and springs
on )our MI1A I rifle get frozen tight,
don't bother shopping for some exotic,
big-name, off-the-shelf stuff to loosen
em up. In fact, .ou'd better not!


t1


BORE (LEANER'S BEST


You'%e got the besst uff in the world
right there in your own kit bag. Yep,
rifle bore cleaner can't be beat for the
job. That's bore cleaner (Cleaning Com-
pound, Rifle Bore. MIL-C-3'2--FSN
6850 224-6656 2-oz bottle; FSN
6850-22-i-665 6-oz can
Non-authorized solutions with hifa-
lurin names ma; be the ern vorst thing
Sou could useon our w capon. Reasons.
Some contain ingredients that just gum
up the works. Others hase stuff in 'em
that attack aluminum and plastic. Still
others leave bare. unprotected metal.
Bur good ol' bore cleaner von't hurt
an)rhing on iour rifle. It's a test-tube
baby straight from the Armm labs-
born for its job.
28


POUR 10.12 DROPS
OF BORE CLEANER
ON IHE FROZEN PARTS


IL :


iTR4





NEW 60-AMP SYSTEM... fl
GROUND MOBILITY I
Watch it! One li'l slip- like touching a battery cable i
to the wrong battery post-and you'll blow your 60-amp
alternator.
This's the AC-DC generator on your
I-1/4-ion M715 truck or M"25 ambu. THEE HOOKUP E
lance. And it's thesamealternaior) o'll GOES THE UP A HE
fnd on late model M15IAI's-and ALTERNATOR BASS
others in the G838-series I/4--on famlls AGAIN! AK WARDS
-starring with Serial No. 02B001-68. A.GAIN.
7 ''


Your alternator can't take current
running through in the wrong direction
freserse polarity). A split second of re-
verse polarity) is enough to put your
alternator out of action-to the tune
of more'n 6200!
That's wh) )ou'%e got to be extra
careful around this AC-DC charging
system-like it tells you in para 06-16,
TM 9-2320-244-20 (Oct 68) and on
page 2-50, TM 9-2320-218-20 (Aug
68).


Always make sure you've got posi-
tive-to-positive and negative-to-nega-
tive when you're making' hookups to
your battery and alternator. No day-
dreaming, or you'll goof like Flubup
Fumble did:
He installed the positive cable on the
negative (-) battery post. Then, natch,
he made the second, and fatal, mistake
-he put the ground cable on the posi-
tive (+) battery post. BLOOEY! One AN ACCIDENT? YEAH, BUT YOUR ALTERNATOR
perfectly good alternator blasted. DOESN'T UNDERSTAND MISTAKES.


,- ACCIDENT INSURANCE
SYou can cut down on the chances of
.W' making this mistake bs placing your
batteries so it's almost impossible to put
a cable on the wrong post. With both
negative (-) posts on one side and both
positive (+) posts on the other side, F
)ou won't have to worry about drop- SAFER
ping the cable on the w wrong post.
On your "' 15 and M725, you can use the same cables you've got.
On your M151A1, though, you'll need a longer cable for hooking your bat-
teries together. Your TM 9-2320-218-20P (Apr 68) lists FSN's for wire, terminal
lus. insulation sleevine and marker band to make a new Inneer ciabl


There's not much chance you'll be issued a battery that's been charged in
reverse-but it has happened. Once is too much-that ol' reverse polarity
again-BLAM-scratch one alternator.
So always check a freshly-charged battery before putting it in your vehicle.
Make sure it's got the right polarity. It's easy and only takes a couple seconds.







Use the multimeter in your No. 1
Common Tool Kit. Set 'er up like in
Figure 2-10, TM 9-2320-218-20 (Aug
68)-negative lead (black) to the
"COMMON" jack on the multimeter
and positive lead (red) to the multi-
meter's positive (+) jack.
Set the range selector on 50 volts.
Now touch the black lead to the nega-
tive (-) post on the battery and the red
lead to the positive (+) battery post.


If your meter needle tries to go down-
scale (to the left), your battery's polarity
is reversed.


But let's dbublecheck. Switch your
black lead to the battery's positive post
and your red lead to the negative post.
Now if the meter needle goes up-scale
(to the right), you can be sure your bat-
tery's polarity is reversed.
In either hookup, if the meter needle
doesn't move at all, your battery's dead.
If your battery's dead or has reverse
polarity, turn it in for another-and
check that one for reverse polarity, too.







PuZ'IT A
MATTER HOW BET!
ITS HOOnEP
UP?





T1tMI&NAL.
oo-hook up to this output terminal. The







Until you make this mistake, you may not realize how easy it is to ground
your alternator output terminal-short circuit-ZAP-curtains for your alter-
nator.
So be mighty careful when you're
ookoin' up to this output terminal. cThe
cable terminal lug is fattterminaler on one side.
This side goes UP. If you goof and in-
willstall the fa side down, the lug willoutput
touch the plate underneath and short
out your alternator.

FAT KEEP YOUR
SIDE BOOT5 OFF THE
UP! ALTERNATOR.





And never- but NEVER- use your
alternator for a step or footrest while
working in the engine compartment. A .-
little pressure on that terminal cover
will mash the cover down on the output
terminal-short circuit-ZOWEE-
no alternator.
33





G890-SERIES 1-1/4-TON TRUCK...

DROWNED


IN OIL


``


'N


And never add oil if your dipstick shows the level's over the "ADD 1 QT."
mark-that is, between "1 QT." and "FULL." Like it says on page 46 of your TM
9-2320-244-10 (Aug 68), adding oil at this level "is not necessary or desirable."
If you've drained your crankcase oil and installed a new oil filter, put in 6
quarts of oil and run the engine a few minutes to give the filter a chance to fill.
Then wait 5 to 10 minutes after shutting down before checking' your oil level.


Take 5-or may-
be even 10--before
you check the crank-
IF OIL LEVEL IS case oil level on
BETWEEN THESE
MARKS, DO NOT your M715 1-1/4-
ADD Oil. ton truck or M"'25
ambulance.
It rakes that long for the oil to drain
down into the oil pan after shutrin' off
sour engine. This's probably a li'l
longer than you're used to ar h other
engines.
Some gu)s'\e been lumping the gun
and addin' oil ahen it's not needed. Be-
sides asking oil. overfilling is bound to
loul up things in your engine.




G890-SERIES 1-1/4-TON TRUCK...


Are you havin' trouble keeping' those round rubber bumpers on your M715
1-1/4-ton truck's tailgate? Here's a cheap 'n' easy way to nail'em down:
Take off the bumper. Give its backside a thin coat of Adhesive, paste-type,
FSN 8040-847-6387.


"--IJ 'NEW WASHER
Toss out that li'l flat washer and get Washer, flat, FSN 5310-809-4061. It's 1
inch across and will fill the recess in your rubber bumper. Give your new washer
a coat of OD paint and let 'er dry.
Now put 'em together-bumper, flat washer, nut-lockwasher-and snug'er


down.



O Dear]
No
H o 9150-
Svariou
ing t
This s
dude
f the in
ii ryou if
odor.
meets
be abli


Mr. G. F.,
Brake fluid, HB, FSN
231-9071, is made by
Is manufacturers accord-
SFed Spec VV-B-680.
pecification does not in-
an odor requirement so
spector should not gig
it does not have a specific
4s long as the brake fluid
that Fed Spec you should
e to use it.
I / t
















Thi ka I s el toh d ld of r~o r pol TM 5-4940-221-15, Feb, Contact Mains MODIFICATION WORK ORDRS
of Inled to ogaonlolatloal ualo. Shop Set 3. 9-1240-200-40/2. Apr. M4AJ3 M60
nmnc peronel. Th. li l compiled TM5-6115-271-20P, Apr, 3KWAC M60AI M726 1TIllEI l anks and
fotm rn a AG DOiribulon Curten 400 Ho/60 Ho and 3KW 60 Hz DC CEV.
Bl lnsn. For complete dalalb se DA GED GenSeol. 55-100-206-30/1. May. UH-1A-IB-
Pose f3104 (May 61. ,and C 5 (Apr 69). TM S-6115-434-20P, Apr, 100KW IC.ID
TM'A Ti'. Fl, rJ DA Pan 310.6 fJol 618. 60 Hz Turbine Drive Gen Seol. s.1500-206-30/2, C2. Apr. UHI A.
and CA 3 (Apr 69), SCI and SMA, DA TM 9-1000-202-10, Apr. Procedure for IB-IC-ID
Pa. JSfg (Mer 69;. MWO'C Etlimating or Dleterining Remaining 55-1 00-210-30/18, May, CH-47.
Round Life of Cannon Tubre of Tanks, 55-1 10-201-40/2, C1, May, U-l.
TECHNICAL MANUALS SP and Towed Gun. and Howillers and S5-1510-203-30/7, C1, Apr, U-6.
1M S-3810-201-12. Ma, 40 Ton DED Recoilles Rifles. 35-1510-203-30/7, C2, May, U.6.
C. r si C TM 9 2300 257 20 M M113A1 -110205l /2 n F.o iU.1


rower .a. r os. .
FM 5-3110-202-20P. Ma.. 20 o1. T
MIa Cranoe-5hofl
TM 5-3B20-236-20P. Apr. 9 F SId Mid
Earth A gor.
TM 5-3120-240-25P, Apr. Sinor Drll
and Pa-nng areakrM
TM 5-3195-271-20P, Feb. I 3 o IS loa
lollI GED Iondtel ller
FM 5-395-271.1 5. Mar, Oill/Sleam
3 Cor Cop Irlr Mid BitIm Heaole
TM 5-3895-250-20P. Apw. DED 5P
talonrr nil.r
TM 5-3195-257-20P. Mar. Bllru Ml<.
for l00 TPH Aohall Ploan
IM S-3895-321-20P. Mo, Dusl Colled.
Ing Machou DED Samlrailer Mtd 100
I PH Mdl KA 60 Comp of Asp Mi*
Plaonl
TM 5-4120-1 5-20P, Apr. Ar Coand
honor, 3 PI 400 Hz RPoo Mid Anr
Cooled 31,0OO0 BT/HR 416v 31.000
srufHI 201V apd 50.000 BTU/HR
2081V.
TM 5-4120-270-15, Apr. 60.000 rU
and 49.000 ITU Air Condilionors.
TM 5-4120-274-15. M. M 9.000 IU
1152301701BVAir Coodloners
TM 5-4320208-O20P. Apr. I S GPM
Freh Waler Ce-lnl Pumps
TM 5-4520-236-14. Apr. 1.000 BTU
Spone Holafro
TM 5-4940-213-20P, M.ar, So El
tron Repali Shop Eqlip.


1r,
Diesel Powered Corrier Family.
TM 9-2320-230-10, Jan, M656 8x8
Cargo Truck XM757 Tractor XM791
Expansible Van.
TM 9-2350-230-12, C4, Apr. M551
Assault Vehicle.
TM 9-4931-333-14, Apr, XM163
20-MM Gun.
TM 9-4931-339-13, Apr, XM163
20-MM Gun.
TM 11-5820-295-20P, Moy, AN/GRC-
19 Radio Sel.
TM 11-5820-296-20P, May, AN/MRC-
73 and AN/TRC-24 Radio Sets.
TM 11-5520-467-25P, May, AN/GRA-
50 Radio Set.
TM 11-6615-242-25P, Mar, Gyroscopic
Compass Syslem Type C-1 2 (Dist in pub
as read DA Farm 12-26 should be
amended o read DA Form 12-36)
U-6A U-8D.
TM 11-6720-239-12, Apr. KS-101 A
Still Pic Camera Set.
TM 1 1-6720-242-12. Apr, KA-60C
Slill Pic Camoero.
TM 11-6740-283-12, Mar, Photo-
graphic Processing Mach EH.1 IA.
TM 11-6760-244-12, Apr, OV-1A-IB-
1C Camero LS-86A Test Set.
TM 11-6780-227-15, Apr. KS-I09A
Picture Taking and Processing Photo-
graphic Set.


55-1520-209-30/78, May, CH-47.
55-1520-210-30/13. Feb, UH.1D.
55-1520-210-30/17, C2 Apr. UH-tD.
SS-1520-210-30/17. C, Maye. UH.ID.
55-1520-210-40/1, May. UH.ID
55-1520-211-30/31 Ma. UH-IA.
IB.IC
11-1 520211-40/. May. UH-IC
5S.1120-214-30/11. C1, Mo.. OH.6
51-1520-214-30/21. CI, May. 0 6
15-1510-214-40/1. C2, May. OH-6.
55-1520-217-30/0,. Apr. CH.54
15-1520-221-30/12. AP.. AH.1I
1-1520-221-40/12, CI, ay,
52-1520-221-30/25, May, AH-10.
S MISCEIANIOUS
FM 33-1. Mar loglslic l.pplp.
FT 15-O-4. C2. Am. 1553-MM
HoItersn.
LO 5-3740-20-12, Apr, 40 GPH Post
Control rSra'er
SB 11-576. Apr. AN/PIC 6 AN/PIC.I
ANtPIC 9 ANIPIC.10 ANJPC-25
ANIPIC 28 ANIPIC.77 ANIPR.9
ANIPIT 4 Radlo Sol
SC 5110-91-CLJ13. Ap. -101 I/G
Elrronli ElQ.'p ool it.
SC 3 l0-91--CL-21, Mr. TK.100/G
ElecIronic Equl Tool Kll.
1C 17-12. CI. May. MSS I Assaul
Vlhlde.


GREASE GUN CARTRIDGE

There's a handy dandy way to get
rid of a dirr problem when you fill your
grease gun. Use a grease gun cartridge
in your gun instead of the dunking
method. The GAA grease comes in a
14-oz cartridge under FSN 9150-935-
1017, for use with grease gun, rype 1,
M1L-G-3859, FSN 4930-253-24L8.


I G


Is,


i







HOW Yro

GET 4
PUBS5






MONROE
GRAZCWICZ...
SIOP PAINTING
THEM ROCK AND
GET ON THE HORN
WITH BIG DADDV
ON THE MAINLAND!!.
SOMEONE'S BEEN
SHORTSTOPPIN'
OUR PUBS!
HOLD
OI%E'


I ALREADY
CALLED FOR
HELP, SARGE.'



101'" OFFSHOPE
COMMUNICATIONS
DEIAImME3NT








37





F--- -~<
IT COULD BE YOU'VE
BEEN SHORTSTOPPING
THEM COURSE. F!


ALL M LIFE I BEEN
DREAMING OF
BEING ALONE
ON AN ISLAND
> WITH CONNIE
RODD-- 1
ALONE'!




















PINPOINT is LIKE
SUBSCRIBING TO SEVERAL
MAGAZINES AT ONE TIME!
... IN THIS CASE YOUR
SUBSCRIPTION FORMS
ARE THE DA FORM
12 SERIES.





Bllh'


YOU USE THESE FOR
CLASSIFIED AND UNCLASSIFIED
PUBS .. WHEN THEY GO TO
THE TWO BIG PUB CENTERS
(ST. LOUIS ANP BALTIMORE)
EACH CENTER SETS UP A
NUMBERED ACCOUNT
FOR YOU !


BATTALION* HAS TO
REVIEW YOUR FILLED-OUT
FORMS. THEY SEND YOUR
REQUESTS TO THE
PUBLICATIONS CENTERS,
YOU THEN GET YOUR PUBS
DIRECT. _


NATURALLY, WHAT YOU
ORDER DEPENDS ON WHAT
EQUIPMENT YOU HAVE.
OH, HERE'S A PINUP
THAT GIVES IT TO YOU
IM A NUTSHELL ..


SIF YOU'RE A SEPARATE COMPANY, BATTERY OR DETATCHMENT, THE FORMS
6O DIRECT TO THE CENTERS! 39













PINPOINT Ra~
Baltimore
12-4 Administrative Pubs
(Except Regs & Circulars)
12-8 Allied Communication
12-9 Regulations & Circulars
12-11 Doctrinal Pubs (FM's)
12-12 TOE's &Training Pubs


St. Loui
12-21
12-25
12-31
12-32
12-34
12-35
12-36
12-37
12-38
12-39
12-40
12-41
12-43
12-50
12-51


12-1


Supply Catalogs
Mobility Support Equipment
Army Aviation Pubs
Missiles and Rockets UNITS_
Technical and Supply Pubs
Nuclear Weapons UNITS
Army Avionics
Tracked Vehicles uTs
Trucks
Dolly, Trailer & Semi-Trailer
Artillery and Small Arms
Sighting & Fire Control
COMSEC
Radiac and Fixed Radios
Field Radios
FORMULA
Pubs and Blank Forms
(Installations, Activities
and Commands)
Pubs 3nd BianL Forms
i3er.ice ipD 3l).villeF ,
Pub; an.l Blank Forms .
iTOE univ f


SCRAZYPU

A PAMPLY



SIG THIS
CRA Z '


SYSTEM (FOR MOST PUBLICATIONS)


AUTOMATIC
"^^^/- IJ -IS0 TREIBUTION OF:
---- p PUBLICA1ONS .



lE FORMULA SYSTEM
(YOU GET SOME PUBS THIS WAY)


I:1


IF YOU WANT TO DISPLAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, LIFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.


r b








NOW, YOU'VE GOT
LOT', OF HELP GOIIJC' FOR
YfOU IE 310 PAM S:;ERES5
ARE INDEXES TO ALL ARkly
PULS AND BLANK FORQJ 5
L CLIu AAC- 1NNAT' _/


P,
...THE INDEX TO FILMS, p ECOR S
AND VISUA~L AIDS 15 PA PAM
lOB108-1 ._






YES...AND DA FORMS 12-1,
12-2 AND 12-3 GET YOU INTO
THE FORMULA SYSTEM!

I t ^


,AND IF YOU YOU SEND IN A DA
NEED MORE FORM 17... LIST
COPIES OF A PARTI- \HOW MANY
CULAR PUB...OR IF YOU Y'NEEP-AND
WANT ONE YOU DIDN'T GET JUSTIFY WHY
AUTOMATICALLY?7 Y'NEED 'EM'


YOU REVIEW AND N-A-T-C-H, YOU KEEP YOUR DA PAM 510-10
REVISE YOUR NEED AT HANDY FOR GUIDANCE.. WATCH THE AG
REGULAR INTERVALS. BULLETINS FOR THE LATEST IN NEW OR
CHANGED PUBS AND FORMS COMING OUT.!
BE SURE TO SEND INI YC.lUR
\ ;W ITE-IN ,-RDEE S TO TrHE
S _, CENTERS G






... THREE DAYS
ALL SHE S TALKED
ABOUT IS PUBS
I'M STILL ON THE
_ 50 YARD LINE


SI GOT ALL OUR PUBS.. PICKED
'EM UP AT OUR LAST LOCATION.
BOY, WOTTA LOAD!


HMMM, NOW YOU'VE
GOT TOO MANY PUBS
FOR 'OUR NEW SITUATIONN
WHAT S NEEDED 15
TOGO OVER 'OuR r"
'2 SERIES FORMS,
AND UPDATE YOUR
REQUIREMENTS!


THIS COULD GFRA7CVICZ ER,
/TAKE A HOW'D YOU SURE,
COUPLE OF LIKE ANOTHER YEH'
DAYS-YOU'RE 3- AY YEH !
O FAR PASS! YEH
BEHIND.'





LOKN FO A P LAC

TOPTYU AIR-6


Forget that salvage yard trip. You can so put your AN/GRC-46 radio tele-
typewriter set on your new M715 5/4 ton truck.
Even though there'll be no installation unit available through the revised
SB 11-131, you and your support can put together a practical substitute.


M Sling, multiple leg, FSN 5410-805 5533

Insulator assembly. FSN 5970 083-0377





HERE'S HOW
TO BLOCK THE
SHELTER.


Naturally, you need the 100-amp alternator kit, FSN
2920-933-3981, that's listed in the parts manual for the
M715.
Requests for the alternator should cite your vehicle
model and serial numbers, TOE number and equipment
requiring the alternator (Angry-46, in this case).


(u th 8-f ln,4 in y4
timbr t 92ice Rees h


-I'





Route the power cable like so:


Remove the knock-out from the front wall Use grommet, FSN 5325-637-8054, around
of the truck bed (about a foot above the bed, the edges of the knock-out hole. It protects
behind the operator's side of the cab). the cable from the sharp edges.

The second grommet, FSN 5325-8264020, dulls the edges of the knock-out hole on the bottom of
the battery compartment, through which you feed the other end of the power cable.


Depending on the production date of your
M715, the second knock-out is on the cab
behind the driver's seat... or in the cab floor.
No matter. When you open it, use insulator
FSN 5970-083-0377 where the cable goes
through the cab.

Adjust the sling to the eyes of the
shelter and truck, as appropriate.
The installation hardware and cables
cited are in SB 11-131 and publications
on the Angry-46 and 5/4 truck.


Of course, you use the 6TN 100-amp hour
batteries, FSN 6140-057-2554, with the 100-
amp alternator kit. The batteries are in TM 9-
2320-244-20P (Oct 68).
Be careful when you're dangling the hot
battery lead around. Even a quick, accidental
touch to the negative post, the truck body or
frame can blow out the alternator if one end
of the hot lead is connected.
k'-- ~^ w~-~i~





XENON ZAPP


Just before you push the panic button get the repairman. If they're pushed in
to call the repairman on your AN/ more than an eighth of an inch from
VSS-1, tank-mounted Xenon search- the lip of the insulator, the male plug
light, try this: can't make good contact.
SEYEBALL Another common Xenon Zapper to
STHE look for is a poor ground at the control
BU1 CABLE box inside the tank turret. The


Eyeball the power cable connection
on the tank turret. Be sure the male plug
is uptight with the female receptacle.
If there are more'n a couple' threads
bare on the connector coupling, chances
are you've got poor contact.
Now, check the connector on the
back of the searchlight itself. That
coupling, too, should be snugged tight.
It takes more time and patience than
the turret coupling.


searchlight won't operate without a
good ground. Which means... scrape
all the paint from the control box
bracket where it contacts the ground
lead. And, get bare metal where the
bracket attaches to the turret, too.
When you do get your Xenon zerch-
ing for a target, heed that TM warning
on operating in overdrive mode no
longer than 15 seconds in any five-
minute period. You'll prevent damage.
First chance you get refresh your
memory on the other cautions spelled
out in Change 1 (Jul 68) to TM 11-
6230-219-12.


'Nother possibility: The contacts of
the female receptacle might be recessed
too far, in which case you will have to





PACK
FOR
c TRAVEL

Newli-repaired common equipment deserves better than bangin' around in
the back of a truck on the return from the shop.
So-o-o-o-o, put the repaired equipment in a box ... and pack pol) sn rene foarn
"norms" around it. That way, it %on'r be ready for another repair job at the
end of the ride
The packing seats itself better n h ever) bump, jolt and jiggle of .our vehicle
to gise )ou a continually improving cushion.
This material under FSN 8135-955-0983. is available in GSA Catalog page
15"' (Oct 68P.





YANKEE NO, NO!








Treat the handle of your SB-22/PT canvas accessory case as though it were
attached to an overnight bag bound for all kinds of goodies and it'll take
the weight of switchboard parts for a long time.
You wouldn't believe it, but some jokers yank the handle clear off the case
with rough handling.
Would you treat your own overnight bag like that?


NO HOLDER HOLDUP


SBOX CUPHOLDERS
MAY BE STIFF.
/ SO PULL OUT
BOTH SIDES
EVENLY'.








BATTERY BOX
It takes a firm, even tug to remove the battery holder from your SB-22/PT
or SB-22A/PT telephone switchboard.
The battery-box clipholders may be stiff, so you'll get some resistance when
you pull the box toward you.
The idea is to pull out both sides evenly and together.
If you pull one side out, then the other, you can bend or break the contact
clips.
Incidentally, be sure those BA-30 batteries are installed right. That means the
negative ends of your batteries go in first, on each side of the battery box, with
the positive ends pointing toward the plastic contact ends of the box.





DOSIMETER DUST,- CAPY, CAAPlI
,Caps are capable .. .,.
S.; Yessi, on your. (M.93/UD iadiacwetew,cape are cap-
a. ble of blocking off the dust and moisturethatt cold hit
the charging. socket and'dift ,into 'he~de teAor cager.
St gri:So-p-cO-o, stick yih your issue cap; 'ag on nwith a
trap,!kar p.r-p?,%:k .


hat epi in dust control on your

.it,.hould losu. ie plastic (i il ca.p, you've still got
.a .g le++!? ,.+, .. .... : ,, ,- .
Yican lipon a ioie-nd ade -cap made of cllophane
i.anchorit,.wkihaiuxlierband. :
yiu. can. probably cadge some throwaway plastic
4ftplug able caps n ear s mo&ir pool, where
,get the cables ii eas Ue thi. ceramic
^ .. ..,.. o. ,. : ^ '' .

PLASTIC SPARKPLUG A GOOD HOMEMADE CAP -
(ABLE CAPS MAKE CELLOPHANEE AND .


..
L ...


L: l .. A RUBBER BAND
S.The cable.caps are longer.than the original issue cap.
Thcj're easier to fnd, iflost, because 6f ihis:extra length.
The yhole.pokit is:'Keep your dosimeter capped. That
S cap--whaiteer kind you're using-should never be off
the charging end unless you're charging.






UNTWIST THAT WRIST











Bored? There are 7,967 better ways of curing the problem than twisting the
receiver elements on the handset of your TA-43/PT and TA-312/PT telephone
sets.
Why better? Because if you choose the handset, chances are great that you're
gonna crimp or break the wires on the element.
Now, with those 7,967 other ways, that wouldn't happen.
It's also a good idea to make sure the wires are clear when you put back the re-
ceiver cap.
And, uh, snatching is great in some cases, but not when you're removing the
handset from its cradle. You bust up the retaining springs. Push toward the
springs before you lift the handset up. Same goes when you put it back.

RETAINING SPRINGS








NO SNAT(HING. PUSH
TOWARD THE SPRINGS,
THEN lIFT UP

COVERED ..UP?-'
Say, if those covers for your AN/VRG--2 ind'AN/PRC-25 series radio sets
are giving you trouble by the overheat route; or if you can't squeeze 'em over
your VRC-12 series components because of the modified handles on the com-
ponents, forger 'em. Pages 28-29 of TB 750,911-2 (Jan 69) say the covers are
unnecessary and are being removed from the supply system.





CHRONOGRAPH CHRONICLE

THAT THING 'LL 1 >
BE USELESS WHEN '
HE GETS IT
WHERE HE'S -
TAKIN' IT !


Interested in a few easy ways to keep
your M36 radar chronograph's aim con-
trol score up to par?
Read on:
Light pressure is enough to secure the
azimuth deflection scale lock knob.
Over-tightening makes the scale ride
high on its rail.





NOT TOO
TIGHT ON
SCALE
LOCK KNOB
This over-ride, naturally, allows the
scale to slip while changing deflections
S. and you lose a few rounds. Which
is a waste of time, money and effort.
So, easy does it.
Kid glove care is the byword when
handling the microphone cable. Con-
nect and disconnect it by the connector.
Yanking or twisting the cable to turn
it loose can put it out of business.


If you plan to give the set a ride in
a vehicle for more than a few yards,
break it down and put it in its carry-
ing case. "Good intentions" and "time


USE THE
CARRYING
CASE FOR
TRIPS


saved?" don't prevent damage. The
carrying case does.
Finally, remove and store the tele-
scope (XM128) when you're not using
it. This helps prevent a buildup of
condensation from humidity, heat or
temperature change. Like you know,
condensation damages the 'scope.


2 STORE
SCOPE
WHEN
NOT IN
USE
Nf?


THATS A
NEW
TWIST


53


ME
-FO)








AIR MOBILITY


HOSES...


Hoses, like blondes, brunettes and
redheads, come in a 'arietc of sizes and
shapes-thei deserve special attention.
Yup, hoses are made of rubber or
retrafluoroethylene Iteflon). From a
distance 'ou can't tell one rnpe from
the other an) more than sou can tell
a book b% Its cover ... little black books
excepted.
Teflon hoses ha\e a shin\. stainless
steel braided couer. And now a new
rubber hose with the same coner has
made the scene. Rubber hose, MIL-H-
58085. has an unlimited shelf life and
is a condition replacement item.
To tell which hose goes where focus
on the metal identification band that's
on eseri hose. You'll find the part num-


ber and federal stock number stamped
on the band. A quick check of the bird
parts pub will clue iou whether the
hose is used in the fuel, oil or hydraulic
s. stem.


PROTECT REMOVED LINES
To keep from isting a line when ou take one off. use a tmo-w rench combi
nation Latch onto the proper size I 2-pt open end crowfoot socket % rench and
a suitable handle. The socket v rench won't round-off the hose B-nut or fitting.
Pul one wrench on the Put another wrench on Turn the B nul to re-
fiting nut. the swivel coupling B-nut move the line


If you'ree going to put the same line back again neser straighten it out. Hot
fuids tend to form the hose while others are preformed during manufacture.
Changing the contour will kink the hose which calls for replacement.
Never place hoses on the floor w here Jh--
they can be stepped on and ruined. MMABE WEOOUQCHTA
Sure, hoses are tough but their can't take TAG THE HOSES 50 WE
CAN TELL 'EM APART.
rough handling. One %a% to protect
used or new hoses is to identify them
with a tag and hang 'em up with a G OFF.
piece of safer wire. ,w.


Protect each end of a
PROTECT hose frum dirt b) using
YOUR OPEN / dust plugs, caps or heavi
ENDS aluminum foil. TM 55-
405-"' Aug 66) on shop
Practices lists a variety of
Sproiectors just made to
N .7 plug those babies.

PUT EM ON CAREFULLY

\\hen 0ou put a line on )our bird
be sure sou use all the standoff clamps
and separation clamps for that parricu-
lar line. The parts pub will clue )ou
on the clamp part numbers. locauon
and how man) of those little jewels
to use.


[O#0:>


HEY!





Hoses have to be supported or they'll chafe against other hoses, accessories or
the airframe. In short order the braid breaks and the hose lets go.
'Tis mighty embarrassing when a crew chief has to face the music when
transmission oil pressure drops to zero and the bird settles in a cloud of smoke.
A blown oil line spraying oil on a hot engine will do it every time!!



I TOLD YA THEM
BRAIPEP HOSES
WAS CHAIN.








NO
Hoses need some slack between
clamps for the normal expansion and
YE contraction you get when the line is
pressurized. Slack is needed to keep a
bend radius as large as possible to pre-
N vent kinks. Also, the hose should not
be twisted.
If all the clamps are in place and you
still have a chafing problem maybe you
don't have the right hose length. A
hose that's too short or too long won't
hack it!
Eye the parts pub for the right part
SYnumber of the hose. If supply is fresh
out, run the shot hose over to support
and they'll make one just like it if it's
the kind that can be made in the field.
Make sure your hose routing is right.
YESUse an extra support clamp, of the
proper size, to cure a chafing problem.
B As tough as hose material is, you still
O may find teflon spiral wrap around
-NO {s some hoses for added protection against
,chafing.






SLEEVES... VERY
S PROTECTIVE, find chafing sleeves
Scrapped around the fuel
SEPLAE lines of a Chinook T55-
S (CHAFING L-7C engine. So, if you
SLEEVES change one of those
hoses, make sure the
S spiral wrap goes back
again.
TORQUE HOSE CONNECTIONS
To keep fuel, oil and hydraulic fluid
HERE'S HOW TO USE flowing always use a torque wrench on
THE COMBINATION the swivel coupling B-nuts. Those slim
OF WECjobs go thru a lot of vibrating, twisting
and turning.
SA B-nut that's too tight can distort
the connection and give you a leak. A
loose nut is guaranteed to give you that
drip! drip! drip!
Hold the fitting with a crowfoot
socket and handle in one hand and a
crowfoot socket and torque wrench in
the other hand.
TIGHTEN TO Tighten the B-nuts to the torque
SPECIFIED TOROUE values given in the bird organizational
maintenance pub.
MAKE THE FEEL TEST
When you eye those slim jobs move
your peepers like you were on a 48-hr '
pass.
Maybe you can spot a damaged hose? FEEL IT
Maybe you can't?
So, if you suspect a hose is faulty go
one step further by feeling the wire
braid for kinks, broken wire and bulg- r,
ing.
Say you spot a hose that has a bulge
in it, which means it's been twisted.
You probably won't find a broken
strand in it.
But the inside has been damaged. i=
57
MOR
















Take the hose off and look thru it like you're about to discover something-
like a shorter mini skirt-you are!! You'll notice that the material has been
twisted, restricting the fluid flow ... the hose has had it.
Never let a crease in a hose fool you, either. The unseen material under the
wire braid is kinked. Your bird's in a bind when the oil supply is even
partially choked off.

REPLACE 'EM IF 1. The hose is cut, 2. Static leakage 3. Six or more
THESE ARE- THE dented, kinked, exceeds one drop wires are broken
CONDITIONtS! twisted or damaged per hour. per assembly, or
in any way. lineal foot when
the hose is longer
than 12 in


liCk


4. Two or more wires are broken in a single plait.
Yessir-e-e-e, those slim jobs are really built. Never mistreat 'em and they'll
deliver for you.


KNOW YOUR A, B, Cs
A1^^O r P
You can bring your Army aircraft organizational maintenance tool sets up to
date if you check SC 4920-99-CL-A71 (4 Feb 69). It includes your set A, FSN
4920-944-0990, Set A (Supplement), FSN 4920-944-0985, Set B, FSN 4920-
-944-1003, and Set C, FSN 4920-944-1004.
- --~-- -- LF--





BE ON THE BALL...


REPLACE 'EM ALL


Winding up with a wobbly tail could make that Hue)bird dance ihe didos.
Yes sir-e-e-e, things could get a bit rocky if you got to mixing old crosshead
bearings with a new one.
When you're changing a bearing 'cause it's bad, go all the way and replace
'em all on the tail rotor pitch control rod with a complete bearing set.
Mixing the old with the new can put a strain on the control rod or even worse
S.. stop the tail from turning. -


So, do that UH-1 a favor when you're making the bearing change b) making
them all new. This'll keep you in good with the bird as well as para 10.38a in
TM 55-1500-322-25 (Aug 68).


SLINK DEFLECTOR "
No excuse now for spent
links from the M134 gun ruin-
ing Hue)'s tail rotor on your
WO 100U.J


MI I1 subsystem. of/ w 7- J -
202-20/1 (3 Feb 69) provides
a link deflector (FSN 1005-
042-5188,P/N 11691071) and
the installation dope. The de-
flector goes on the delinking
feeder of the left gun only. So
hop to it, you 45J's.


D59 COR
59


'1::'









Before Murph gets his mitts on those hydraulic lines in that AH-1G helicop-J
ter's stability augmentation system, shift an eyeball this way.
When removing or replacing the SAS actuator, take one line loose at a time.
This'll keep 'em lined up right.
If you take 'em all loose at one time you'll have lines criss-crossed like a pretzel
and that hydraulic fluid will be coming when it oughta be going. It'll wind up
knocking the "Y" out of YAW.
A good idea would be to make up a stencil reading: CAUTION: DO NOT
CROSS LINES.
Then, put the stencil on the forward side of the bulkhead at FS 186.25.


LOCK PIN SAFETY


You 45J gunship armament types
having trouble with quick release pins
that won't hold or that need pesky
safety wiring ... like the feeder quick
release pin that's pur in upside down
on the XM27EI subsystem, f'rinstance?
Here's )our quickie cure:


Get hold of a supply of these brand-
new lock pins (FSN 5315-223-6113,
P/N AN 416-1) from your supply
guys. Your subsystem's TM authorizes
'em.


Stick the release pin on a vise with
the jaws 1/4-inch apart.
Push the plunger forward and, with
a 1/16-inch punch (FSN 5120-240-
6082), knock out the plunger balls and
shear the shaft at its second decent.

Then, shove a safety lock pin thru
the holes.
Presto, it's safe and safetied!


Os~





GUESSING NUT TORQUE IS NUTTY

HMMM... -YA Making the upper uniball bearing
TRY ABOUT 5URE nut uptight can set up a lot of hydraulic
TEN POUNDS / fluid leaking at the upper cap seal and
S OF TORQUE could cause binding in the controls.
2 Leaving the nut too loose can cause
feedback in the cyclic stick.
~ Your best bet's to leave off with the
make-shift tool method such as using a
screwdriver or drift pin in making the
adjustment.
Stick with the 1-1/4 to 3-in circle
-" diameter adjustable spanner wrench
(FSN 5120-277-9075) and the 0-4-1b
indicated scale (FSN 6670-618-5662) to
get the 1-lb torque needed.
Too loose or too tight just isn't right! Remember to lubricate the uniball
When it comes to UH-1 and AH-1G bearing during the periodic inspection
helicopters the adjustment nuts in the like it tells you in the TM.
hydraulic servo cylinder mounts have
to be torqued to the tune of the right LUBE
touch. BEARING
Para 6-45c in Ch 1 to TM 55-1520- DURING
210-20 (Oct 68) gives the lowdown on PERIODIC
all Huey model aircraft, and Ch 1 to
TM 55-1520-221-20 (Nov 67) covers
the HueyCobra.


H01- NO,
YOU DON'T




NO LUBE, PLEASE!
There're places on a chopper that need oil and grease-but the tail rotor
control chain on the Huey and HueyCobra is not one of 'em: Lubricant attracts
dirt and sand ... wears the chain something fierce!! Be sure you keep the chain
and sprocket clean and dry.

61





Fil THINK TANK...

WITH


Foreign object damage keeps lurking
in every nook and cranny when it comes
to aircraft.
Take, frinstance, the UH-1 or AH-
1G helicopter.
Sure, a screen has come along to pro-
tect the separator to keep out nuts, bolts,
cotter pins, safety wire and other such
items.
But, there's the doctor-like mechanic
who leaves odds and ends even tools
- inside his patient.

I I I WATCH THOSE OL ....


FOD like that can chip or break the
compressor's vanes, knocking the breath
out of that bird.


When the bird's cranked up vibra-
tion jiggles a tool against moving parts,
like a tail rotor drive shaft, and dam-
ages your equipment.
Then there's FOD such as broken
screwdriver tips, slivers of metal, papers
or rags that get caught up in the air-
craft's compressor.


w s


FOREIGN OBJECT DAMAGE i
And ... depending on the extent of
FOD .. power is cut to a nub or the
compressor stalls.
'Cause when the vanes are knocked
out of rinktum or damaged, they can
set off a chain reaction, damaging others
by direct contact or by overheating.
So, instead of being added to the
nightmare crowd, join the FOD squad
and attack at every turn.
Like wherever tools are used make
sure they're accounted for and picked
up. See to it no debris, even a twig, is
laying about when you pull mainte-
nance.

















Dear Windy,
Our Loach has a lot of slippage marks painted on it.
When we put in new hardware should we continue to decorate it with slippage
marks?
What's the low down on using slippage marks on all aircraft?
SP6 R. W. B.
Dear Specialist R. W. B.,
The slippage marks on your Loach were put there by the manufacturer as part
of his quality control. Slippage marks for the field are called out in the main-
tenance pub for your OH-6A.
The Aviation Systems Command has no plans to apply the marks generally,
to your bird. Of course a local commander can use the device as an inspection
aid.
But splashing war paint all over your Cayuse, or any bird for that matter, may
not be the answer. Slippage marks can drive you to distraction.
Maintenance and inspection types want hardware to stay put. To assure this,
torque values have been set and lock wire, cotter pins plus other locking devices
added as a safety factor.
Nuts and bolts will do the job they're supposed to do when they're tightened
right, with a torque wrench, and secured with the right safety device.A)j


NEVER SEND SCRAP!

/ HOW
t'COULP r YOU WANT
ULSE EM FOR
.AS FLY HEM
SWATTERS.

When the main rotor blades of your Cayuse (OH-6A) don't pass the new repair
limits givenin para 8-10.1 of TM 55-1520-214-20 (Dec 67),dispose of 'em locally.
It CO$T$ to ship scrap for repair.

















Your bird's on the spot if the fire extinguisher is missing.
That's because Ch 7 (20 Feb 68) to AR 95-1, on general
provisions, says that each bird will have a minimum of one
operating extinguisher of the proper type ready for use by
crew members and passengers during all flights.
Without one, your bird has a deficiency a materiel de-
feet that renders an item inoperable, results in an
unsafe condition or safety hazard to personnel.




CRACKED YOKE NO JOKE!

Look sharp, birdman! eternal radius area, with a 4-to-6 power
That's the word in para 8-29 of TM magnifying glass. No cracks allowed.
55-1520-206-20 (Oct 65) on inspecting A crack in the yoke can throw the
the tail rotor hub and yoke on your tail rotor out of track and give you a
Raven (OH-23). high freq vibration ... or worse.


LOOK NO
FOR CRACkS, CRACKS,
LEAKAGE PLEASE!
AND FREE
MOVEMENT
ON THE
DAILY! '


When you pull the Intermediate and
Periodic go one step further. Eye both
sides of the yoke, especially in the in-






COMBAT S1PPOR/t/EQUIPHIE

NOT TOO HIGH...
20-TON CRANES DON'T FLY

YOU
GOTTA
KIPPING






Figure 14 of your rough-terrain crane
book, TM 5-3810-232-12 (Jul 66) got
you a little up in the air?
Come down for a soft landing- that
picture was meant to show how the out-
riggers are placed on the ground, not to
imply that you work with the wheels
off the ground. RE ON G
Eyeball para 18(d), page 30, of the
TM and you'll find the word on proper
outrigger positioning and operation.
You put those outriggers down just
far enough to take the strain off the tires ALONE WON'T
just slightly slacken the sag. You CUT IT.
need those big rubber doughnuts for
stability.


CARBON MONOXIDE KIT
You needn't toss out your carbon monoxide detector kit,
FSN 6665-618-1482, just 'cause it's short a component or two.
These replacement components are available for the kit: Indi-
cator tube, FSN 6665-276-7545. Sampling bulb, FSN 6665-
725-0130. Seal breaker, FSN 6665-725-0131. The compo-
nents will extend the life of your kit, and they're cheaper,
natch, than ordering a new kit.














U CAT PM,






SGO ) LIVE ...
I ~ ITt THE RI '.
PA PMA













ST" re ,rnn T nn

Sthe pal li te V -u-
h .,on when e O e t"-uld loTse thhe,-t
.,r n h\ e.l gets an in-ch r C ndh ke 'en the e*m "
t or b r i not sore' .engin in ano hat ou h grtnd uo n
bt d Oo o t Bo .
M uI t hat a L, Don'th wait oo t e I d r .

[check e rn o state w

a t clean 1 the lt er
e I.neee t It GVv O 00H


DON' tOhE fil 0tI

rEI ER ONE


66 67















FUEL-Life No. 2 is the contaminarnon-prceenter ssserm ,ou ha.c in )our
drain-strainer-filtir system. Fuel loaded with dirt, nater, or fungus plugs feed
lines and cuts injector tops to pieces.
Draw of0f icondL ns.iie ,' ,.hlr through ihe tra.p pi~.tock LnL r ,rninMi. .ind e.r
few days catch ,ome in a glass If it looks green, have support check your tank
for fungus.

OIL FILlER FINAL FUEL
CHANGE CORE WITH FILNAl FUl FUNGUS
EACH OIL CHANGE SWITCH CORES
IF FUEL
PRESSURE
DROPS

PRIMARY CALL


CHANGE AND DRAIN YOUR FILTERS
Drain your primary filter every couple of shifts in wet weather. Wet or dry,
a weekly cleanout can help-along with your tank-cap strainer. Then if fuel
pressure drops on your gage, you'll know it's final filter core-switching time, fast.


OIL-Feline Life No. 3 is fresh, clean lube. Some units, in heavy dirt or blow-
ing sand, make 125-hour change their SOP. Whatever local rule you have, stick
to it. And when refill time comes, the greatest thing is utensils absolutely CMMI
clean. Funnels, cans, spouts and such that wash in grit are engine-killers.

I1.. ^,





You've got a trashcan system to take
care of-your oil filter. Change cores CLEAN
AROUND
every time you change oil-but with OUTSIDE...
this routine: drain the filter, clean the I iT
cover, clean off the case... then take the LEMNT
.. THEN
top off. Keep out blowing dust while (HANGE
you have it open. Then clean out your ELEMENT
breather pipe.
A lube fitting you can't forget is on
0 GREASE each outer frame bearing cap. You take
FIING the pipe plug out of the cap before you
shoot in lube, otherwise you'll blow the
drive seal and get real trouble. Leaving
PIPE it alone and failing to lube will get real
PLUG trouble too-especially in Beautiful
Southeast Asia. No matter what your
LO says, look after it every 10 to 12
REMOVE PLUG hours, depending on how dusty it is. Be
BE-OR" IUBING sure, but certain, that the fitting is clean
before grease goes in.

befor in.P


COOLING-That's Life No. 4, and it takes tongue-
lickin' cleanliness too. Start up front with something as
obvious as what's behind a Bikini-your radiator.
Dirt outside is the main pain here. Compressed air from
your contact truck tank will help get out mud and trash
between your radiator guards and the core, and if you're
where you can, a backward wash with a water hose occa-
sionally is no mistake.
Then get after the dirt-inside bit. Water can carry in
mud and minerals-and salt is positively the worst, so
look at the innards every couple of weeks even if you're
not having overheat just make sure nothing is sneaking
up on you. A petcock test for mud while the radiator is hot
is good insurance.
69


DIRT PACKS CORE
AND GUARD


E





Naturally, if you do get steam and find mud, clean out
like your TM 5-2410-214-12 says on pages 3-6 and 3-7.
Be sure clamps are tight, hoses are solid, pressure cap is
tight... and nothing drips.
YEAH,
Y'HEAR BEEN HEARING
ANY IT ALL PAY,

SOUN05D?








BELTS
OKAY
2 A MATCHED, FANS OKAY?
WEU SEATED, BELT SITS RIGHT,
NOT TOO SMALL, NO SUP?
SNOT TOO OLD


CHECK PULLEYS
FOR WEAR AND
ALIGNMENT




HIT THESE TWO
TURBOCHARGER-The gadget that BET TIGHTENER
packs air into your engine is Life No. 5 I LUBE FITTINGS
on your rat-eraser. Used right, it'll run
for years. Mistreated, it can grind up in
roughly 90 seconds.
Bearing oil starvation is the main HOW 'BOUT THAT
STARVING CAT-f BEARING
turbo killer. It catches hold when you OIL coMI
don't idle up right to start off or when UP'
you make a quick-stop shutdown. If
you idle up s--l--o---w----1---y, 4 or 5 V '
minutes, to start, and do the same when f
you park the rig, you'll be over the first
hurdle.





The second thing here is, no goosing the throttle--not ever. That turbo turns
14 miles a minute top speed, but doesn't slow as the engine RPM drops. So let oil
pressure build or drop in steps. Clean air filters help, too ... makes that whiz-
piece breathe easier. WO! LOOT

NO WONDER
SHE'S BOILING .




S--- ---

Turbo bearing burnout, with no other damage, can be (only $12.50!) mended
with a new Kit, Turbocharger, Seal and Bearing (11083) P/N 3R8683, FSN
2950-247-9856. Otherwise, P/N 4S9705 (Code 11083), Turbo Assy, costs
$355.35. That one is a part-numbered piece you get fastest on an exception-type
requisition marked "Hand Process," and routed straight to U. S. Army Mobility
Equipment Command, ATTN: AMSME-MCC, St. Louis, Mo. 63120.
Then don't throw out the old turbo. Ship it back to that MECOM address or ask
your Local MECOM Mobility Service Office where to leave it.

THE IT'5 JUST A
OKA'/Y BURNED-OUT
BEARING.,SO
NO NEED
TO SCRAP
THE WHOLE
WORKS.


TRANSMISSION-CONVERTER- Here'i Life No. 6.
Overheating is the main trouble. That hits )ou mostly TRANSMISSION
OIL PRESSURE
when you run in a gear too high for the job you'ree on
and lug )our torque converter.
One insurance is to watch ,our gages. An oil.pres-
sure drop in sour transmission or temperature jump I
in your converter will tell )ou to STOP, idle down,
and check. If)our transmission dipstick shows plenty
of lube, 9 rimes in 10 )ou'e been high-gearing. TORQUE
But if that's not the medicine and heat keeps ham- CONVERTER
5 TEMPERATURE
mering. get a support checkout. You could have a
scavenge pump kaput. WATCH YOUR GAGES
71






CLUTCH-BRAKE SYSTEM-Life No. 7 is no great trick to protect. Just keep
away from downhill overspeed and brake-on snap turns.
If your load pushes your D7E downhill, brake back before turning-and you
know the usual turn recipe is reversed downhill: letting the steering clutch off

TUR !TURN!P 6 K -,
Ir FIRST!





HOLD
on one side allows a (urn to the other side. But what GOVERNOR
you keep in mind is, you'ree hauling the load; you be. CONTOL
gin to have trouble when you letr t haul .ou. Lise SE-
your decelerator to kelp engine speed down, too On DUSE(ERATOR
normal turns, get around lust fast enough not to lug TO CUT SPEED
your gear train or strain brake and clutch against
each other.

TRACKS-Your cat's paw-and-claw LET GREASE OUT
setup is Life No. 8. The trick here is care TO SLAKEN TRACK
for 3 things: track tension, shoe wear, i-
and adjustment. Figs 3-12 and 3-13 of '. GREASE TO
your -12 TM give you the story on the TIGHTEN
1-in to 1 1/2-in track slack but be T' IRACK
sure both gun and grease fitting are .., .
completely clean before you shoot. a
Speaking of clean-watch those breathers final drive and transmission
both. Clean whenever they get clogged -and be sure to do it when you change
the transmission oil filter. It's your big protection against seal failure.
Your smiling support can give you a measure job on track shoes and a rebuild
or swap when needed. Anyway-forget about any track-switching stories you
hear: it won't pay. Sprocket adjustment by the book helps stall off downtime.
In heavy red clay soil areas, wash out with a hose between your final drive ring
lock and the sprocket.




B 4 /'





Do it when you end your shift-never wait until later. Overnight, that clay
bakes into brick. Then, when you try to move, you either strip the adjusting lug
or shaft threads, break the shaft, or ruin the whole final drive.
Waiting until morning could cost your Uncle $4,000 for replacement ..
which you don't want on your conscience.
You can get the same result by parking in heavy mud so the tractor sinks
into the goo. Then the stuff dries around track and sprocket.
If you don't take a crowbar or pry tool and get the guck out before you try to
drive off, you do the enemy a big favor.
ClAY
HOSE OUT"LLh .,vM AND
MUD
BUILDUP


-k -- L' _- I I
PUBS-This is the 9th piece of your Cat's life story, and it rings in all the
others. Here is the know-how you have to have. If you're short on books, keep
pressuring for 'em. Your D7E has no brain of its own,-so you have to be the gray
matter. That's where you really count. Here're the pubs you need-TM 5-2410-
214-12, TM 5-2410-214-20P and LO 5-2410-214-12, -1 and -2.
So keep all 9 lives healthy .. and purr, tiger, purr!

TURN ON THE LIGHT... 2

1 GET THE NUMBERS RIGHT 9
Grabbing the wrong femme in the movers, bulldozers, tractors, wreckers,
dark (or anyplace, for that matter) can fuel rigs-lots of stuff -may carry as
get you a mild pain in the jaw. many as 5 or 6data plates with separate
And leaving )our support in the dark serial numbers for hydraulics, cable
with wrong-serial numbers can give controls, special blades, winches, scrap-
your maintenance a pain. ers, etc.
The thing is, lots of end items have So make sure the data plate you copy
atachments with data plates and serial from is for the item you need help on.
numbers-so just grabbing off the first Whether you're writing for help, fill-
number you find may give no light at ing TAERS forms, looking up parts, or
all. The model and serial numbers of whatever-mox nix. Turn on the Light
the major item itself are not enough to with the right serial dope.
identify all the components of a unit. As the manufacturers say: When
Such equipment as power units, earth-, you're specific, our support's terrific!
73






























D isn't the best grade to get in school ... but there're places where D's are hot
on the scene. Like on that new 440HA grader- because D stands for 2 things:
Diesel, and Different. Get with those D's and you'll switch onto the action.
First thing, this Wabco is Diesel, which means forget most of the gasoline-
engine book.
For instance, where your TM says "at operating temperature" in the start-up,
it means 160 or better (except in Far North) on that coolant temp gage.
Even in tropics, shortcutting is unsmart ... 115 in the shade may be hot to
you, but it's chilly to your engine..
SLA COLD DIESEL CARBONS UP WARM
A LOT FASTER. 'ER UP.



Carbon and varnish hide out on guides and stems and rings of cold engines like
snipers in spider holes. Good warmup shoots down that kind of trouble, and it
gets the lube oil to the vitals besides. So make sure you're up to the 160 operating
temperature before you move out.
Those gages read 15' to 20 low in sub-zero climate. So there's a D for Differ-
ence-go through the TM-12 cold-weather drill (para 2-15), make sure your
weather closure is good ... and when your gage has been on 140' to 145 a couple
of minutes, you're safe.
74


-~ --~ -, ~ -.- ~ '.1*---

WATCH THAT ENTHUSIASM

These Wabcos can be kinda fun to run-but don't let excess joy get the
best of you. Even taking off from parking can be dangerous-
Like, when you raise your blade, watch your blade lift arms. Keep the
left lift arms to the outboard side of top
TAKE LIFT ARM OUT OF GEAR... center for normal grading operations.
When using your 440HA for bank
sloping operations, it's OK to move the
left arms past top center; in fact, it's
necessary during this operation. If you
operate with the left lift arms inboard
S1of top center during normal grading
operations, you can very easily ram the
left hand blade link into the leaning
wheel control shaft.
Otherwise, you can bend the shaft ...
or snap the linkage ... and there you'll
BEFORE IT HITS STOP go, wobblin' off to unnecessary down-
time.
75


































AYE, EYES ARE HANDY
That neck-saving gaze can help you
on a pair of other places, too. One of
them is another new-machine checkover
bit, only for this'n you wait 'till your
440 has been run 3 days or so-not
less'n 1 or over 4, that is. Then have
your support unit mechanic retorque
your tandem wheel hub nuts. The right
out-of-gear figure is 600 lb-ft. Be sure
your front wheel bearings ride snug,
too.
The other look-at-often is your cool-
ing system. Look and clean when needed
with an air hose. If you can make it
without splashing hot pipes and elec-
trical equipment use a water hose every
now and then. Keep mud, oily sand,
76






leaves and trash, and of course all old
worn-out $10 bills out of the radiator
fins and honeycomb air passages. Every
time you do that, clean the breather cap
on your lower transmission housing.


BLOW OUT THE JUNK,USE LOW PRESSURE AIR AND WEAR GOGGLES

NO SOUP ON THE MENU
Never think your 440 can do better souped up.
Your favorite Uncle had it souped down. A bigger injector or a jazzed-up
governor will only add heat, and heat means trouble.
There's a chance-but slim-that you might get a Wabco-type with an
old-style hydraulic pump. If you do, you're in trouble.
So requisition from page 7 of that fold-in section of your factory manual
labeled "Draft List of Stock Type Items."

3805-071-2657 PUMP ASSEMBLY: hydraulic (35311) 403975



You'll get the right pump the second
time around. It comes under the same
FSN the old 'un did.
Take care of your scarifier like letting
your n rench wielders look after the lift
links, drawbar pins, and lift balls every
time you find an) part worn oser 1/5 of (HECK LIFT
the a) t hru. LINKS AND
But what you really watch is sour LIFT B
moldboard. You can replace a boot, a





blade, or even the whole moldboard ...
but banging into big rocks is a great way
to bust up your circle.. the big round
steel suspension for the whole digger.
If you find rock that hasn't been scar-
ified, try that first. If it won't scarify,
don't bust your moldboard on it. The
Army owns bulldozers so ask for
help. WATCH THOSE ROCKS

WELL, THAT All checked, all done, could make a
CARE OF ANY CMMI with no sweat?
CARE OF ANY
CMMI Great-go check your fuel strainer
INSPECTION drain cock and fuel filter drain for water
just to be sure. That's the first place
0 those inspecting cats look. Then they
i catch your oil filter set-up, so get that
d 5293too. OK?
IN'C isPE.: rToW
URK

CHECK
DRAIMS




GIVE 'EM A BREAK

You can stop parking brake failures on that LARC-V. Just put your trust in
the word, "adjust," and do the adjusting like TM 55-1930-205-20 (Apr 66)
says on page 48, figs 3-48 and 3-49, using the lever knob to take out slack. One
big help is-don't move out with the parking brake engaged.You might have
to replace the lining.


WAREHOUSE TRAILER HUB CAPS

Keepin' dirt out of wheel bearings can be a problem if the hub caps are miss-
ing from your 6000-lb capacity warehouse platform trailer, FSN 3920-856-1342.
You can solve that problem by ordering Caps, hub, FSN 2530-679-4512, Mfr.
Code 52793, Part No. 6394.






WELDING BOOTH PAINT
USE THE Dear Editor,
RIGHT PAINT, Healthwise, not just any paint will do for a welding
area or booth.
The right kind of paint is needed to reduce the hazard
of eye burn for individuals in the area. It doesn't have to
be a costly, special covering, but the paint should be lus-
treless or flat, so the welding are won't be reflected, and
it should reflect a minimum of ultraviolet radiation from
the arc.
The following paints meet the safety requirements.
They're available in the supply system from GSA in 1-gal
cons:


________m James J. McLeskey
Merrill Cohen
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.
(Ed Note-Thanks. Also, remember that good ventilation is real important
in a welding area.)


IMMERSION HEATER WICK

Dear Half-Mast,
We have the new type immer-
lion heater, Preway Model 447-
2EX, and we need a new wick for W
the lighter assembly. Can you SPRING
Jhelp?. R.
\ G .__J. R. D


SERGEANT J RD.,
FSN 4540-125-3784
(MFR CODE 48745, If you need the complete lighter as-
T N. embly ask for FSN 4540-129-3241
WILL GET YOU
THAT WICK. (Part No. Y11683).
FSN 4540-124-7132 (Part No.
K12810) gets you the spring for the
lighter assembly. .
79 o1010






NO MIXED DRINKS HERE

I PAN OUTrA
THE GI SIuFF.




V, a


Yep -''tis true you keep anti-
freeze in your carrier engine on the
Model 2380 rough terrain crane--and
in the crane engine too ... winter and
summer, tropics and Arctic circle, makes
no difference where you are.
And in your chromate corrosion re-
sistor, you use nothing, but nothing as
a substitute for FSN 2930-929-5501. If
you run out of antifreeze and just have
to use water, no filter at all is better than
what's been around up to now. In any
case, you never let the Perry chromate
filter sack (Item 23, Fig 46, TM 5-2420-
206-35P) touch your antifreeze solu-
tion. Leave the two plates in-they're
good at fighting electrolysis (that's
Irbanian for water rheumatism).


DON'T
USE AN'/
KIND OF
SUBSTITUTE.


The same thing goes for your 290M
tractor, too-it wants antifreeze the
year round, and no Perry chromate sack
in the filter. This word is on page 38 of
TB 750-971-1 (Feb 68).

/TAKE OUT THE FILTER-
LEAVE THE PLATES IN.


YOU NEED IT
You're darned tootin' it's important to have a
,' ground rod for your generator. It doesn't matter
whether you have a trailer mounted one or a skid
S mounted one. They both need it.
The ground rod is a part of your Basic Issue Items
List. If you don't have that rod, here's what you
Should order: Rod, Ground: 3 section, steel, 9 feet
long, 5/8-in diameter, copper coated finish; cone
point; male thread end, separable clamp for attaching
ground wire; furnished with 6-ft grounding cable
and ground terminal, MIL-R-11461, Type II, Style
S2, FSN 5975-878-3791.












I' StaeC Se 74umn
S That "sore thumb" sentence on page
25 of PS 199 identifies the M 6A1's sear
spring as sear pin and so does the pic-
ture down below. Make it read spring
instead of pin both places. It might save
Half-Mast from getting a sore thumb
answering letters about it.

O/d Lin toS NHew
Is your SB 700-20 suffering from an
appendectomy? Appendix II has been
removed or maybe it didn't have one,
and you need it because it's a cross-
reference from old line item numbers to
new. You can solve your problem by
using SB 700-22, (Apr 69) Cross Refer-
ence Old, Line Item Numbers to New
Army Line Item Numbers.

See or DA 2406
Before your next materiel readiness
report (DA 2406) falls due in September,
make sure you read and heed DA Cir
750-29 (9 May 69). It sets up new equip-
ment category codes (ECC) for this re-
port, coupled with SB 700-20 LIN's. Your
CO also may want to use 'em on other
i records.

1W741 'a444 MiWes4
The M17A1 field protective mask is
Covered in new movies, TF 3-4060 and
TF 3-4061. They are 10 and 11 minutes
S long, and the nearest audio visual center
,.\can loan you a copy


ift Hwoes &an Cte
Even if you get some other lube as a
gift in Vietnam, never use anything but
LSA on your M16A1 rifle. LSA's THE
ONLY LUBE AUTHORIZED for the tem-
perature range in RVN. Remember: LSA
...MIL-L-46000A. FSN 9150-935-6597
fetches you a 2-oz plastic bottle.


Belt 96o W151
Back off on that PS 200 info about
generator belts for your M151 (or other
G838-series 1/-ton vehicle). That FSN
3030-756-8390 gets you only 1 belt.
You're s'posed to replace belts in sets, so
stick with FSN 3030-833-1297 in your
TM 9-2320-218-20P w/Ch 1 (Feb 69).
But be sure to specify Part No. MS
51065-33-2 when ordering so you'll get
a pair of 33-in belts for your 25-amp
generator setup.


A4ng-106


Been bugged by a couple' mixed up
FSN's on parts for the AN/GRC-106
radio set? Read on: FSN 5995-985-7898
on page 6 of C1 (13 Oct 65) to TM 11-
5820-520-12 should read 5995-985-
7998. That'll get you the 10-ft cable you
need. Also, FSN 5330-727-8518 (not
8515) will get you the gasket you need
from page 91, TM 11-5820-520-25P.

(WE GOT A AINTENNCE
PROBLEM, CONNIE!





MOVE
LATELY





I

~---4 -- -
If your unit's just changed its address
or is about to ...
D Be sure the pub centers (St. Louis &
Baltimore) are notified at once!
This will assure you of an unbroken
flow of vital publications.
You can't get pubs if you're not there!

TELL TE PUB CENTERS