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PS
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00046
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1969
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00046

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12-13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26-27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40-41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44-45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52-53
        Page 54-55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text


v-'4A


Ll


W WOT ARE
YOU BEEFING
ABOUT.. I'VE
GOT 4 MEN WHO
PON'T KNOW
THEIR SUPPLY
PUBS... NEVER
REAP AR 755-35,
PON'" REMEMBER
SUPPLY STATUS
COPES... AND
THEY'RE TALKING'
ABOUT REPLACING
ME WITH A
SPEC 4...
BESIPES YOUR
FSN'S ARE
WRONG
a AGAIN.' I


,,* ..': ..^ *".*. '* ;:. ".: ..***
* '*- '. f' ,' '^ c ; "," ,. J .i' .
4
''ZS7














A lot of guys who do maintenance
on engine-driven equipment shy
around the electrical system like it
wur a ghost ready to gobble "em up.
Wlhal's more, when something
goes wrong in the electrical system
these guys throw out generators. reg-
ulalorm and batteries like mad. Teel
'em out with your L\CT? Nevah
hoppen!
The guy who's a pro knows it's
easy to check out your electrical sys-
tem's parts. All you need is a little
time, patience and know-how.
You can do it with the Generator
and t ollage Regulalor Test Set (FSN
4910-092-9136) which your outfit
has in its Common Tool Kit.
The words and pictures on how to
use the tester are in either -

TM 9-4910-401-12 A Ch I
(For Auto Test Inc Model 10308 and
Atomic Engineering Model TV 100)
or
TM 9-4910-402-12 & Ch 2
SFor Electro Mechanisms Corp Model 1060)

S So, make like a pro and get your
tester off the shelf where it's been
Z' collecting dust. Li-e the manual to
learn how to check out sour electrical
parts. The pro makes sure before he
losses out a part. Try it. You might
be amazed how easi it is.

1


THE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MONINLY
lsue No 199 1969 Siries
IN THIS ISSUE


1


GROUND MOBILITY 2-24
Specall Feature .. Coolng Systerns 2.24





FIREPOWER 25-27
M1MI RIle 25.2-27



AIR MOBILITY 37-43

Pats Cianging 38
Shoulder Harness Reel 39
Tro Viiatieon so
Paraculte Caue 40-43



COMMUNICATIONS 44-51
AI/IPRI4 AN/PRR-9 44-51




GENERAL & SUPPLY
Genertor PM 52-4
Ner Publications 2R
SuDply 22.21.24 37, .,45.47

Ua If lunds for printlg of tlls pullta-
ion has umen approved by Hsadquarten.
Department of tIhe imy. 2 February 1968
DISTRIBUTION: It acmrdnice with re-
quireamtets submitted an DA Form 124.

s A ,("~.

O-fl.K


-































It's much, much hotter than you think gasoline. dicscl. multifuel or let
fuels air or liquid-cooled ..
Whatever you push, its cooling system has got to be in good shape or you're
not going anywhere.
That's no threat. That's a fact.
On sedans, trucks, tanks, SP's, APC's, tractors, aircraft, cranes, MHE, com-
pressors, generators-on anything, in fact, that's powered by an internal
combustion engine-the heat created in the combustion chamber by the burn-
ing fuel is downright hotter'n blazes.
For example, on some vehicles-inside where the horses live-heat may go
as high as 4500'F. Some iron, my friend, melts at around 2000F. Or, as the
heat experts tell it-the excess heat generated by a hardworking, high output
engine could melt a 200-pound engine block in 20 minutes.
Diesels run a mite cooler than other types, but they still put out plenty heat.
And, of all that fantastic heat only about 1/3 is used for power. Another 1/3
is handled by the exhaust system. Getting rid of the rest, as fast as possible, is the
big job of your engine's cooling system.
Which is why you've got to know your engine's safe operating temperatures,
and you've got to mind your cooling P's and Q's. 'Cause, if ever the cooling
system fails and you don't catch on fast, the engine can quickly end up a lump
of junk.
2


I .


In addition to getting rid of excess heat and maintaining safe engine operat-
ing temps under all conditions, your cooling system protects the engine against
overcooling, which can also stop you fast. And, it usually provides cooling or
warming services, as needed, for other components, accessories or systems on the
equipment (differential and/or transmission oil coolers, heaters, compressors,
auxiliary engines, etc.).
Your equipment is cooled by either a liquid cooling system or an air cooling
system. One cools with a liquid, which in turn is cooled in a radiator by a fan
and outside air. The other uses a cooling fan and shrouding to force air over,
across and around the engine and other hot spots in the engine compartment.

3>


























S'I 1\ AWAY FROM

Some air-cooled engines may use a blower instead of a VENTS,
\fan assembly to provide the cooling air. And, in fixed- GRILLES,
wing aircraft, for example, the opening in the engine ETC.
cowling, right behind the propeller, provides the air MUST BE
r KEPT
i passage into the engine compartment. The cooling air CL EAR
is aimed right at the cylinder cooling fins. The air flows
around the cylinders, and shrouding, baffles and tubes
force the air to hit other hot components, as it rushes
out of the engine compartment.

COOLING HELP
All the special design features, such also important factors in engine cool-
as heavily finned cylinder heads and ing. They're used to direct the cool air
barrels (in air-cooled engines), shrouds, to exactly the right places, and to pass
air baffles, ducts, vents, deflectors, the hot air out of the engine compart-
grilles, shutters, panels, doors, etc., are ment fast.
With either cooling system, a run-
ning engine must be constantly hit by
streams of cool, outside air. And, natch,
it's up to you to make sure that the






incoming air flow doesn't get blocked,
detoured or slowed up in any way, and / ANP, THE LLJSING
that the used air can stream away freely SYSTEM. HELPS
so it won't be recirculated to the hot WITH ENGINE
engine. COOLING, TOO'
Both air-cooled and liquid-cooled en-
gine cooling systems get a big helping P
hand from the engine's lubing system. POOR LUBE GOOD LUBE
CREATES FRICTION
The cooling and lubing systems, in fact, WHICH GIVES KEEPS FRICTION
are mighty dependent on each other for OFF HEAT DOWN... HEAT OW
proper operation. Each system must do
its main job just right; otherwise, it'll
cause serious problems in the other.
The lubing system helps cooling by '
reducing friction heat in the engine,
and carrying heat off as it lubes the
engine. And, it cools bearings, shafts,
rods, and other moving parts as it flows
through the lubing system.
The oil in turn is cooled by the cool-
ing system before it's recirculated to
the engine.

COOLING THE ENGINE LUBE
In your liquid-cooled engine the hot oil may be circulated through an oil
cooler which is cooled by engine radiator coolant, or it may be cooled by the
engine cooling fan, or by outside air that's aimed directly at the oil cooler, oil
lines, oil pan or reservoir.
SOIL
WHEN THEOT LINE OUID
OIL 5 COOLED BY COOLANT COOLED
RADIATOR -COL ANT. UNE
IT WORKS LIKE

COOLERS
FAN OIL
UNE
The equipment's transmission oil cooler may also be piped for coolant cool-
ing, or it may be cooled by the fan.
The oil and the coolant have separate passages through the oil cooler. The
passages are designed to transfer heat easily from one liquid to the other. During
5 W >




















warm-up the heat from the coolant warms up the oil, and during operation the
flow of heat is from the oil to the coolant.
In engines cooled by air the hot oil is circulated through an oil cooler, where
it's cooled by the engine fan. The fan draws outside air from under the engine
or from its sides; or it may get air through grilles, screens, shutters or other
cooling air inlets on the equipment.
On some heavier equipment (tanks, SP's, recovery vehicles, etc.) 2 engine
cooling fans, located on top of the engine, will handle 2 or more engine oil
coolers ... and, they'll also cool the
equipment's transmission oil coolers.
The equipment uses radiator-type oil
coolers which are mounted along the
top sides of the engine, and handy as 011i
possible to the overhead fans. The hot
oil circulates through oil lines in the
finned core of the coolers, and the fans
keep a strong flow of air rushing
through the coolers.
Thermostats and valves control the
flow of oil through the coolers and con-
trol panel gages and warning lights '
report the oil's temperature and pres-
sure.


GOOD LUBING-GOOD COOLING
To help with cooling, of course, a lubing system must be clean and in good
order. And, it must have the right amount of good, clean oil. Contaminated oil,
the wrong oil and low oil levels are first-class trouble makers. While they're
causing wear and damage in the engine and the lubing system, they'll also kick
6






T HI L wIT LOW
KILLERS DIRY ON


WROMG
OIL
CLOGGED
STRAINERS
up overheating problems that'll tax the cooling system.
And, clogged, dirty oil coolers, oil lines, oil filters and sludge in the oil pan
or reservoir not only interfere with oil circulation and lubing, they'll also
insulate the oil against the cooling system.
On the other hand, if the cooling
system fails, the oil's lubing powers can
be quickly fouled up by the excessive OIL
heat that'll build up in the engine. Then FILTERS
varnish and other harmful deposits
will form in the engine and the lubing
system.


FANNING THE ENGINE
AIR TUAT
CAN'T GET
_-.. I ,T TIROU-&O
DOES NO
-C GOOD.





While you're this close up to the fans on an air-cooled engine, here's how
they cool the hot spots on the engine:
In addition to drawing air through the oil coolers, the fans pull outside air
through the cylinder cooling fins and they aim it at other hot components
in the engine compartment. And, shrouds and baffles are used to direct the
air behind each cylinder to completely surround the hot cylinders. That cool-
ing air, in fact, is a matter of life or death for the cylinders. So, if you ever find
shrouding or baffles missing, cracked, bent, installed wrong or in anyway out
of line, you'd best forget about operating the engine until the problem gets
fixed. Same goes when cylinder cooling fins or oil cooler cores are damaged
in any way.

7






TEMP GAGES
HoLP IT!
The big things you've got going for you in bird-dogging HP
the engine cooling system, of course, are the engine temp
and oil temp gages on the control panel. On some equipment I'M
you've also got a coolant temp gage. HOTTI
You have to keep a sharp eye on the gages when you U
crank-up-and you check 'em often during operations. The
instant a gage reading threatens to climb past the safe operat-
ing zone, you have to stop fast, cool the equipment and GLUG
troubleshoot for cooling problems. Also, during warm-up, if
a temp reading swings up suddenly, you have to stop quick-
like and check out the problem. Same goes if a gage or a
warning light refuses to give you a safe reading or signal L
when you start up.

THERE HANDY DATA
ARE
OTHER Along with the gages, most equipment uses data plates and
SIGNALS decals on the control panel to tell you what the gage readings
TOO! should be when you start up, when the engine's running, and
when you shut down. The same scoop is spelled out in greater
detail in the equipment TM's, but the sooner you memorize
exactly what the temp gages should be saying at all times, the
HV safer you and your engine will be.
,If you're not paying close attention to the gages, overheat-
4) \ ing problems also warn you with engine knock, loss of power,
S excessive fuel consumption; and in liquid cooled engines by
loss of coolant (steaming, boiling).

OVERCOOLING

VICM OF With most equipment, to guard against overcooling prob-
OVERCOOL, lems and damage, you have to keep the warm-up run as short
as possible. You also stop fast if the gage readings don't start
moving up to safe operating temps like they should.
Although overcooling may not be sudden death for the
engine, like overheating is, it can cause serious headaches. For
Sone, the engine'll run rough, lose power and waste fuel. In a
cold-running engine, fuel exhaust and water vapors can blow-
1', by the piston rings and into the oil system where they'll form
acids that'll corrode the engine. Lower operating temps also
-. 8






interfere with normal venting of moisture and vapors in the oil system. That too,
can mess up the lube enough to bring on engine damage or increased wear.
Operating conditions, instead of a bum cooling system, are often responsible
for overcooling problems. For example, long idling, underloading, low speeds
and short hauls can keep an engine cold. Missing or busted thermostats, shutters,
panels or doors, will do the same, especially in cold weather.

ADDED LOAD


CCON nONSPU'rAN I


A cooling system's big job gets even stickier-and the sys-
tem needs added care- in extreme hot or cold climates.
In extremely hot weather you have to eye the cooling
system carefully several times a day, like the TM says ..
and, in some real hot, dry places, you may have to do it even
more often.
To protect the cooling system in cold weather you've got to
really warm-up to the special operating instructions for the
equipment, some of which may be kept for you right there on
the control panel. To beat real arctic weather you've got to
S be on the ball about a few other very important things- like
starting aids, special lubes, fuel, coolant and winterization
Skits authorized for your equipment.
It's also harder on the cooling system when your equipment must be operated
at a very high or very low speeds for a long time, or when a vehicle makes long
uphill hauls, rolls cross-country, or in muddy, sandy areas.
For example:
Flying debris, mud, dirt, leaves, branches, bushes, bugs, rocks, gravel, and sand
clog and damage radiators, oil coolers, fan shrouds, fan wells, air passages,
screens, shutters and air outlets. They'll dent, crack, loosen, wear or otherwise







MUD "
AND %!
WHY CRUD ,
OON'TCHA CLOG
0 CLEAN GRILL/t-elt

GRILL.' WATER STILL HOT WHEN
RETURNING TO ENGINE
beat up fan blades, rotors, belts, drain cocks, oil pans, oil and coolant lines and
hoses, nuts, bolts, and clamps.
Equipment vibration will loosen mountings, shrouds, baffles and connections.
It'll cause cracks and leaks in radiators, oil coolers, hoses and lines, and it can
damage pulleys, pumps, shafts and tanks.

OPERATE(
S-' WILL HELF
r KEEP THE


*Aaitn4 you EB NGIN E

.^Sy. f *.... ,,ii'"i *,,

eor an re"latsyst:em n equip-.lp


e .shoeatsng. d a' -sbieg 6 r t \ w GEAR
;-snerea'e4 y xoogb/cam er. -,0;
citfeialn f io ej!R Bhingl oir over- DON T
problems naB lag-' t in DON T LUG .

B ek~lr, gggu hie engine. se eial c o. d iri

nuebsop beo .e ofustop'm.c T' t R m-Mo I

SHUT-DOWN COOLING
Overheating damage is a big threat even when you stop after a hot run.
Proper shut-down SOP is important PM for all equipment, but it's especially
critical for some vehicles.
Briefly, you have to cool some engines slow-like by idling 'em fast for a few
minutes before you stop'em. Two to 5 minutes (or a few more) of fast idling






is usually enough. But after-cooling
needs vary for different kinds of equip-
ment, and the length of time the engine
has been running may also make a dif-
ference. So, be sure you know exactly
what your specific equipment needs ...
how fast and how long to idle, and what
your temp gages should read when you
get ready to stop the engine.
After-cooling boils down to this--

SUPPEN
SHUTDOWN 50O
CAUSES PISTON
UNEVEN RINGS
CONTRACTION CAN
OF PARTS. WARP

BEAING


sTCBEARINGS
CAN LOOSEN
VALVE
STEMS
CAN
.." BEND


In those few minutes of fast idling
the engine has a chance to cool off more
evenly. If you shut down suddenly,
without after-cooling, the trapped heat
-which is greater in some parts of the
engine than it is in others-will cause
uneven contraction of metal as the en-
gine starts cooling. The uneven con-
traction can crack or warp the engine
block, cylinder heads, damage pistons,
piston rings, bearings, and valves, and
foul up fuel injectors, the exhaust man-
ifold, seals, gaskets and thermostats.


WHEN YOU SHUT DOWN SUPPENLY
-YOU STOP THE OIL
FLOW... BUT THE TURBO
KEEPS SPINNINGe.







THE LIQUID COOLER


THE IMPELLER WORKS
LIKE A WATERWHEEL


.O And, there may be an overflow
tank (also called a surge tank).
----
HERE'S HOW

WORKS


PEA


COMMON HARDWARE hose
clamps, connedors, drain cocks,
Splugs, gaskets, seals, and the
like

.... ..- ,

IT ALL

INSIDE I FAN DRAWS AIR
THROUGH (ORE


SEALS AND HOLDS
IN PRESSURE
ALLOWS WATER TO
CIRCULATE
UNDER HEAT.


0 0

0 THE HOT WATER
RUSHES TO THE
S BOTTOM THROUGH THIN
SCOOUNG TUBES
INSIDE THE
0 RADIATOR'S
FINNED CORE


OVERFLOW PIPE
TAKES CARE
OF EXPANSION

AIR
RADIATOR
OUTLET
AIR -- HOSE


AIR COOLS WATER BEFORE
IT RETURNS TO ENGINE


RE





OVERFLOW TANK Loose,
rusty, leaky. Pressure cap miss-
ing, damaged. Drain cock or
overflow line plugged, damaged.


3;).


COOLING SYSTEM TROUBLE SPOTS


RADIATOR Baffle plate or filler neck dam-
aged, loose. Overflow pipe cracked, or
dented, clogged. Leaks, rust, corrosion in
radiator core, seams, upper or lower tank.
Radiator core clogged, blocked; fins bent,
crushed. Radiator mountings loose, dam-
aged. Cooling tubes clogged with rust,
grease, corrosion, shreds of rubber hose
Hoses leaky, cracked, worn, rotted, hard-
ened, collapsed, swollen, sucking air. Hose
clamps loose, buckled. Clamp-bolt threads
stripped. Hose hooked-up wrong.

BE SURE THE HOSE
IS IN FAR ENOUGH ON
CONNECTORS...SO THE
HOSE CLAMP IS BEHIND
BEAD ON HOE CONNECT
...OR HOSE WILL
BLAST OFF WHEN
1 SYSTEM'S UNDER
PRESSURE. i


K

II I I
.l* 01
I I
** .Ii


THERMOSTAT Rusty, damaged, miss-
ing; valve weak or stuck. Wrong thermo-
stat, or thermostat installed upside
down. Housing leaky.


WATER PUMP -Worn, loose, dam-
aged, sucking air, leaky. Belt crack-
oa mnrn fr~warl nn tioht nr Innm


ENGINE WATER JACKET-Leaky, clogged.
Head bolts loose, damaged, head gasket
installed wrong. Corrosion, rust, clogging
or leaks inside jacket.
COLOR
/ \ AND CRUD IN
COOLANT
CLUES YOU
WHEN THE
WATER JACKET
A AND RADIATOR
ARE INA BAD
WAY INSIDE!


SOFT OR MUSHY
HOSES... TIP YOU
OFF TO TROUBLE!!





OTHER HOSES, LINES, TUBES, PLUGS,
FITTINGS, GASKETS, CONNECTORS
Leaks or damage in cooling system
hoses or lines to heaters or other com-
ponents using coolant; at connections of
cylinder-head distribution or by-pass line
or tube, at the connections or in the sup-
ported components.

MORE,,


hAL''r


FAN AND SHROUD--Fan blades cracked,
muddy, grimy, worn; mounting studs loose.
Fan vibrates, squeals, rattles or is otherwise
noisy. Fan well crammed with trash, mud.
Belt out of adjustment, worn, cracked.
Shroud loose, bent, cracked, crowding fan.


I


[ (Most water pumps are sealed, butYIV

soene ue We raei
cneetetp n uigfe


rrMll


.4





RADIATOR
The radiator stores and cools the
water. It has a bottom tank to hold the
cooled water for recirculation and a top
tank to receive the hot water from the
engine water jacket (some tanks are on
the sides of the radiator).
The radiator cap is a very vital part
of the cooling system. It seals the system
so a fair amount of pressure builds up,
so you have to make sure your equip-
ment has the right pressure cap.


ing coolant force the valve open, the
overflow pipe is opened to release the
expansion.
. V E~; *: : PR"sURVELVE:
- ., SEALS OVERFLOW:
PIPE UNTIL.
SDDECtilDC --


On most transport vehicles the cap's
OVERFLOW
L pressure valve is set to open at approxi-
V mately 7 or 13 PSI. At 7 PSI, for exam-
VACUUM ple, the coolant's boiling point is raised
VAlVE to around 234F, at sea level. At 13
PSI it's raised to about 251 F.
With coolant under pressure the en- On some combat vehicles the cap's
gine can operate at much higher temps pressure opening is set as high as 17
without the coolant boiling over. PSI, which raises the coolant boiling
The cap has a pressure safety valve, point to about 263 F.
a vacuum valve and a gasket. The pressure rating is stamped on
The pressure valve seals the overflow the top of each cap.
pipe during normal operating tempera- The cap's vacuum valve opens as the
tures, but when steam pressure or boil- engine cools and the system's pressure
drops below the outside air pressure.
UNSCREW IT As the vacuum valve opens, air rushes
C-A-R-E-FULLY. into the system through the overflow
pipe. The automatic suction of air pre-
.t f. ( Y vents the collapse of the hoses and thin,
unsupported parts in the system. When
the system's pressure and the outside
pressure are about the same the vacuum
valve closes.






















(CYLINDER
HEAD
CASKET

(YLINDER WATER
BLO(K -- PORTS

'ata& passages in tiie cylindr block and die iyinid&ieaid form: the *aier'.
jacket. In the block the water-jacket surrounds th cylinder liner and passages
between the cylinders-let the.water circulate around the cylinders. Water pas,
sages also protect other hot spots on the block, and plates or baffles may lso
be used to help the circulating coolant hit the hot sections. The engine may
also.have a water.distribution line or tube which aims coolant at the cylinders
and the valve seats.
Water ports between the cylinder block and the cylinder head let the cool-
ant flow into the cylinder head Cp cool the top of the cylinders and the valves.
Or, there may be small water jets or nozzles built into the cylinder head to cool
the valve seats.
The engine head gasket, along with its other important sealing chores in the
combustion chamber, provides the seal that keeps coolant out of the combustion
chamber, and fumes and fuel contamination from leaking into the water jacket.
SWater remains in the water jacket, just as it does in the radiator, whether the
engine is running or not. '


WATER PUMP: HEART OF THE SYSTEM
The pump takes cooled water from the radiator's lower tank and forces it
into the engine water jacket. To do a proper cooling job some pumps may have
to circulate between 4,000 and 10,000 gallons of water an hour.
17
MRE








The thermostat regulates the engine
temperatures by controlling the cool-
ant flow through the radiator. When
the engine is cold the thermostat valve
stays closed and shuts off practically all
coolant circulation to the radiator. As


OSTAT

the engine warms up, the thermostat
valve opens gradually to allow the com-
plete cooling cycle to begin. During
equipment operation the thermostat
will open and close as often as called for
by the engine operating temperatures.



THERMOSTAT
OPEN


The 2 common thermostats used are
the bellows type and the metal spring
type.
The bellows type contains a liquid
that'll create gas pressure, so the bell-
ows expand when the coolant reaches
a given temperature.
The other type is forced open as the
coolant heat expands the bimetallic
coil (spring).


METAL SPRING
THERMOSTAT.


SHROUD OOING FAN AND SHROUD
SHROUD
The fan pulls outside air in through
the radiator core to cool the water
( -', tubes, fins and the coolant. With help
.' from the radiator shroud the fan also
iy ,y ) blows or draws cool air directly on,
'J T over or across the hot engine. The fan
is belt driven, runs off the crankshaft
'-" and normally shares a pulley with the
water pump, generator or some other
AN SCREEN
N S component.
18





AIR COOLING SYSTEM CHECK POINTS
The big things to watch on an air cooling system are:

FANS/BLOWERS/ROTORS Binding, noisy, dam- OIL COOLERS-Radiator
aged, dirty, clogged Shafts or clutch assemblies cores leaking, tins dam-
worn, damaged, leaky Fan blades, rotor fins cracked, aged, clogged. Cooler
bent, dirty Fan housing or towers damaged, loose, mountings loose. Oil tube
clogged wilh trash. clogged. Oil lines dirty,
leaky, damaged.

tiI


CYLINDER COOLING FINS I BAFF
- Bent. cracked, smash- CYLINDER BAFFLES,
ed, blocked, grimy, SHROUDS-Bent, crack-
clogged. ed, loose, missing, n-
stalled wrong, dirty


AIR OUTLETS, AIR INLETS,
SHUTTERS, GRILLES, VANES.
SCREENS, PANELS. DOORS-
Damaged, stuck, blocked,
missing, installed wrong:
their seals, gaskets or at-
tachments worn, damaged,
missing, installed wrong.


19






STATIONARY OR MOUNTED EQUIPMENT
On things like generators, compressors and other engine-powered tools or
support equipment, you also have to make sure that the equipment has plenty
of breathing space-that it's not crowded by other equipment, walls, tents,
fences, embankments or protectors, that'll block the flow of air to the engine
and its air inlets..
STHE IDEA 15 TO MAKE SURE
THAT HOT AIR DOESN'T SET CHANNELED
BACK TO THE ENGINE!
... .II ....


The proper care and replacement of
hoods, panels, shrouds, doors, etc., is
very important. They must be in place
and in good shape for the cooling sys-
tem to work right.
When you get down to the 1- and
2-cylinder engines used on some tools
and equipment (small generators, com-


pressors, chain saws, etc.), you have to
remember that their cooling comes
mostly from flywheel breeze, shroud-
ing and the normal circulation of air
around them. So you have to keep 'em
clean, uncluttered and unblocked so
they're hit by outside air from all direc-
tions.


... COPIES OF PS '
NO? YOUR OUTFIT CAN GET
ENOUGH BY SENDING IN A NEW
SA FORM 12-4 TO THE AG
PUBLICATIONS CENTER, BALTIMORE.
ORER THE QUANTITY YOU NEEP.

20






N ~SOL HEAT
WHICH On any piece of equipment, regard-
WAY IS less of size or MOS, it'll help the cool-
7HE WIvD? .
Sing system a lot if you shade the engine
\ i some from the direct sun blast-when-
\ ever possible. It's especially helpful to
point an engine upwind when the
equipment is overheated.

ABOUT ENGINE COOLANT
Keeping the coolant solution clean
and at the right level is top priority
PM. And, a good point to remember i
in checking coolant is that coolant ex- SHOULDA
pands and its level rises as the engine / WAITE A
warms up, and the level falls as the FEW
engine cools. So, whenever you're refill- ,, MINUTES!
ing the radiator you have to recheck
the coolant level after the engine has
reached operating temperature to get
a true reading. Run the engine a few / ,
minutes and then recheck the coolant
before you re-start 'er.

The coolant should be visible at the bottom of the filler neck, or just so much
over the radiator baffle plate. But, exact level and filling SOP will vary with
different equipment, so that's PM SOP you have to learn by heart for your
equipment.

: -.Y.I "" KEEP YER .'
i G'RIIMY PAWSS
OUTA THAT NICE '
THE CLEAN WATER

COOLANT ...
LEVEL! -






Overfilling, or filling when the en-
gine is cold, can cause coolant overflow
or coolant waste. And, repeated over-
filling will weaken the coolant's anti-
freeze and rust inhibitor protection.
On the other hand, with a short
measure of coolant you'll have poor
coolant circulation and overheating, '
specially at low engine speeds. And, of
course, it's not very healthy at higher
speeds, either. For example, low cool-
ant will let air into the system. The
air'll cause bubbles and air pockets
which'll reduce the coolant's cooling
power, and the air will also cause rust,
foaming and further loss of coolant.


FILTHY Cl
Rusty, oily, scaly or otherwise con-
taminared coolant won't carry heat off
well at all. And, coolant that's con-
taminated means the inside of the cool-
ing system is hurting-it's rusty or
scaly, or it's got inside leakage, or it's
been getting dirty water. You've got to
drain contaminated coolant as soon as
possible and clean the cooling system
before you add new coolant.
Cleaning a cruddy cooling system
normally calls for Cleaning Compound,
FSN 6850-598-7328. But, cleaning and
flushing and use of the compound take
special care and know-how. On most
equipment it can be done by the organi-
zational maintenance experts, but on
some engines the job is done by sup-
port. See your trusty TM.
Use of the cleaner is covered in TB
750-651 (Nov 68), Use of Antifreeze
Solutions and Cleaning Compounds in


Engine Cooling Systems. The equip-
ment TM's and TM 9-2858, with
Changes 1 and 2, (May 45), Cooling
Systems: Vehicles and Powered Ground
Equipment, also give info on cooling
system cleaning, flushing and use of the
cleaner. And, a page of instructions
also comes with the stuff.
When you clean a cooling system,
the fresh water gets a batch of Corro-
sion Inhibitor, FSN 6850-753-4967. It
comes in a 6-oz can, and you mix it
1 ounce to each 2 quarts of water. The
stuff comes in a light powdered form,
though, and has to be mixed with warm
water before it's added to the radiator.
It won't dissolve completely in the
warm water, but the important thing
is that the solution doesn't have any
lumps.





LEAKS AND OVERFLOW T OR A RAYISH-
Another important coolant check WHITE STAIN CAN INDICATE
OTHERWISE INVISIBLE
point to remember is that a clean, leak- OHE LEAKS I'
proof cooling system will lose only a ,'
very small amount of coolant through \
evaporation. Any heavy loss of coolant -
during normal operations means leak- O
age or overflow problems. Problems,
that is, that won't be solved by simply
filling and refilling the radiator.
A damp spot will give most leaks away, but some are so small and dry so
fast when the engine is hot, that it's hard to catch 'em in action. But, the give-
away on slow, persistent leaks is usually a rusty or grayish-white stain at the
leak point, or wherever the coolant hits. And, don't let small leaks mislead you.
They can rob a cooling system of gallons of water in just a few hours-so
they've got to be stopped as soon as possible.
When leaks aren't obvious, you have to suspect overflow problems. Constant
coolant overflow and overheating can mean real problems, like:


Ignition or valve t) o o throughh damaged hose, through
-Riao r ing off. loose radiator or pump connections.)
aor tubes clogged; fins, air pas- -I Thermosftatr stuck shut r in s a
sages damaged, blocked,
Water pocket corodle doged Distributor tube clogged or replaced
le orff~ r ooodiator hose collapsed.
Radiator pressua e cap damaged. Fan or water Pump belt damaged
roylinder head gasket shot, installed out of adjustment Belt notreplaced
Water impeller as a matched set.
roded.pump impeller loose, car- Muffler clogged, exhaust pipe bent.
__~s I -'^ ^


And, natch, antifreeze (ethylene glycol) is a must for liquid cooling systems
in temperatures ranging from + 32'F to -55F. It comes under:
FSN 6850-243-1992 (1-gal can)
SFSN 6850-224-8730 (5-gal can)
---~- FS .." SN 6850-243-1990 (55-gal drum)
23


I


t


I






In temps below -55'F, cooling sys- '> NTIFREEZE CANS HAVE
rems need Arctic Type Antifreeze, FSN U ) A PROTECTION CHART
6850-174-1806 (55-gal dhun). And, s/ RIGHT ON THEM!
arctic antifreeze is not mixed with any-
thing. It's already mixed. You use it
as it comes.
NO WATER! IT's
ALREADY PROTECTED. TA T
(T'S SO, JUST APPDD MORE L TAG HE
LW ANTIFREEZE! RADIATOR
AFTER
YOU ADD THE
ANTIFREEZE!
YUP

The exact time for adding antifreeze is normally set by local maintenance
SOP. Instructions on use and care of antifreeze are in equipment TM's, TB
750-651 and TM 9-2858.
Antifreeze has a high boiling point, it doesn't readily evaporate in use, and it
gives complete protection from freezing when used in the right amounts. A
mix of 40 percent water and 60 percent antifreeze, for example, will protect at
temperatures as low as -65F.
But whatever mix you use, you'll need to test the batch with a hydrometer
to be sure you have the protection you'll need. Once the cooling system gets its
antifreeze, you use the hydrometer to test its strength when you have to add
water to the radiator. And, so nobody'll goof up your solution, you tie a tag,
giving antifreeze info, on the radiator filler neck.
TIME T" ^WHAT DO
'T(A & TO PM CAUTION fpW V1 DONOW?


Antifreeze doesn't carry off engine heat as efficiently as plain water does. So,
during antifreeze season you have to keep an even closer check on coolant level
and condition, and you keep an eye peeled for any sneaky leaks.
At the end of cold weather, you drain the cooling system and dump the anti-
freeze. The cooling system gets a fresh batch of clean water and some corrosion
inhibitor.
Keep arctic antifreeze in all year round, as long as tests show that its corro-
sion inhibitor is still good.
And, when the antifreeze is drained is a real good time to give the cooling
system a complete going over for leaks, damage, rust, proper adjustment, etc.,
from the thermostat right down to the water pump.
24






STRICTLY OFF LIMITS!
CHECK I REASSEMB LE
E HAMMER ENTIRE RIF,
SPRING,./^^ I JST, Y V f


.I '2


Word's around that some riflemen
and armorers are fouling up working
parts in the lower receiver of their
M16Al's-like putting the hammer
spring or sear assembly in bassack-
wards.
But, whoa, back up!
Lower receiver parts are OFF LIM-
ITS to anybody below the DS level. So,
please to keep your mitts outta there...
except for necessary cleaning and lub-
ing, o'course. No matter what you may
have read or heard any where any time,
this is like it is, Man!


Howsomeier. better make sure that
hammer spring's been put in right, no
matter w ho did the job. 'Cause unless
the spring goes on lop of the trigger
pin, sour zap-machine just might not
fire when \ou need it most. That's be-
cause the hammer won't have its full
force and the firing pin might fail to
fire the primer.
Another thing, if the sear pin's stick-
ing up in the air like a sore thumb, no
automatic fire. Somebody goofed. Not
only is the sear assembly installed
wrong, but you could damage this
spring when you close the receiver.
So, check your weapon. If the ham-
mer spring's on top of the trigger pin,
she's OK.
But, if the hammer spring's under
the trigger pin or if the sear spring's
pointed toward the sky, get your rifle
to DS pronto.


I




YOUR M16A1 BATTLE-READY?
KNOW BEFORE


F So, Zapper, you're set to head into action and you're face to face with that
naked truth: In a combat situation, you're never much healthier than your rifle.
You've done all the things you're supposed to do in the way of cleaning and
lubing, but when you gotta go, you gotta know: Is your M16A1 really fit to
make the big scene with you?
If your weapon has any of the ailments listed here, turn 'er in for repairs or get
another that's healthy. Your armorer can cure some of these ailments, sure, but
he may have to ship her to the DS "hospital" for others.


SELECTOR LEVER Stuck,
won't hold position.


g, i r.
% TE g


BOLT CATCH -
open position.


Won't hold in


REAR SIGHT Ears bent,
windage drum damaged, de-
tent stuck.

CHARGING HANDLE Won't
exIract bolt and Doll carrier,
latch broken.
FORWARD ASSIST ASSEMBLY I I .
- Won I close bolt


/BLITT STOCK Stock lurns, loose,
I,/ ] separated Irom lower receiver;
J swivel base busted or pin missing;
/ I butt cap screw missing, won't
hold, any deep culs, cracks or
breaks [hat weaken the stock
INP LEA.'E THE
CcSMETIc5 TO .1E...
LEA',E THE EiuTT AND .
HANCc-fiRDA S ALONE ...
I IF THE e re? p L Z
ie'r THE, ,.K,-
A, LL THEY''E ) BUFFER ASSEMBLY-Retain
BEAUITiFUL. er won't hold; butler badly
\\ 1 corroded, cracked; spring
i \ kinked


TRIGGER MECHANISM AND
LOWER RECEIVER CAVITY -
- Parts damaged, assembled
wrong, won't work


I


rOU GO BAYONET KNIFE Release spring
FRONT SIGHT Loose bent, weak, broken. Blade bent, broken.
elevation detent and post .
stuck.

BARREL Bulged; bore badly
pitted
FLASH SUPPRESSOR--
EJECTION PORT DLISTI COVER Loose. busted.
Won't open and close like Lo,
it should Missing, Avn Tii R,,


UPPER RECEIVER -
Cracked; locking lugs
badlychipped:gastube
bent, badly dented


\ MAGAZINE CATCH
BUTTON- Stuck
won't hold maga-
zine atter you've
adjusted.

MAGAZINE Overloaded
More than 20 rounds); tube
dented; lips bentl spring rusty,
action weak: follower sticks.


l~ .f IL
HANDGUARDS- Deep cracks, cuts
or breaks that make 'em too weak
to trust, Iront and rear areas
busted off, won't hold in place
when slip ring's pushed up, slip
CHAMBER Pitted. ring damage that d keep it from
doing its job

CAM PIN Missing, cracked.

r BOLT Cracked; face badly
pilted; locking lugs chipped;
rings busted.


BOLT CARRIER Body crack.
ed. badly pitied; tiring pin
well is corroded
CARRIER KEY'-Crackedloose,
badly corroded, gas port clog-
ged; carrier and key screws
sheared off, missing.

S, i ^ FIRING PIN Cracked. blunt.
ed, missing

FIRINb PIN RETAINING PIN
-_____ Bus:ted. missing. I1

EXTRACTOR-Bent, cracked,
claw damaged. spring weak or
delormed, pin cracked.


/,


i


------^"

























This is a Iseldd list of recent pubs
of inter~e to orgonizotional nmaint-
nonce personnel. The list is compiled
from recnt AG Ditoribution Centers
iulletins. For complete details ee DA
Pon 310.4 (May 68). and Ch 3 (Nov
68). TM's, TIB, ec.; DA Parn 310.6 (Jul
68). and Ch 3 (Apr 69), SC's and SM's;
DA Poa 310-7 (Dec 68); MWO's

TECHNICAL MANUALS
TM 3-4240-229-20P, Jan, M10 Hawk
Btry Control Collectiva Protec Equip.
TM 3-6665-264-10, Feb. MX 7338/
PDR-27R Gamma Krypton 85 Radio-
active Toes Soample.
TM 5-350. Nov. Hyd Power Control
Sys.
TM 5-2420-213-12 C1, Jan. Heavy
Wreel- d Todctro
IM i 7.051 56 24P Sea I1, nF
GC1Ol re FIq\
IM 5. 43.117.5 CI. Iaon -ier
IM 5 3610 723.13 O', P, '.',' &
Pa'o q ".
tM S.3610-744.13. Ien ODte.,
DupS.sl eg Maoch
IM S.310- .?4.15 CS Feb Gn'r.,
do. 'q Eq. p Sc anro .
TM S.1105. 74.10 CI Feb lor.
MO'. tl cu.p LOa..rn
IM 1.380010-2.0 0 C3. Ia. 7) ion
Ie MIJ0 Oc.S. ro.els
TM S.JIIO3120-IS C4 FIo Wseel
M.a Cean. Sno.e
IM 5. 310-.70.20P Ion vrtti oa
>,'. e She 00l
IM S. 110-205-10/1 Ct teb. oClk
D .*i 1q Eacup
IM S. 120-IO-10/1 C? 111n s5-
0. 1 oq Coi.p
IM 51,870 .36.1 De, in., 6o,.-j
EI. p
TM .-1820-739.1S C( Feo Eao.
bo .' t -.,.
IM .J;89537 8.2SP la- B5'.S .
& Cc- e'er P.en,
IM 5.1910-700 70P e- BI.s.-nos

IM 5 -310 .207.0P I- 300) IPs

IM .4110-208.10 CI Feo 10,':0l
Btu r.' q UI


TM 5-4320-200-15. Nov. Petroleum
Centrif Pumps.
TM 5-4320-218-15 C4, Feb, Petroleum
Centrif Pumps.
TM 5-4320-228-14, Dec, 170 GPM
Fresh Water Centrit Pumps.
TM 5-4330-214-15, Jan, Petroleum
Dist.
TM 5-6115-282-15 C2, Feb, 3KW 60
Cyc Eng Drvn Gen Sets.
TM 5-6115-328-20P, Jan. 2KW 15V
DC GED Gen Sets.
TM 5-6125-206 25P Cl, Feb, 30 KW
Motor Generaotor.
TM 5-6125-211-15. Dec, 60 KW
Power Supply Motor Generators.
TM 9-1005-233-25 C1, Jon, M73
7.62-MM Machine Gun.
TM 9-1220-221-20P, Jan, Gun
Direction Compler.
IM I4 130 20 CS 3 e ,.Q ,

IM c t1I .214 12 i: ,*

IM 0.1 l 0. 750.1 P/20/1 I.

IM 9.2)00.11o.70P Cl Fr, e l.,.
C. & wl' ,- 11..
IM 9. 270 28 70P C(1 er. MS1
l*Io' A s ',1I C 1 I 1..I &S

IM 4.7150.21 .10 CA4 I M Ie:6

IM 4 1120 100 10 CI '.. 10'1l

TM 9 4021 200.14 D len' -. AN


TM 0 43i3.106 27i/./l nt 1. e
C e t...ar. o 11 fe r1'rI E...
IM 9.61 1 2i 7.14 ee uMt7

IM 10-4320 707 7.P Cl r-L
.a. 4- (C.-. '-.'
IM 10.1746 207 14 De. I 0-'e Isp



TM It 5i30 2 9.15 1: I .I. an

TM 11 i1lS.127)i. i AN tIC 12
.I. l l.,. 1 0: Tal l .' :coi .: '
IM .1 rJ.780 e. 5..'. 7
'.- i ** i.c) B


TM55-450-8, Dec, External Transporl
Procedures.
TM 55-1015-244-12-1, Jon. XMI02
105-MM Howitzer Air Trons Arty M6
Firing Platform by Helicopler.
TM 55-1930-203-20P, Dec. LARC LX..1
MODIFICATION WORK ORDERS
9-1090-202-20/1, Feb. M21 Armo-
menl Subiys to Instlll Link Deflecor
on Dalinking FPoder MAU 56/A.
9-2300-216-30/25, Jon, M107 Gun
M110 Howitzer.
9-2300-216-30/31, Jan, M107 Gun
M110 Howilzer.
9-2300-296-40, Jan, M107 Gun
MI10 Howilztr.
9-2320-218-20/14, Jan, % Ton Truck
M718 Ambulance.
9-2350217-20/12, Jon, M109 SP
Ho-.;ll M127 Maenl Pro.ldl.g or
Ime o.ed Cre.l G.l.e n.d Coae ..'
.. oupelao,
97 1o0 .17. 0/8 Cl No. M1061
MIAA Ho. nnes
MISCELLANEOUS
CIA 510901 Ion. Istllllcs
DA Poa 310-4 C3 No. N lid.. l IM i
tB 10 i *l
DA Paon 310.7 Dec Cranel Mr*O
DA PAM 700-2. Dor Comonandl. u.
& i-nloi HonaDoaO
DA Pam 150-10 Jan CMIa
reoadDool
IM 31.21. 4eo Gueri;nlllc rala &
Spc'.io Facse Ope-'a.c.s
FM 444 I'r PofeaO.e. & DIl.,i fto
ChIcoasa S Weapon Sls
FM 101.10 1. lo. Sil Oiance FM
Par1 I
10 S-4940 221.12 Ion. ShoD Eq.lp
Carlool manln Ilk Mla le. No 3
LO S-6665-20.132. Ian land Mtme

10 9 2JS0-22-12I Sap uo0AIE?

SC 1820.9 .CI-404 c"n 2J5 loIr
IPO Co..,r q Sc ee..ng & Wao. ng
PlInl
SC 3820 97 CL.E07. Ion 75 TFH rs'
'1d C;1 sr" 1 & Sl.en.ing Plan1
Il 7s0.9oE.i Fea EIll? Ma." Dres'
tC 17.17 I, MS'.I 0a-sea DeI-
Aeis on


_i~~la







KNOW YOU
IlG SUPPLY
ECONOMY
...BUT WHERE
DOPE AIE YOU WITHOUT
SUPPLY,
DISCIPLlNE!












lISCI
A SUPI
IS RPE
THE

.... -

le *







/ NOW. JUST WHAT
POES A SUPPLY SPECIALIST
HAVE THAT SETS HIM
APART?


^^^ J idiiAML-


-IT HOULP 1E ON HANP,
ANP PROPERLY MAPE OUT... LIKE
YOU SENP SUPPORT ITS COPY
OF PL.1. PROMPTLY ANP GIVE
'EM PLL CHANGES QUICKLY!/






A YOU KNOW YOUR SUPPLY -ON AUTHORIZED ALLOWANCES
PUBS... -KNOW HOW TO USE SUPPLY PUSS
Y'R INPEXES! PA PAM' TO FIGURE UP ALLOWANCES
31o-1 -4 -6--FOR AUTHORIZED.
xnkAMPLE' ETC LIKE "
KNOWING
i MINIMUM
STOCKAGE
ITEMS BY
:r; HEART!






-THIS INCLUDES, NATURALLY. NOW, THERE'S PEMANP
KEEPING STOCK ON HAND INFO! HERE'S WHERE KEEPING
OR ON ORPER AT GOOD PLL AND FRINGE ITEM
ALL TIMES! FILES, (DA FORM 3318) RECORDING
DEMANDS AS THEY OCCUR IS
A MUST!

"I,


LIKE REVIEWING
YOUR CARDS
QUARTERLY AND
DELETING, ADJUSTING
ALLOWANCES, CORRECTING
FSN '... ALL ACCORDING
TO AR755-:5 AND THE
LOCAL SOP!


'BdA.jMji^j
., p.^^


HEY" HERE'S
A PS PIN-UP0ON
THIS VERY SUBJECT
.. NOW HOW DO
Y'SUPP05E IT
GOT OUT
HERE'






With disciplined thought in supply,
You'll know what to do--even whq--
You'll be functioning right,
You'll make everything bright...
For yourself.,. and that Other Guy !


111l


IF YOU WANT TO DISPLAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, LIFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.


11'I


_:im





















( SUPPLY STATUS
(PUE-OUT) FILES GOTTA
BE KEPT CURRENT /
AND ORDERLY!


YOU MUST MEMORIZE. I HEAR
SUPPLY STATUS A RUMOR
COPES... AT LEAST THAT AR
THE MOST 735-35 LITS
IMPORTANT ADVICE, STATUS
ONES! AND IDENTIFIER
CODES!


CANCELlATIONS MUST BE ...YOU USE PLL STOCK
PROMPT... AND FOLLOW-UPQUERIES TO FILL 8lL REQUESTS
SENT ONLY AFTER PATE SHOWN QUICKLY!
ON STATUS CARP ON REQUEST...
OR ON CARPS RETURNED BY R1 ECORD DEMAND
SUPPORT! ANP RE-ORDER
PLL REPLACEMENT
____ HUH?


P-1 *j


L "=


a as at






YEP...ANP YOU USE THE THEN, THERE'S RECONCILIATION
M'S INTERCHANGEABILITY INFO... LIKE KEEPING STATUS CARP
INFO 70 PROVIDE NEEPEP FILES UP-TO-PATE SO AS TO GIVE
TEAMS FAST SUPPORT FAST, ACCURATE
REPORTS











YOU KEEP YOUR CURRENT
PX LIST HANPY AND MAKE NOT TO MENTION
SURE UNSERVICEABLE PX FAST AND CAREFUL
ITEMS ARE PROPERLY TURN-IN OF SAME!
TAGGED WITH DA FORM 2402.





CHIEU W,






OF COURSE, SHARP
INVENTORY CONTROL
MEANS MAKING A AS
PHYSICAL CHECK CALLED
OFTEN! FOR BY
AR135-35
OR "/OUR
CO...









35






















C'MON, MAN, GETTING' SUPPLIES... WHrCH Y'SEE, EVERYONE IS1
LET'S JACK IT UP!! INCIDENTALLY, Y .OU INVOLVED IN SUPPLY
k WHERE YOU GUYS SHOULD HAVE ASKED 1 DISCIPLINE!
BEEN ALL PAY? FOR 5 PAYS AGO. h


THE USER WHO MAKES THE REQUEST
PROMPTLY... THE SUPPLY MAN WHO
KNOWS THE PROPER FORMS AND HIS
SUPPLY 5OP... AND THE COMMANDER
WHO SEES THAT PROCEDURES ARE
FOLLOWEP!... 17 TAKES EVERY-
w ONE TO MAKE IT WORK!.'






"CHOOSE YOUR PIN,

S PARDNER"


You Chinook (CH-47) tenders, better
check the engine mounts for security -
and focus on the aft mount.
Make sure the quick release pin used
to attach the engine support link to the
mount is a single-acting type ... one of
the good guys. It has a handle.
A double-acting pin is something else
again... one of the bad guys. It has a
pull ring in place of a handle.
Trouble is, a pull on the ring to check
.pin security can upset the apple cart!!
The pin moves enough to allow the
locking balls to enter the hole-the


pin binds and feels tight.
During flight the pin works loose
and your engine will be held by 2
mounts instead of 3. 'Taint a healthy
situation.
Nosir-e-e-e, you don't want double-
acting pin, FSN 5340-226-4961, fig 64,
item 6 of TM 55-1520-209-20P-1(18
Mar 68).
Make sure your engine is anchored
with a single-acting pin .. one of the
good guys. Order the right pin, P/N
NAS1338A2C20, FSN 5340-921-0666,
listed on page 665 of the parts pub.


APQE YOU
SINGLE-ACTING-
OR DOUBLE
ACTING7






SAVES ELBOW GREASE


Dear Editor,
Know how tough it is to shoot grease
into some push-pull rod-end bearings on a
chopper? Plentyl
You can't fit the standard bearing lubri-
cator into place, so, the rod has to be taken
off the bird to get at the bearings.
To save time and elbow grease we now
just disconnect the rod and grease one
bearing at a time-using a locally made
lubricator.
To make this little jewel just drill a'hole
in the B-nut, thread the hole and insert a
suitable zerk fitting. Add the necessary
hardware.
It's simple to use the tool. Put one
washer on the bolt and add the B-nut.
Add a second flat washer with the ID
longer than the OD of the bearing inner
race and the OD long enough to rest on
the outer edge of the bearing.
Insert third washer and retaining nut,
finger tight.


BOLT
(FSN 5306-182-1915)
ZERK WASHER
(FSN 5310-167-0765)
-4-I-NUT
F WASHER



ROD END-BEARING
WASHER
(FSN 5310-167-0765)
RETAINING NUT (FSN 5310-176-8107)

Make with the grease gun and you've
got those bearings greased, easy as you
please.
Otto T. Trapp
Fort Douglas, Utah


(Ed Note-Looks like a real handy tool for tight places.)


BE A PRO


Ii.

(~t


A quick-change artist on the stage is a pro. A mechanic who is a quick-
change artist with parts is an amateur. Be a repairman, not a parts changer,
by troubleshooting your equipment.






"SOCK IT TO ME"


Kicking a bird tire on an inspection
won't prove anything. But a rap on the
MA-1 shoulder harness locking reel,
P/N 21-0121-23-440, will.
The reel is in the Mojave (CH-37B)
for one. It may also be supplied as a
repair part for your bird.
You can yank on the payout cable
'til kingdom come to check the auto-
matic locking feature of the reel, and
it won't lock.
The whole assembly has to be accel-
erated 2-3 "G's" for the spring-loaded
locking mechanism to work.
What to do? Well, reels are mounted
on surfaces that will yield slightly un-
der "G" forces.
So, with the harness locking lever in
automatic, give the reel a sharp rap
with the palm of the hand. Then pull
on the cable and you'll find that it's
locked.


EASY WITH THAT
SHARP RAP,
BUDDY.

I-


To unlock the reel move the harness
lever forward to the lock position and
then back to the autolock position.
There's no problem checking the au-
tomatic locking feature of the MA-2
type reel, used on most birds. A sharp
pull on the cable will do the trick.


TBO VARIATION


Dear Windy,
How about a reading on extending the
operating life of a time change item in
accordance with the info in para 5b of TB
55-1500-300-25 (Mar 67) on component
replacement?
Para 5c says that unit commanders can
extend the operating time on components,
only under emergency conditions of com-
bat or disaster. It also calls for a red dash
entry in the DA Form 2408-13.
When we extend a UH-19 engine change
so that it falls on a Periodic are we acting
under emergency conditions?
SP6 C. E. M.


Dear Specialist C. E. M.,
Nosir-e-e-e! This is a normal TBO
variation no red dash needed.
Normal variation of an engine TBO,
per para 5b, is encouraged to get full
use out of the engine. It also avoids the
use of extra NORM time which would
be needed on an engine change between
Periodics.

AS YOU








"Don't pack troubles in )our old kit
bag and smile, smile, smile!"
That's the new serse gung-ho air-
Sborne troopers have added to an old
S barracks ballad makes sense.
You'll be helping the MOS 4-3E rig-
gers, and )ourself, b) taking care of
)our parachutes and air delivery equip-
ment. A little tender lo in' care means
less maintenance swear on shake-outs
and repairs.
BAG IT!
Like -after %ou land and collapse
Sthe parachute, get the harness into the
Skit bag. pronro... if the tactical situa-
tion will let \ou. Never drag the har-
ness along the ground because the
quick-release box. for example. is a


AFTER A NYLON LETDOWN...


A LITTLE 11IS1pSI'-i


10 KEEP DIRT OUT OF
UICK RELEASE BOXI


mite aeleatre ann can get lammed Aun in
dirt.
Keep the bell band hanging out of
ihe bag so )ou can secure the chute
Go to the chute apex and grab the
bridal loop. Gentl pull the chute to
straighten the canopy and suspension
lincs. Be sure sou don't drag the canopy
oer stumps or thru the dirt or uu're likely to tear some of the gore sections
Fold the sides of the canop) into a ss dth of about 2 feet.
Go back to the apex and latch onto the bridal loop with sour thumb. Stretch
our sour arms and make like a soaring bird as luu gather in the canop. and
suspension lines in a tigure-8 motion.

THEN FOLD THE CHUTE I I


a~ A~ E\'~X


r a


#'


~'

t~i ~$,


i






Lay the chute on top of the harness
and secure the chute with the waist-
band. Make sure you don't pull any of
the canopy thru the waistband adjuster
because you may tear the canopy or
wind up with friction burns.
Put the reserve chute on top of the
main canopy. Fasten the kit bag and
you've got it made in the shade.

FOR BIGGER (HUTES,
BIGGER PM


Recovery of cargo chutes is some-
thing else again-more material to get
torn up and longer suspension lines to
get twisted .. unless you use TLC.
Whatever you do, never jam the
chute into the recovery bag in a bundle
or it'll take all day for the riggers to
figure out which end's up??
Stretch out both the canopy and sus-
pension lines by lifting, not dragging.
This will help keep sand, dirt and
debris out of the canopy.
Take off the riser extensions and
ground releases. Put the clevis bolts into
I U2MINMEML iili


SECURE THE '(HUTE
WITH THE WAISTBAND


DON T JAM ,- -
THE CHUTE'







the devises from which they were re-
moved. Lock the nuts back in place on
the clevis bolts.
Next, daisy-chain the suspension
lines. This will prevent tangles in those
long lines.


42






"S" fold the canopy into the deploy-
ment bag. Fold the suspension lines and
risers on top of the canopy. SMALL CHUTE?
CANOPY
When you're recovering small cargo IN LAST.
chutes, like the G-13, put the suspen-
sion lines inside the deployment bag
first. Then lift the folded canopy into
the bag.
Tie the bag shut with any cord on
hand (don't cut suspension lines, and
your chute is ready to make the trip to
the tower for shakeout and repacking.

ABOVE ALL-CLEAN!
When transporting your chute to the If you're the type who likes to do a
flight line or from the drop zone, think little homework park your cap at the
"clean". The kit bag is not water-proof tech library and cuddle up with some
or oil-proof. of these pubs.
Never pile the chutes into a truck ..
that just carried fuel or oil drums, 's
grease, batteries and the like. That stuff
will eat into the kit bag and into the
chute. w
Use a covered truck and if the floor "
is a mite dirty, spread down a tarp to
TM 57-220 (4 Jun 68) Technical
protect your equipment. That's TLC
in action. training of parachutists.
TM 10-1670-213-23 (2 Sep 63) Para-
chute, personnel, troop-back 35-ft


dia nylon canopy, type T-10.
TM 10-1670-214-23 (17 Jun 66)
Parachute, reserve, personnel,
troop chest 24-ft dia, nylon can-
opy, type T-7A, T-10.
TM 10.1670-223-23 (23 Mar 64)
Parachute, cargo 24.25-ft dia can-
opy, type G-13.
You'll find all the pubs for your other
chutes listed in DA Pam 310-4. Dig-
dig-dig, Tiger!


k I k;LZ_






oMMUNICATION I


ITS LEAN, LIGHT & SHORT


ON MIGHT, BUT...




j TL


GRGL


I" Y'MEAN I
T'SAY V'HEAR
A WOMAN'S
VOICE... /Ou'RE
READY FOR
R AND RI !
.. 'A*


IT5 THEM
NEW TYPE
BATTERIES
... THEY'RE
MAKING
IMPROVEMENTS
ALL THE TIME.!


A long-range rough gu) it ain't. It
nasn't made to be. Thin skin ir has... .
so it won't pull You off balance when
ir's in )our poickr .. or fiel like a rock
\hcn it's dainglng from sour helmLt.
It's got faults. urc. but .'Lur li 'I -'
squad radio IAN/PRT.-4 and AN/
PRR-9O is undlrgp-ing ia cinsianlit face.
lifr that'll II: it do a hb irr job for iou.
Range ill still be 1600)i yards or less
under good condiion .nd do, n to
I 15 -2(10 \ yards in thick brush bu
then. just ho far iou gonna get from
\our squad Icadir. man? Or huw far's
he g'pnna peir rom in ou
That lightitight job isn't supposed
to gert IIr rthrL I lke the higge r stulf
And, Lr. ho,, d m.iu like to dangle an
AN/PRC-2' Irom )uur hclm(.r hilsc
\>u r %% illin_: %%or d 'from sour squad
Ic.idcr .... *r shariL our back nith
squad lIadcr year. rifle. cjmba( pack
and Ptrk-25' Like. gi it the TLC it
diLsert.s. T'.tcrn' hbuili for sledgc-
hamnmer ireiamcni.
Etn so. th ri re recent and upcom-
ing impr' mk-nits (hat II chtcr sour
hcart-- hini. like betrtr ba.l ries,
v, ih lo'ngcr life, hLci.r moisrure-prorf.
ing, sturdier antennas, and so forth.


r BATTERIES
A ailablc right no% is an aluminum
shelled. magncilum batter the BA-
-is5O/U. rhat'll almost triple the lifi of
[ht original BA 505/Li lup tr, 10 hours
continuous siLriic:. You get the mag-
nisium job wih FSN 615 -935-8630.


r ATTENTION
ALL PATROLS
...KEEP A 150-
YARD DISTANCE
FROM WATER
SHC'LE "B"' A


BA-4505
Ji BATTERY


S ,om other advantages. The BA-
5i has longer shelf life. need- no
r frit er..ilon durmnu shipment and sior
IaS e .. and fares betrcr in sEA.


, dw


i n)'8





BA-399/U
The BA-399 transmitter battery also R
is improved... which you may've
learned by now. Because of moisture BATTERY,DRY
BA-399/U
problems, each battery comes sealed in DAABO5-68-C-2256
a plastic bag.
Keep it in said bag!
Insert battery, bag and all, onto the
male plug of the transmitter. Puncture
the plastic with the pins and slide the
battery into place.
SLUDE IN BATTERY It may not be the total answer to
AND BAG waterproofing, but it's a better deal
7 than the BA-399 without a bag around

After salt water wading remove the
transmitter battery (receiver power
I pack, too, if you splash it), dry the bat-
tery and contact points, and reinstall it.
Stops corrosion.

COLD OUTSIDE
If you don't have Arctic accessories and the temp's below freezing, a couple'
new remote cables will let you keep the receiver and transmitter batteries snug
in a pocket or under a coat.
REMOTE
S(^CABLE BLE







Both tabbed Cable, Special Purpose, / 'M KEEPING
Electrical, you can get CX-11990/PRR- THE BATTERIES
9 with FSN 5995-179-8256 and CX- SNUG INSIDE
11991/PRT-4 with FSN 5995-179- FMY PARKA
8257. Each is 38 inches long.
Connect one end to the equipment
and the other to the batteries and you
got battery juice problems beat with
the heat.
For Arctic conditions there's a parka ARCTIC
harness and accessories spelled out in GEA
upcoming Change 5 to TM 11-5820-
549-12.

SE0RGOP5,
/BEFORE I ERGO-T
Wa E TAKE Tof GOOD CHECK







out on a mission I
'I SUE CFE
THCSE
BATTERIES
-:,RE CK






'Nother point on batteries: Later model BA-505/U's and all BA-4505's have
aluminum cases for better moisture and damage protection.
Finally, when alining either receiver or transmitter, check the voltage range
of your batteries with the AN/PSM-13 or ID-1189/PR test sets. Be sure you get
a scale reading of GOOD and check your spare batteries, too, before going
out on a mission.
NEW CAPTIVE

The latest production model receiver K IP ANTENNA PIGID
antenna (AS-1998) features a captive
screw which won't back out and leave
you with a wobbly "stick."
The screw will help keep the antenna
pointing at the sky, where you get
maximum range. The best way to wave
the antenna around is on your helmet







(receiver attached, natch). The steel acts
as a ground plane, which in turn im-
proves reception.
If you want your AS-1999 transmitter
antenna to put out No. 1 style for you,
raise it all the way. Like, slip a finger J
under the base and push it up till it
won't go no more. Otherwise, it might
bounce down and ground itself on the ~i .i\
battery compartment clamp. I
Also, while transmitting, be careful
not to ground the antenna on your hel- ,
met. The word you're putting out won't
make it to the next bush.
Meanwhile, back at the farm, there's
a new model AS-1999 that snaps into
place when you pull up the antenna ...
preventing slippage during use.
`'OU COME
AN/PRT -4OU COME
AN/PR4 IN SOUNDING
To make the latest Model, the PRT-4A, com- LIKE PONALD
patible with the squelch modes on the AN/PRC-25 PUCK, CONNIE
and AN/VRC-12 series radio sets, a 150-cycle tone
generator was added. That way, the A model, also -
in the 47-57 MHz range, can net freely with the T
above sets. Naturally, primary netting will be with \
the PRC-25.
OVERRIDE SPRING

Eyeball the override spring next time 7
you want only TONE or VOICE opera-
tion. If it doesn't drop down over the
rail edge, it defeats its purpose... since OVERRIDE
you can tune both TONE and VOICE. SPRING TONE
If the spring rides high, give it a tap
with your finger so it'll slip down over
the right or left side of the rail.
A heavier compression spring is on
the way in later production models
and it should eliminate the override COMPRESSION
problem. SPRING





If, for some unforeseen reason, you
remove the TONE/VOICE switch and
loosen the retaining nut on the case, be
sure to retighten the nut so its lower
edge is parallel to the rail. If not, the
override spring won't be able to drop
into place ... even with a heavier com-
pression spring.


Recent production transmit-
ters feature a remodeled lanyard
holder, with eyehole and a snap
which allows you to freely attach
it to your harness slide.
There're 2 handy little crystal
snatchers in your transmitter
which make the job of removing

SIPHERE'S A NEAT
S. IMPROVEMENT.


MIKE ELEMENT


Coupla' precautions are necessary
when you remove the microphone ele-
ment for cleaning:
First, be sure the rubber teats on the
top and bottom of the element stay with
it. Break 'em off or lose 'em and the
mike contact pins won't make good con-
tact with the fuzz buttons on the chassis.


cm bout a 1000 percent easier.
Be sure to slip those n' Ion cords
hecreen the contact pins %hen
.ou install sour icr.stals. Forget
the cords and you'll damage the
cr\scal when Mc'u remove it
And since ac'rt here. same
deal cots for ihe receiver crystal


LANYARD


SUZZ BUTTONS





CONTACT PINS






And, about those fuzz buttons, the only thing holding 'em in place is friction
and gravity. They can fall out or otherwise get lost during cleaning, so be sure
they stay with you. Otherwise, forget about transmitting. A conventional plug
and socket arrangement in place of fuzz buttons is being put in the PRT-4A.
BATTERY CHECK
Quick power test: You
can check out the trans- IS liV
matter battery by holding SHE|
the TONE/VOICE switch ALLRIGHT.
in the TONE position and |
listening to the sidetone in
the mike. A steady whine, .
gurgle or unsteady tone
clues you that the battery's
in good shape. If you hear
nothing, replace the bat-
tery.
When adjusting the loading coil (page 6-13 of the WHEN YOU FEEL
-12 TM and also in TM 11-6625-937-12, May 68), TORQUE... STOP!
stop turning when you feel torque ... or you'll strip the
threads or screw slot in the plastic loading coil adjust-
ment screw. Use a small screwdriver so you can feel the
resistance.
Coming up: a design change aimed at beating the
frequency drift problem, and elimination of the 2 "dum-
my" battery pins on the transmitter .. leaving only the
2 that do the work.
AN/PRR-9
Keep straight .when you remove or install the
receiver battery. When you install the battery, ease it in
place in a straight line, then give it a gentle shove until
the contact pins are fully engaged. Back it straight out
when you remove it.
Any other way can break the pins. And, since batteries
now are aluminum covered, sliding 'em through the f DON T BEND
retainer clips won't damage 'em or allow moisture to THE PINS
get to 'em.
EARPHONES
If you were behind the door when earphones were passed out, you should
know that they come with the receiver. They come in mighty handy for quiet
listening, so ask your supply people about 'em.
50






When %ou get your earphone, and use it, an occasional
check on the connector cable can pay dividends in listen-
ing pleasure. Snug it up. An improved model has the
cable permanently attached to the earphone but it
may take a while to get to you.

As you attach the receiver to your helmet have mercy
on the spring clips. They go over the steel helmet only- -'
not the helmet and liner. Forcing the clips over both can
break 'em or spring 'em so much they're useless.

O0 [ Talking about muscles, leave 'em home when you turn
TURN the volume-on-off switch. Turn it clockwise for action,
SWITCH but don't force it-you'll bust it up! When you feel
EASY resistance, stop! Chances are, if you don't ger any noise
you're due for a new battery... or the control is in
OFF squelch setting.

After a hike, when you're tired, and
sweated up, and about to take some
pounds off your head, hold one! Re-
member, your receiver's still attached
to your helmet ... so don't slam it on
the ground. The helmet's tough, but
that little ol' receiver ....

You SEA types will be happy to learn that recent pro-
duction models have a plastic barrier in the horn which
stops mud, sand and water 'bout half way up. It keeps
the gook from getting in deep and putting your receiver
out of business.
HON BARRIER If you're tramping thru that kind of stuff, give the
INSIDE receiver an occasional shake to let the gook come tum-
bling out.

AN/PRC-88?
Somewhere along the trail, by school or by scuttlebutt, you may've heard of
the "AN/PRC-88," a "combined" PRR-9 and PRT-4. Well, the PRR-9 and
PRT-4 are as combined as they are ever supposed to get, but USAECOM has
taken action to standardize "AN/PRC-88" as the nomenclature ... as a means
of identifying the receiver and the transmitter under one identification.























There's a sleeper card in this Beautiful Southeast Asia generator game.
Combat poker with this kind of joker could take )ou-and )our whole outfit
-right out of the round.
The name of the card is Neglect.
F'rinstance, you might try to take shortcuts. You might think TM dope is for
brick-barracks types across the Big Pond, not fighting' men.
The real deal is, you have to do more, not less, to win out here.
So cut the deck before you bet your life. Four-Season types close to their
FIGMO day will tell you there's two things to look out for:
Heat is one.
Dirt is the other.
They're both mean. And when you think you've studied up a way to get
around one, the other clobbers you from behind.
Revette and roof in to keep out blowing sand, and you choke off cooling air.
Stay wide open for breeze, and you get sandblasted.
But you can protect your ante. There are ways.

THOSE VITAL CHECKS
Just one man in your outfit can do much to keep power up. That's you, the
generator operator. You can hack it just one way-
52


That's b\ checking, watching, and taking the time. You have to do it over
and over. So look after-


E.- e.


W




Ad ., V~ 'A -.


: ) A4


AIR FILTER-Real dirt
load dry-core units down
on the bottom of an
means clean out ... a
filter can make you run


-.s h!. q'dc7
OgBI:.Ie t~ $;~: is;Zmequa
nut.'~L~~ill?~:~:; *


S FAN Belt loose, frayed; shaft or bear
ing worn, unlubed, blades hitting guard
or radiator core.


y~u__


RADIATOR Fins clogged with mud,
sand, trash; joints or hoses leaking, cap
loose (Watch it' No yanking off those
pressure caps'); coolant low.


DRY TYPE


y weather can RADIATOR DRAIN COCK- Turn it: If it
in 2 hours; grit won't drip 'till you poke the hole or
oil-bath cleaner comes out thick and muddy, it's clean-
nd any bum air out time here.
1 hot, hot, hot.


jfl


OIL BATH TYPE


IGNITION- Plugs dirty, carboned,
burned; spark linkage binding, spring
weak; cables burned; water in cover
caps or outlets; cracked magneto or
distributor cover.


-,10 A W


PUMP Broken, stuck,


HOOD AND COVERS -Keep snug, mend
i1 broken, take no chances
SHUTTERS. COWLINGS Loose, bolts
out or brackets broken, closures in
wrong position: louvers or vents clogged
with oily dirt or trash


New sets now get stenciled on their sides to show whether you keep the panels
open or shut to run-and when. You do not paint over that stencil. Anyhoo,
if you spot a temperature jump and don't find it in your cooling system itself, try-


CARBURETOR Governor linkage stick-
ing, loose; air intake choked; out of
adjustment.








FUEL STRAINER/FILTER -Check filter
screen carefully lor thin layer of fungus,
especially if any traces of water show
in either strainer or filter. Get out sand,
rock chips, and look for signs of mud.
Mud in this end may mean your fuel
intake is blocked at the tank.


r1-.


FUEL INJECTOR Look for a cracked
inlet collar, caused by over-torquing fuel
supply line.
I MORE


I 1"F


I


Il


r



-~





If you do find a cracked inlet collar on the fuel injector,
more muscle on a wrench is not the answer. A temporary
fix with plastic electrician's rape, teflon tape, or plain
old black gasket cement will do for a time, but only on
small cracks.
It could get you more trouble if you just check the
strainer and not the filter ... or vice versa. Strainers keep
rocks and small fish out of fuel pumps. The filter catches
fine stuff.
'IOU COULD FIND THE C.EANOUT ACT
OUT YOU HAVE A
FOULED-UP COOLING
SYSTEM AS WELL
AS A GUCKED-UP
FUEL SUPPLY'


For filter cleaning, you hang out the
No Smoking sign and wash our with
any approved solent -no carbon ler.
gasoline, or other dangerous fluids.
Clean-rag ipe the filter shell inside.
Do the same with the strainer.


lg' ,


/ YEH, HALF.
1WA`/RINSE-'UTS5
don'tT CUT 7HE
MUS7AELl


Nextr, eliminate the cause of the foul-
up Get rid of grit, mud and water in
your fuel supply lines. Then you clean
out your fuel tank. You may have to
get rid of a hole 55-gal drumful-
but don't grieve over It.




Co. Td
ft..4


~jq I-


Radiator cleaning goes best with the kit from TB 750-651, FSN 6850-598-
7328, Cleaning Compound, Engine Cooling System.
Drain your radiator and engine completely while hot. Completely dissolve
chemicals separately before pouring in, unless package directions say not to.
Check your mixing pail for sediment-don't put guck in a radiator you're try-
ing to get guck out of. Be sure you protect your hands, eyes, and clothes from
chemical burns.
Flush after each round of chemical. Leave none of one chemical to mix with
56






the next. The second part of this kit, for instance, neutralizes the first part-
and it could make a hunk of rock form in your radiator. Let no chemical-loaded
water get onto anything it could hurt.


MIX COMPOUND S
SEPARATELY FLUSH EA(H ROUND

Check all hoses for leaks. and soft spots, and replace weak sisters.
And be sure you put in the rust inhibitor unless you're in and-freeze
country. Ethylene glcol and arctic anti-freezes have inhibitors in them.

OVERHEAT CAN OTHER TRICKS
COME FROM LOTS
OF "ThNGS.


PARK.

': Chck to see that .our sct is




j a j' le\l--and sta.s thar V.as.

7 :" Over 15 degrees tilt knocks out
S ',. your oil pump. Get a good foundation under your set.
You may have to use dunnage and rock. On trailer-mount rigs,
block up wheels and support legs. In dry season, get ready for rain.
You can mount a level right on your set. FSN 5210-203-8056, Level, Bench
(Fed Cat C-5210-IL-A, Jan 68), is fine. Check it regularly-even if you don't
get a burn up from oil starvation, your set could slide in the mud or skid
downhill on sand ... disaster.


























Besides that, your set has to have room to breathe. Double sandbags and a
heavy roof may be great for mortar protection-but-
Closing a set in too tight keeps out cooling air and holds in overheated air.
It takes lots more work to build a big enough, roomy enough, dry enough shelter
that'll also keep out blowing grit. But every hour you spend getting one will pay
you back 10 in dodged deadlines.


FRRE EXINGUISHER Useless if you can't reach it or kill yourself grabbing it.
Take out of shipping dip and mount it nearby -on a 3-legged portable sign
stand frinstance. Keep it away from your spare fuel sump, too.

Never touch a set thaigrunning on fire. Insulation burns off fast. If you doped
off and left your extinguisher on the rig, stand back and mourn the loss. Don't
add your funeral to the bill.
Hear in a generator shed -can make you careless, too. You find yourself
mopping off the sweat and wanting to get out. You hurry too much to check
things you should, like-






GROUND ROD Connedions con come LOAD TERMINALS et
loose; ground can dry out around it, wire can no row wire stick out over
break. In dry country, it's smart to hove 2 twice its own diameter
ground rods like FSN 5975-642 8937 several Must be clean of sail and
feet aport. Wire, No. 6 AWG, FSN 6145-189 dirt. Check only when set
6695, 10 ft required, goes to each Use Clamp, is dead and disconnected
FSN 5925-243-5861, or equal. Bindings must be tight.
covers closed Shorts spell
calamity
You can make one
locked.cinch bel on that
"set of cards-if you don't
heck those fire hazards
'-"" and quick killers, they II
USE 2 GROUNDS get you

BOOBY-TRAP SCOUTS

You are in luck on one thing-you have a bunch of automatic scouts going
for you in sets over 3 KW. They're built in to keep you from boobytrapping
yourself-

I'M CIRCUIT BREAKER Kicks off all outgoing
WATCHIN' power for overload protection Overloads of
OUT FOR 0 25 per cent or more bring a fast cut off.


OU -S





OIL PRESSURE SAFETY SWITCH Cuts off ()
engine if oil pressure drops under 18 PSI

OIL TEMPERATURE SWITCH Kills engine if
oil temperature gets above boiling and near
flash poini (where oil would burn)
So, you say, nothing' to worry about.

NORMALLY, YOU'VE GOT
IT MADE... NORMALLY
AHEM-

59






But there's another switch on your panel that knocks loose your oil safeties, and lets
you run whether or no -

AS EMERGENCY RUN Bypasses all your pro-
No RM BEA6menmCY tedion except Circuit Breaker Its mean for
oPCE1 noAN sToP use only when you have to go, in real emer
Eu OM~Nw agency, or in a breakdown situation you just
OPrtATI O have to bypass.


The thing-is, it'U let you run even.when your cooling fins begin to glow red,
your oil gets like soup, and your battery's dead maybe not for long,
but you can run.
But paste this in your hat:." O, S6L VARS... THAT
Emergency means combat 6r major i NOT AN EMERGENCY /
danger- not keepingthe drink cooler ...SO PULL THE PLUG'
in the squad cent down to 38~F.
Besides, even with those safeties, you
could get major overheat damage.
Safeties aren't.100fper cent-certain, as
many proud fathers know.
And naturally you'd never do it your-
self, but there have been people who
bypassed those sentry devices. Block-
ing off circuit breakers is one mistake -
Everybody needs more current some-
times. But play around with your built-
ins and you risk having your whole unit
down silent in the boondocks without
power.


ANOTHER BOOBOO

Some folks think it's only cold weather that goofs up batteries. How wrong
can you get?
Yet they goof off and let that current can conk. Then here's the picture:
The starter won't work. That means rope-starting on Emergency Run. Then
because the automatic cut-off switches won't work on less'n 18 volts and the
alternator won't charge on less'n 18 volts, they can't go back to Normal. The
battery stays dead unless it's changed out.
That spells either standing right there eyeballing gages or risking a fast
burn-up on one more generator that shouldn't been shot.
60







PUN ANOTHER "
CHECK EVERY
r7IME YOU
CHANGE OIL







CABLES (lomps on battery posts must
be clean and tight. Replace if flayed or in.
sulation bad


CELLS Flectrolyle must rover plate tops.
use pure water to fill Replace if case or covers
break. Tropic hydrometer reading is between
I200 and 1225, 1280 in cooler climates,


-WHUT on ull charge eep clean. I
CAUSES
SALVAGE THAT THAT OTHER KILLER
INCREASE
IN WEAR Dirt does cause heat. But it's the
worst kind of bad news on its own.
THIS! Let less than 1/200th of an ounce of
dirt smaller than even 2-1000ths inch
size in with a pint of your fuel, and you
i f gget an unlucky 13-the wear race on
Your engine inside goes up 13 times.
Let in 1/20th ounce, and you get 85
Times normal wear. So is your Uncle
going to buy you 85 times as many
generators as you need?
'Lots of outfits have tried lots of ways to beat dirt.
One plush set-up was a 45 KW in a half-dugout with room to run a D7E
Car Tractor all around it, all encosed, and-
A 36-in fan set in a frame covered with screen wire, gauze mesh, and coarse
curtain. Air zoomed in-minus sand and dirt.
Another big fan and overhead vents took hot air out; exhaust was piped off.
An operator stayed handy. One breakdown in over a year.
So what does a dream deal like that take?

MAKE YOUR OWN
Enough work and some help can get you well off. Maybe you have just a
5 KW or 10 KW. Maybe you're no place close to a hill you can back up to.

61COR






But you can get a start with a pile of sandbags shaped like a U and a sheet-
iron roof to strain some of the fire out of the sun. Spend no time lamenting what
you don't have; use what you can lay hands on.
Here's what you need: TIME I
I ( \ THE KEY TO
A shield to keep windblown IT..T... YOU N
grit out. NEED TIME TO
MAKE THE SET-
Overhead shelter. UP IN THE FtR5T
L Anli-Chorlie protection PL ACE... AND
TIME TO KEEP
l Plenty of room for air to IT GOIN .
circulate around your set.
SFlooring out of the mud ,i
that will stay put. t
L Time to do the lob.


Let your sergeant know the problem; then when he gives the nod, get with it
and stay with it.
WEATHERWISE
A light sprinkle of logic on your handsome head will tell you certain jobs
come oftener as weather changes.
When clouds so thick they gurgle are so low you can slap their bottoms, you
know to check diesel fuel filters for water 2 or 3 times sooner.
When sand blows by like buckshot, you look after air filters often. Talcum-
powder-fine dirt moving like a jet takeoff can clog up dry-core air filters in
2 hours or less. Oil-bath units won't go much further.
In dry season, even when it's not blowing much, you change oil oftener.
Crankcase oil picks up grit. If your set has an oil filter, double up on core
cleanouts then, too.
The thing is, don't wait until filters clog. Keep track of time, and get your
licks in before your set starts gasping for oil or air.
Otherwise, black smoke out of the exhaust could tell you it's getting late.
That spells too little air, engine running weak, and carbon crusting inside.
.a






BECTRICAL END
Grit is no more a friend of your juice-producing box than of your engine.
You have to be careful about-
BRUSH FACES-Worn,
COMMUTATORS Segments ground overheating, pitted, chip-
down, trenched, pitted, sparking. ped.


RELAYS Bearings lam.
ming, contact points burn-
ed, shorts.


ARMATURES Insulation
cuts, coatings rotted, out.
put lowered, trickle shorts
built up.

SWITCHES Pivots ground down, contact points sticking or blocked.
sputtering. JUST
Keep your head and fingers away Irom electrical gear in operation CLEAN ..
- but sometimes you can hear a hiss, a sort ot frying noise, inside PON'T
relay or switch points. You may see a needle that runs to that box I
bounce a little or swing in jerks. It's a good bet then Ihat dirt's giving P !
trouble. Notify support before it gets worse


You can be a favorite side-kick of your generator.
Cleaning Smooth down grooved commutator segments with
No. 00 sandpaper and dean the cracks gently with on old hacksaw blade


OURllIS Load terminals
and sockets must be clean.
dry. and oil-free


YOU CAN HELP
It's a bad mistake to put oil-soaked excelsior or gauze in front of the generator
air vent inlet. That could get you spontaneous combustion-fire, that is. If
you want to use window screen wire fastened down good, do, bur keep it clean.
You can keep a running check b) eyeing your instruments.
If you have a fairly heavy load, for instance, and the output ammeter begins
to drop, you could have armature overheat.
63 [






A voltmeter drop or surge can indicate trouble down the line or an unbalanced
load. Look for somebody trying to use more juice than there is.
If you hear the engine throb and see your frequency meter jump, have a look
at your governor. Then see whether you have overheating, air choke-off, or
bad fuel. EH
And if oil pressure hits the skids, iALPI .. ME ,
water temperature gets in the red, or
your battery ammeter hits heavy dis-
charge-shut down. Call support.

WATCH THOSE GAGES
LOOK AROUND
You can have the best site in Beautiful Southeast Asia, the best-tended set from
Saigon to San Fran, and the best PM program from pole to pole-and blow it.
The catch?
One attachment the factory didn't see fit to put on was an operator. That's
why your generous Uncle graciously allowed you to fill in.
Generator operators are supposed to learn how to work and move in the dark.
Besides, they're expected to keep from tripping up their own troop.
Marking fuel sump locations with reflective or luminous tape is one help.
The same tape for fire extinguisher stands is good. Low-overhead roof supports
can use it too. Tape, Luminous, FSN 9390-282-7867, or Tape, Reflective, FSN
9390-753-3208, are both in Fed Cat C9300-IL-A (Oct 68).
You ought to make sure spare fuel supplies of 10 five-gallon cans or bigger
-or over 50 gallons in one container-get 15 feet from your juice jewel shop.
Do sandbag spare fuel storage separately and do protect it from sun and rain.
Other top-drawer tipoffs are on-

BURIED1 CABLES--Discorded iron pipe or LOCATE COM
plain beam makes good cover to keep some- O COMPOUND -Keeps bes from
body from staking a spde nto one. Mark king a of stud holes or nu n es
and panels (FSN 8030-952-220S for I oz).
such carefully.

FUEL PUMPING Fiter-separator FSN 4330-051-0666 and water segregator FSN 4930-276-
0087 are great.

CIRCUIT BREAKER- What, again? Yep, he WHERE'S THAT
sure it's Off when you fire up. 28-volt common CIRCUIT BREAKER!'
sets especially are guaranteed to burn out if
you gel to leaving the load switch on to start.
burca















7op 'eve 9or Att
From now on unit Materiel Readiness
Reports (DA 2406) will list as "Autho-
rized" reportable items (col. e) the full
quantity of equipment called for under
equipment level 1 in the unit's TOE,
MTOE, TDA or MTDA. The next change
to TM 38-750 will say so, as spelled out
in DA Msg 901810 (20 Mar 69).

MW728 CE
Oil(ee4Mce
If your M728 combat engineer vehicle
is in SEA or any other area where the
temperature stays above 32F, take the
OE 10 out of your hydraulic reservoir
and replace it with OE 30. USATACOM
TWX 9-11, 616 (30 Sep 68) had the
official word on this and the next change
to LO 9-2350-222-12 is scheduled to say
the same thing. The OE 30 will improve
boom operation.

Pin On o u a 7il7
Ruffled tail feathers on your UH-1 or
AH-1G helicopter can put you in a spin
if those castellated self-locking nuts in
the crosshead are left behind. Make it a
part of your Daily and Pre-Flight to see
to it the cotter pins (MS24665-115) are
holding the nuts so they can't get away.


PS slipped up on that stab mode item
on page 42 of PS Issue 198. It was half
right, half wrong. It is OK to fire a con-
ventional round in stab mode while on
the move. You never fire the missile in
the stab mode. Firing conventional
rounds on the move with the stab mode
is being done in Vietnam. It works real
well with the canister round and on all
area targets.


qdU 7X"t Order
Hold one and don't order that radio
decal from Sacramento like the article
on Page 48 of PS Issue 198 said. There's
been some rethinking, and that decal is
going to get an FSN. Watch PS for later
news on the decal and its FSN; mean-
while, send no money to Sacramento.


7ae!t44


Common repairmen who need the lat-
est listing, the pictures, of the compo-
nents in the TK-101/G tool set should
keep an eye peeled for a new catalog,
SC 5180-91-CL-R13. Your pubs people
should be able to get it quick-like.


Would You Stake Your Life on
the Condition of Your Equipmnent?


































KEEP THEM
LEVEL



WARM UP
BEFORE SWITCHING
LOAD


KEEP
CRANKCASE
OIL UP


DON T
OVER-
LOAD
CIRCUIT