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PS
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00041
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1968
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00041

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4-5
        Page 6-7
        Page 8-9
        Page 10-11
        Page 12-13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26-27
        Page 28-29
        Page 30-31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40-41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46-47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60-61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68-69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72-73
        Page 74-75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80-81
Full Text



















r HOLP IT '
YOU POA BEFORE-
OPERATIONS CHECK...
JUST TO Mo
BE SURE!


F' AAAH,
WHY BOTHER


CHECKOUT
LAST NITE!
JUST APPLE
UP... 'N'
MOVE


i- 4;-L

(I~i


4


~i~ "
\tK`
cc ~t~_~?t~t~Lhr \$
~~rCk-~-






HOLD ONE-

BEFORE YOU 001o
You've seen guys who think they're hot-rodders. The) ''
flip the switch, slam the gas to the floor and try to hit 60
in 6 flat.
Nuh-uh!They're not hot-rodders. They're not even drivers.
They ought to get jobs in the local junk yard tearing up cars /
for scrap. for that's x.acIrl % hat thi. 're doing.
When sou see a sldier creating a l.S. chicile like [hat.
better hall him and rcll him to "\tch a fe-n things, liki -


-
WHL


For more details, see the "B.D.A.C." arti


rHu PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE orHLY
IsIUe No. 193 1968 Sries
IN THIS ISSUE


T Tires OK?
I Engine oil up OK?
S Radiator full?
Fuel tank full?
No gunning the engine.
Worm up at idle before
moving out.
Move out in the lowest gear -
steady and easy.


Keep on eye out for any drastic
changes in dashboard gage readings.
Listen for any unusual noises.
Keep RPM in operating range
(no lugging, no over-revving).
No jack-rabbit starts and stops.


Cool down the engine with high idle for a
few minutes before you cut her off.
Fill up lube, fuel, coolant.
Check 'er over for anything loose or damaged.
Clean 'er up, and she's ready for an overnight.
cle starting on Page 37.


GROUND MOBILITY 2.21
BYOIM01IS ANG5SS14
Series Irk 2.15 Seaecnsilgi 20
'r.oln rk 16 500-alh Fel Drum 20
GC42 .2.T-.n Irt 17 PolPump 21
5-Ton Tri 118 I fuleshooling
Palnting Chllns 19 Fix 21


FIREPOWER 22.27
Blarker.nd. SlMns 2 23 MI6AI hraul Frlng 23
Like Hercules 24.25 2f.21


GENERAL & SUPPLY
M17CBR1Mask 2-365 Lubricatlln B177
Nea Publrcatins 59 DA orm 3311 18
DA Form 2028 67 E.aui Wanranhlles 79
Supply 18 1.7.18.19.24.33.36
57.62.63.65.78


AIR MOBILITY 45-58
OIal UT CI-S flall Rolor 57
ILI21AJ 4554.55 TAERS Forms 57
AH-ICG Do H.oue 58 Cable
OH-A 57 renslimefers 58


COMMUNICATIONS-
ELECTRONICS 60-66
Anlennra lTps 841. 62 ANGRCIC 1 64
SIIicon' Grease 62 SB-6 PhOitch-
lunlnl Headi 62 boad 64
AN MP-44 Radar 3 ANiCRC-SMI 65
AN110 ll2IPA Se 61 Ah.PRC-74 65
IA-14,PT IA-M12 6 ST 394WV/G 8 E
Use ol lndi Ior prmtian o this publlca
clan has bere approved by Headqiarters.
Department of Int Amnn. 26 february 1968
DISTRIBUTION- In accordance with re-
quirements submitted on DA Form 124

1Liilq qzi M"
road2I


F


STARtING

UP I






INSPECTOR ON...


A CHECK-
DETECT


YOUR


HOOD Safety catch bent,
not alined, broken, missing;
hold-down catches stuck, bro-
ken, missing; National symbol
wrong size, missing; markings
wrong, missing; safety stencil
(underside) wrong, missing


w


TRUCK


WINDSHIELD Cracked
enough to obstruct driver's
vision, crazed. discolored,
weatherslripping cracked,
torn, missing; tie-down catch
or stowage strap unsound,
missing, glass broken; hood
bumpers missing.


COWL VENT (older models)
Jammed, screen clogged; bro-
ken, rusty, stuck.


'-"--


HEADLIGHTS, BLACKOUT
MARKERS Painted over. u,
dirty, broken; marker twisted
out of line; blackout support r ,
bracket or shield loose, bro-
ken; lenses waterlogged, I
'L. clouded.

WINDSHIELD WIPERS-Blades
broken, missing; rubber
cracked, cut, hardened.


sq.s ~ s



'p


TURN SIGNAL
Loose, lens
P-, loose, frayed,


FENDERS-Rusled, bent.
seams cracked; side channels
, cut, crushed


BUMPERS Army or unit
markings missing, wrong; (see
STB 746-93 1 Ch 2. lul 66) U.
i channel bent, cracked, loose

... IL


LIFTING SHACKLES Stuck,
bent, loose, missing; safety
pin or chain missing


----s Z
This set of heels gets lots of use.
\ear and road licks can make trouble.
The best detecrive around to find such
trouble, before it grows, is the guy be-
hind the w&heel-sou.
\ hen .ou find something wrong
during your eyeball exam, get it fixed
- fast if it% anything listed here in
boldly tpe.


But. puh Iteze. lease it to a regular
mechanic unless you're authorized to
~ mess n ith it. Just be sure to jot it down
on a DA Form 2404 for )our unit me-
chanic to tackle.


You don't have to do all this in one
shot. Do it bit-b -bit. In a short time
you can inspect the whole vehicle.


AND M1SI5AI-


IM






FIRE EXTINGUISHER-(if be-
hind seat) Discharged, not
tagged or sealed (check local
SOP), bracket loose, broken ,


MIRROR-Broken, too clouded
lor good vision, missing: back
et not adjustable


LEFT


1 V


SIDE PANELS Bent,
rusty, seams cracked;
strap eyes crushed,
missing; bow rod hold-
downs bent, broken;
reflectors (if present)
broken: warning de.
cals (25 GPM luel ac.
cept and overfill warn
ings) missing, unread
able


AXE-Missing, rusted, handle
broken; mount or straps dam-
aged, unserviceable


M1U--I oWow


TIRES & WHEELS-Lug nuts loose.
missing; studs Denl, stripped; hole
edges cut, cracked; air-drop eyes or
jam nuts loose, missing; rims dented,
bent; tire bead not snug on rim; valve
caps missing; pressure wrong (unless
local SOP says otherwise, in mud, sand,
or snow it's 12 Ibs front and 18 Ibs
rear; on pavement it's 20 Ibs front and
25 Ibs rear; on cross-country 18 Ibs
front and 22 Ibs rear); tires mismatched,
cut or worn to fabric, unevenly worn.


FUEL TANK--Filler cap rusted, miss-
ing; gasket broken, missing; vent valve
in wrong position (if it's at OPEN but
you feel pressure loosening the cap,
the vent's clogged or sticking or tank
-to-carburetor is clogged); tank leak-
ing; strainer clogged, holed, missing;
fuel level too high (2 inches below
tank top is top); foreign objects under
seat endangering tank or lines.


LUG NUT

JAM
NUT

AIR DROP
EYE


SIDE PANELS, TIRES & WHEELS -
Same as LEFT SIDE


SHOVEL Missing, rusty. dirty,
handle broken; bracket bent, straps
or buckles unserviceable, missing.


-. ----


-
-;re
--
ul*
~P


~cb~c~"pl=~d








RI


CANVAS, WINDOWS Torn,
dirty; retaining straps frayed,
buckles missing; seams open;
windows logged enough o
hamper vision.

ALER COUPLING RECEPTA.
E Damaged, corroded:
ews. cover or cover spring
se, missing: gasket miss .ii


REFLECTOR Painted over,
broken, missing; not on spare
wheel assembly.


AR


I.'


FUEL CAN-Rusted, leaking,
cap missing; chain broken,
or missing; gasket missing or
cut: webbing or O-ring un
serviceable.


'/OU 170 A GOOP
AFTER- OPERATIONS
SERVICE... DOESN'T
MEAN YOU CANS SMPP
THE BEFORE-OPERATIONSI
SERVICE,


TURN SIGNALS, LIGHTS -
Glass broken, dirty, painted
over; waterlogged; wires
Irayed. exposed; loose.


BUMPERETTES- Bent, rusty,
broken, bolts loose, missing;
unit markings wrong or miss-
ing.
SDOMI'T
STAKE RAR'EL"
SEE ITEiMS
SFO G,'A-LTE.L
ri-iEr RE IMPORTANT
r: i


NEEP TmEA


SPINTLE-Not
lubricated,
rusted, spring
?t1 broken, won't
S work.


r &16L,


,I


I.


SPARE WHEEL & TIRE-Loose on mount,
flat, valve cap missing, sidewalls cut,
tread worn off, wheel bent out of shape.



END PANEL-Rusty, badly dented; can-
vas tie-down brackets bent, missing;
seam cracks visible (especially under
stop & tail lights).


LIFTING SHACKLES nl;t
loose, stuck, rustj rniss~ing
safety pin or chain broken,
missing. t e






TOOL BOX Unauthorized tools or
Sparts, tools broken, missing:l check -10
TM OEM); t'ci dirty, wel; cover bent.
rusty, crushed, missing.


WINDSHIELD WIPERS Hose
cracked, loose, leaking; not
enough slack to lower wind
shield without pulling loose;
manual operating handle bent,
scraping glass or frame, loose,
knob missing.


KEEP TRACK OF ,OUR
PUBS... THE' RE THE
ADVICE YOU CAN TRUST!


BATTERY BOX-Cover bent, clips loose
or broken; box dirty, corroded.


I


I


: '


BATTERIES Cracked, leaking, dirty;
clamps or posts loose, corroded, man-
gled; electrolyte level low (should be
3/ inch above plates); low charge (check
electrolyte specific gravity with hy-
drometer-should be 1.200-1.225 in
tropics, 1.285 elsewhere); filler caps
loose, broken, missing, vents clogged
(clean with wire); holddowns too tight,
loose, corroded.


SEATS--Covers torn, dirty; frames
bent; retaining pins or chains missing;
adjusting knobs binding, unlubed; move-
ment blocked by trash; safety strap
(passenger's side) cut, frayed; retaining
eye loose, broken; catch broken.


SAGES, INDICATORS-Glass broken, painted
over, clouded; unreadable; pointer missing.
DATA PLATES-Painted over, loose, missing.
FLOOR-Rusted, drains clogged.
(More on INSIDE items coming up in
WORKING CHECK)


Q~JI;" ~:


,9i


__ k






SAFETY CATCH Won't
hold hood up securely,
cracked, not alined right,
rusly.

WATER TEMPERATURE
SENDING UNIT Connec-
tions loose


HORN Loose, corroded,
won't work, connections
loose.


SAFETY STENCIL -
Painted over,
missing


DISTRIBUTOR Cracked,
screws or lockwashers
missing; cables loose insu
lation cracking: seal miss
ing.


GENERATOR REGULATOR-
Mount loose, connections
loose, wires exposed.


FUEL LINES--Crushed,
leaking, chafing


OIL FILTER Loose, leaking.

OIL PRESSURE SAFETY
SSWITCH Corroded, con
sections loose.

OIL DIP STICK Bent,- '
O ring cut or missing, won't
seal right, missing, oil level
low, below ADD.



MASTER CYLINDER-Vent hole (side of
square plug) clogged, cap too tight,
loose Ilinger-light is enough) tluid low
(more than I',, inch below top edge
of filler cap).


- I


VACUUM PUMP -
Loose, leaking,
gasket bad.


FAN BELT-Too tight, loose


AIR CLEANER Oil level
low, grit on bottom ot bowl;
Intake screen missing,
joints leaking.

ENGINE VENT VALVE -
Threads stripped, connec-
tions loose, lines crushed,
leaking

INTAKE MANIFOLD-Bolts
loose, gasket leaking,
cracked.


EXHAUST MANIFOLD--
Bolts loose, lock langs
broken, missing; outlet gas
ket to pipe flange loose,
missing


11 [ -M E


-;


-~Y A `


(use ruler to measure 2.1
deflection in center of be it).
frayed, grooved, cracked.


AFNHEADLIGHTS Cnetr
loose, corroded. cracked;
loir my wires exposed.


_74 ; .~.. ..


GENERATOR Out of line,
loose, pulley cracked or
culling belt, connector
loose.

,, LINKAGE-Chole throttle,
or accelerator co:uplins .- .'
bent, badly worn, binding;
pins or retainers w\ ,rn,
missing.

OIL FILLER CAP--Casket
loose, missing: chain
broken, missing hissing
sound here means your
crankcase venting is bad)

RADIATOR-Cap missing, wrong should
be 7 PSI), chain miisinrg, broken rubber
insulator cracked, hard, tanks or lubes
leaking at seams or ioinls hoses ld,
cut, sponge, clamps loose; Ins crushed
or clogged by bugs or dirt, loose in
mount, vent lovertlow) line crushed,
missing.







:; UNDERFRAME-Bott
.' members gashed, w
;:.:.:i plate ends broken to
neath.


DRIVE SHAFTS,
unlubed: spline
(you want the
differential, "long


REAR DIFFERENTIA
washers or screw
models were issue
breather plugged, m
bolts loose, battered
; (may indicate suspense
; are bent); leaking lub
......., ZI "' .. .',1 : .--,*"


om plates or cross-
elds pulled loose;
admit mud under-



U JOINTS Rattling,
ends toward wheels
"short end" toward
end" to wheel)


L Flange-guard
s missing (older
d without them);
missing; suspension
; out of alinement
ion arms or braces
e.
2* 3itJ:v


SHOCKS & SPRINGS-Same as front
end On either set, a sag to one wheel
indicates a shock absorber, coil spring,
or both are kaput.


SERVICE BRAKE LINES-Leaking, chaf-
ing, crushed; tees and connectors wet
at joints; clips dangling, missing.


PARKING BRAKE--Loose on support,
out of alinement; linkage bent, loose;
oil drip fouling brake band; return spring
slack, not engaged (clean off guck to
look for signs of excess wear). TRANSMISSION-TRANSFER Plugs
TRANSMISSION-TRANSFER Plugs (1
Sfill level and 2 drain plugs here) leaking,
loose; breather cap stopped up. missing
..,. _. (be sure not to twist reverse shift pivot
f l pin thinking it's a plug)


FRONT SUSPENSION -Bolts loose on
lower arm assembly; shims missing;
shaft bolts loose; arms or crossmem-
bers bent, cracked.


FRONT UNIVERSALS-(Shatt and wheel
drive) Nuts or bolts loose, missing; ex-
cessive wear (a rattling sound tells you),
poorly lubed.



DIFFERENTIAL-Dripping lube, breather
S plugged or missing.


DIFFERENTIAL FLANGE GUARD-Bent;
bolts, washers, screws loose, missing.


RADIATOR DRAIN COCK Clogged,
stuck, broken.


ENGINE OIL PAN- Drain plug loose,
leaking; pan gaskets leaking; bolls
loose, missing.


COIL SPRINGS-Broken, lopsided, tips
broken, insulator missing


SHOCK ABSORBERS Bent. crushed,
loose, dented broken.
SPEEDOMETER DRIVE- Transfer case o
connector broken, loose; housing or FLYWHEEL CLUTCH HOUSING Drain
fittings crushed. plug not in blind boss (on early models
it's kept in the tool bo,); transmission
seals leaking.


In -.


- 1 -. -ls ^


EXHAUST SYSTEM-Rust or burn holes
in pipe; suspension brackets broken,
missing; muffler to exhaust pipe gasket
leaky, missing (if brackets are all
present but chafe marks or holes show,
suspect engine mount damage); muffler
crushed, rusted out.


STEERING Pitman or idler arms or
shafts loose; nuts or cotter pins miss-
ing; tie-rod spindle-arm assembly bent,
loose; bushings worn; grease fittings
broken, missing; clamps or sleeves
bent, loose, missing.


''''1


._ .._a






r NOW
LET'S
GIVE. IT
AN
OPERATING
RUN-THRU.


r ACCELERATOR PEDAL-
Binds, sticks in any position
loose, broken.
,_._ .-.
STEERING-Wheel gouged or
cracked so it hurts hands to
drive: core rusted through;
steering column loose, dash
Bracket loose, tube cut; front
end shimmies or bounces;
steers hard or loose. Horn
stuck, won't work.

TURN SIGNALS (If present)
Won't work, slip out of posi
lion, handle damaged, mount
loose (check all bulbs in all
lights at standstill with engine
running)

HEADLIGHTS, BLACKOUT
LIGHTS Mouns. brackets
loose, broken; won't light.
Ilicker when rolled


ot teshlll IW

I 'ae s~cs. loose;
;ont .13V engage wou
won ss noise or lu"In% outt
ot %ear.1


CHOKE CONTROL & THROTTLE
CONTROL-Sticking, handles
loose, missing; won't stay set.

BATTERY- GENERATOR INDI-
CATOR-Needle fails to swing
from far left to Yellow or low
Green as switch is turned on
and in idle; while running
usual speeds, needle doesn't
stay in Green.
OIL PRESSURE GAGE Fails
Sto read between 15 and 30
PSI when idling in ordinary
weather and close to 40 PSI
at normal speeds.


ENGINE TEMPERATURE CAGE
--Fails to read 160 to 180
warmed up, around 200 in
usual operating conditions.

SERVICE BRAKES-Spongy, wrong
justment check Iree Iravel by han
standstill. '* inch plus or minus
Inch is righl and should clear I
by 2 inches). Vehicle should slop
straight line in 100 teet or less on
road luse sleady pressure, not pa
slopI at highest permissible road spe
II vehicle swerves, brakes may ne
adluslment

BUT I
SFIT o'"'
BRAKES
AeourT c'.500


NT -V
Ez-N, K
IB~5


ad-
d at
ocr
Sin
dry
nic
ed
eed

A


HEADLIGHT DIMMER SWITCH
dash panel indicator to be
sure high beam circuit works).

(
SPEEDOMETER-ODOMETER -
/ Sticking, works erratically,
mileage does not register.
jumps, broken. -,;

LIGHT SWITCHES Handles
broken, sticking, retaining
screws missing. main switch
lthere're 2 kinds of switch:
yours might give you Stop
Lught and Service Drive with
out using UNLOCK).


I






G838-SERIES 1/4-TON TRUCK...
WARNING DECAL


Would you believe some guys forget
to disconnect their vehicle's battery CAUTION -
cables when they hook up a battery BOOSTER OR BATTERY NEG(-) CABLE
charger for in-vehicle charging? MUST GO TO NEG(-) POS(+) TO
And would you believe that some POS DISCONNECTBATTERY
guys actually connect the charger's neg- CABLES BEFORE USING CHARGER
ative (-) cable to the battery's positive
(+) post-and the charger's positive the battery box cover. Ask for D
cable to the battery's negative post? FSN 7690-912-3504, listed in SC 76
, Well, believe it or not, they do. 90-IL (Jun 67). After installing, gi
So a few words of warning may save a a coat of clear varnish so it won't g
lot of batteries in your outfit's M151A1 pot.
1/4-tonners or other G838-series trucks. And then remember- always,
Get a warning decal for every one of ative-to-negative and positive-to-]
those trucks and stick it on the inside of tive.

SIfCHERRYYUICE -MXUP : '
.- .... -." ':, -,* ',.:,. .* ^ '. ,:..' .. ...- ......,,
.. :.:' ::: :.

PRU
HYRULCFL1
USE IN AUTOj
JUM WA


Cherry juice razzle-dazzle is fine at the gedunk stand, but it can be downright
dangerous if it's practiced in the maintenance shop.
Take the recent case of an M151 in a shop for a brake job. The mechanic filled
the master cylinder from the first can of cherry juice he came across.
Trouble was a-brewing 'cause he picked up a can of petroleum base hydraulic
fluid used in automatic transmissions. Sure, it was cherry color and flowed like
hydraulic brake fluid.
But the brake system had to be purged because petroleum base hydraulic trans-
mission fluid will destroy brake system seals.
'Course you wouldn't reach for the wrong fluid--not as long as you eye the
label on the can of cherry juice c-a-r-e-f-u-l-l-y. You want the non-petroleum
base brake fluid.


ecal,
60/
ve it
'o to

neg-
posi-






















Dear Half-Mast,
Two-and-a-half pints is the capacity of the steering gear housing on a G742-series
2-1/2-ton truck. That's what it says in LO 9-2320-209-12 (Jan 68). This much GO
doesn't fill the housing to the fill hole. In fact, you can't even see the oil through the
fill hole.
The LO says to "check level," but how're you going to tell where the oil level is
when you can't see it?
SGT J. H. N.
Dear Sergeant J. H. N.,
REMOVE COVER
You need an oil level check hole-
like's on the new production vehicles, DRILL & TAP
So...
So... 27 NPT HOLE
Take off the side cover. On top of
the cover, measure back 1.484 inches
from the center of the forward upper
bolt and 1/2 inch in from the mount-
ing edge. Drill and tap a 1/8-27 NPT
hole. Clean off any metal particles left
on the cover.
Put the cover back on your gear
housing, using a new gasket, FSN 2530-
752-1485.
Refill the gear housing up to your
new check hole./ *f
Install a check hole pipe plug, FSN
4730-350-3401, listed in Fed Cat
C4730-IL-A.
When you want to see how your just take out that new plug and get the
steering gear housing's setting' on oil, hole story. j os





G744-SERIES 5-TON TRUCK...
CLUTCH SPRING SAVER


WRONG









HOOK TO LEFT


Dear Editor,
There's no need for losing the clutch pedal re-
trading spring on a 5-ton truck even when
rough terrain operation does its darnedest to
shake the spring off.
Usually you see that spring installed the easy
way, and it comes off almost as easy as it went
on.
Installed the hard way (you use a little more
muscle), that spring will stay put until you want
it off.
Instead of hooking the top first and then pull-
ing the spring down to hook the bottom (with
the bottom hook open to the left), you hook the
bottom first (with the hook open to the right)
and then lift the spring to hook the top.

Edgar H. Woodring
Fort Knox, Kentucky

(Ed Note-Must be a lot of Mechanic-types don't
pay close attention to Figure 161 inTM 9-2320-211-
20 (Mar 63).

k AIR SETTING CHANGED


... YOUR MECHANIC'S JOB J W WH
You'll be seeing a change in TM 9-2320-211-20 for your 5-ton truck's air com-
pressor air governor setting. It's been upped to 125 PSI maximum. The old maxi-
mum, 120 PSI, is given in para 187 (d). Minimum stays at 105 PSI.
So how do you adjust the air governor if the setting's wrong? You don't if
you've got the old Type O governor- it has to be replaced.
But you can adjust a Type D governor -Governor Assembly, Airbrake, FSN
2530-854-4457. This governor replaces a Type O Governor that can't be repaired.
18





5-TON MULTIFUEL...


ENGINE
MOUNT --"
STAYS s


Hold onto that front mount-all of it-when you send your LDS 465-1 or
LDS 465-1A engine off for repair or rebuild. These're the engines used in G744-
series 5-ton trucks.
Some guys've slipped up on this deal, and now they're huntin' high 'n' low for
front mounts for their replacement engines. The mount's not a part of the engine,
so you don't get it with your replacement engine. Besides, the mount's a non-stock
item, which means you have to bank on your cannibalization point if you lose
yours.
Like it shows in Ch 1 (Jul 64) to TM 9-2320-211-20, you take the engine and
mount out together. But once you get the engine out, take the mount off-all
the parts, right down to the block-and put it back on the truck.
Then, when you get ready to install the replacement engine, take the mount
off the truck, put it on the engine and set the whole works into place.






AN/GSS-14...

TOP AND BOTTOM
The cowling-glass assembly of your AN/GSS-14 23-in Xenon searchlight
can be put on upside down. So paint the word TOP on the top of the cowling
assembly, or make some other such marking for the same purpose. This'll make
you put the assembly back the way it should be, every time.



PAINT WORD
HERE




EASY WITH
THOSE FEET




Footloose feet can bang, bash or bend the shock absorber on the truck-mounted
Xenon searchlight.
Sure 'nuff, it's easy to get your feet all over the shock absorber, since it's
pretty much out in the open.
But a little watchful maneuvering should take care of the problem all right.
The important thing is:
Watch those footloose feet.


GOT THE RIGHT TAP?

Mixing fuels when you're not supposed to
could cause the engine of your equipment to
conk out. To make sure that doesn't happen to
/ w you, look for the grade of fuel stenciled on the
< Y 500-gal drum and be sure it's the right fuel for
the piece of equipment that keeps you from
walking.
Your 500-gal collapsible drums should have
one of these markings: JP-4, AVGAS, MOGAS,
or Diesel Fuel.
20







POL PUMP BURN STOPPER


REMOVE Burned up because the insulation
INSUIATION burns off your 6-inch Brielle PP113
SPetroleum Pump engine hood or panel?
That stuff can't take all that heat from
the exhaust and it'll char, melt or burn.
SJust take the insulation off and keep
H the side panel on the exhaust manifold
side open as much as possible when run-
ning. Sure, the outside paint'll scorch
TAKE EET off-but mox nix.
-'"- OFF... TAKE ./ If you've got no tools to take off the
*. EET ALL insulation, ask your DS for help.
AWF'


MKE YOUR TROUBLESHOOTER
Dear Editor,
THERE'S A doctor's stethoscope is mighty handy
A for during-operation-troubleshooting of en-
S BETTER gines, generator regulators and turn signal
WAY! S(or iack of sound) may offer a clue as to
whether anything's wrong inside.
Even if a stethoscope was easy to come
by, it still has a limited reach.
So we made a listening gadget that costs
practically nothing an old carburetor
float, a piece of welding rod and a dab of
solder. And its reach is limited only by how
long you want it.


Floyd H. Turner
Ft. Huachuca, Ariz.

-- CARB FLOAT


SOLDER HERE


(Ed Note-That sounds-even without a stethoscope-like you're on the in-
side track with your troubleshooting. Take care, though, that you keep your
listening gadget away from electrical connections. Electrical insulating tape or
plastic tubing covering most of the rod (from the float to just short of the end) is
good insurance against hooking your ear up in a short circuit. Whatever you use,
keep it away from spinning components, such as belts, fans, pulleys, etc.)
21






FIREPOWER
*--*- *g:" p


Nosiree, you'd never catch Johnny Unitas or Mickey Mantle or any of those
guys going into battle without first putting on some stuff to cut the glare. And
they're only sighting on championships and loot and reputation and such-like.
It's much more important, natch, for you combat riflemen to go and do like-
wise.
Only difference is, o'course, the stars put stuff under their eyes while you use
it on the front and rear sight of your weapon. The aim's the same, though: To
sharpen your game.
Here're a few ideas on blacking sights that'll help. Put 'em to work every time
just-before you head into action .. and check 'em every so often when you can
after that.



OLi ^^


1. Clean the sights. A dirty sight can foul up
your aim by giving you a blurry target.
Use a swab or handkerchief or something.
Bore deaner's great for getting rid of oil
and gook.


2. Apply blackener to get rid of the shine. A
shiny sight can half-blind you as you take
bead in broad daylight.






'Most anything that makes the sight as rifles. Incidentally, FM 23-71 (Dec
black will do. Some guys use liquid shoe 66) with 1 change-Rifle Marksman-
polish, matches or cigarette lighters or ship-has some good poop about this.
carbide lamps, if one's handy. One of
the favorites is to take a cleaning swab,
wet it good with bore cleaner and twist
it like a wick. Then split a stick and
shove the swab in the crack. Light this
up and you'll get a good soot.
The trick with any fire, though, is to
hold the sight at the point of the flame
a few seconds till it turns black. Just be
careful to black the areas around the
peep hole or notch or on the blade or
ears ... and wipe off any soot that gets
in the wrong places.
This sight-blackening deal, of course,
goes for all shoulder and hand weapons
--carbines, pistols, revolvers, as well















Like day follows night ... like ...
That's how your humdinger of a bore-cleaning job had better follow the use
of tracer ammo in your M16A1 rifle.
Roger!
Tracers leave a coppering in the bore that can cause a buildup of metal that
can tear bullets apart (makes 'em like birdshot, even), or block the gas port and
put you out of business. The longer you delay cleaning after firing tracers, the
tougher the job's going to be, too.
So, really get with it. An A-Plus-No. 1 job, eh?
'Nother tip: Try to fire no more tracer rounds than the situation calls for.










I~


I[K e SPRING CLIP
-SN 5340- LIKE SO..
850-6896

ERCU LM You'll find the clip on page 12 of TM
9-1440-250-15P/6/1 (Jun 67) -under
FSN 5340-850-6896. Use the screw and
lS ock washer in the cover plate of each
outrigger to hold the clip in place.
"" .6b-l 24


SEVERING
RELATIONS?

4MMR.. BUT,
3OME BABY--
3IFT.1 T.--HAT'S A
CLIP
F5N 5340-
850-6896.

The cable (P109C) that runs from
your Nike-Hercules launcher erecting
beam to the pre-launcher signal simula-
tor can be cut to bits when you lower
the beam if it gets caught under the
launcher-handling rail outriggers.
You can get a guy to hold on to the
cables as you lower the beam and so
keep 'em out of the way. Another way
is to fasten a spring clip to the top of
each outrigger and then run the cable
through the clips.








APS OR HPU IT PEPEN5
WHAT'S IN YOUR
Dear Half-Mast, BIRP!
Just what is the right oil-pressure-gage
setting on the portable oil fill and filter unit
when we fill a Nike-Hercules missile? I
read one thing in one place and something
else in another.
SSG R. S.

Dear Sergeant R. S.,
It all depends on what's in your bird. If it has an accessory power supply
... then the setting is 150 PSI 10. But a hydraulic pumping unit in the
missile means a setting of 110 PSI 10.
In other words, you go with the figures in TM 9-1410-250-12/1
(Nov 67). fl-ffw|


REMEMBER THE PLUGS









Way back when, support people against the sweat on your brow in your
riddled the bottom of Nike-Hercules area, a weekly drain might be called
launcher erecting beams with larger for.
and new holes -according to the word
in MWO Y75-W62 (Mar 60). DON'T FORGET
in M Y They enlarged the 14 holes already *
in the beam and added 3 new ones to
make it easier for water to drain. They
also added drain plugs to the 3 new .
holes- and there's the rub! Lotta units
forget they're there!
Take the plugs out once a month so's 1% ,,l, I'll
the water will run out. If you're in a lil
dry place, once every 2 months or so
ought to do it. And if the rain beats
25







GIVE BREAK, NOT A GIG

HOLV IT HeN there. Mr Inspeetor what's
... I'LL this they're saying about your gigging
S GEr 'ER a Nike-Hcrcules ,outfi on its stagnation
i B K TO pressure and acuum pump? You kno"
IN A\. after the pressure iS released, the
vBINUTE/ needle on the gage doesn't return to
Sby it~ell Then comets the gig.
wVhen .a guQ u.cs the' gage, he can per
S. the needle to go "O "o b tapping the
.. ~ gage housing. And this is OK because
S the a..' the gage is made, the needle.
"' mas need some help no" and again if
it's going to mo\e.
Incidentall the note to para 5 in TB 9-95() .
1-1 1 ISep 6Oi sas about the same thing. That is,
the TB talks about tapping the gage to mo'c the
needle.


S STILL GOOD

SYou think haste makes naste
S S) does tossing a a) good "-i 10 clec-
c ron tubes that're used in power sup
S TI plies for ,our Nike-Hercules s ,rcm.
Don't discard the -i 1it ( h 1 a crack
S ed b.ase. but make a nort and Alatch it
of r furtnh r etffT.s of heat and %ibration.




AR N ~THE 4-IO OUT
CRA-- CEC' Sj NO RE4AON iT
-5 m ..'ON THE COTHEER
HANP. A EA5E TmAT;
'1 AA PiZ'O, THE
S-LASS ENELCPE
\A HAD IT. /


26


\ < MAYBE METER, M
Sure can set sou to ondering-w hen sour
about making checks with a %olrmeter. You'
means a \ TVM like the ME ,0.1/LI a mul
Shatenecr one wou happen to hat; hand .


\OLTs\ETER
OR MULTIMETER,

THE RIGHT
RANGE AND
T FUNCTION
THAT couNTS.



S\onder no more. \\ hen sou read \olmtre
multimetcr-as long as it has the right range
to use a VTVM, any clcttrc.nic.-i,pt colimetr
range and function will do the iob.

DRAIN THE F

OK .. TM 9-2_30-212.1I 1 cp
6-i doesn't s-3 anything about ho"
often you 'r supposed to drain the 2
air tilter assemblies for the airos, cr
Shdraulic brake system on sour Nike-
Herculcs trailers.
To be on the ball. %ou'll %ant to re-.
mo'c the plug from tach assemhly be-
fore eer) operarion-esen dailt, if
S you're optratin' e\cr) da. A little con.
Sldensaton in the filt-rs %,on't hurt a
thing, but enough water to fill them
could mess up the braking s stnem--
S especially if it freezes and there is no
a, .a for the air I) g,' through
SA dirrt filcr can ge(t ou in the same
kind of trouble so remove and clean the
f filter at eer) "'5 5erMice.


AYBE NOT \
Nike-Herculhs publications talk
re not sure whether ,olimeter
ime;cr such as the TS.52 or













r, Mou can ue jn\ \oltnmotcr or
and function. If sou re supposed
:r or multmcicr ith the right


ILl


N
-N


~L








THE DAILY

Daily PM amounts to a
quick visual check for grime,
damage, missing or loose parts
on the mask and carrier, put-
ting on the mask and clearing
it to test for leaks and opera-
tion.


You also make sure the au-
thorized accessories-- the M 13
deconning and reimpregnating
kit, the 3 atropine injectors
and the M1 waterproofing bag
-are in the carrier and in
good order. Be sure to check
the hood-M6 or M6A2-if
it's authorized.

WATERPROOF

M13
KIT



ATROPINE INJECTOR
If there's damage to the face-
piece or eyepieces, or other
damage, loose, or missing parts
or items you can't handle, turn
the mask in to your unit supply
man for replacement.


Weekly checks can be sched-
_L uled on DD Form 314, like it
says in TM 38-750, para 3-
-- 3c(l). And, the weekly is done
Sby-the-numbers, with the out-
S fit's CBR expert looking over
y-our shoulder-and DA Form
-- 2404 handy for noting prob-
lems.
obs you can do you do on
the spot; other problems are
corrected soonest by the spe-
cialist in your outfit who is re-
sponsible for organizational
I maintenance on masks ... or
Your mask is replaced. Just
remember the closer you
check, the better off you'll be.
For example.



































PILL I VML.VL M.).2L iL.LIL- 1 -' L .
ICi.. ,lirlty l rria d i l worn Ioi, i rig i. '
nr: problerrm, e:pl whei, yOu re in
te -pips A, I1 F and btelowi Only lhen do
you need full growth of fuzz on the cov-
ers). Assemblies installed upside down VOICEMITTER-OUTLET VALVE AS-
(top side is marked on assembly frame. SEMBLY-Cover loose, grimy, gum-
If not marked, or mark is off center, my, ripped. Frame, crimping ring
remember the louvers inside the cap damaged, loose; locking studs dam-
must slant down). Valve rubber disks aged. Voicemitter diaphragm dirty,
torn, folded, kinked, lost (disks must be damaged, loose (gives to a twist
flat and centered). with your palm). Outlet valve rub-
ber disk dirty, kinked, folded, torn,
lost, loose (nub at base of disk
must be through valve seat); valve
seat broken, bent.
1---L--------- i=------------














Check the carrier for mildew, wear, grime, damage,
loose or missing hardware. How about accessories ... any
of 'em damaged, missing? Get replacements.
And that's about it. A good weekly check should keep
your mask in top shape.







SGive the mask a good cleaning anytime it needs it. But,
remember, it doesn't have to be shiny black. For example,
a white or rust-colored waxy film doesn't mean your mask
Sis dirty. The stuff (it's called bloom) comes from a pre-
servative built into the rubber, and it'll continue to bleed
off as long as the facepiece is good. Just brush or wash off
the wax.when it accumulates or gets crumbly.
For a good cleaning job you need soft cloths, a soft-
bristle brush (a small paint brush will do), warm, soapy
water and warm, clear rinse water.


To clean the mask you remove
the voicemitler.outlet valve cover.
and Ihe Inlet vale assemblies But
you don t remove the filter ele-
ments lust make sure the pouch
flops are buttoned up good and
KEEP THE WATER AWAY FROM
THE INLET VALVE CONNECTORS.







S32






Dip the cloth in warm, soapy water, wring Use the soft brush (dry) to get around
it out good, and wash the mask carefully covers, joints, frames, crimped edges and
inside and out. Some goes for the voicemilter other hard-to-reach places.
outlet valve cover and the inlet valve assem
blies. And. be extra careful with the rubber
disks in the valve aysemblies. 'i




Dip cloth ** wring it dry, and wipe all washed parts. Then dry a
in clean, everything
warm with a dry,
water, clean cloth.

ALL DONE...?
Replace the voicemitter-outlet valve cover and the
inlet valve assemblies. Be sure the rubber disks in the
inlet and outlet valve assemblies are snug and flat.
Press the inlet valve covers hard so they'll snap in
place, and remember the louvers slant down.
FINGER TIP HELP If you ouch a moist singer ohe seal-
ing ring, frame and locking studs it'll
'& U o I be easier to replace the voicemitter-
outlet valve cover.
And, touching a wet finger to buttons
also helps to button and unbutton the
pouch flaps, and to remove and replace
JUST A buttons. Same goes when you're replac-
TOUCH OF ing the outlet valve's rubber disk .
MAKES IT just wet the disk's pigtail to help you
EASIER thread the pigtail through the valve
seat center.
LENS CLEANER
To keep eyelens and outserts clean and
I clear you can use Plastic Polish, FSN
7930-634-5340. It'll not only clean
the lenses, it'll remove surface scratches.
It's a GSA catalog item, it comes in a
pint bottle and costs 33 cents.
33* -:::








\tARIERIL NWI
Remove accessories from the carrier and wipe
carrier off with clean cloth or brush it good, inside
and out--to get rid of dust and grime.


NEVER
PUT MASK
INTO A
PAMP
CARRIER.






Inspect all accessories and
replace 'em in proper pockets.
Nestle harness inside mask
and place mask in carrier
heads-up and with its nose fac-
ing the carrier dosing flap.

NEW CARRIER? When you need a new car-
PROTECTIVE FI rier, you may get the newer M15A1. But
when you use the new carrier you have
XMl7/ to block out the Al stamped on its side
L so it'll read M17 mask.


PUBS & TA's

The M17 mask, the carrier and the accessories authorized for use with the
mask are covered in TM 3-4240-202-15 (Nov 62) with Changes 3,5 and 6. And,
the new repair parts manual for the mask is TM 3-4240-202-25P (Jul 68).
SB 3-30-2 (Jan 68) lists serviceable filter elements.
And, for training films on the M17 see TF 3-3203 and TF 3-3204.







17A
K


(8771


It may be awhile yet before you get
the newer mask, the M 17A 1, which has
a drinking system and a resuscitation
system. But just so's you'll know what
to expect here's the PM deal on the Al.
On the Al you have to cover all the
usual Ml'7 PM check points, plus a
few more to take care of the compo-
nents on the 2 new systems.


HERE'RE THE COMPONENTS
OF THE NEW SYSTEMS. o


A flexible, corrugated rubber
hose extension, which attaches to
the outlet-valve well to provide
mask-to-mouth respiration aid,
completes the resuscitation sys-
tem. The hose isn't issued with all
Al's, however. It's for special units
only. The hose is about 14-inches
long, stretches to about 20-in, and
when authorized it's folded U-
shape and stored in a pocket in-
side the carrier.


A rubber drinking mouthpiece
and a corrugated rubber breathing
tube with a white plastic mouth-
piece, located inside the mask.







CLOSE-UP ON PM CHECK POINTS


DRINKING TUBE & QUICK-DIS-
CONNECT COUPLING HALF-
Tube damaged, loose, dirty.
Coupling half missing, damag-
ed, clogged. Storage channel
or pocket split, dirty.


LEVER Damaged, binding,
loose. (The lever controls the
position of the drinking tube
and the breathing hose inside
the mask. It should turn easily
left and right).


DRINKING MOUTHPIECE & CORRUGATED BREATHING HOSE o/
Damaged, dirty, clogged stuc IThe drinking mouthpiece of .
and Ihe breathing hose should move freely forward and bach f a
when the lever is turned leif or right) I

And, the ` The corrugated hoce (when
carileen caP-- authoriedl-Damaged.dirty.
Missirig damaged, O
dirty mssin
REPLACING PARTS
Only 1 part in the drinking system is authorized for replacement at organiza-
tional level. It's the drinking tube with the coupling half. FSN 4730-903-4573
will bring you the tube with the coupling half.
You're authorized to replace the outlet valve disk, of course, as you are on the
M17. But, on the M17A1 you have to clip the disk's pigtail almost to the tapered
end of the cone. Then you wet the shortened stem and push it through the center
hole in the outlet valve seat.
If there's damage to any other component of the drinking or resuscitation sys.
teams the mask must be turned in for repair or replacement.
Like theM17, the Al comes in 3 sizes: "l
Small--FSN 4240-926-4199. / THE SAME T'P
Medium -FSN 4240-926-4201. DETAIL NECESARY.
Large FSN 4240-926-4200. T N A
And, the manuals for the new masks are:
TM 3-4240-258-14 (Mar 68), and Change 1. TM 3-4240-258-20P (Mar 68).
And, incidentally, the FSN for the drinking tube quoted above, is correct. So
remember it for page 7 of the -20P.
Also, the filter elements used in either mask must be checked for lot number
and serviceability in SB 3-30-2. So, when you check the elements in your mask be
sure the elements bear the same lot number.
36










































WE TELL OKAY..
THE STORY so
OF PM I'
NAKEDLY FRANK WATCHING!
... RAW... ANP
BRUTAL... NO
ONE UNPER
THE AGE OF
16 WILL BE
ALLOWED TO
SEE I-T'


OKAY ... NOW GET THI,
C.B... WE OPEN WITH
THRE-E MAIN rYTPES
OFTEN FOUNP AMONG
TROOPS. WE CALL
7HEM TOM, PICK,
ANP HARRY!







TOM... HE SLEPT
THRU RIVER
TRAINING. NOW *
HE FIGURES HE
CAN MAINTAIN
VEHICLES BY
SUPER-
GADGETRY.' O
SELF TImitt I ,
LUBE 0 10
mP PLICEATOR
t SERVICES


BUT HE'S
SUST MAKING
, MORE WORK
OUT OF WHAT5S
REALLY SIMPLE
Joe.


SPICK
SSAVS HIS
EQUIPMENT
I5 SO
RU6GED IT
NEEP
BABYING!


r HARRY IS
THROWN INTO
A FLAP BY THE
PM JOBS IN MIS
TM'5. HE DOESN'T
REALIZE HE
CAN USUALLY
PO'FM A
LITTLE AT A
TIME.


' AAAH...YOU PON'T '
HAFTA PO BEFORE-
OPERATIONS MAINTENANCE
, IF YOU PO A BANG-UP
AFTER-OPERATION-S
JOB!!


THE
BAD
GUY
WHO'S
AN
'EXPERT"
ON
SHORT-
CUTS!


REALLY)
2







ENTER
THE
HEROINE
CONNIE
ROPW!


BPAC MAKES SURE YOU
GET WHERE YOU'RE GOING
... PREVENTS ACCIDENTS,
BREAKPOWNS... DAMAGE
ANP INJURY...ANIP IT UPS
THE OPPS YOU'LL GET BACK!


b. m & __--- --


STHE TOOLS
..WHAT YOU USUALLY
ABOUT TOOLS ) NEEP ARE
LISTED IN
YOUR VEHICLES
-IOTM... -


'... A CRESCENT WRENCH, '
SCREWDRIVER AND PLIERS...IN
SOME SPECIAL CASES YOU'LL
USE TOOLS IN THE I COMMON
TOOL SET. ONLY ONE TIRE
GAGE COMES IN THE SET, BUT
YOU CAN GET MORE --ONE FOR
EVERY 8 VEHICLES, INCLUDING
S TRAILERS! _


/ SUPPOSE YOUR V WOW...THE THOUGHT
GAS TANK SPRINGS OF GETTING CAUGHT
A LEAK DURING THE ON A PLANTATION
NIGHT... AND YOU RIOAP GAS-LESS
MISS IT IN A SHAKES
SLOPPY BEFORE- I ME!!
OPERATION, ME!!
CHECK! M








Doeheit


The job is to get
it tiere, Jack'!
So. be sure you do
all your BPAC.
Before, during and after
your run.
You have basic service
to be done.
Each mission includes
-getting back. y


Ill


IF YOU WANT TO DISPLAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, LIFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.


t
.tii.'~ ~
,ry








NOW, BEFORE YOU APPLE
UP FOR A MISSION CHECK
OUT THESE CRITICAL POINTS!


TIRES. OIL
OR C
FULL
P FINIl
BELOW



...GOT ENOUG6HIAIR
ACCORDING TOTM? .
GET METAL, GLASS,
ETC. OUT OF TREAD
ANP ROCKS FROM
BETWEEN PUALS. A


FILL TO ONE B
INCH BELOW TOP
OF TANK!- THE7
REINFORCEMENT PLATE
JUST UNPER THE FILLER
>. MOUTH CAN MAKE IT
LooK FULL WHEN
IT ISN'T!f


FUEL
TAWI










F I~ T'S MOT a
LEAKING, LEAVE
IT ALONE.TIGHTENINi
A NON- LEAK MAy/
GIVE YOU A
LEAK.


ENGINE
STARTS
SMOOTIILY
- RUNS
,MOOTHLYj


THESE'RE CHECKS
BEFORE EVERY
OPERATION. THERE'RE
S OTHERS IN YOUR TM
YOU MAY PO ONLY
WEEKLY DEPENPIN'
ON HOW HOT 'N'
HARD YOU'RE
OPERATING. EVEN
UNPER'NORMAL"
CONDITIONS
THOUGH,HIT 'EM
ALL AT LEAST
ONCE A WEEK


F REMEMBER YOU MAKE ONLY
ADJUSTMENTS AND REPAIRS
ALLOWED BY YOUR VEHICLE'S
MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION CHART
OR BY LOCAL
SOP. GolN'
APE WTH A
WRENCH OR
SCREW-
DRIVER
MAKES
BIG
TROUBLES
OUT OF
LITTLE
ONES.


OPEfATIONS
YOUR PM
CONTINUES


eagL~IEp


PROBLEMS O
7O R 24~HEN R RT

FORM ANC TELL
YOUR SUPERVISOR
ABOUT AP4Y REPAIR
NEEPEP R*;HT
WAY!~







USE YOUR EYES, EARS
ANP NOSE TO DETECT
ANYTHING THAT COULP
MEAN TROUBLE LATER...
MAKE A NOTE OF THEM//


SNOW DO YOUR AFTER" -
@PERATION CICK...
PO THE SAME STUFF YOU PIP
BEFORE OPERATIONS. HOW
FAR YOU GO INTO THOSE OTHER
CHECKS" DEPENDS ON HOW
ROUGH YOUR OPERATION WAS.

-:... B:,* .% ^ '. :


THIS IS THE TIME TO
GET YOUR LOG BOOK UP-
TO-PATE ANP TELL YOUR
SERGEANT OR MECHANIC
ABOUT ANYTHING THAT MAY
NEEP WORKING ON.

Jim'






UTE(U-21A) MECHANICS...

HS16 MA9R0


Hey there, man, get set for a new
experience when this sleek bird comes
in to roost. The newest addition to the
fixed-wing fleet has a lot of get-up-and-
go, supplied by two turboprop engines.
With full-feathering reversible-pitch
props, king-size brakes, a simplified
fuel system and an oxygen system you
have features not found on other utility
aircraft.
'Course, to keep this sophisticated
lady in numbah one condition is going


to take tender lovin' care. Use your time
and play money wisely-give TM 55-
1510-209-20 (23 Oct 67) a good going
over. Boning up on your baby will put
you in the know.


--y D m --- d-owgnws
FORMS AND RECORDS- Page thru the log book to make sure all the forms are on hand
per AR 750-31 (20 Feb 68) and that they're filled out according to TM 38-750(15 May
67). Look for any write-ups that affect the status of your bird.
45


L.


Fk~- ~2-

r~4, e


^-*a








STATIC PORT-Clean?


0
0.


vATD/ nixm


EXTERIOR SKIN Look for dents, breaks,
cracks and corrc:ion



i + "

r'\ ,J

._J___---- -


/ DURING THE
RAINY SEASON ANP
NEAR COASTAL AREAS,
FIGHT CORROSION BY
KEEPING DRAINAGE
HOLES CLEAR. AND
MOVING PARTS WELL
L LUBED.


HEATED FUEL VENT, FLUSH
RAM SCOOP- Clogged?


AILERONS-Cracks? Corrosion? Dents?
Loose or missing rivets? Eye the brack
ets for bends, cracks, elongated bolt
holes and corrosion.


ual damage?


Corrosion here shouldn't be a
problem since the inboard and oui-
board flaps are ichemicall) treated,
inside and outside. [o resist corro.
sion. The ailerons .,nd other con.
trol surface also got the treatment.


WINDOWS Clean'
Cracked' Craed /
Discolored? 1

Be sure )ou don't use hard, /
dirty or gritty cloths when '"
cleaning transparent plastic l.
windows stash sour rings
Dirt cloths and rings n ill
scratch plastic something firce '
and reduce isiion Your best ,
bch is to follun the cleaning
info in para 6of TM 55--105-3


ENTRANCE DOOR Eye
the .uppor r. able lrr :e.
(urltv and malrre ure the
door l:ckring Ijlch worl S
right


S PITOT TUBE-Plugged
with dirtl


FUEL TANh SLIMP DRAIN-
Lise a sample bottle and look for con-
tamination. Therc're actually[ 10 quick
drains on )our bird that descrne \our
attention from time to time Par 1. 120
of the organizational maintenance pub
locates them for ,ou.


Ai^"dO


w~'usELAGE~E


L ~e~ ~ar I



(d'C


Y~V







The fuel sampling bit is mighty important. It wasn't so long ago that bacteria
was discovered in JP-4 and presented a real contamination problem. After a lot
of digging the experts came up with the word that the bacteria wasn't really
growing in the JP-4 ... it was living in the water within the jet juice.
Get rid of the water and you get rid of the bacteria growth possibilities.

TAKE A Ol SHOULD
GENEROUS ... LIKE BE ABLE TO SEE
SAMPLE FROM IT DOES WATER BECAUSE
THE PRAIN... IN THE JP-4 IS STRAW-










If the sample has water, take more samples until you get pure JP-4. There's
THE WATER FUEL COLORE
IN IT WILL TANK'
SETTLE TO
THE
BOTTOM.

JP4


If the sample has water, take more samples until you get pure JP-4. There's
nothing more embarrassing than when a fact-finding team discovers water in the
tanks of a bird that augured in. See TM 10-1101, chap 14, for details.

DEICER BOOTS-Abrasions? Cuts? Wea- Keep close tabs on the boots. Eye the
their cracking? Edges secure? wing and stabilizer boots for engine oil
or spilled fuel during servicing and af-
ter each flight.
Clean up any fuel or oil right away,
using non-detergent soap, MIL-S-4282,
and rinse with clean water. No scrub-
bing, please-you might rub off some
of the graphite coating!
These boots are flexible and can be
easily damaged if fuel hoses are drag-
ged along the leading edge of the wing.
NO Nix on resting ladders against the boots
LADDERS! also, for the same reason.
Fuel your baby from a maintenance
stand or protect the boots by laying the
hose against a ladder positioned a foot
\/ = ..B,, H r-'' '- >or so from the boots. And remember-
your bird can't be flown with a dam-
,,4w a aged deicing boot.







-NIN GEAR

~711 13E


TIRES Pressure low? Cuts? Blisters?
You don't have any slippage marks
to check on these tubeless jobs. If you
spot grease, oil or hydraulic fluid, wipe
it up pronto ... plays hob with tires by
breaking the adhesive bond between the
rubber and metal in the tread.


BRAKES Damaged? Alinement pins
cracked? Disks, linings worn


It' a. caia ide no to stndo
ths kn -siz brksul ssyural
mos ou ofrnwy.. moetre e
blwS ta. wy


During a tire change be sure the rim NOSE
is really clean so you get a good seal on Struts clean? WHE
your tubeless. Otherwise you'll be run-
ning for that air hose rather often! !


sand over everything. When the dirt mixes with oil-based fluids you get an abra-
sive that eats out seals something fierce.
So, be sure you wipe the pistons and shock struts using a rag dampened with
hydraulic fluid.






NOSE WHEEL-Salc wvre secure, mjk WHEEL WELL-FuI Ieas' Do iIks









FUEL DRAIN -
U.e j jmpie, L
lar ard eye
Vyour luel











Dene, ) I rroled il ,: olr
d~,u 1 5r;.r-, ,,ure" OW N



'IU 11EAN...
ALL 4ACJE5S POOR5'
AN FLrATES SHC'ULL
BE FUTTC-NE' uPE








Plares that don't fit right will produce drag in flight and
expose components to wind buffeting .. .'ain't a healthy situation. So, see that all
fasteners are in good shape and secure.






EXHAUST DUCTS-Cracked7 DIstorted'
Corr2jdd' Vanes cracked, dislcr ted, 0J LC OLER Cloged 2
ij? OIL COOLER -Ciu09 9 cllna


AIR SCOOP The engine air
iinlt ha.j 3n inlIke suE'Fl. en
circling Ihp tnginr vMhiCh keep:.
ct'1ecI, Irgi. emriuigh to driagt
the CrclmprreirrTcr from Eneririg
he enyriine i1 thet ;rio
;neadirig Ijr KIDO ni
surp f-i. raos nir I cii; 3re tell in
01 'irii


HUB Grej.e
leakag" -


PROPELLER
BLADES -
''*,h-[ j lr h ."

Lieni; '


- SPINNER S.rj,:hid
i. rji:ked' Tight '


H






HYDRAULIC FLUID RESER
VOIR-lf you discover fluid
HEATER RAM AIR INTAKE- leakage in the wheel wells
Door move Ireely? Spring in check the fluid level The
working order? reservoir should be filled to
within one inch ol the top
no more


TAb G5 01t70

HORIZONTAL. VERTICAL STABILIZE.
ERS-Look for cracks, dents, holes .-
ani loose or missing rivets Inspect
rubber lairings for deterioration
and lightness Eye the brackets on
the trailing edge of the horizontal
stabilizers for cracks, dents, bends
and tightness.
DEICER BOOTS-Give
these boots the same
eagle eye treatment
you used on the wing
boots.

RUDDER-i"racked' Dented' Loose or missing rivets'
Corroded? Brackets bent. cracked, corroded, elongated
pivot holes:


nf gpw'irg^^gr ^y





It .ou '. becn used ro cri;%"ing other rNpci of arir afti,chances arc .ou rarc\l
used ox e nn no sio ith this high flitr.
Inspciring. handling and ser' icin- the o i gcn .,stem call for all sour sa .N'.
Rermcmbcr--any spark around oxgLn can make things real hot! So. never ler
foreign matter enter the lines and keep )our mnitt, tools and cloihts absolutely
clean.
















OXYGEN SYSTEM -
Pressure OK?







Keep oxygen regula-
tors, cylinders, gages,
valves, fittings and masks
free of oil, grease, gasoline
and any other easily com-
bustible materials.


Keep fire (no smoking, please) and heat away and
take care not to generate sparks with your tools.
In addition, never let electrical equipment come in
contact with oxygen cylinders and never use oxygen
from a cylinder without first reducing the pressure
thru a regulator. ..

FIRST AID KITS -
In place? Sealed?

FIRE EXTINGUISHER In '
place? Secured? Charged

FIRE AXE -In place2 Se- /
cure? Handle cracked?
Head cracked, preserved?


POWER CONTROL LEVERS (THROTTLES)-
When you're in the cockpit be
sure you don't grab hold of these
levers, pulling up and aft. into the
reverse pitch position % hen the en.
gines are not running you'll
damage the recersing linkage for
real!
One wa\ to overcome such a rt-
voltin' development is to make a
handy little metal coser. Slip the
cover over the Ieters w hen the bird
is on the ground and nobod) %Aill
accidental. pull 'em aft. sou
betcha.


0~ Ilo
ujr


























The fuel, oil, hydraulic fluid,
oxygen, battery water and air serv-
icing points are shown in Fig 1-14
of TM 55-1510-209-20. Table 1-1
has the correct specs. Following
servicing make sure all the filler
caps are secured.


- __ _ __ -,








MAYBE THE
PLUNGER'S STUCK







Hold one! Before you call for an engine removal on your Ute because of high
torque readings, make sure the torque plunger's not just sticking.
Contaminants in the oil can cause the plunger to stick open, giving you a
phony torque reading and a goofed-up automatic feathering system.
What to do? Well, you can't get at the plunger inside the engine so give your
baby the shock treatment.

Put your mitts on the prop and rotate it Disconnect the hose (ot either end) running
back and forth. Don't spare the muscle power. between the reduction gear box and the
This rotation of the reduction gears should torque manifold.
loosen the torque plunger. Have your buddy rock the prop while at
If you still have a sticky wicket on your the same time you shoot 150-lbs of shop air
hands, tho, go one step further, into the engine. .


-


That should do the trick.
That should do the trick.























Oil and rubber don't mix, when they come together something has to give.
Take the engine and transmission oil-cooling blower. It's mounted on the
number 2 tail rotor driveshaft in the dog house of your HueyCobra (AH-1G).
The blower mountings are made of
rubber. When synthetic oil drips from
the oil tank or transmission input drive
\1 quill, for example, and winds up on the
mountings the bond between the mount-
ings and the metal shaft is weakened.
SCREEN Before long the fan mountings shear,
RUBBER the fan stops, the oil temperature rises
INSULATION ... you've got a time-consuming blower
CAN COME change on your hands.
LOOSE... 'Course this baby shears easy enough
AND RUIN as it is, if a hunk of metal hits the fan.
THE FAN I The equipment was designed so that the
Less expensive fan will fail on an FOD
strike.
But there's no sense asking for trouble. Keep the drive shaft bone dry. Clean
it by using a rag moistened with dry-cleaning solvent, P-D-680.
Don't stop there, either. Find the source of the oil. If it's just a seep or a spill
chances are you can handle the drip with a clean-up job.
If you have a leak, tho, better check the oil lines and accessories for damage
and tightness.
Changing a line or gasket makes more sense than changing a blower, any day.
'Course if you have a factory-fresh bird it has a new bleed air driven oil cooler
blower... no problem. MWO 55-1520-221-30/11 updates the original blower.






(jCHANGE THE HOSE


Guaranteed to shake up any airplane i HALP!
driver-fuel fumes in the cockpit!!
That's what you get from the fuel
vent system on your Cayuse (OH-6A)
if rubber hose, P/N 369A8131-13 or i
-5, is shot. V
To play it safe better change the hose ,
every periodic. /
While you're at it, tip off supply that .'
improved hoses, P/N 369A8131-19
and -21 are in the mill.
Eye the new hose for defects every
third PMP. CHECK HOSE OFTEN
third PMP.


ABRASION STOPPER




When abrasion begins to make an impression on the leading edge of your
Cayuse (OH-6A) main rotor blades, reach for vinyl pressure-sensitive tape, FSN
7510-019-4750. You'll find it listed in TM 55-1520-214-20P w/Ch 1 (3Jul 68).
The organization pub tells you where and how to apply the tape.









NEW BIRD DATA PUB
Don't reach for TB AVN 23-65 to see what TAERS forms are needed for
components requiring historical data. You want TB 55-1500-307-25 (8 July 68).






USE 'EM TOGETHER


When you calibration-types look
over TB 55-6635-334-20 (23 Aug 68)
on cable tensiometers don't strain your
eyeballs looking for the test frequency.
Calibration intervals for all aircraft
measuring tools are spelled out in one
pub-TB 750-931-10/1 (5 Jan 68) on
calibration of aviation test and measur-
ing equipment.





















Th is a so Iea d ler of renl Crbb
on inlem To oGrgoneiollonor molnf-
unac personpel Th.' IIf iIs on.ple
.rmAn recona AG Dirnb6lo.i Canoern
BOrlliln For u;naplro deoaio we DA
Paon 30J. Ch 5 lFai 61i. FM 1Ti.
ar, DA Pa.. 110.6 Iul 681. SC' arnd
IMo, DA Poo 31JI0 lApr 68). MWOl

TECHNICAL MANUALS
IM I-AH1-S CI. Aug. ANH1G.
IM 1-250, May, Flisd Wing
TM 3-1040-204-14 C3, Aug. M2AI-7
Port Flan. Thrower.
TM 2-1040-209.12 CI. A.g. MIO-I
Moeh Flam Thoier
rM 3.1365.200-10. .ug, 72 Ch..
Agenl Id.nlIincolon Tng Sll.
TM 3-6665-259-10, Aug oadloacini
ier Sonmpie Caloin. 13' Gmmea M 9
TM 5-2410-231-10, Aug, Full Troaked
Iracoor low Speed DED 16,000-24,000
Lb Draobor Pubi 60In Min Gage
Socllonalised All Trman.
TM 5-3810-225-15 C2, Aug. 20 Ton
Irk Mil Cr .ap.Sr.oel,
IM 5-3810-213-12, Jli. I Ton Cap
Whel .Mid Co.ao
IM 5-3 19-271-15. Iul..MoIoIedId
Roll, GED Tandim 13.16 Ton Buoalo
Sp ingslid Mdl KX I2EIA661
TM 5-189I-21)-15 lJu. Drler l,.,
Bllr. ConireRl GCD 3I10 Tonl/H
MrConnaghoy Mdi hTDO A.67
TM 5-319S-376. 1. Jun, i-,.. Maol
Dlinrlb.oor GCD 600 Gal.
TM 5-4110-208-10 C2, Aug, 10,000
ITU Refrig Uni.
TM 5-4120-227.15 C1. AMg, 24,500
BTU A, Condslioners
TM 3-4120-295-.2P, Jun, 60,000
BTlU/H Air Conaillionr Cn rrir Air
Candlllonang Co Mdi 76E34.104
IM 5-4J1O-719-10 C4, Aug. 600 CFM
An Comp.anaos
TM S-4310-246-15 CI. Arg. IS CIM
Air Co-o,a!oo
IM S-J-20-242-20P. Jl. Pmp Ay,
GED Gorman R.pp Mdl 84CIS.d-0B4
TM 5-4440-209-.1 Jul. Fle Delo...on
Dah.onid.ler Eaolrm ind Mdl ADS 100
Ivpel 201 and 204
IM 5-4610-205-20 C1. Aug. Water
Purdlleon Equip
TM 5-4940-220-12. I.I. Shop Equip
Conlsac Malnl Trk Mid
TM 5.5274 CS. Jun. ISD KW ond Up
Eng Drivn Gon Slt.
TM 5-6115.222-10 C3, Aug. 150 IW
and Up Eng Dr.n Gen Seal
TM 5 61-i340-15 Cl. Aug. 5 KI
400 C, Gen Sell.
TM 5-6115-345-20P. Jl. J.. IW Ge.
Sol 60 hern AC.
TM 5-6115-735-11 C1. Aug. 15 OW
60 Cyl Gin .el
TM 5-6111-450.25P, lu, Gen LSe 10
IW AC 400 He T MDR HF 100.MD.
TM S-6115-102.25P CI, Ag. 45 60


KW Molor Generotors.
TM 5-7430-213-23P, Jun, Composing
Mach Varityper Mdl 840.
TM 9-1005-224-10 Cl, Jul, M60
7.62-MM Mach Gun, M122 Mount.
TM 9-1015-203-20P, Jul, M101/
MIOIAI 105MM Towed Howitzer.
TM 9-1025-200-12 C3, Aug, M114AI
M123AI 155MM Howiltor.
TM 9-1190-222-25P, Aug, Hon st
John.
TM 9-1440-301-12P/1, Jul, Sergeant.
TM 9-2300-216-20P, Jun. M107 Gun,
MiO Howitzer.
TM 9-2320-206-20 Cl, Aug, Mi23,
M 23C, M123A1C 10 Ton Traclor Trk,
M125 Cargo Trk.
TM 9-2320-224-10 CS, Aug, M114/
M114AI Carrier.
TM 9-4940-251-14, Jul, Nike-Herc
Nike Herc Imp.
TM 10-1670-208-23 C2, Sep. Aerial
Deliv Equip.
TM 10-1670-215-23 C3, Sap. Aerial
Delit Equip.
TM 10-3930-242-12, Jun, Rough
Terrain Forklift.
TM 10-4930-203-13 C5, Aug.
Petroleum Diitrib.
TM 11-5805-472-15, May, SM-528/
FTC-31(VI Simulalor.
TM 11-5115-331-20P, Aug. AN/VSC-2
Radio Tlfelypewriter Sel.
TM 11-5820-287-12 Cl, Jul, AN/
GRC-75, -76, -77, -78, -79 -80, -81,
82, -83 AN/TRA-.25 AN/TRC-24, -35,
-36 OA-3668A/TRC-24 Radio,.
TM 11-5820-287-20P-15, Aug, AN/
TRA-25, -25A, -258 Radiol.
TM 11-5820-568-12, Aug. AN/GRC-
147 Radio.
TM 11-5821-260-20, Jul, AN/ARC-
115 Radio Sel.
TM 11-5965-282-15 C1, Aug. AN/
VRC-12, -43, -44, -45, -46, -47, -48,
-49 AN/PRC-25 Radio Sets.
TM 11-6615-241-20P, Aug. AN/ASW-
29 OC-54 Aulo Flight Contral Set.
TM 55-450-3 Ci, Jul, UH-1.
TM 55-1520-201-20PMI, -20PMP, Jul,
UH-19.
TM 55-1520-202-ESC, Jul. CH-34.
TM 55-1520-202-20P C5, Aug,
CH.34.
TM 55-1520-203-20PMP, Jul, CH-37.
TM 55-1930-205-10 Cl, Aug, LARC V.
TM 55-1520-206-20 C12, Sep, OH-23.
TM 55-1520-206-20P, Jul. OH-23.
TM 55-1520-209-20PMP, Jul, CH-47.
TM 55-1520-209-20-1 C1, Aug.
CH-47.
TM 55-1520-209-20P-1 C7, Aug.
CH-47.
TM 55-1520-209-20P-1 C8, CP, Aug.
CH-47.
TM 55-1520-210-20 C9, Aug. UH-iD.
TM 55-1520-210-20PMI, Jun. UH-iD.
TM 55-1520-218-20 C5, Aug.
UH-1A-IB.


TM 55.1520-218-70PMO -20PMI.
-20PMP Jul. UH IA-B.
TM 55-1520-220-20 CS, Jul, UH.IC

MODIFICATION WORK ORDERS
5-6115-42-20/1. Aug 100 KW AC
DED Gen Se, Hall Bros Mdl HB 3333
Senal No I.1.48 Rlnlo.a Generalor
Croo.Member Supporn.
9-1240-227-50/I. Aug. M4gAIC
lank.
9 2300-216-30/18, Aug. M107 OEr.,
MIlO Ho~~ir r Ieplace Molo Range
Scoeno in EleTaairg and TIroaering
Dilorenloials to Pro* de for Lknolwing.
9-2300-216-30/23. Aug. M107 GCi,
M110 ow-lazer Replao Irl.ening
Final DR.oe Aluminum Housing w/Sleel
Housing
9 2320-.211-20/11. Aug, MSiA2 3.
Ton racto' Tock Inltai Talchogioph
Un .
9.2320.223-20/3. Aug. Ml16 Cargo
Caole, innlall Improed Fuel P.op
Flool S. Ichel
9-2320-22420/8. Aug M114i
M I IAJ Carri Inliall Asia
Shot Relainer Il

MISCELLANEOUS
AR P00-li, Sp. Supply Discupline.
AI 750-57 Aug. Malarlal Readinlss
ESC.
10 3-1040-257-20. Aug. M9TI 7 P.rl
FHioe Thrower
10 5.2420-206-12.1 Jul. Ind
Wheeled Taldor DED MED DBP
w* Dore(
LO 5-3895-281-12, .n. Hol Oil
Heoare, asioer MrO E.er MnloI 0Dn..n
2 100.000 ITU'Hr Ourp.
LO 5-3895-282-12. Jun. BrIlu Driei.
Mruer GED 3 10 T on'Hi wjg.
LO S-3195 321-17-1. Jun, D.i Col.
selling Macn Pov.ng Moll DED Semi
Trailer Mid Barb.m Greer.e MDI CA-60
SC 4920-99 C1 A77, I.. OH 6 Ali
io1i Maoil fool Sei An.aobile
IB 9 2320-244.-0, Jul. I Ton M715
Coroa Iluk M725 Amobu'ane.
TI 55-1510-202-20/9. Aug. 0 I.
TI 750-931-10/1 Cl. Aug, Fied.
Polo0 Wing
TB 710-991-3 Jun reod Wing EIR
Digeol.
TB 750-992.3. rAg Roaor Wing EII
Digeo.


TB'S IURGENTI
TB SS-1500 206-20/12. Ocl 61. UH.
IA II. UH ID.H, UH.IDI
TB 55-1i00-206-20/13. Oct 66. UH
IA IB Un D1/H
18 55-1500-211020/4, Ori 60, CH
47A, CH. A7
TB 55 1510.209-20/,. Ort 68 U-21.





AANTENNA SOUND GETTER...
Y0 UR
ANTENNA 15
DELICATE LIKE
THE IN-IDE OF
>OuR EAR ...TREAT
IT wlTH CARE. Secio
MAKE SURE es
THERE RE NOrf lades s
BROKEN CS E N contacts.
BENT OR L OOSE
SECTIONS... OR
YOU'RE A PEAVD
b END .-


OUT
OF


n contacts and antenna base receF
should be cleaned for making goo
9


Keep telescopic kind free of dust and dirt
for easy raising and lowering.


S VEHICLE RADIO ANTENNAS

Keep tied down when radio set is not in Clean fittings of antenna sections to make
use, and especially tied down when moving sure they have good contact as well as keep-
through terrain covered by low-hanging trees, ing them from freezing together. Use a dry
electric lines, bridges, etc. or damp doth for meaning ... and where cor-
S rosion is caked dean with a nylon or wire
brush.

Hr


Never use steel wool. On cleaning pro-
truding contacts, give a couple or three rubs
with an eraser.







Make sure antennas with ceramicor glass-
type bases are not cracked or full of water.


Never fold a ribbon-type backward when
putting away. It'll leave the antenna limp
and lifeless. Always fold it toward the con-
cave side.


Never BUT NEVER operate a radio set
without first installing the antenna, or the
radio set will be damaged.


Keep water, dirt and mud out of lower
antenna base section with rubber caps or ad-
hesive tape. ,


Vehides should be as level as possible
when stopped to keep weighty antennas as
vertical as possible. -


I


~C~=r
----~

----
---~











Your radio set
may bend over backwards to
do a good job for you... but,
don't expect the same backward bends
out of its antenna.
Like when you're through communication' on that AN/PRC-8, -9, -10 or AN/
PRC-25, -77 radio set, and you're punin' away the ribbon-type antenna, watch
the way you bend or fold it.
AT-2720/PRC for the Perk-8, -9, -10 and AT-892/PRC-25 antennas have
to be folded toward the concave side before pushing'em in a carrying bag.
Folding 'em backward will sprain the life out of'em and keep'em from stand-
ing up straight or even wind up poppin' 'em in two.


SECTIONS AND SILICONE

If there's freezin' out of season
I^ on the mast and base sections of
your RC-292 antenna you need to
-V do some lubricatin' with silicone i
grease.
It's available in 8-oz tubes under \
S ),' FSN 9150-257-5358, and you use B
Sit on both the base and mast sec-
tions.
It's listed on Page 4.18 in Fed Cat
C9100-IL (Sep 67).

TUNING HEAD TIPOFF

Supply ought rate a break or two,
right?
So why not mention what tuning
heads you'll need when you order Army
Area Communications (AACOMS) off in time saved and costs cut.
radio-set assemblies such as the AN/ This goes for the new AACOMS as-
MRC-54, -69, -73, -102 and the -103? semblies, too ... such as the AN/TRC-
This'll stop any guessin', and it'll pay 108, -109, -110, -117 and the -143.
62






BLOCK THE SHOCK
Beat your AN/MPQ-4A radar Knock it by replacing the J1003
set to the punch by blocking chances accessory outlet (FSN 5935-202-
of electrical shock. 0940) in the OA-1926 control-indi-
cator group or J1403 outlet (FSN
5935-201-9396) in the OA-1257
receiver-transmitter group with a
3-contact receptacle (FSN 5935-
615-3911). The receptacle's listed
on Page 422, Vol 2, of Fed Cat
C5935-IL-A (Mar 68).
Be sure to ground the round con-


tact.


HOLD CONNECTORS NOT CORDS
NOW HEAR A tug and a jerk can put the quietus
TH... ONT on your AN/TIQ-2() public address
AT THE WIRES! set.
Especially, when it comes to discon-
necting the CX-50 or CX-56 micro-
HUH F phone cords.
Instead of givin' the cords the muscle
treatment to get 'em apart, grab the
connector in your hands and unscrew
the locking nut. Then, still holding the
A connectors, gently pull out.
GENTLY! This'll save your set from a lotta
silence and down-time.

CRANK FOR RINGING
Are you trying to get your hands on
a handle for that G-42 generator on
your TA-43/PT or TA-312/PT tele-
phone set? No sweat... FSN 5805-392- .
7726 for the hand crank assembly is
being added to the repair parts and
special tools list in TM 11-5805-201-12,
,nd it's listed in Army Supply Catalog
SC 5805-IL(Jul 67) on Page 97.


I


r&^


!


























Before you threaten your AN/GRC-
106 radio set with maintenance shop
surgery due to low power output, make
a double-take on the AM-3349's driver
amplifier tube plate current adjustment.
Make sure the RF DRIVE and RCVR
ANT cable connectors are disconnected
when you set the test meter switch in
the POWER OUT position.
This should get a meter reading in


NEVER SAY DII

You say your SB-86/P switchboard's
not on speaking terms with anyone be-
cause the BA-200/U batteries are shot
and you can't get new ones?
There's an out on page 27 of TM 11-
2134 (Sep 55)-where it talks about
using storage batteries in place of the
BA-200/U's.
If you hook up the storage batteries,
remember what it says on page 35 of
the same TM. That is, move the BATT.
EXT.-INT. switch to EXT.


the gray portion of the meter just below
the O mark.
It's no sweat when you follow the
setup in para 41b, c, and para 44 in TM
11-5820-520-12 (Aug 64).
Forget, and leave those cable connec-
tors hooked up, and your radio set's
transmission will be cut to a nub, 'cause
it'll have a case of low power pulse.







r'" PUT OUT OVER OUTPUT
SGetting hung up on high 'oltage can sure cause
a freak-out on tubes in a radio set.
Like, f'rinstance, in your AN/GRC-50(V) series
radio set's CN-514 voltage regulator, make sure
when you're adjusting the output that it goes up to
115 volts on the REGULATED OUTPUT VOLT-
AGE indicator and no more.
Boost it any higher than what it calls for in Para
3-7b of TM 11-5820-461-12 (Oct 66), Change 1, and a
a lotta 4037A-type tubes will burn out as well as 115 VOLTS
causin' old age to set in on others. ARE TOPS

WATER, WATER ... KEEP AWAY

FINDING LEAK5 IN ,
A- N SOUR AN, PRC 4 I NO
5NAP... PRESENTING THEA~\
IS EASIER-- HERE 5 HOW. I


RELEASE DAI OF COAT LATCH
LATCH SEALANT HOOmS








em '"
S S S S

S S S 55 5 5















It's the chassis that counts ... Con-
nie'll vouch for that! ...
She's right, too-but sometimes it
can count against you, especially when
you lift up on it as you remove the SN-
395 synchronizer from the CY-4918/G
equipment case on the SN-394 (V)/G
electrical synchronizer.
What you're liable to do in such a
lift-up is break the J1 or J2 connector
mounted on the equipment case.
To discourage such breakage, just
pull the SN-395 straight out, gently.


ic~~T~ c,
f1





GENERAL &
SUPPLY


A DA Form 2028 is the way you do it. It's called Recommended Changes to
DA Publications.
You can also use the Form 2028 to point out errors and suggest changes to
your pubs.
Fill 'er out with all the details and send one copy to the outfit responsible for
the manual. You'll find the address in the first part of the pub.
A straight line is the shortest dis-
tance between two points. You learned
that old rule in math class, but it also
applies when you're sending in that DA
Form 2028.
So how does that math rule apply?
You send that form straight to the
people who wrote the pub. You'll get
results faster, too. -re a





WHEN IT COMES TO LUBING...


L40


SFRICTION-- LIKE
FIRE--HAS TO BE
CONTROLLED. IN
MACHINERY ESPECIALLY.
ANY TWO MATERIALS
RUBBING AGAINST
EACH OTHER WILL
CAUSE FRICTION.


FRICTION c



OO Ia i BAD!!

Like fire. friction can be both good and bad \ hen iou hit the
brakeson iour chicle., ou sure v ant the friction tbat goes ich the
brake linings coming against the brake drums. But iou don't need
the friction that iou wouldd get ,ith the bare metal of the pistons
rubbing against the bare metal of the cylinder calls in the same
vehicle. ,, .,,, .. m .


And when you want to cut down on friction, You call for lubri-
cation. Lubrication, in a fen simple words. means purring a film
of something like grease or oil between the parts that rub together.
69
MORE


:i
;i
8:


d


,'1 ,i


, Z


'MY0-i75
tltp Wywh.


<7



























HANDLING








Watch how you handle con- Try to keep opi
trainers holding lube. A hard they're outside, co
bounce could split the seams ground, if there's a
enough for junk to get inside, in water like car
but small enough for you to The right way to sto
miss. level to prevent br
water from collection

Lids, caps and plugs belong in one place
when you're not using the lube on the con
trainer and shut tight.
Before you pour out or dip inlo the lube,
wipe away dirt, water and other assorted
junk from around the opening Thai means
before you take off the lid cap, vent or
bung.


en containers out of the weather. When
ver with a tarp and keep them off the
ny chance that they might end up sitting
Happen when rain settles in a low spot.
ire a 55-gal drum is on its side with bungs
eating moist, outside air. It'll also keep
ig on the top. / /






CLEANING
Fresh lube is one of the most refined, carefully-made substances in the world.
It comes to you "pure as the driven snow." But if you don't have your brain op-
erating on all eight cylinders you can muck it up in no time flat.
Maybe you touch the lube with grimy mitts. Sure ... if
VTM you work around grease and oil your hands are going to be
N E'- greasy and oily but that doesn't mean they have to be coated
; with a mixture of dirt and lube.
Could be you use a dirty grease gun or oil pumpto get the
lube into the equipment. It doesn't take much time to clean
the gear before using it. Also important: watch where you lay .
it down while you're lubing. And when you're finished, put'
it in a clean place.
Maybe the lube fittings are dirty. When you have dirty
fittings, the dirt gets driven into the fittings along with the
lube. It only takes a few twists with a clean rag to wipe away
the grime.


Sthe spring-hinge cap... if
'N the spring is shot so that
the cap doesn't snap shut
x and stay that way, it's time
''at for a replacement. A loose
g' cap will let in dirt. And
0" .,' don't forget to wipe away
__ the grime and grit before
lifting the cap to squirt in
the oil.


/ PON'T MIX LUBE -LIKE
OE 10- WITH OE 30... THEY
LOSE SOMETHING IN THE MIXING.
EACH IS MADE FOR A SPECIAL
JOB!.
----- ( M









CARRIES

HEAT
One of oil's biggest jobs is cooling.
If it's too light, ir can fall down on the
job of cooling. If it's too heavy, it can't
carry off the hear fast enough. And dirty
oil can't move away the heat as quickly
as clean oil.





Oil is also a big deal when it comes
to sealing an engine. F'rinstance .
sealing the space between the piston and
cylinder wall to keep some of the power
from being lost. If the oil is too light, it
can't hold the blow-by. If it's too heavy,
the seal won't be tight enough. Dirty? POOR SEAL GOOD
The stuff wears away at the metal and SEA
makes a bigger space between the pis-
ton and wall.






ulaion u need against engine heaRTT
which brings on sludge. hen it's too T
WEARS

TOO


GET
1-- INTO
Then there's the job of cleaning. Too TIGHT
light an oil and you won't get the in- PLA(L
sularion iyou need against engine hear t ANP D
whichh brings on sludge. WXhen it's too OIL JUST
heavy. it's slow-moving and can't get ON APDING MO
into the tight places to carry off dirt and PIRT!!
things to the filter.


All of a which boils down to one thing: you've got to use the right lube and use
it right.
And that's where sour TM's and LO's come in. They sure don't leave much to
gutsswvork as far as vnhat. when and where.
If you think the TM or LO has some THE 2028
bum info, fire off a DA Form 2028. 1 A LOT SAFER)
FOR YOU AND YOUR
EQUIPMENT THAN
EXPERIMENTING
S ON YOUR OWN!


UNUSUAL CONDITIONS

Your TNM talks about lubrication of the equipment "under unusual condi-
tions." That icoop's for real. So please to heed, indeed. If you want to find out
about the difterien problems %ou run into with lubrication in wet, cold, damp
and duit places, spend some time ith TM 9-273 (Jan 62)- "Lubrication of
Ordnance MNatriil The TM is also loaded with lots of other dope on lubes and
their use.
Your LO is your lubricating bible. It
,'.,/-K outranks the TM for the-equipment-
except for special cases. That's when a
pub of a later date changes the LO or
when the equipment has no LO--only
S, a TM.Then you gowith alongthenewest
.. scoop..


YOU'VE GOT WHAT IT TAKES

Uncle gives you the lubes, the in-
structions and the tools.
The lube fitting tool you find in tool
sets is a jewel. It's a combination tap,
die, wrench and remover. The wrench
lets you take out a fitting by taking hold
of the flat sides. If the fitting is busted
off below the flat sides, you put the
r73 *R>








I
TAP



WRENCH -4


THIS LUBRICATION-FITTING TOOL
(FSN 5120-246-2311) IS IN TH
LUBRICATION KIT THAT COMES WITH
NO. 1 AND NO. 2 ORGANIZATION
COMMON TOOL SET.


remover into the fitting hole and turn
S counterclockwise-real easy. You go
slow because the remover bites into the
plug and begins unscrewing at the same
time. And the die makes new threads on
the fitting. Real handy.
The tool is great to have around
when you run into a fitting that's hard
L to get at with your grease gun. Use it to
E take out the fitting and put in one that's
YOUR built to your liking-such as a 45-
NAL degree one in place of a straight fitting.


POINT AT WHIC- NO
Ut'\~P T T WTOH RELIEF VALVE RELIEF
STOP! VALVE?
STOP WHEN
-YOU SEE
STOP WHEN CLEAN GREASE
GREASE COMES OOZING
OUT
SWhen to stop lubing at other grease points-places where you don't have
sealed units, as on spring shackles and suspension ball joints? As soon as the
fresh, clean grease pushes through, that's when.


WRENCHING REMOVING TAPPING RETHREADING
OUT A A BROKEN NEW A
FITTING FITTING THREADS FITTING

Those power-operated lube units are great when you have the air to run them.
But there are places you just plain don't use them. The fitting for a vehicle's uni-
versal joints, for example.

With high pressure air behind the
grease, it's too easy to blow the seal in
the joint. So use the hand pump. If the
fitting has a pressure-relief valve, stop
when you see the grease coming out of
GOT it. If it hasn't got one, halt the pumping
LOTSA as soon as it starts to take extra muscle
PUSH! to move the leer. Usually one or two
pumps are enough.
74


Let's say you're going ro shoot
some lube into a ftinig. The
coupler fits tight on the fitting
. and you start to pump.
But the grease leaks out be-
tween the coupler and fitting.
Chances are the fitting or coup-
ler is dirty. The fitting could
be bad or the coupler jaws are
worn. The jaws are revers-
ible, of course, so turn'emend-
for-end if it hasn't already been
done.


CHECK
FOR
WORN
COUPLER
JAWS






iORE





Now and again you might find the going
mighty tough when it comes to getting lube
through a spring shackle fitting. It might be
fitting or coupler troubles. But the answer might
be as simple as taking a spring shackle bar and
giving the leaves a couple of shakes.
'Course, if at all possible, get your equipment
out of the dust, snow or rain before you lube.


JUST
TESTING '
PRESSURE.


PLUS A FEW MORE TIPS


No lubrication is bad, but too much
can also hurt. Take wheel bearings.
The grease gets hot and the extra stuff
gets into the brake system. More than
enough grease on the gears in a Hawk
CW acquisition radar and the overmuch
will be slung all over the place -may-
be on the sliprings. And ... but you've
got the idea.


Ever hear of silicone-type grease? It's
used in places like missile systems. And
it's great for the job it does. But watch
how you spread it around. The silicones
can burrow themselves in metals like
aluminum and magnesium castings.
And it's a mean chore to get rid of them,
even with a cleaning solvent. If you
don't, you won't get paint or primer to
stick to the metal, at least not the way
it should.
'Course ... it doesn't pay to put lube
on any porous metal that's to be
painted. The lube can work its way out
and lift off the paint.

CooL IT!
P LEAVE WELL
ENOUGH ALONE!...
BEFORE YOU
GET ENERGETIC
AN[ REPLACE
THE SEAL-- FIRST,
SEE IF IT NEEDS
REPLACING.


I





True... the seal is given a bath in or coated with the same lube used behind
the seal. So it says in different places-such as TB 9-255 (May 60), page 41 of
DA pamphlet 750-10 and the pubs that talk about oil seals and the like.
This tells you what to look for and what to do about it.
Amount You Should

SEEP... *
Forget II
tube is moist It s normal
to fouch,
but it doesn t
form a drop


LE .( Change the seal if you re
a losing 20 percent of the
Lube comes out ( lube between scheduled
in little drops services



DRIP.
D R IP... Change the seal.
Lube comes out in drops
and makes a puddle.
Of course, changing seals because of leaks or drips will get to be a habit if
someone doesn't figure our the reason for the lube loss.And it's a v.ise gu~ t ho
first figures rhe leak might be caused by a clogged %enrilation salve or line.

HMMM VE LUBE CAREFULLY--
CHANED SEALS TOO MUCH AND I'LL
ABOUT 18 TIMES--- SLIDE OFF THE ROOF--
AM OTAY3 THERE'S TOO LITTLE AND THE
MAE THIN WERE'SONG FRICTION WILL WEAR
SOMETHING WONOUT THE RUNNERS!

oear,






RECORD OF DEMAND TIPS
CAN I
USE MY INITIAL
PLL ALLOWANCE .
AS A GUIDE In
To TOTALd
DEMANDS?

WHAT DO 1
PUT DOWN WHEN I
GET THE INITIAL
3 ALLOWANCE?

When you receive your initial PLL allowance all you record on DA Form
3318 is the document number and date in column a, and the quantity of items
received in the BOH column. You can add the note "initial issue" across
columns b and c, if you like.






supply support. The card doesn't keep track of your issues to the unit's main-
tenance types or equipment users.





THAT'S LEFT IN THE BIN!

-On items supply support issues by "unit pack" instead of by "each", (for
economy reasons), you record the quantity received in the BOH column, and use
the items as needed. But, in the remarks section of the title insert, explain why
you have more on hand than you're authorized with a note, like: "item issued in
unit pack of ."
NOW, WHAT'S A
S GOOD REASON FOR
A HAVING 1473 ARCTIC
PARKAS IN STOCK?






WARRANTY WONDERS

Dear Half-Mast,
When a using unit's required to fill out DA 2408-8, I'm wondering how we're
supposed to get the "warranty period" required in block 15. Any suggestions?
SSG J. L. W.

Dear Sergeant J. L. W.,
That's about the size of it, Sarge -suggestions.
O'course, there's some specific warranty info for a few vehicles (3/4-ton and
1-1/4-ton) in TB's, such as TB 9-2300-295-15 (Jun 67), TB 9-2300-295-15/1
(Jun 67) and TB 9-2300-295-15/2 (Jan 68).
But for most other equipment you have to nail down warranty details by
checking the fine print in purchase contracts. This info is available to accepting
inspectors (who're normally expected to fill in DA 2408-8).
When you, the user, are required to fill in DA 2408-8 (as you are in certain
cases) here are a few suggestions:


TI-l WARRANTY
PER lOP
I INFO. -





NO,
aGc 4 '"" CONNIE, WE
ARE NOT
UNDERWATER
RIVERINES... WE
JUST HAVE A
iiM NTENANCE
---* PROBLEM A_ N.,


mag 9n A4 Ba ?


You M16A1 zapmen using a plastic
bag (FSN 1005-052-6942) to protect
your loaded magazine, use your head.
Sure the bag's apt to collect condensa-
tion on the inside if it's wet or humid,
but this probably won't happen in dry,
dusty weather. So, check your bagged
magazine daily, but if there's no con-
densation don't remove the magazine.
Leave it alone toll regular mag-cleaning
time comes along. However, if you see
beads of condensation inside the bag,
don't let it go. Take off the bag and dry
it, the magazine and the ammo thor-
oughly and don't forget that little
film of LSA on the magazine spring. This
bag, y'know, won't excuse you from
regular PM chores.


Hold one, Cayuse (OH-6A) mechanics!
Never take a short cut when it comes to
pulling the preventive maintenance
daily. It could lead the bird crew straight
to the deep-six. Follow TM 55-1520-214-
20PMD to the letter, step-by-step.


.21







Now hear this:
Always release your waist strap be-
fore firing the M2A1-7 portable flame
thrower. That way, if you have to ditch
the tanks in an emergency all you have
to do is hit the quick-release fasteners
on the shoulder straps and you're
free to scoot out of the danger area.
The waist strap is OK for holding the
tanks steady when you're walking or
jogging along, but it's not needed for
firing. In fact, Change 3 (Aug 68) to TM
3-1040-204-14 adds a warning to page
35, which says to release the waist strap
a fair distance from the target area.

,4teUdio oer?
Here's the very latest stock number
for the audio connector caps on your
AN/VRC-12 series radios. It's FSN
5935-973-1732, backed up by the Army
Master Data File (AMDF). This also
covers the caps on your AN/PRC-25
radio set.


Armor Kct Reaedy
When your Cayuse (OH-6A) wades
into the fracas make sure she has all the
armor protection you can give 'er .
MWO 55-1520-214-40/1 (18 Jul 68)
at least!

7Too Kt--Set 4 or B 7
That's right, you can't have both
Tool Kit Set A and Set B for pulling
maintenance on your M151's and other
G838-series 1/4-ton trucks. TM 9-2320-
218-20P (Apr 68), page 10, says which
one you get.

Heater V0amagesTa
Some guys've missed the word in Ch 2
(Jun 66) to TM 9-2330-267-14. Man-
hole covers on all M149 1-1/2-ton
water trailers must be stenciled: "Cau-
tion: Do not use immersion heater in this
tank." These guys are ruining the plastic
liner in the tank.

eheck Fr Leakage
When you Seminole-types eyeball
your luxury model, 0-480-3 engine fuel
injector pump oil screen, on a PMI
you're looking for leakage not visual
contamination. The screen is removed,
inspected and cleaned every PMP.


When you write an EIR (Form 2407),
it's a good idea to include your unit's
telephone number. That way, the com-
modity command responsible for the
equipment can reach you soonest if they
need to and they may need to! Just
include your telephone number on the
form some place but not in any of the
numbered blocks.


You say you have an AN/PRC-74( )
radio set which is nice but it doesn't
operate too well without a power sup-
ply? Don't sweat it. The power supply is
a part of, but not issued with, the set.
Your best bet's to pick the one you need
in the BIlL (Basic Issue Items List) in TM
11-5820-590-12 (Mar 66) and -12-1
(Mar 67).

Ruty D eea 7
Don't fret when you find rust inside
the Ml1 portable decon. Just wipe out
the container as best you can. The DS-2
will dissolve the fuzzy surface rust and
the siphon tube strainer will catch any
flaky rust particles. You can help keep
rust out if you always store the M11 with
its head assembly screwed on tight.


the Condition of Your Equipment?