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PS
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00035
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1968
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00035

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4-5
        Page 6-7
        Page 8-9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16-17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22-23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38-39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46-47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50-51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56-57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62-63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text



Issue 187







1968 Series WAYA MEAN
THE SYSTEM'S SHORT
ON GENERATORS...WHY
DON'T THE' GET 50ME
OF THE GOOF-OFFS
/ OUT THERE TO TJRN- IN
THEIR UNSER ICEABLE
BN MAINT 5 I ONES FOR REPAIR
AND REISSUE!




GLAD ,OU
MENTIONED
THAT













... ...
43Z~ s



S//















THE PRMrMTflE IrELIINCE MONTHLY
IsIue No. 187 1968 Series
IN THIS ISSUE

GROUND MOBILITY 2-15. 44-49
peelal riatur
BYOl. i Ton Truck 2-15
M113 M113A1 44.45 CDSOOTiansmission 49
MII4Al 4648 AVBL Launchar 49
Crewman s Helmie 49


AIR MOBILITY 16-27
Spar Plugs 16-20 ANRARC4
U-A 21 U 8
Distress iUgh 22-23 ire Etlinguisheri
UH-. UH-IC 24 OVI
0. 7n



FIREPOWER 37-43
MIAI 37. 3.39 M6C Spotting Gun
Mi4 31 M6 Baorel Knifr
6Machine Gun 40 MU I Scabbldr
M4OAI 10-MM Rifle 41 M77( Snolgun
2 7-in Roclke 43


25
261
26
27





41
42
42
a2
i^-
8a..


ELECTRONIC & COMMUNICATIONS
50-58
ANIPPS5 Radar 5052 CPSChlunmeove 54
AI MPiA Radar 53 5-221 I'PT 54
ATTKl2 Radar 53 AN'PRC-6 55 56-5
ANPRC 5 55


1


GENERAL
loom Saleguaras 59 IAER5 82-63
HE-202 60 M il Decon 13
Ire pack 60 fool Calibrallon 64
O-GalDrum 61 Re* Publicallons 28
A Form 2407 6I Supily 1.21. 22.24.41.
f 92995 61 42.44 45 48
55.59.60 63
Use ol lunds fr pnntia l of this pubila-
lion has been approved by Headqaarters.
Department of the arm, 26 February 198I
DISTRIBUTION: In accordance with re-
quirements submitted on DA Form 12-4.




mo 01o


s
I
5
D
I








FRONT


Luckily, you can do it by pieces-a
bit each day. It's real PM (Preventive .. ,-
Maintenance) too, because it helps you
see things you might miss otherwise. V '
S The only tools you need are pliers,
screwdriver, crescent wrench, tire pres-
sure gage and ruler or steel pocket tape. -
You may be tempted as you go along '- -
to borrow a torque wrench or such and .
S make a fix on the spot. That's bum dope -.
-because the fault you find may be a
sign of another fault you can't see. If
you make a fix that doesn't do the whole
-. job, you're just covering up evidence B.
...and maybe heading for a good-sized
breakdown.
It's right to huddle with your unit
S mechanic, though. He'll know the de- B
tails, and he'll tell you right when -
you're in doubt. Ie'll expect your DA
Form 2404 from you when you're
through, too-which of course you'll in our pocket. sour unit shop genius
S fill out according' to your TM 9-8030 takes oier.
and LO. When )ou get to the underside, use .g.
Just put down the faults you do find, a rack or ramp. Some stuff sou have to -
01 nothing fancy. They call it Inspect, look at from both wass, top and boom .. parked right now.
SDetect, Correct. The first two you do; -stecring gear, frinstance. The bold type is fo
the third one, unless it's something Start v here Anywhere ... like say v serious thing. Ge em fi
serious things. Get 'em hhx
JrV^ minor you can handle with the tools you just walk up to where )our truck's .
.-"4 2'


GENERAL APPEARANCE -.Rusty,
dirty, dented; leaning to one side
(could be a broken spring or U-
clamp).

HEATER (if present) Won't work,
loose; clamps or hose cut, loose;
screen missing.

BRUSH GUARD -Loose, bent,
rusty; weight classification missing
(FM 5-36, Ch 1), wrong.

HOOD SUPPORT LATCH (over top
right of windshield) Missing,
won't work, bent, rusty.

HOOD Hinge pins bent, broken;
support latch socket missing,
loose; holddowns missing, won't
work; registration unreadable,
missing (AR 746-5 and TB 746-
93-1).

HEADLIGHTS, BLACKOUT LIGHTS,
TURN SIGNALS -Not working, not
adjusted; lenses cracked, painted
over, clouded, dirty, waterlogged;
blackout shield missing, not in
place; bare wires, insulation frayed.

LIFTING SHACKLES Stuck, miss-
ing; base cracked; cotter pin oul.
BUMPERS Badly bent, cracked;
unit markings (AR 746-5 & TB 746-
93-1) wrong, missing; bolts oul,
loose; clevis pin rusty.


r those real .
d, but quick.
3
i. r


.7/-


[i MORE







ln


WINDSHIELD WIPERS
-Jammed, broken;
motor not working;
manual handles miss-
ing; wiper rubber hard,
streaking, cracked.
gone; mount loose;
won't work.

WINDSHIELD--Glass loose, crazed,
or clouded enough to obstruct
vision (driver's side); adjusting arm
or lock rusty, stuck: seal torn;
frame bent. Glass crack longer
than 2 inches.


REAR VIEW MIRROR -
Glass clouded, broken;
supports bent, broken;
won't adjust and stay
put.


DOORS- Latches loose, driver's latch
sticking; panels torn, loose; hinges bent,
unlubed; handles missing; glass won't
roll up or down; stops won't hold in all
positions, drain holes clogged.


SEATS -Regulator lever stuck,
loose, missing; cushions torn, dirty.







FLOOR BOARDS Dented, loose, un
fastened, muddy, rusty, trashy.


STEERING COLUMN-Clamp broken, loose.


MAP COMPARTMENT-Trashy,
dirty, leaky; pubs and forms
(check your local SOP and TM
38-750) missing; flywheel hous-
ing fording plug missing; latch
kaput.


side of seam toward
front, eyelets missing;
ropes frayed, missing;
tarp hooks missing,
badly bent, rusted,
loose.


r. BATTERY
COMPARTMENT
TOP Hold-downs corrod-
ed, loose; cover rod, latch,
or bolts bent or missing.
CASE Trashy, dirty, cor
roslan-loaded


CABLES Clamps loose;
posts loose; live cable hit-
ting cover.
BATTERIES Caps miss-
ing, vents clogged, loose;
.s electrolyte not covering
plates; wrong specific grav-
ity for climate (1.200 to
1.225 in tropics; 1.280 in
temperate zones), tops
punctured, cracked; cells
dead, dirty, corroded.

ORE


DATA PLATES Missing, loose, painted
over.


~c~ ~r






OPERATIONS CHECK


LIGHT SWITCHES -
Cracked, painted over;
handles missing, loose.
sluck.won'twork.dash
lights won't work.


-1.
1.*


4... 4
TA


/ -
/ i4


TURN 'IGNALS (if presentl-Mount
ed loose; indicator lenses broken.
painted over; control sticking, loose,
wires exposed. (See Paras 166 172,
Ch 8 TM 9-80301.

-A, \j


SOME THINGS HAVE
TO BE CHECK /
WHILE ON THE
RUN... SO, TO BE
SURE PO A WORK-
OUT TEST.'


/ '
-.4^


+0~ Iu


,o issn. I


GAGES-Ammeter not showing charge;
oil pressure below 40 PSI or not read-
ing; water temperature over 180' or
not working; fuel level not showing;
speedometer jerking, unsteady, not
working; odometer not totaling dis-
tance; dials painted over; covers crack-
ed, missing.


in os e: honwo'
wor.


~- jiiP1
i-Ii-


'/'


? r '
.,~' ,:I


B


II
'


~CC







/ MAKE SURE YOUR HOOP N
SUPPORT'S HOLDING GOOD 'N'
SOLIP BEFORE CLIMBING UNDER
THE HOOD. IF IN DOUBT, USE A
ROPE OR PIECE OF WIRE TO TIE
IT BACK-- ANYTHING THAT'LL
SAVE YOU FROM MEAT CLEAVER
' TREATMENT!


IIl II


GENERATOR Cable insula-
tion cut, cracked, wires ex-
posed; mounting loose, out
of alinement, squeaking
(don't try to lube it's
sealed')


STARTER Wire lead crack-
ed, frayed; bolts or nuts
loose; dirty.
\


CAREFUL-
KEEP HANDS
AWAY FROM
MOVING FANS

FAN Blades bent; rivets
missing; belt frayed, loose,
over-tight (1 2.n dellection
is right); hitting radiator or
shroud.


OIL FILTER -Mount
loose, dirty, leaking;
cover loose.

REGULATOR Cover
loose, damaged: mounts
loose; cable ccrnnec
tons loose. bare wires

CRANKCASE-Oil level
low (below ADD mark
on dipslt l pressure
sending unit (behind oil
Illler pipe)loose broken,
wire loose or frayed


FUEL PUMP-
Leaking; :
dripping oil; .
loose on
mount case or
base cracked.


WATER PUMP -
Shaft wobbly;
leaking; unlubed


CRANKCASE VENT -
Loose, pinched, dirty;
clips missing.


CARBURETOR Base
loose, choke or throl
tie controls sticking:
linkage worn, not work.
ing easily, leaking


DISTRIBUTOR -Dirty,
loose in mount; spark
plug cable ronnectors
loose; primary wire
lead connection loose,
cracked.


,L. I-flL-


FUEL LINES Leaking;
bent pinched loose.
Fuel bowl dirty


a ;


WEr


011,-,












UNDER THE HOOD

AIR C N tA P S- r k'







WINCH
If you have one, it's your sub that comes offa the bench to get you out of
tight places ... the extra-kicker that may not play much, but oboy. So scan-


CA L I.lbe, coroe (us fes
lurcn ony) kinkd fraed loseon
drum; im rpel Iond Iud-cogged



DIVESAT
Dry diry unlbe
cote pin gone


- I


med, no


* L amr
nu s totgt
spin broken


BLS Frame
or bupr ot


L L.


,i.

I


I






BIGOT SIDE


)U POrJ'T FUEL C
E TO WAIT loose:;
L THE CANVAS frayed
5 OFF THE leaky,
S TO DETECT
)R CANVAS-
CARE' I


CAN BRACKET-Rusty,
webbing cut, mildewed,
; container (it present)
dented.
il. 1 i


44_17177{


rain or snag on
branches; dirty;
ropes missing


GAS TANK FILLER -Cap
loose; gasket missing, dam
aged; venl closed (used only
for fording); flange or neck
bent; strainer, missing or
dirty; chain missing; fuel
fill stencils missing.


WHEELS & TIRES Lug nuts or
ilnnge bolts loose, missing; tread
pattern mi.,matched, ire pr..sure
rronng (40 Ib i: right). tires badly
or unevenly worn, cut to fabric;
"ear wheel puller screws bent, lam
nTed, fluid slain on rear hub; valve
items bent, valve :aps missing;
Aheel bent.


TARP HOOKS -
Loose, twist
ed, missing.


/ 'O
HAV
UNTIL
ROT
BOW
PoO
FOC
I'-


SPARE & RACK Bracket, locking
stud, or nut bent, rusty; carrier
bent, rusty; tire flat or pressure
wrong (Some models carry spare
on left door).


3
s
b

























COUPLING RECEPTACLE- PINTLE & SHACKLES-
Cover bent, muddy; con- Jammed; unlubed;won't
tacts loose, burned; spring hold.
broken, rusty.
SEATS- Broken, rotting,
S unpainted; brackets bent;
pins missing.
SIDE RACKS Rolling;
missing; loose: slats, hooks
or bolls broken, missing
.-./,)W


TAILGATE-Chains broken,
missing; retaining hook or
hinge pins missing, bent,
jamming; gate bent, rusty.
PIONEER TOOLS- Loose,
straps torn or missing; tools
rusty, missing, handles bro-
ken. (Local SOP may not
require these tools on post).
LIGHTS- Lenses cracked,
waterlogged; painted over;
broken; won't work
BUMPERETTES- Bent,
broken, rusty, loose;
markings wrong, miss-
ing.


FLOOR PLATES-Bent, mud-
caked. rusting.






/ UNDERNEATH .











BRAKE LINES-SBroken,, BACK ..PLATE ATTACHMENTS
leaking pinched; spring Fittings loose, missing,
. ps louse, missing. leaking; anchor boils loose.
.STEERING KNUCKLES and
7 1 _Wmissing. ISTEERING KNUCKLEtS arid bot rknmsig


SHOCK ABSORBERS Cyl.
hinders stuck, dented; bolts,
nuts missing; clip plate
bent, broken; rubber shock
bumpers (over axles) miss
Ing, cracked.

EXHAUST PIPE. MUFFLER,
TAILPIPE Holes, soft
spots, flange connections
loose.



R^B,
-: ,


BALL JOINTS Worn,
rusty, unlubed, loose, dent
ed, leaking: bolts missing.
loose.


BRAKE MASTER CYLINDER-PushS
rod bent or safety nut loose; lines
loose, Iluid leaking; cotter pin gone
on pedal rod end, boot torn or
missing; return spring missing.
II...H* I^..,


Bent, twisted,
cross-members


SFOR PUBS
YOU'LL NEED TM 9-8030
INCLUDING CHANGE 8)
AND A PARTS MANUAL
TTM 9-2320-212 -20P
'CHANGE I AND CHANGE 2).
YOUR YARDSTICK BOOK
SIS TM 9-2320-212-E5C!/


I -


E/2


WEATHER
WISDOM


Depending on local SOP, a
change o' season brings more to
check. Your checkup switches a bit
-so like in winter. hl)k after-
CHAINS Links or cross chains bro-
ken; wrong sizes for wheels; too tew
chains to go around.
ANTIFREEZE Installed before frost.
fall (TM 9 207 tells all); have your flavor
lie mech check.
BATTERIES Winter specific gravity
standard is 1.280 Have your shop make
sure
Then come spring. )ou drain
that anti-freeze and the rust and
guck suspended in it (TB Ord
65 11, make w irh arms weather LO
specs and you'ree in.


I





AIR
MOBILITY













A spark plug bin with nothing in it
is starvation for sure.
Aircraft don't fly without spark.
But there's help in that spark plug
cleaning kit like your FSN 4910-"86-
9271, Type TK-2, in your organiza-
tional maintenance A, B and C tool
sets. With a kit, any plug that's
basically healthy can be put back to
work.


@0s


SPARK PLUG
CLEANER KIT
Ot~ 00


I A MOTOR
WITH
CHU(K
(LIKE A
SDRILL)...

STo sae lasted 'ork, hold a muster
L- on sour used plugs. Toss out the hope-
S less cases wnth cross-threaded bases,
rounded hexes, chipped or broken in-
I sulaon tin barrelor base). mashed bar-
rels, or electrodes chewed halfway off.


and guck from plug bases and make
your pressure-cleaning compound last
longer. Steer clear of carbon tet and
gasoline and use lots of ventilation.
Whenever you use solvents, you want
no fires, smokes or matches around.
You can put plugs in a metal tray
(fabricate one as you like it), and give
'em a bottom-end bath in solvent.
About 15 minutes should do the
trick. Then turn the plugs over in the
tray and dry 'em with compressed air.
Before applying that pressure, protect
yourself with safety goggles and gloves.
Don't be tempted to hold the plugs in
your bare hand while drying 'em. Com-
pressed air is dangerous when shot at
your skin.
DUNK 'EM IN SOLVENT


Trichloroethylene vapor is toxic,
which sort of rhymes with sick, a kind
of sick you prevent with ventilation.
You want no fires, smokes, or matches
in the area.

ON THE BUSINESS END
Now check out your cleaner kit,
make sure your water trap on the
air supply line is good, your cleaning
compound is dry, plentiful, and not
over-age ... and you're going good. If
your compound is shy, take off the door
and take out the container. Pour in
pure AC type CL-3 Aircraft Spark Plug
Cleaning Compound... about half a






fresh package is right. Never use sand
or gypsum powder. Replace your clean-
ing nozzle with a fresh one (part CL-73)
every time you replace compound. Then
put door and container back snug.
On this outfit, you have to make sure
you're grounded. If your electric supply
isn't 3-wire with ground, then hook the
whole case to a standard ground rod or
water pipe.
Now sort out your plugs .. Put
the right adapter for the bunch you'll
work on first into the pressure-cleaning
rig, lock it in ... and here you go, first
plug in place.
You push down the compound blast
lever with one hand, and wobble the
plug with the other (holding the plug

WOBBLE THE
PLUG -
DON I TWIST


in, natch) for about 5 seconds. Then
take a 5-second plain air blast cleanup
to blow out compound particles.
Then's when you hold another small
CMMI of your own- get the firing end
of the plug under the AV24-1 inspec-
tion light and scan sharp-eyed. If you
see carbon or anti-knock deposits up in
CHECK FOR LEAD AND OIL FOULING


-a


the cavity, set the plug aside for a trip
through your vibrator tool-AV19-3
by name.
If the firing end isn't badly leaded
or carboned, another short compound
blast and air cleanup could be enough
... but not a long grind. That just
chews up electrodes and porcelains.
Whatever you do, that compound,
every speck of it, has to come out of that
plug base before you even think of
reinstalling in an engine. Nothing on
earth is deadlier on polished aircraft
cylinders than that abrasive.
USE THE VIBRATOR
Several plugs will likely be black
up inside. Your vibrator, which looks
like a small smiling alligator with buck
teeth, fits right up in the shell.

RECOGNIZE
ME?



It's simple. You pick out the right
tool, take each plug between your
thumb and fingers, and rotate it gently
while running. On 3-electrode plugs,
use paired tools CL-273 and CL-274 in
a CL-272 holder.


Soon's the tough ones are thru the
vibrator, run them back for a com-
pound and air cleanup. Then all you
have left is barrel run-out and re-
gapping.






THE OUTSIDE END
Barrel cleanup is an item you can't
be slack about. Electrical leaks there can

GA, ;K

BARREL/


be disastrous .. and a dirty barrel is
a leaky barrel.
So put the sleeve cleaner in your
bench grinder chuck, use AV7-1 cleaner
compound like creamy soap, and make
with a gentle ream-out. Then comes
dishwashing; all that soap has to come
out in plain old good 'n' warm water.

GIVE IT
A FINAL
INSPECTION.




Air blast drying is the finale. And right
then is a good time for another short
inspection.
The thing is, breaks you couldn't see
for dirt may show up when you get
barrel insulation nicely cleaned. That's
one reason you do that barrel shine job
in the first place--so you can see what's
what.
GET THE GAP RIGHT
You have a set of spacer gage leaves
to take everything up to 21 thou-
sandths. Follow your TB 55-2925-200-
25 (Feb 66), and be sure you have not
left any wire brush bristles inside. Then
check the gap. For flight engines, the
gap is .016, that is, 16 thousandths.
You can have a thousandth over or


under, but two thousandths over is
NO-GO.
For AC 172, AC 272, SR47P and
REL38B plugs, a gap of .019 is right.

CORRECT GAGE
LEAF WILL
GIVE YOU
CORRECT GAP

That's all there is to it... but do be
sure you gap all the plugs you clean.
Looking at them and deciding they
don't need gapping could conk an
engine.
WELL THEY
LOOKED
OKAY/



RNAL INSPECTION
You need to make sure of your work,
of course, and this kit even includes a
little giant handy checkup, otherwise
called the indicator portion.
Pick the right size adapter for the
plug to be tested, run the plugs in just
finger tight (you have to have a little
bit of air leak for the tester to work
best), and hook on your connector.


Next, get the high-voltage contact arm
onto the exposed terminal, and take
your hand offa the works.
Reach over by the indicator gage and
push the high-voltage button. If your

> r~ e -






plug is healthy at all, it'll flash fire, and
you can see it reflected in the gage
mirror.
Now put the air pressure to it .. .
open air control needle valve gently,
and let pressure build a bit. See if the
plug still sparks; as the gage needle
goes from red to green, do you still
get good fire?








HOOK UP OPEN AIR
CONNECTOR CONTROL VALVE
Several things could happen. You
might see sparks run all up and down
the center porcelain, but unless one gets
"stuck" in one spot, mox nix-that
high voltage current wanders around
like thunderstorm lightning. What you
want to be sure of is, the spark on the
plug tip doesn't dim out and an arc
doesn't develop in one single spot away
up inside the throat... if it does, you've
found a break in the porcelain, and out
goes the plug.










QU ICK! GET,
THE DOC! IT'S
ARCING UP
IN THERE!


You could get a spark at first, then
it could stop before your needle ever
gets out of the red-and you'll know
that if there's nothing left in the throat
by accident, and the gap is right, that's
a bum plug, too.
In fact, if the spark stops but your
dial still registers, no matter what the
air pressure is, you've probably got an
invisible insulation crack some place-
so take no chances with that plug either.
The same troubles could be in the
barrel insulation. A fine crack there
could be draining your current. So be-
lieve your gage pointer, and the rule
is-




SPARK PLUG HEALTH HINTS
You won't be doing anybody's en-
gine a favor if you reinstall plugs that
haven't been brush-cleaned at the base.
Those threads take on a lot of carbon
and lead guck. A rotary brush in your
chuck, .005 wire size, and a careful





BRUSH
CLEAN
THE
BASE
hand-held run-through, will do the job.
If you've got a slow-turning motor,
1000 to 1725 RPM, that's good.
Checking gaps before you give plugs
a thumbs-up is another good rule.
That's what your GO-NO-GO round-
wire gages are for.






Your magnifying glass will help you
see whether any fine breaks in sleeve or
tip porcelains might have sneaked past


And before you store plugs for later
use, best pickle those barrel and shell
threads in an oxidation inhibitor, MIL-
C-6529-A, Type III. While you do that,
scan the threads real well to see that
none of them are roughed up and likely
to damage your engine; if in doubt, get
your support to check 'em with a thread
gage. Damaged engine cylinder head
bushings is one item you can do with-
out.


-2XZ"t-' BY THE NUMBERS
You should have received a TM 9-4910-422-12 (Jun 64) with your kit; if not,
get one ordered on a DA Form 17. It has all the factory part numbers and FSN's
you could dream about. / UST IN CASE
YOU NEED THE LIST
OF FSN'S5... HERE
THEY ARE! <


I PROPS `-- PITCH

Basic Beaver (U-6A) props P/N 2D30-301 and 2D30-237-6101A18 have the
same diameter-8 feet, 6 inches-and a pitch range of 10.5 to 24 degrees at the
42-in station. You may have prop, P/N 2D30-237-6101A20, which is 2 inches
shorter in diameter and gets a pitch range of 11.5 to 24 degrees at the 42-in spot.
Better check your props and pitch ranges 'cause a wrong pitch setting could put
your Beaver-bird in a bind.























Mayday! Mayday! from pilot or troops gets faster action than Cong from
Mini-the-gun. Successful rescue from Cong or crash may depend on how well
you've pulled PM on your distress marker light-FSN 6230-067-5209, P/N
SDU-5/E.
This 8-oz strobe light is about as caretaker-free as can be. Usually the only
upkeep is replacing the battery when the light needs a shot of adrenalin. But
giving the light a PM check-out once in a while is playing the game according
to Hoyle.
PM CHECK LIST

Check the date of manufacture CHECK DATE
of the battery. If you think a bat-
tery has been in your light two
years or longer, replace it with FSN
6135-073-8939, P/N MSS6135-
IC. Cost: $2.50. PiE

Take a look-see at the battery -
for cracks, dents, leakage. You'll
know a leaky battery by the strong
pungent odor that smells like A PLAIN OL'
vomit. UGH! Bum batteries get ERASER DOES
the heave-ho. THE TRICK!

Peek inside the case at the bat-
tery contact for rust, dirt, corro-
sion. A pencil eraser does a bang-up
Mr. Clean-type job here.


If \ou find corrosion
or rust, a wire brush
treatment is in order.
Add a dab of silicone
grease to stop crud
build-up.


Notice the glued-on
O-ring? Is it cracked,
broken, loose? If so, you
may not have a water-
tight light. Replace bat-
tery if you can't find
new O-ring.
Lens on this light come like field
grade weather-clear. Security from
Cong while waiting rescue is nil. But


Play peep-eye regu-
larly with the:

LENS AND FLASHTUBE
--for cracks, distor-
tion. No monkeying
around with these 2
items. Anything wrong
with 'em and you order
a new light. Cost:
$12.00 for light, bat-
tery, carrying case.


So-o-o-o, if you're an OV-1 pilot who
has punched out or a crew member of
a bashed rotorbird, your fast rescue may
depend on how well you've maintain-
ed your emergency equipment. How's
your light?


CASE-looking for
cracks, excessive abra-
sions.

NYLON LANYARD AND
CANVAS CARRYING
CASE-for rips, tears,
fraying, lost snaps.
RUBBER SWITCH BOOT
-for cracks, loose-
ness.
IC















Checking for wear on Huey (UH-IC)
parts is a natural when you'ree pulling
a preventive maintenance inspection--
and washers are no exception.
For one, be sure \ou focus on the
chamfered washers, FSN 5310-925-
8641, at both clevis ends of connecting
link, FSN 1615-986-6160. One washer
goes on each side of the bearing in the
scissors and sleeve assembly.
These babies near out at around 400
hours and then the clev is wears a groove
into the mating surfaces of the scissors


. means an expensive part replace-
ment.
If the clevis doesn't appear to be
centered on the mixing arm the washer
is shot.
Keep the washer wear pattern in
mind, say, every 4th periodic. You can
replace worn washers for peanuts.


A LITTLE DAB'LL DO YA
Ever notice how a doll needs a touch- the lever shaft splines.
up here and there to stay at her best? Read all about how it's done in Ch 7
Sure you have! (19 Dec 67) to your Equipment Im-
The same deal goes for the stabilizer provement Report and Maintenance
bar dampers on your Huey (UH-1). Digest ... TB 750-992-3.
Give the damper shaft splines a littleALITE E
extra care or they'll go to pot on you. A LmE EXTRA


Like-to guard against cracking,
chipping or breaking of the damper
splines make with Adhesive Metal Set
A-4 on the damper shaft splines and







fR WORD FROM A DIRTY BIRD

SOUNDS
kb LIKE HIS and you'll get an off-frequency that
FILTERS
SII FLARER keeps the pilot from yow-hooing on
DIRTY his FM set.
S SET AGAIN SEWS LOCKING COllAR


PULL UNIT. AND PM OFTEN
Every time the unit is pulled out of
its cover, take.a long look at the 4 air
conditioning filters. If the 2 top filters
are dirty-toss 'em.


Common equipment caretakers can
squelch a squawk box by not keeping
the innards of the RT-348 receiver-
transmitter kitchen-clean. A dust-dirt
jammed switch or coil that keeps
Pickled Pilot from maydaying will get
you a bonnet-ful of dirty words!
It's nor a big cleaning job-except
when your unit's operating where you
get more'n your fair share of dirt, dust,
FOD and smog. Normally, you'd spit
'n' polish the unit every 300 hours, but
it makes a heap of PM sense to pull out
the unit more often for cleaning-say
every 100 or 200 hours-if necessary.
Para 26, TM 11-5821-244-12 (Mar 64)
gives you the stepped-up cleaning deal.
Most dirt build-up is on the power
amplifier mechanical linkage and be-
tween the coil core, P/N 805C L803,





DIRT BUILDS c.
S UP HERE


and its sleeve. If you get a dirmik dust-
in here, the set screws in the locking
collar on the right hand cam will break


But hold one before you deep-six the
2 on the bottom. You can reverse these
2 filter pads 'cause only one-half gets
dirty while installed. Just be sure the
blue sides face each other when you
stick 'em in. This blue bit goes for all
4 filters.
Equipment kept in a standby status
collects dust faster'n Bob Hope ad libs.
So-o-o-o, keep this gear protected and
remember, it gets intermediate mainre.
nance PM at least once a month.
Electrical leaks and short circuits
caused by dust and dirt in avionics gear
can be reduced to zero-zero with by-the-
book PM.
15






U-8F... RAM AIR JAM


LO5IN"
P*WER


By-the-book maintenance and fol-
low-up inspection will put you with
the in proud-crowd of professional
mechanics. A mental goof-up and you'll
get a piece of the action-in front of
the top kick!
Like maybe you're replacing the ram
air scoop-duct assembly-after put-
ting a new 0-480-3 engine on your
Seminole. The scoop end, P/N 50-
910235-149, catches and crimps the
inside of the flexible duct hose, P/N
NAS1374A12CA016, as you seat it.


DON'T
MANGLE
FLEXIBLE
HOSE


You forget the follow-up inspection,
spelled out in para 5-319,TM 55-1510-
201-20, to see if the air scoop hook-up
is OK.


.INSTALL... AND l
INSPECT!
You guessed it. On the maintenance
test flight the pilot has loss of power on
climbout and at 6000 feet with new
engine full bore his manifold pressure
was on the minus side by 2 inches. Took
much downtime finding the trouble
cause ground checks were OK.


CF3Br TAG BAGGED
That's right, aviation types. You can
remove DA Form 253 from all CF3Br
fire extinguishers mounted in Army air-
craft. Use this monthly inspection tag
only on extinguishers located in build-
B ings. You still weight-test the CF3Br
( every 6 months and make action entry
TEST i on DA Form 2408-18.







wHAT DRAIN OIL SAMPLE
OIL- FILTER
NECK When you Mohawk (OV-1) types
sample the engine oil don't remove the
s oil-filler-neck screen and poke a drain
S' tube in there ... more screens get lost
that way!! TB 55-6650-300-15 (26 Jun
67) allows you to drain the sample.



S0-470-11B ENGINE..
A GOLD PISTON POUNDER

















If your Bird Dog (0-1) comes back from depot with a new engine, don't
panic if you see a gold one under the hood!
Now hold one, Goldfinger O-level type. Don't start chipping nuggets from
that hunk of metal. It's only an 0-470-11A engine updated with the 0-470-15
cylinder, piston, and ring assemblies- and branded 0-470-11B.
You're looking at a power plant virtually identical maintenance-wise -
with every other Bird Dog piston pounder 0-470-15 type.
So-o-o-o, pull scheduled inspections, special inspections, troubleshooting bits,
and repairs by the maintenance pub, TM 55-1510-202-20 (May 66). Remem-
ber ... the gold is only paint skin deep!



















~I Ue *'


"AI h. mollodad ado mammal pols
.3 Intond to a.3 aunft.
- IO Ti. Ed I una dw
fi. -.W AC Bhimlomdm Cuda
Sa.d. Ia, c..t DA
: 10.4. Ci 1 (Od l. LTM', IV..
D. A Pa n 10.6 (Pal .I ad Co 2
"ha 6EL CI. ad WM'AA Pa .10.1'*


TIOIONCAL MAINUAlS
Tq I-111u443C-. lab 00.2
TM S-0100010 C4. Mar 1 Ill

Tm 5-220- -S a. lab bao-.
WIl. Mad DounhSa I
13 3-343I-224-2 Cl. .1b. W~dlhg
Equip.
T3 5-M3105-21" U aM um. 26f
M.Ang Simow.
113A -0-2-2 CI a doM. la.11

N3-311115-22931 5P. Ma. Enb



TM 5.4120-22-15 Cl. Mar. 1100
WU Ca..Pd Ail C-&

Ai Coo om..
`111 S-U642054-41 Mao. blIa,.
1 15VV-213-35P CF. ab. 45 MW
B~aa 5~aa c
1131 6II5-24&103 a. Mor. 430W


Ce. Sub 60 CIN
13 5-IIS-lOlO C2. film. 3K0IN
BL Ga. IEqip 400 Cv
I1 S.6115-460-12. Jam. 200 MW Baa
3M. M20 60 Cy AC 12012111
2d01416V 3 Ph C..,rlol
11 5-6115-405-15 Cl. lab. .125 MW

TMA 9II04124.25. 0.. M60 7A2-
MM Mudd Gm.. 11122 MoL
TM 01003-25741P. Dan MII.
Sf1201 Alnoll IA..amml FOB.
US 9VON11415r. la Mu. MM.

11 94915-431 C Cl. J..6 M4AI.

'3 9-14W0-37S-Il~. Fk

M3 9-1410.330-1211, Na.. mo-Naor.

1 110914114177-1201. Ja. a.-g.
TM IA1-21000236l62/ a. Ahur.
"a4 CGou. Cook..
1111 9-22PB-SS4-201217 Cl. Mlo..
WI C.u. Ga.1..
III NX-SO-224-1002/1 C4. lab.
MIID. M3tI~S27Al MGAI.
IS. 13I. A1577AI. MlO&AI.
MIZIAI. M548 Cordo. and
M132AI I- Thnm u k .

MUMs .. mlor


TM 9-2320-218-ESC/1, Jan. M151 1
Ton Truck.
TM 9-2320-218-ESC/2, Jn, M170
Ambulance.
TM 9-2320-222-20 C2, Feb. MI8
Iovry Voh.
TM 9-4935-305-S1P/1, Jan, Srgoant.
TM 94935-425-15P, Feb. Radeye.
TM 9-4935-509-15P/1, Dec, Hawk.
TM 9-4935-516-14, Feb. Hook.
TM 9-4940-251-15P/1/2, Jan, Nike-
Herc, Nike-Here Imp.
TM 10-4520-201-10 C2. Mar, 250,-
000 BTU Environ.mnlal Equip Heater.
TM 11-1520-206-20P, Feb. OH-23B.
OH-23C. OH-23D, OH-23F, OH-23G.
TM 11-2300-361-15-4, Jon, OInstllo-
tion of adito Set AN/VRC-12 AN/VIC-
46 AN/VRC-47 AN/VRC-53 or
AN/GOC-125 and InteOrco Set
AN/VIC-1 (V) in M60 Tonk.
TM 11-5821-204-20P, Mar. O-1A,
0-1E. OV-IA, OY-1B, OV-.1C U-IA.
U-6A. U-ID, U-IF, U-10A. CH-21C,
CH-34A, C-34C, CH-37A, CH-371.
1-47A, OH-13E. OH-13G H00-13H.
OH-13S, H0.23B, OH.23C. OH-23D.
OH-23F. OH-23G, UH-IA. UnH.IB
UH-ID, UH.19C, UH.19D.
TM 11-595-490-20, Jun, RT-859/
APX-72 Iadio, MT-3809/APX-72 and
MT-3948/APX-72 Mountings.
TM 11-5895-585-15, Jan, AN/MRC-
115IV) Radio Terminal Set.
TM 11-5965-283-15, Mar. H-182/PT
Headsel-Micnophona.
TM 11-5985-293-15, Feb. AS-2169/G
Antenna, AB-1078/G Base Antenna
Support.
TM 11-6130-250-25P, Fb. PP-4127/U
Battery Chargr.
TM 11-6625-1653-15, Jan, MK-986/
ASN-72 Elodronlc Equip Maint KIt.
TM 55-1100-226-124 C1, Mar. CH-
21. OC-34. CH-47, UH-IA-18-IC-ID.
TM 55-1510-202-20PMD, Feb, O-1.
TM 55-1510-202-20PMI, Feb, 0-1.
TM SS-1S10-202-20PMP, Feb. 0-1.
TM 55-1510-204-20 C2, Dec, OV-1.
TM 55-1520-204-10 CS, Mar, OH-13.
TM 55-1520-206-10 C3, Fb. OH-23.
TM 55-1520-206-20PMP, Jan, OH-23.
TM 55-1520-209-10 C10, Mor, CH-47.
TM 55-1520-209-20 C20, Mar, CH-47.
TM 55-1520-209-20PMD Cl, Jan,
CH-47.
TM 55-1520-209-20PMI Cl, Feb,
CH-47.
TM 55-1520-209-20PMP C2, Mar,
Of-47.
TM 55-1520-210-20P-1, Feb, UH-IA-
IB-IC-ID.
TM 55-1520-210-20P-2 C2, Feb.
UH-IA-1B-IC-1D.
TM 55-1520-214-10 C2, Mar. OH-6.
TM 55-1520-214-20 C4, Mar, OH-6.
TM 55-1520-214-20PMP Cl, Feb,
OH-6A.


TM $5-157-17-10 CS, Mor, O-54.
TM 55-1520-217-20 C3, Mor, CH.54.
TM 55-1520-217-35P2 C1, Mar,
CH-S4A.
TM 55-1520-218-10, Jan, UH-IA-18.
TM 55-1520-218-10CI Jaa,
UH.IA.1B.
TM 55-1520-211-20, Jon, UH*-A-18.
TM 55-1520-218-20PMP, Jaa,
UH-IA-IB.
TM 55-1520-219-20, Jan, UH.-IA-11.
TM 55-1520-219-20PMP, Jaa,
UHA-1A-8.
TM 55-1520-220M-20MI, Ja, UH-IC.
TM 55-1520-221-10 C6, Mor, AH-10.
TM 55-1520-221-20P CS, .Feb AH-1G.
TM 55-1520-227-ESC, Fob, CH-47.
TM 55-1520-227-10, Fob, C-47.
TM 55-1520-227-10OCL Feb. 0-47.
TM 55-1520-227-201PM, Feb, -047.
TM 55-1520-227-20PMI, Fb, CH-47.
TM 55-1520-227-20PMP, Fb, CH-47.
TM 55-1680255-24 CS. Ma. OV.1.
TM 750-134 Cl, IJn, All roor wiag.
MODIFICATION WORK 010H1S
9-2320-224-20/9, Fb M114/
M114A1 Commead oad RoaWn Pmr
C.riar.
10 40-211-30/1, Mar, Te-Nt.
55-1500-202-30/2, Feb. UH.1A.15,
UH-ID.
55-1510-201-30/1, Mor, U-S.
55-1510-20-40/2 C, Mar, 0-1.
55-1510-203-30/5, Mar. -6.
55-1510-204-34/, Fb. OV-1.
55-1510-209-20/3, Mar, U-21.
55-1520-204-20/9, Mar, OH-13.
55-152020920/57, Feb, CH47.
55-1520-209-20/5, Feb, CHI47.
55-1520-209-40/20 CI, Feb, CH.47.
55-1520-209-0/54 Cl, Mar, CH-47.
55-1520-209-0/51, Ja, CH-47.
55-1520-210-30/18, Mar, UH-1D.
55-1520-211-30/5. Mar. UH-IA-I.
55-1520-211-30/32, Fb
UH-1A1-1-1C.
55-1520-211-30/35 C2 Mar,
UH1-A-I-1lC.
9-2520-223-50/1, Mar, M48A3, M60,
M103A2 Tanks. M67A2 Flae
Thmovr Took
MISCBUJAIOS
FM 19-5, Mar, CMi Ditltrboancs and

LO 5-2805-256-12, Dec, 1% HP Mil
Sid Gas Eange.
LO 5-2805-257-12, Doc, 3 HP M Sid
Gao Engion.
S 5-3805-246-12-1, -2, -3 and -4,
Feb, Cat 112F Molarild load Grader
DED 12 FI Blode.
LO 5-3495-327-12. Fab, DIddbtiro
Bit Mat GED Trk-MMd 800 Gal Boy
MIL-D37. MIL-D40.
1t 9-1005-262-15, Fob, M23/M24,
XM41 SAubyslts.



























t~o SvPOL


Once again we take you to
Sthe top secret headquarters
|of the Army's maintenance
i supply system.

AHA; CONNIE RODI
HERE SHE AT LAST!
COMES.


































S WE DON'T MILLIONS OF
SJ HOLP OUT DOLLARS WORTH
iV J ON THE TROOPS... OF REUSABLE
SWE KNOCK OURSELVES STUFF 15 OUT
OUT SATISFYING DEMANDS THERE WHICH
...WHY 9 OB PO THEY WE CAN FIX
HOLD OUT ON US?!! AND REISSUE...
IF ONLY WE
CAN GET
OUR HANDS
ON IT!


I KNOW JUST WHAT
TO DO!
=; mm
hO



Ill
























NEXT STOCK ONLY ACCORD-
ING TO YOUR. DEMAND
RECORDS!! TURN IN ITEMS
NOT SUPPORTED BY
DEMAND AND ITEMS FOR
EQUIPMENT YOU NO
LONGER. HAVE.


FINE U5E IT! THE 1316
THING To REMEMBER Is TURN-
IN PRONTO ALL UNSERVICEABLE,
RECOVERABLE ANP REPARABLE
ITEMS ALSO ANY UWAL4THORIZEP
H7EMSj
AWW, I HATE TO
GIVE THIS GAPGEI
UIP... J DON'T
NEEP IT, BUT
IT'S NICE TO HAYI
TSK! TSK !


ER, MAYBE I'LL irtRI If IN
NEED THIS SUB- ...MEANWHILE
ZERO ARCTIC SOME ARCTIC-
BATTERY WARMER )BASED OUTFIT
IF WE SHOULD CAN USE IT.'!
GET SHIPPEPD
THERE SOME
DAY.








Our system of Arm4 supply4
Waits for 4ou and 'that other guy":
Pull "bad" stuff from the bin
For repair turn it in.
It will help you roll, shoot or fltl!







DX
LIST1































IF YOU WANT TO DISPLAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, UFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.







POLICE YOUR STORE ROOMS,
BINS, LOCKERS AND UNUSED
CORNERS OF YOUR SHOPS...
ION'T LET REPARABLE ITEMS
PILE UP...THIS TYPE OF
HOARDING CREATES A
SHORTAGE THAT WILL
HURT YOU IN THE END.'











BUT THEY PO!... ANP THEY
HAvE A WORKABLE SYSTEM.
BUT IT IS BASED. NATURALLY,
ON EXPERIENCE-LIKE, HOW
MANY OF AN ITEM GETS USEP
UP IN A GIVEN TIME.


SO. IF A BUNCH OF
SHORT- SIGHTED TYPES
GET LAZY OR GREEDY
ANP DRAIN OFF AN
UNUSUAL. AMOUNT
B' HOARDING OR
FAILING TO TURN-IN
REPARABLES... THIS
BLOWS THE
WHOLE BIT!


50,
WHY DON'T THOSE
SUPPLY TYPES ORDER
ENOUGH STUFF?


THE STOCKAGE FACTOR ALSO
iS FIGURED BY COUNTING ON
A CERTAIN AMOUNT BEING
RETURNED, REPAIRED AND
REUSEDP.'


1 I SEE... 50 THEIR
ORDERING PLANS GET
SCREWED UP AND
WE GET THE DUE-OUT
NOTICE... WHEN
REALLY THERE'5
PLENTY AROUND
NEEDING JUST A
NUT OR WIRE TO
MAKE 'EM
SERVICEABLE. .


34

























IDENTIFY YOUR RECOVERABLE
PLL ITEMS ON YOUR SUPPLY
RECORD SO YOU WON'T FORGET
TO TURN-IN UNSERVICEABLE
ITEMS WHEN YOU HIT SUPPORT
FOR SERVICEABLE
REPLACEMENTS/









CONGRATULATIONS
CONNIE... YOU
DID IT AGAINI


F YES, EVER I
SINCE YOU DIP
THAT EDUCATING
BIT IN THE FIELD
THE SYSTEM'S
SMOOTHED OUT
L AGAIM'


DON'T WORRY, CHIEF.!
WE'LL BE BACK SOON
AS THEY RELAX
AGAIN. HEH,EH. IHJ.


LMI


LV.E.T.C.H. H.Q.
Special Subversive
Anti-Maintenance
Division )
S .0M


*KVETCH (Killers, Villians, Enemies, Terrible Collection of Humans)


r .~L,.Rn~j


4110010,






M16A1 RIFLE

ADDED LSA
INSURANCE
.lW2.aMr,


Oops, hold one there, you sure-shootin' M16AI zapman.
Before you head out on patrol or even to the firing range, add this one bit of
LSA-type insurance to your weapon. WHAT WE MEAN
THIS IS WHAT WE MEAN
Put a very light film of LSA inside the BY VERY
bore, the chamber and on the locking lugs Put some LSA on a swab, LIGHT!
... after you clean 'em good and get through squeeze the swab out till
with the other before-firing cleaning and lub- it's just moist...
ing chores outlined in paros 3-7 and 3-8 of
TM 9-1005-249-14 (1 Aug 66) w/4 changes.













The film of LSA it leaves won't interfere one bit with your shooting, but it
will protect the pas against corrosion-especially, if for some reason you
don't get to fire off.
The next change to your good book will have a word on this.
Meantime, remember: Cleaning and lubing before firing go together like a
go-go girl and a cage.




















Dear Half-Mast,
Some of the M16AI rifles in our outfit have letters stamped on 'em to show that
they've been chrome-plated. Does this mean they don't need as much cleaning as
those not chrome-plated, or what?


Dear Specialist F. C. E.,
Kill that idea quick, Man! Every
weapon ever made needs the best clean-
ing job you can give it.
If your M16A1 has a C, or RNC or
RUC stamped 1 inch from the flash sup-
pressor shoulder, it means the chamber
has been chrome-plated and that's
all. Not the bore, or any other part.
This chrome job helps keep the cham-
ber area from getting pitted or cor-
roded... a real good deal. It will not
keep the chamber from getting powder-
fouled or otherwise gooked up.
The dirt'll get in there same as


SP4 F. C. E.
always, and it will still foul up your
firing if you don't get rid of it real often.
Matter of fact, after a weapon's been
fired for some time, you can't tell by
looking whether its chamber's been
plated or not. Either way, give the
chamber the cleaning job the TM calls
for. And keep the habit of eyeballing
the chamber area after you clean it for
any kind of damage.

BORE NOT CHROMED
Once more, the bore is not chrome-
plated. Clean it extra carefully-and
keep a sharp eye peeled for pitting.


H~~-A~


looks can be deceiving. battered bolt, ruptured cartridge or
unextracted cartridge. And too little
headspace in the other weapon can
IDDBIIAL make it tough to chamber a round.
DONT BT So ... please not to switch bolts-
ON if! either on purpose or by accident. And
you can make the switch accidentally
What your eye can't see is the hair- by mixing your disassembled parts with
width difference between bolts for the another guy's-like when you're clean
same weapon--the kind of difference ing the weapon.






You know it... you leave the job of removing the
butt plate from your M14 rifle to the man in your HANDS
support unit. OF
And now that the M14 is getting a plastic stock,
it's even more of a must for you to keep a screw-
driver, knife blade or what-have-you dear of the
screws-especially the top one--that hold the butt
plate fast.
Seems the top screw goes into a nut and retainer
nut in the plastic stock. With the screw out, the nuts
can get lost. And when this happens, it's a job for
your DSU to replace them.







M60

NEEP SOME
SIGHT ADVICE


~j~AI6P Hirs UIr


Even a seeing-cye mutt can't help
you if you let the elevation sight scale
on your M60 machine gun get bent or
busted. And this aluminum part is the
No. I patsy when you're careless with
your weapon. So-o-o-o...

1. Always loosen the range-plate screw
before you move the scale up or
down. And tighten it reda snug after
you've found your setting. \


2. If the tadicad situation permits,
always fold the sight down flat when
you cany or haul the M60, and any
time you lift the cover. You don't
have to danger the sewing to do
this, either.


3. Always fold the sight dwn flat be-
fore you put your weapon in a
vehide-ond he mighty careful
how you put it in the vehide, too.
Never pile one weapon n top of
another. I- %
%4 -


7/11


Incidentally, if your rear sight assem-
bly does get banged up, get DS on it,
pronto. They're now authorized to re-
place busted parts.


_W


















NOW, I |
KNOW A
COUPLE OF LAPS
POWN IN SUPPORT
ThAT'LL SAVE YOU.

Are the socket-head cap screws (re-
taining bolts) loose?
Those would be the ones that hold
the elevating and traversing assembly
to the tripod on the M79 mount for
your M40A1 106-MM recoilless rifle.
Your support people can take care
of 'em by latching onto a 10-CC plastic
bottle of sealing compound -the kind
that comes under FSN 8030-081-2339
on page 73 of Fed Cat C8000-IL-A
(Jan 68).

TAKE A MINUTE
TO CHECK THE
6 SCREWS IN THE
5POTTING GUN /
RECEIVER!/ 0


They'll remove the
screws and lock washer
...clean the screw and
hole threads with dry
cleaning solvent. Put new
lock washers on the screws...
and then coat the screw threads with the
sealing compound. After the screws
are put back and tightened, you're in
business.


GET 'EM STAKED

He%, reckless rifleman, take a minute
right now to ee-check these 6 screws
in the receiver of your M8C sporting
gun. Loose? Missing? Not staked?
They're apt to work loose after a lot
of firing if the wrong screws are in
there and if they're not staked. Get your
DS to replace any loose screws with
socket-head cap screws (FSN 5305-389-
81331 and to stake each of the 6 screws
in 2 places.




















off in places and you'd lik
the shiny spots were dulle
what to do.


Ask your armorer to do
up painting. GSA catalog (


ON GUARD


I rOLE
YA NOT TO
S HAVE IT ]
WELDED C 7




nishon your a 16-oz pressurized can of flat black
rd has worn lacquer that's just the ticket. It comes
e it better if under FSN 8010-582-5382.
d? Tell you There's also something worth know-
ing about the M6 bayonet knife-the
one that goes in the M8A1 scabbard.
Don't sweat it if the guard loosens.
If it becomes so loose that the plastic
handle cracks, then it's time for a new
bayonet. But the chances of this happen-
ing are on the slim side.
One thing you don't want is for any-
one to try to weld the guard to the
some touch- blade. This could foul up the hardness
Oct 67) lists of the blade.







SNB(DON'T HOOK A MISFIRE M

AW, 5ARGE--
IT WAS JUSTA BYEAH
LI'L WIRE! BU WE
HAP A
MISFIRE!



It ,*,, \Watch it. .ou 2."5-in rocket han-
dlers! If ,our folding hn aerial rockets
Si ,' ... come through with retaining wires in-
,J l stead of shorting caps over rheir fin
IL. ends. be real careful ahen %ou unpack
em that you don't snag this retaining
v aire on the firing v ire leading to the
rocket motor or on the contact disc
-holding the fins together.
You could cause a misfire if you hooked up a rocket in the launcher with a
damaged firing wire or a disconnected disc on it.
Here's the safe way to do it: Lift up the looped end of the retaining wire,
then push it forward and away to unhook the other end -making sure neither
end catches on that firing wire or the contact disc.


Then, never forget to check the condition of the firing wire and disc as you
load the rocket in the launcher.






M113A1 CARRIER
SMOOTH
OPERATORS
NEEDED

YOU ARE?
SO LET'S
SEE HOW
YOU DO
WITH YOUR
ENGINE .
^d


A smooth operator always knows just
what to do, whether he's making out
with girls or keeping the blower drive
shaft on his M113A1 engine from
breaking.
The smooth operator sees to it that
his M113A1 engine is adjusted so it has
a gentle idle. A rough idle puts too
much strain on the shaft.
Likewise, he lets his engine warm up
3 to 5 minutes at 800 to 1,000 RPM
before he moves out and he gives it a
2-minute cool-down period at 1,000
RPM before he shuts down.
He does these engine and shaft-
saving things because he operates his
vehicle like it says in Change 1 (Oct
65) to his TM 9-2300-224-10/2/1
(Sep 64).
A SUDDEN
TORQUE ,\
CHANGE....


A smooth operator always keeps his
air cleaner clean, since a plugged air
cleaner puts a fatal strain on the blower
drive shaft.
One thing a smooth operator will
never do-he will never, but never,
stop the vehicle engine by pulling the
fuel cutoff out and letting the vehicle
coast to a stop. This sudden change in
torque can break the shaft.
The new and tougher shaft, FSN
2990-903-0908, will also break if
abused. (It is made weak on purpose
so it will break and save the blower
and/or engine.)
If this happens, send out an EIR on
DA Form 2407.


-. CAN CLOBBER
S THE BLOWER
DRIVE SHAFT!

















Dear Half-Mast, 'W\AWfIN? ,M '1Wli' IIL Il Ir----..J ll 1-I
What are the right stall-check figures for the M 13 and M577 carriers' The ESC
says one thing and the TM's another. Which is right?
CW4 ,. M.
Dear Mr. J. M.,
Neither. The correct stall-check speed range for all members of the Ml13
(gas engine) family of vehicles is 2300-2600 RPM in 3-6 gear position.
The newest ESC's and TM's will have this figure. Hl! Oat


TRACK PAD TIP


WHO OLD MAN,
SAYS THAT'S




Dear Half-Mast, ,
What is the authority for removing track pads on the M 113 personnel carrier?
SP5 J. R. B.
Dear Specialist J. R. B.,
There is no special authority for this but none is needed. Your CO can order
it done whenever he thinks that running without track pads will improve vehicle
operation. H f


SHOE BLUES

FSN 2530-930-2011 is the number for one complete shoe assembly for any
member of the M 13/M113A1 family of vehicles. However, the shoes come 8
to a package, so if possible, order in multiples of 8 and supply won't have to
open packages.






The M26 cupola on your M114A1 M114A1
carrier can put your gun on target in CARRIER
a flash. But unless iou know how to use
it right you can bang your buddi in the ,
head or shoot .50 caliber holes in your
S o n vehicle. MAXIMUM
The 2 things that can mess nou up DEPRESSION IS 15 PEGREES...
i are BUT MAXIMUM SAFE
are: DEPRESSION I DEGREES
S ,.Tr ing to operate with the gun de- IN SOME PLACES.
* pressed too lohw.
2.Not understanding how the inter-
rupters work.
Maximum depression for the gun is
15 degrees 1265 milst but it's not safe "
to trascrse with the gun lower than"
,d -,-or t I "i m;ili epen outside of the l.


zone protected b\ the interrupters.
Under degrees the gun barrel %ill
I hit the observer's hatch cover hold-open
- catch mount II \ou lowered the barrel
to 12 degrees (21 mils) .ou would also
hit the driver's hatch coaer hinge.
If Iou tried to fire at or near maxi-
' mum depression twih %our gun posi-
rtoned to the front of the vehicle. sou
could ,hoot out iour headlights, hit
the right corner of the vehicle, and put
holes in the surfboard if it happened to
be up.
0,I


-CE -iY


t


Aside from these danger areas you
can, of course, both traverse and shoot
at maximum depression.
The thing to do is traverse gently at
different elevations until you get a feel
for how low you can go in various posi-
tions before iou hit something. Sort of
file that away in your memory like you
hate already done with the location of
the interrupters.
Not understanding how the inter-
rupters work is the other thing that can
foul you up.
As iou already know, when you tra-
serse in a complete circle to the left and


CAPERS 1* -




4


a complete circle to the right, there are
2 places where the gun stops like a
balky mule and will not go ahead until
you press the red o'errind button near
the poIer control handle.


OVERRIDE
BUTTON



\\ hat iou may nor know is that on
late production and retrofit MI I iA I's.
the 2 interrupter points are closer to-
gether, gis ing )ou a wider area to mo e
the gun without hitting either inter-
rupter.
Another thing, each individual vehi-
cle, old or newt. aries slightly tn the
placement of its interrupter stops, so
Iearn where they are on sour vehicle.
These stops are a warning to the
track commander that his observer
might be in danger of gearing clobber-
ed. The TC should nor press on the
override button until he is sure the gun
barrel is riding high enough to clear
both the observer and the observer's
machine gun.


5 ,: A'~.-. -


r







This system will work OK if everybody remembers that each stop gives pro-
tection from only one direction.
After the override button is pressed and you continue traversing the gun in
the same direction, you will pass through the opposite stop without knowing it.
This stop will work only if your gun barrel "hits" it while moving in the
opposite direction.


DErUIKLE ur. HILL V
HALT THE GUN.



This is the way to remember it .... Once you have pressed the override for
either stop, neither stop will work again until it is hit by a gun barrel traveling
in the direction it protects for. A gun barrel going in the opposite direction
would pass right through the position without being stopped.
'Course, actually the stop action is done by a cam but the position of the gun
is what you have to think about so you can clobber the Bad Guys instead of your
buddies or your own vehicle.





NEW OIL FILTER CD 850
SFO TRANSMISSION





FSN 4330-770-7862 FSN 2520-61-1983
LD NEW (Reusable)
Supply will no longer issue the old filter for CD 850 series transmissions.
However, they will still be used for the CD 500 series transmissions.






Dear Editor,
We know what you mean when you say an armored vehicle
launched bridge can collapse when the lock pin safety pins drop
out of place. (Page 42, PS 177)
The safety pins stay in place on the AVL bridges here-now
that we've wrapped them with a few turns of plain old safety
wire. Ralph Barbari, SAFETY
Fort Carson, Colo. WIRED


j^, c THE SWINGER "I

Hey, now hear this. Your
combat vehicle crewman's hel-
"i met's not made for tossing
around in circles by holding
the end of the upper cord as-
sembly. That's plumb rough
on the cord.
Instead ... carry the helmet
in your hand or under your
arm.







EIBMflli'TI1EAI~ii)





/TH IS
BABY SURE
DOES THE
JOB,
CONNIE. Z


Here's a little tip on the halves of
the AS-2023 antenna reflector.... Even
though they're interchangeable your
best bet's to install 'em the same way
each time. 'Cause once the set's adjusted
ONCE ITr ADJUSTED... .


Coming to ihe front of the quiet ones
with ihe big cars is the AN/PPS-5
radar ser.
Taking orer the duties of the AN/
PPS-.i I and AN/TPS-21. and -3( 1
radar sets, it scans more [erritun than
the Pips -i and it's nor as big as the
Tips)- 2 1.
Yep, the Pipsy-5 covers a locta
ground, but it still takes preventive
maintenance... with capital PM ... to
keep 'er scanning job up to snuff.
---


lake the RI 69? iadae irecivei
fransmitter
One thing that II buqqer up your
ser is Irving to make elevotion
adjustments, ,thout rcleacing the
lock
II s umple though
Juls pull the elEv iron ot* lock
out and push the lock Ievrl down


YES,
PROVIDING
YOU KEEP UP
WITH HER PM,


NEVER GET
DIRECTLY IN
FRONT OF
ANTENNA


BEAM
WIDTH


After setting elevation adlust
handwheel. push the lock Ilver up
and the stow lock in


0' course, remember to have the
handwheel at 0 elevation when
you're on the move with your set
or it'll get damaged.


Always push the beam -
width control in the NAR
position when installing
the AS 7024 waveguide
horn. Otherwise,the flange
will scrape against the
waterproof rubber protec-
tor and it could get a hole
in it.
When the horn's not installed, be sure the
protective cover is slipped over the feedhom
coupling to keep it free of dust and dirt.


...IT'S BEST TO ALWAYS
INSTALL THE VALVES
THE SAME WAY.
with the reflector in place, the setting
can be a little off when the reflector is
reversed.
To keep 'em the same, put a small
piece of tape on the back and at the top
of each half so's you can see or feel
which side is which when you're re-
installing 'em.
On the CX-8666 remoting cable, you
should never put it on the ground unless





the dust cover is on the connector. With-
out the cover dirt or sand can get inside
and short 'er out.
Also, in hooking up the CX-8666 to
the remote cable connector plug take a







look-see at the color coded (orange)
ring. If it's showing you know the con-
nector is in place and the pressure lock
has a good grip on the plug.
Then there's the battery cable. It too
has the color-coded pressure lock to
insure it's secured to the RT's battery
connector. CABLE
CONNECTOR









But, when the battery cable isn't in
use, keep it snugged up to the dummy
plug on the bottom of the CY-3871
battery box. This'll help keep the con-
nector clean and dry.
And, you say you have to pull the
end cap and storage bracket out of the
MX-7565 tripod column assembly and
lay it down every time you set up the
MT-2958 radar tripod.


Then, loosen the leg locks and swing the
legs in the opposite direction.
\\ //


S'


ygNlW MI1 IM
This'll let you leave the bracket with its
components shoved up the column, safe and
sound out of the way of big-booted feet.

Oh yes! Wipe the dirt or other such
off those ground pins before stowing
'em. Besides protecting the telescope
lens, you might save yourself from hav-
ing to carry an extra ounce or two.
Incidentally, there's always an elec-
tronic mathematician around who
wants to make 6, 12 and 24 the same
when it comes to the use of an outside
power source.
Forget it!
PP-4450
POWER


USE WITH 6 OR 24-VOLT BATTERY ONLY
Dressing up the Pipsy-5 with a PP-
4450 power supply for auxiliary power
ties into a 24-volt external battery only.
One last tip...
Keep dust caps and covers on con-
nectors and plugs. A dirty connector
can short out your Pipsy.







LUBE IT L QHTLY

More'n likely you won't need more
than 15 to 20 CC's to bring the oil level
even with the bottom of the front hole.
That's what it takes for proper lub-
ing.


When you lube ... be careful.
In refilling your drained AN/MPQ-
4A radar set's scanner gear motor gear-
case, watch it. Better guard against put-
ting in too much oil.
Too much'll cause leakage and dam-
age to your oil seals.


COMING UP ROSY


Don't sweat it. '
When this blooming occurs in your set's IP-795 radar target indicator, pull
the plug.
That is disconnect the 5W6 cable's P2 plug on the CV-2093 signal data
converter-restorer from the 9A2J3 video jack of the R-1335/G or radio receiver.
Leave it off until you're sure a data signal is coming in, then reconnect 'em.
This is in the very latest change to TM 11-5840-294-12 (Sep 66).






CPS CYCLES .\ MY
SHMYGLES! PUBS
ARE THEY'RE D ON'T S
HERTZ NUTHIN
NOW N W! ABOUT
HERTZ --- _____ HAT.
You'll be in the driver's seat when you get this cycle per second changeover
to hertz down pat. 'Cause in electrical, electronic and communication circles
hertz (hz) is replacing cycles per second(cps). So ... instead of words like kilo-
cycles, megacycles and gigacycles, you'll be seeing kilohertz (khz), megahertz
(mhz) and gigahertz (ghz). 0' course, it'll be some time for the cycle system to
be scrubbed, so you'll still be seeing it around for awhile in pubs and on
equipment.
This hertz term has nothing to do with the car rental business. It is only the
naming of common electromagnetic terms for an early radio wave discoverer,
Heinrich Hertz. No. 1 radio guy, you might say.



THOSE SPLITS CAN HURT



Is that rubber protector on your elec- Then taper- the edge. Watch out you
trical cord assembly for the SB-22()/ don't whittle the cord, or your hands.
PT switchboard doing the splits? By the way, when you're working
That sleeve-the one that shields a the switchboard, never let any of those
portion of the cord assembly can turn self-retractable plugs slam back into the
up split. This doesn't do your TA-222/ entrance holes. This'll cause much
PT line jack or TA-326/PT trunk jack damage to the plugs and, maybe, fly up
cord assembly any good at all. and crack the catseye covers or your
To remedy this splitting, take a own eyes.


single-edged razor blade or a sharp
knife and-cutting around the cord-
trim off the split portion of the sleeve.


CUT SLEEVE-NOT THE CORD


So-o-o-o ... make it gentle when
you handle those plugs... they'll last
longer... and they'll do better, too.






FOR PORTABLES U MER i ---- o
MORE Ru_ f
PER
PACK HERE ir.
PACK cOME, COACH!

Like a fresh, power-packed football team coming in the game at half-time a
couple of high-powered magnesium dry batteries are field-bound for portable
radio sets.
They're fresher, ready for longer periods of workout and can really take
the heat.

BA 4270/U (FSN 6135-390-0031)
SUBS FOR BA-270/U
IN AN/PRC-6





BA-4386(FSN 6135-926-8322)SUBS
FOR BA-386 IN AN/PRC-25.
These Perk power cuties will come through for you without much sweat at
temperatures up to 160 degrees F.
When you have your mitts on one of these longlife batteries go easy about
replacing' it. 'Cause the BA-4000 series magnesium types have longer transpor-
tation and storage life, and do not need to be kept in the cool, anytime.
While they're not in use, they sleep--pretty much holding their rated hours
of service life. This being 40 hours for the BA-4270 as compared to its team-
mate, the BA-270, with 24 hours at best, and 55 hours for the BA-4386, com-
pared to 30 hours for the BA-386.
To make sure you know you have a magnesium battery, the shipping, inter-
mediate and unit container are stenciled, stamped or labeled in orange or red
letters:
LONG UFE MAGNESIUM BATTERY
Also, an orange pressure, sensitized tape with bold, black type ... TWICE
THE LIFE OF BA-270 ... or ... BA-386 ... is over the battery socket. Take it
off when you're ready to put 'er in the Perk-6 or -25.
To keep you getting' better batteries, fill out the log (card) that's with each
battery. It furnishes feedback info on the battery's performance.
55






You might latch onto a clairvoyant,
an astrologer, or a Gypsy fortune-teller
-but preliminary PM by the old per-
sonal inspection route pays off big with
the AN/PRC-6 radio set.
To keep your Perk-6 full of person-
ality and at the ready, you'd certainly
never stretch that new looped handset
cord, just to see how far it'll go. The
curly-cord could lose its snap.
You'd remember to remove your BA-
270/U battery, or BA-4270/U long-life
battery if you meant to keep your set
out of use for a time.
You're extra careful with the sub-
miniature tubes along both sides of
the receiver-transmitter no break-
age likely for you.
And you'd never turn the discrimina-
tor-transformer .. one half-turn can
put you off-frequency.
If the small tube pins break in their
sockets, you'd not try to pry 'em out,
that's for sure. That's a job for support.
You always give the air valve a half-
turn to the left to open it, a half-turn
to the right to close it. Too much turning'
will twist out the knob. If this gets
lost, moisture has an Open Sesame to
S your set.
(Incidentally, the air valve should be
open when the Perk-6 is operating, to
S avoid damage from battery pressure.)
S You're always careful about han-
dling the cover ... rough removals can
sabotage the Y-spring.
But, guess it wouldn't hurt, would it
even as careful as you are- to check
I over some of the potential danger areas
Son your Perk-6.


^. IH
O' -Dy dam.
HASIS- amp, drty


CS ..Io roed.ap
dirty.







HANDSET H-33 ( )/PT


clogged holes.


HANDSET CONNECTOR
- Damp, dirty.


HANDSET CORD-Kink
ed, frayed cut.


DISCRIMINATORY.
TRANSFORMER Keep
unturned.

ELECTRICAL CONTACTS
- Dirty, corroded


TUBES -Broken, glass
cracked, not snug
guards missing


*
a -


SUB MINIATURE TUBES
- Broken


WATERPROOF GASKETS
- Leaky.


1 I -


OPERATING CRYSTAL
- Not snug.







SAFETY

S PUB CAN

SAVE YOUR
NEW
SWORD LIFE
OUT
M 0B5- MOBILE
CRANES



NO SWEAT
} 5ARGE. I'M WEARING
INSULATORS
Electrocution hazards in crane operation near high-
voltage lines is the target of TB 385-101 (Jan 67). The
pub gives commanders 8 recipes to cut down accidents,
and new equipment just made available backs up the
bulletin.
First listed in the safeguards is provision of a dielectric boom shield and in-
sulated link for lift lines. The dielectric shield can be placed above the boom and
end sheaves to fend off charged wires. The link can fit between the hook block
and the load, protecting assistants on the ground.


INSULATED
LINK

DIELECTlRIC
BOOM SHIFiLD
That's where the new equipment comes in. U.S. Army Mobility Equipment
Command has two kits, both of which include entire Boom Shield and Link out-
fits. For cranes under 20-ton size, FSN 3815-065-8609 gets a Shield. Safety,
Electrical, crane boom, insulated, plastic-coated, and a Link, Insulating, Crane
load line, with hook and swivel. Cranes 20-ton size and over take the same-
name outfit, but under FSN 3815-799-0654.
But just putting the new stuff on isn't the whole story. Training, caution, and
respect for the rest of the rules are also needed.
59





ON YOUR MHE-202...
SOMETHING NEW'S BEEN ADDED


You may do a doubletake when you
look at the control panel of your Chrys-
ler Model 6,000-lb rough terrain fork
lift. That emergency stop control seems
to have moved to the right.
You're not seeing things, it has been
moved so that a "T" handle could be
put there for the new "Normal Engine
Shutoff". This new handle is easy to
use ... DOWN to start, and UP to stop.
(You can remember by comparing it to
the accelerator of your vehicle-push


down to go and let up to stop.)
Always shut the engine off with the
shutoff control before you turn the
ignition switch off.
The fuel shutoff solenoid, FSN 2920-
924-8773, which was wired to the
ignition switch, has been done away
with. You no longer need it.

NVARNING: o not usethe erner
gcnc^y sto control fr anything buta
ernergencN. ^^^^^^^^^^^


TIRE INFLATION RACK
Dear Half-Mast,
Our outfit's required to use a tire infla-
tion rack for inflating tires with a split
locking ring. I agree that this rack should
be used.
My question is-is there an FSN for
such a cage or rock?
CW2 J. W. S.
Dear Mr. J. W. S.,
There's no tire inflation rack in
the supply system. Most outfits I've
run into just make a rack out of
pipe or angle stock. The metal used
is welded together.
llqoa 60






ALLOW FOR EXPANSION

SWhen you fill those 500-gallon col-
lapsible drums (FSN 8110-753-4892
and 8110-824-1444) without using the
'; pressure filling control (FSN 4930-855-
8739), be sure that you don't overfill
them. Leave a slight bow in the top
MURPH OVER- of the drum a minimum of 3/4-in to
FIALEP THE TA NK 1-1/2-in deep to allow for expansion
t of fuel in hot weather and at high
altitudes.
You have to be real careful when transporting these drums at high altitude;
you don't want internal pressure to go over 5 PSI. Use the pressure control
device for drum filling operations any time you're going to be hauling the drums
at high altitude.

FILL THE FORM :

6 (OMMODITY
Fill out that DA Form 2-10" Equip- COMMAND
ment Improement Report tEIRI and -O i
send it in today to the commodity com-
mand that made your equipment. N Jt1 s
That's the wai to tell the engineer
types what goes wrong on the gear
they design. Don't wait; do it roday.






g TOXOR L--
'Round and 'round they flit... and that's the "X" or the "L" of it. Some
unwanted and unneeded duplicate reports are plugging pipelines and stacking
up at NMP's.
Appendix II of TM 38-750 tells where most "feedback" type forms should
go. But a note there tells you that-once the data is transferred to punch cards


and sent on its way-the filled in "hard copy" forms will be held at the local
level.
What's more, paras 9 and 13 of DA Cir 700-15 (11 Oct 67) have some special
word on disposition of the 4 copies of DA 2408-7.
For both inventory actions and other transactions (transfers, gains, losses and
FSN changes):


OR HOLD
Keep in mind, too, that any time the rules permit you to report a transfer of
several items on one DA-2408-7, the Logbook copy is retained in the unit voucher
files for 6 months and then destroyed.
Wherever the rules in DA Circular 700-15 conflict wit rules in TM 38-750,
they superseded the rules in the TM- unless there's a change to the TM with
a later date.

























FSN 4230-720-1618. But, all you've got to work with are 5 items listed in
Sect II, Ch 3 (Sep 66), TM 3-4230-204-15. So, when anything you can't fix goes
wrong, the only thing you can do is get the M11 replaced with a new one.
A new one, in fact, is the only answer you have to the maintenance short-
comings (DA Pam 750-10) that are beyond your control.







CALIBRATION

WHEN PIP YOU
GET THIS TESTER
CALIBRATED LAST?


Sure, you've been trying to take care of those tools in your No. 2 Common
Tool Kit, but you may have overlooked TB 750-113 (Sep 67), which lists those
tools that need calibrating. Here they are:



Multimeter 6625-543-1438 9-6625-794-50 180
Scle, Didl Idikcaing 6670-254-4634 9-6670-248-50 180
Tester, Cylinder Compression 4910-250-2423 9-6685-210-50 *SCAN
Testehterihl m i(WAsji~ i Egine 4910-255-673 9-4910-508-50 180
Tester, Spring Resiliency 6635-449-3750 9-6670-251-50 180
Tes I Se, Genelr d Vog 4910-092-9136 TM 94910401-12 180
R agulular A d mi.- e- .
Test Set, Tachometer-Dwell 4910-395-1996 180
WrMndsTtoq 51210-640-634 9.5120-202-50 90
*Scheduled for Calibration As Necessary
You don't have to do the calibrating, because your support calibration people
do it. But be sure to check those tools listed above to see if they have the DA
Label 80 on them to show when they're due for calibration. If there's no label,
better send your DA Form 2407 request to support to have it done. TM 38-750
gives the dope on how to fill out the 2407.


GENERATOR BREATHING RIGHT?
When you're doing those PM services on your 5- and 10-KW generators, don't
forget the crankcase breather should be cleaned at least quarterly. More often
is even better, especially if you're in a sandy and dusty area.







BRIEFS r^ CONIE CALLL ING
BRIE F S CONNIE ROP...
We GOT A
MAINTENANCE!
c 7j PROBLEM !


7ew sse Rude
A change on ESC ratings is in the mill
for Combat and Tactical Vehicles plus
other equipment rated on age or ac-
cumulated miles. Watch for changes
to ESC TM's before making the next
ESC rating. Age alone should no
longer give your rig an Amber rating.
The word went out to major commands
in DA Msg 849833 (1 Feb 68.)



Been having ignition timing light
trouble with your FSN 4910-500-2135
model? Replace it with 4910-937-5724,
which will get you a Sun-Electric No.
X47 or equal. The timing light is a part
of your No. 1 and No. 2 common tool
kits. You'll find this new one listed in
SC 4910-95-CL-A72 (Apr 67) (No. 2
Common) and SC 4910-95-CLA74 (May
67) (No. 1 Common).


So/der, So/dt er 7
Having trouble finding an FSN for
Solder, Resin Core, Alloy 60/40,
1/32-in diameter, Code 81348 No.
QQS571, for use with your Pershing and
Sergeant guided missile test sets? Ask
for FSN 3439-555-4629. You'll find it
listed in SC 3432/70-IL (Jul 67).


W&uti6ued MWO
Your starter gets MWO 9-2920-248-
30/1 (Dec 67) if you've got a 2-1/2-
ton truck with the LD 465-1 engine or a
5-ton truck with either the LDS 465-1 or
LDS 465-1A engine. Your support will
fix up the solenoid to save you starter
troubles. (Catch the slip in the MWO -
it should be Starter Assy, FSN 2920-
999-6216.)



Your M17 field protective mask must
be a good fit... and it's especially
risky to wear one that's too large. Could
be you've been issued a medium (FSN
4240-542-4451) or a large (FSN 4240-
542-4452) M17, when you need a small
(FSN 4240-542-4450) mask. So test
yours out for the right fit like page 22
of TM 3-4240-202-15 says.


One'Al Do
No need to repeat your DA Form 17
order for the same pub to the AG Pub-
lications Centers unless you get the word
from them that they can't identify the
pub you want. They keep your order on
file and will ship it to you when they get
it. Take a look at DA Pamphlet 310-10
(May 64), para 18 d.


Would You .Stake Your Life Y'on
the Condition of Your Equipment?






If you've
got free
turn-in,
please tag
the parts


for repair
and reissue
carefully
to avoid
damage
in transit.


BECAUSE-

MAY BE,


THIS MAN

YOU


Get your reparable
items back into the
supply system NOW,
so you can help yourself
later ....