<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Main
 Back Cover














PS
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PDF VIEWER PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00029
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1967
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00029

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

PS174_1967 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18-19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24-25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38-39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44-45
        Page 46-47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56-57
        Page 58-59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text






I


w- c-=---


S THINK IT'S
BAP NOW...
WAIT TILL THE
SPRY SEASON
5TARTS.


Y/ES THE5E
SNO~HAL
ALLA TIME,
^ JOE-'
WHAT'S '
SO UNUSuAL
ABOUT THESE
SONPITIONS?


,-Jc


*^'J^


V I ^
-1 i. -.^i


















Commanding general
., ii" '. ."Military A"t,. an "
Command Vltfl1""'
Smob irpoer and fighting men are our
/-. : ru' l fir e'power anti
' Sgter a in m, ielna. They are the reasons wh battle
test assets In a these ll sez are
field victor is a certainly. The greatest of themobi are
he men of coure but the firepo r a uddnl a
the mental an lo our advantage dden
esentil, dnokept in top.notch
finally if our fighting equipment
a l dependable hard-
condition-
tUve- depend upon quicreactio ll and depelilh hard
ware. whether in the rice paddy. tropical jungle, mountain
or coahetal plin aea of Vieetna. e neler ha.e encoun-
or oatal plain area where. The
S termed more difficult combat conditions any.,here. The
i-ered mor eo1 anth bratie combination
alternating mooon seasn on the probabili that
of heat, dust, rain and mud add to the probabin thattle
equipment will fail at precise. the rong imet in barottm he
unless we take care of e ier piece of equine
Un-I- to the torque wrench.
ur-D to the torquent mu be given the finest possible care.

It mu e operated properly. It must be cleaned. lubricated
and adjusted regularly. I t muse repaired promly and
correctly- cobat h.a Cood pre*e-
Never before in the historof co abolutel good preen-
the maintenance been so important- o utey e
ti o the .. nten fighting men and their allie.
tial-to the L~s. figh ing "e


IS A MUST!!


Connie and I have made tbii
PS Magazine all about mainte
Army equipment under condi
you find in Vietnam.
If you're "in-country" now,
this issue hits you where it he
If you're not in Vietnam. be
it anyway.
IGUYS GET ROTA
YOUR CHANCE
BEING 'N- COU
SoON ARE REAL
HAPPY PM


L e iL PSE UItALE ImaWon.nr

tlsuI No. 174 19gI7-Series
IN THIS ISSUE

FIREPOWER 2-22
"' Ul M lHwze 2 .6
ita01Ghnmdiaclun 17
I16bl aIe 1122




COMMUNICATIONS 23-27
TA4I31PorTk3M12/PT 23
Truaao tasoeiod ctor 24-n



AIR MOBILITY 37-45
hippinlPg W ek Hueyi 3C 3
ThyBoToBak 4445
Issue of
nance of
ions like

we hope GROUND MOBILITY 46-55
we hope Trick hts MM
Ips. Cc Pu ollk
tter read


S OF
ITRY"
L.GOOD-
I 1


7-v-


GENERAL AND SUPPLY.
.,.,IWTivt t SIM HaPdWi adm 21
iZuWtt 0llf 0 SUpply 3,7.13.14. 19.

-; .-Miad IN r a f itt fi
U- I bus h w- S by IIhadumn.
ta am. I F1rt ay l.
11sBUF ON: In iactolict e ith re-
ihremnts sinutted an DA Form 12-4.

n P0 M,.2,-, 9.







FIREPOWER
__EO~~


FIELD-GROWN '

ADVICE ON YOUR

M102 HOWITZER


Your M102 105-MM lightweight towed howitz-
0 her's sure throwing heavyweight punches where they
JSE count.
IZE. But, here're some gentle reminders to avoid cer-
BE tain PM goofs that've been known to cramp its
fighting style at times. You Chiefs of Smoke could
do worse than to get every guy in your crew to look
'em over careful-like and then take the pledge.
Like:


take the covers off every day at least...
dry the covers ... wipe all the scopes
and mounts real dry .give a sharp
look that no moisture's leaking into the
counters and windows and then re-
place the covers.


-
Not a single one of these places needs
lubing-and you'd better not forget
it! In fact, if you put oil or grease on
em, it'll mess up the dry film lubricant
and this'll collect dust and grit that'll
chew out the parts.
Just keep all these parts real clean
with Cleaning Compound (FSN 7930-
395-9542... 1 pt). Be positive you
never clean 'em with anything that con-
tains an oil base.
FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT
Condensation Control-Never
make the mistake of believing that your
scopes and quadrant are protected when
you put the covers on 'em. Sure, these
plastic-type covers do a good job of
keeping rain, fog, dust and the like off
these delicate pieces but they also
create one heckuva problem with con-
densation.
A lot of section chiefs find this a good
way to fight it: Detail a good man to


KEEP COVERS ON BUT
CHECK DAILY FOR CONDENSATION


Thid






Pan-Tel Counters Won't Count? -
Maybe you're trying to drive in high
gear when all you've got is low. Your
TM says don't turn the Pan-Tel coun-
ter crank faster than 150 turns per
minute for a very short time or more
than 100 turns a minute for continuous
movement. Otherwise, you'll damage
the counters 1


So, slow down, Gunner! T
you save might be your own.
Each turn of the handle mm
sight head and counters 100 mil
OK, so here're the safe speed li
you: For that short run--sa
1600 mils-count 3 seconds
2 turns or count 10 for the 16
For the long run-say. 3200 i
up-count a full second for e;
of the handle.
In-lrument Lights Case-
forger the dumm) receptacle ge
ed into the container. Neser ju
in and grab the banery case a
away. You'll damage the ca


wire connection. Before you remove the
case, unscrew the cable end out of the
dummy receptacle. __a


Uai Cant Corrector-Leave the cant
": corrector on the weapon-always.
Y Never take it off for cleaning or any-
SIT .' thing else. You just might lose the
: shims and then you'll have trouble.
If you disturb or loosen the cant cor-
rector, you'll put it out of alinement
he sight with the trunnion-and then you won't
get a correct reading with a gunner's
oves the quadrant. If this happens, your weapon
, right? would have to go to Depot for realine-
imits for meant.
y, up to
for each


STAYS ON
WEAPON All
THE TIME


, ,;


Q7~
*J- kr *
.i ~ J


00 mils:
mils and
ach turn

-Don't
ts screw-
st reach
nd pull
ble and


~yl
~; ;;i


11 Vc






COLLIMATOR
You guys with the M102 are about the first in history to get this fire control
aid. Here're some tips for getting the most out of it:
Remember, the cover's got to be open for operation. If you close the lid with
the cable installed, you'll slice the cable in two.
Always set up the collimator to the left and a little to the rear of the howitzer
like the TM shows. 4


Put a "fence" (rope, tape or something) around the collimator to protect it
from big feet-especially after dark. Make sure every guy in the outfit gets this
straight: If you accidentally knock the collimator over or budge it at all or trip
over a wire, report it pronto. Don't just set it back in place and forget it. Likely
v- l -rnrvlrj*^ if f m:1c A- mA*n -6F -- .._-4


You, Gunner-when you're correcting for displacement and the "0" vertical
line of the collimator is not visible, make real sure you place the Pan-Tel sight
number on the correct side of the "0" line. F'rinstance, if the collimator num-
bers are increasing up and to the left, select a number on the Pan-Tel which is
to the left of the Pan-Tel vertical line. Then superimpose it over a correspond-
ing number on the collimator.







Watch out you don't over-tighten the leveling or elevating clamping knobs
on the collimator or the three leg clamps. They should be just snug enough to
hold, but too much pressure will damage the threads. Incidentally, all of these
clamps have 2 holes, but only one has a visible screw head.

PON'T

TIH TEN ...NOR LOOSEN
T Is THIS SCREW
KNOB...

Heads up, Hey! Never loosen the screw. It acts like a stop for the friction
clamp-to keep the legs and other parts from moving. Mess with this screw
and your collimator's in for a trip to Depot for readjustment.


PLATFORM AND STAKES


THERE
ARE
TWO
BIG
THINGS
TO
REMEMBER
WHEN YOU
PRIVE A
STAKE!!


Stay on the Ball--


FOR TRAVEL


When you're emplacing your weapon, be sure you drive in all 8 stakes, not
just some of 'em. When you're firing, try to maintain the full depth of the stakes.
This means you may have to doublecheck 'em every so often. Sometimes fre-
quent repositioning is needed in soft soil.
And when you're ready to pull up stakes to move on, be sure to remember
these couple things:


1 Don't hit anything but the stakre. Especially
be careful not to hit the elevation mechon-
ism, the suspension lacke brackret or theI
actuator assembly. Traverse the weapons
to get a beff er shot at the stakes.

































Worth their weight in piastres hard to get replacements .. so guard 'em
like you owned 'em.
Matter of fact some outfits mark their pins with a number or letter to identify
which howitzer they belong with. Might be an idea, if your CO approves.
Here're a couple other things to keep in mind: Keep these pins clean and

KEEP

-LOOSE-
ANP
CLEAN r



loose meaning, dip 'em in solvent and press or pull the plunger pin at the
same time. This'll clean the balls. Then keep 'em lubed--and put some lube in
the holes they go into. If a pin gets gooked up, don't pound on it with a hammer
to make it go in. It'll bust.
If a pin does get busted, beware of unauthorized modifications. Remember,
using a cotter pin or small bolt to repair or replace a pin could be dangerous.
It'd no longer be quick-release.
7






Retaining wires for release pins-don't lose 'em. They're plastic-coated, so
when they wear they get scratchy. Be careful you don't hurt your hand. Any
ordinary piece of wire will do if you have to replace 'em. Some combat outfits
find a small thin chain makes a good field fix-using the same old S-hooks, of
course, if possible.
The cradle assembly travel lock pin /
is one you want to keep real clean so
that it doesn't freeze. The pin's made of '
steel and the sleeve bushing it goes
through is brass. This could cause cor-
rosion because of galvanic action- two KEEP IT
different kinds of metal rubbing against CLEAN
each other. So, clean it often. You'll be
glad when that big moment arrives.


ROLLER ASSEMBLY


Smart operating tips:
Don't use more than the 4-6 PSI
pressure the TM calls for in the roller
tire. O'course, if you have the new type
roller filled with foam rubber or styro-
foam, you don't have to pester with PSI
at all. x //L1


Always use the right prime mover-
the 3/-ton truck-if you can. This
vehicle's pintle is at the right height to
make an even tow. If you ever have to
use any other prime mover-like a
4 -ton, f'rinstance-drive mighty slow.
The quarter-ton's pintle is too low. If
you hit a bump while towing the M102,
the roller assembly's likely to get cut
on its own roller rim.


TRAVEL TIRES
Here again it's bright to follow the
PSI requirements spelled out in Change
2 to your -12 TM: 40 PSI for transport
and 20 PSI for cross country and tac-
tical.
8






And stick to the speed limits: 35 And, naturally, slow and easy does
MPH for good roads and 10 MPH or it in rough country. A one-minute rapid
less for cross country. The big danger occupation's not worth much if Ole
of fast travel with over-inflated tires is Betsy ends up with 3200 mils of cant
that you'll flip the howitzer if you hit -you can't shoot thataway!
a bump.
FIRING TIPS


Firing-You assistant gunners, when you pull the lanyard, hang on to the
handle till after the cannon returns to battery. Otherwise, the handle could get
busted or caught up in the recoil.
And both you and the gunner want to be real careful you don't even touch
the trails when you're firing. This could throw the weapon off 5 to 10 mils.

9 WE.0i1


Bore and Especially The (hamber A
build up of material from cartridge cases
really fouls 'em up. So, after every 12-15
rounds it might jam up. Use your bore brush
and clean the entire bore and chamber
but good.







`Riller Assembly-After every 15 or 20 rounds of firing, it's a good idea
opidc up the lunette and rotate the roller assembly a bit. This'll lessen the
chances of excessive wear on the helical gears in the front bracket. Constant


bouncing up and down of the weapon
during firing may cause the worm to
shear off the teeth.
Never let the roller assembly dig into
soft ground or mud. I'll make it mighty
hard for you to traverse by handwheel.
Incidentally, if the handwheels get
oisy. after a spell, don't worry about it
-,t least not after you check and see
t -t.they don't bind.
Lunette-Always
turn the lunette up
during firing so that
it won't dig in and
get bent or busted.
And-any time you pick up the
lunette to change the position of the
howitzer, put that lunette down easy
... no dropping or tossing. This is an-
other way you could damage those same
helical gears in the front housing
group.
Lifting-Here's where you put those
LIFT HERE markings on your MI 02
105-MM towed howitzer to make sure
the sling attaching and lifting points


I


--Tool Box It's for tools, stakes and
;other equipment needed for operation.
F'gosh sakes, don't clutter it up %ith
*other stuff ... and then ti to close the
cover. You'll bust the lid.

Records and Forms- Let TM 38-
750 (Jan 64) /2 Changes be sour
guide. Tip: Get in those EIR's (DA
Form 240"'s) that's the best was you
can help improve new equipment. But.
please, when reporting on EIR, be sure
to give all the facts on breakage or mal.
function-like the rounds or charge
fired or some clue as to the cause of the
defect.
Pubs-Get 'em, keep 'em, use 'em.
Here're the ones you want: TM 9-1015-
234-12 (8 Mar 65) w/2 Changes; TM
9-1015-234-ESC (7 Sep 65).





\i .



get used right during transport and
airlift operations.
TB 746-95-1 (14 Aug 64)-color
and marking of towed artillery will
guide you on this.






XM48 TOSS GRENADES
WITH YOUR XM16E1 RIFLE LITTLE

SBUT
LETHAL

A k-


-- -
So you've been picked to lote one of -- -
these spanking new 40-MM XMI48 -....
grenade launchers on sour XMI6EI
rifle. Congratulations. Obviously you'ree
a guy who can be trusted to handle spe-
cial assignments ... v ith a real special
weapon that deserves special care.
A responsible type. that's wot!
OK, so here's some dope that'll help
you keep your weapon ready for those
big moments in anm grenadier's life -
when the whole outfit's depending on :.
you. Some of it goes along with what's
in TM 9 1005-249-14 (I Aug 66) and
TC 23-10 (Apr 66) and some of it
comes from guys who've already had
a lot of experience with the XM148.
All of it rates sour strict attenuon.
Like ...


MFoai







BEWARE M75 AMMO
Yeah, if you goof and use the high
velocity ammo for the M75 grenade
launcher mounted on the M5 helicopter
armament subsystem, the recoil could
lose you a shoulder, if not a life ... and,
natch, there'd go another valuable
weapon, too!
You've got to be real careful 'cause
the M75 cartridge-both the 40-MM
HE M384 and Practice M385-will
chamber in your XM148. It'll lack only

B3UT, CONNIEf, BOH
NROUNS LOOKED
n STHE SAME...THEY RE
CHAMBEREP...


Vs-in of closing, but the firing pin
spring may be strong enough to actuate
the firing pin!
So, your best bet's to eyeball every
round-top, bottom and side-before
you load up your bandoleer or what-
ever you carry ammo in. Turn in every


Here're the things that distinguish
the high velocity M75 round from the
low velocity 40-MM HE M381 and
Practice M382 you have to use in your
XM148:


INSTALLATION AND FIRING TIPS


round pronto that's not meant for your It only takes a couple minutes to put
weapon .. and don't let your buddies the XM148 launcher on your rifle. Just
get at it. 1NO! follow the steps in your TM. But make
^ NE SOLPIER 'sure you remove the bayonet, change
IMPERIALIST OR S the handguards, and transfer the sling
S WEAPO REMOVE swivel and sling from the rifle to the
SA BAYONET! launcher. Otherwise, the rounds will be
S -L' F ., blocked or deflected when you fire.
S, ,- 12







'Course, you can fire both the rifle
and the launcher after the launcher's
been mounted. Just watch it that the
launcher trigger doesn't get in the way
of your rifle trigger. The best way to
avoid this is like so:'
When you expect to fire the launcher,
keep the launcher trigger extension
pulled all the way back and in the
down position. -,..m .: ..


TOOLS AND BRUSHES
Combination Tool-You'll have
either the interim tool-no FSN or
Part Number-or you'll have the
standard combination tool, which comes
under FSN 4933-999-8554.


You want to be careful when using
either tool to assemble or field-strip
your launcher, especially when you're
working on the firing pin retainer.
Watch out you don't damage the slotted
part of the retainer. Easy does it-like
always.

Brushes-If you don't have these
requisition 'em right off.


M6 chamber...
""Br" / s, a g, Small Ars:
TIP--Be mighty careful with your FSN 1005-610-8828
weapon when the launcher's loaded
and the safety's in the F (FIRE) posi- Thong, leaning Brusk... I
tion. Striking or bumping either the i FSN 1010474-5465
rifle or the launcher could discharge
the grenade.

HEY, 1I, T1STH
SALVAGE HEAP? FIELD STRIPPING
WANNA SELL
SOMETHING ? APNl l I


Running into trouble when you disassemble/assemble according to the steps
in your TM? OK, here're a couple changes in the procedure that'll ease things
for you. You'll find 'em in Ch 1 (Jan 67) to TM 9-1005-249-14.
13 amor -


















CLEANING AND LUBING
Never forget, you owe it to your outfit to keep your launcher in A-1 shape-
whicli means dean, lubed (but lightly) and with good serviceable parts. Clean
it every time it gets wet, muddy, or dusty.
ON INSIDE ON OUTSIDE
C AN PARTS USE: PARTS USE
IT EVERY
PAY YOU FIRE j^ ./|
IT... OR
ONCE A WEEK MW
WHEN YOU'RE W


N.


1 IKING BORE fANER DRY MEANINGG
I (C FSN 6850- SOLVENT (I))
224-6656 FSN 6850-281-1985
(2 OZ CAN) (1 GAL CAN)
The big idea is to work the cleaning ing's aluminum. If you go to mate the
stuff in good with your brush, covering threads with sand or grit on 'em even
all areas. Then wipe 'em good and dry one grain the housing'll get torn up.
with a patch or clean rag before you You shouldn't have any trouble with
apply the lube. cross-threading, by the way, if you use
Really bear down when you clean your combination tool carefully.
the firing pin recess area. Clean the Incidentally, you can use the end of
threads inside the housing and on the your cleaning rod to work on the grip
retainer. Make sure you don't leave any lock plunger.
sand or grit on these threads. The re-
tainer's made of steel, but the hous-
:~s- 4


KEEP SAND
AND GRIT
OFF THESE
fTHREAPS.


i






ACTION
Lubing-Two big rules: FREEZES
1. Never use any lube not specified in your TRY A
TM- no off-the-shelf stuff, hear? Actu- PROP OF. 4
ally, it'd be better not to lube your1XM148 \
at all than to use the wrong stuff.
2. Lube lightly--like with a dean rag
dampened with PL Special. Too much
lube's worse than no lube, too. Oil's like e w
a magnet--attracts dust and dirt ..
and trouble, when it's over-done.

USE YOUR EYEBALLS
Make a practice of checking for cracks, burrs, severe wear, loose or missing
parts, powder-fouling, rust, weak springs and the like every time you take your
weapon apart and clean it. This is the best time to see if they're OK. Fix what-
ever you're authorized to, and get your armorer or support to replace or repair
anything else. Just make sure that launcher's ready for action at all times!

DOUBLE CHECK THESE PARTS
TO PREVENT COCKING, FIRING ANP
EXTRACT(NG TROUBLES!

FIRING PIN- Badly
FIRING PIN ACCESS- worn, busted, burred, f
Dirty, powder-fouled, rusty, threads worn or
threads badly worn. damaged. TRIGGER SPRING -


15A ORE






SIGHT ASSEMBLY


Remember, you're not allowed to
disassemble a single part of the sight
assembly--and your armorer can only
replace the sight slide spring.
However, if the range elevation set-
ting changes when you fire, or if you
can't make an adjustment or change in
setting, look for looseness or tightness
in the friction bolt. Get Direct Support
to fix it-they have the tool for the job.


TIP-Tilt the sight on its side for an easier look at the settings. And, remember, you've got
to press the sight lever all the way forward so that it dears the serrations on the scale.

OTHER TIPS


Keep 'Em Pinned If the cotter pin
holding those 2 front mount capscrews
gets busted or lost or bent so that you
can't put it back, replace it pronto-
either with the same-type pin (FSN
5315-236-8346) or any piece of wire.
(A paper clip's too thick, by the
way, but common wire should be easy
to come by.) Even one leg of a busted
pin's better than no pin at all. The 2
screws will work loose when firing if
you don't pin 'em.


Lose 'Em Not-- Any time you field-
strip your weapon, do it over a tarp or
blanket or something that'll catch any
parts you drop. It's a good idea, also,
to do this field-stripping in the presence
of your buddy, if you can. Two pairs
of eyes are better than one for check-
ing the condition of parts-especially
those in the firing pin recess area.

PLANTING NO, LOOKING'
RICE? ) I e A Ic-T


$; 11


Trigger Extension-Keep a watchful eye on it.
Make sure it works smoothly, without binding. Espe-
cially, make sure it doesn't get bent so that it puts
pressure on the sear lever. You can check this like
so: Unload the weapon. Set the Safety on F (FIRE),
then press the sear lever with your finger. It should
move easily.


2- -


, t *__ --n$_ __ _.







Pistol Grip Finger Guard-Make sure it works
OK. Could save your fingers when you load or un-
load in a hurry.

Go By The TM ... Always-If any dope ou find 4
in TC 23-10 (Apr 66) conflicts with dope in sour FINGER
latest TM 9-1005-249-14, follow the poop in the TM. CUAPD
Corrections To TC 23-10-If you've got a TC handy, make these corrections
in it:
Para 12, page 6 REAR SIGHT-One click of the elevation screw will
move the strike of the round 1.5 (not 2.5) meters at a range of 200 meters.
Chart IV, page 34:-showing the distance the strike of the round is moved
at various ranges when a one-click change is made in rear peepsight settings.
Change the 3.0 to 2.0 and the 2.5 to 1.5 meters in the second column.
Something to Remember-This XM148 is the infant of the outfit. Baby
it. Better yet, help it grow up into the weapon it's meant to be by getting in
those EIR's (DA Forms 2407). This way the engineer-types can improve it.

5.56-MM SUBMACHINE GUN, XM177E1: HERE

So you've got the new XM- CO IES
177E1 5.56-MM Submachine Gun O E
-or you're expecting it on the next SHORTY!
chopper!
So, here's the Numbah One poop on it:
It needs exactly the same tender loving care and cleaning as the XM16E1
rifle. Give out with this TLC and you'll escape the woes some Joes had because
they skimped PM on their Sweet 16's.
Yeah, this Shorty's pretty much like the XM16El-it's just shorter in the
barrel and hand guards, has an adjustable butt stock and a combination noise
and flash suppressor. Most of its other parts are common to the XM16E1.
All cleaning and lubing requirements are the same, too-and if you don't do
em Shorty'll act up. Even the cleaning tools are the same.
You'll find all the parts common to the XMI6El in TM 9-1005-249-14,
Ch 1 (Jan 67) and all the parts peculiar to the Shorty in POMM 9-1005-294-14.
SAME AS a SAME SIGHT
XM16E1
SPECIAL
ADJUSTABLE NOISE
BUTT STOCK AND
SHORTER FLASH
HAND GUARD SUPPRESSOR






XM16E1 RIFLEMEN:
WHEN THE BASES
ARE LOADED...


PITCH
IT TO
KIP...
I'M SHARP!
d


I'r


'J'J'


OKAY BOYS,
LET'S KEEP THAT OL'
XMI6EI RIFLE'S
BATTING AVERAGE
LUP NEAR THE TOP!
oA TN VTO


S?


7


(LEANING ROD NEWS
CLEANING ROD NEWS


Had trouble getting an interim
MI El cleaning rod from the bat boy?
No wonder! That FSN 1005-999-1295
in the new TM 9-1005-249-14 (I Aug
66) should be FSN 1005-903-1295.
But the big news is that the interim
rod's being replaced by the MI E2 .. .
FSN 1005-999-2035... which has a
folding handle you can use it straight
or you can open it. Ask for this new
rod after your interim rod gives out


TIP- The threads on the MILE2 are the
same as on the M11EI, meaning you could
interchange rod sections if you had to. Just
remember this, though. Never try to use it
with sections ol any other rod and especially
with any brushes except the new bore brush
IFSN 1005-903 12961 and chamber brush
IFSN 1005-999-1435)
%h l.BOP( BRUSH
FStJ ii5 903-1296


Yeah, that season's here again .. a good time to sharpen iour eie and loosen
your soupbone for a better year against malfunctions with your XMI6EI rifle
in the Vietnam League. CHAMBEP BRUSH
Here're some coaching hints that ma) help-all the wa) from inside dope 2035 MIL LANING ROD F U i9 n43
on new equipment to a couple signals to keep you from bumping heads over T. 10-9-0' ell ,L.A --i.r.___________I ______ n ,,

18 19


ffMLl


C~,sl~c "







LAID A BUNT LATELY'







START AT THE
Probably not. But you could use the RECEIVER...
same idea when you're bore-brushing
your weapon. Right. Choke up on the
cleaning rod-hold it about 2 inches
from the receiver and push it straight
inch by inch in short jerks all the way
through the flash suppressor. Then pull GO RIGHT THRU THE
it back all the way out-again in short SUPPRESSOR
jerks. Never pull the brush back till
after it's gone through the flash sup-
pressor. Do it the right way and you
won't hurt the rod.
Same idea goes when you're running patches through. Run it all the way
through the flash suppressor before you start to pull back ... no matter what
size patches you're using-the one for the XM16E1 (FSN 1005-912-4248) or
any large type that you have to cut into 4 equal squares.

(O ,T DOUBLE-PLAY COMBINATION

ST GET HELP HERE I




By the way, when was the last time
your unit armorer- Max Schnell, good
'ol Speedy Four-checked our \our
weapon? Don't know? Can't remem-
ber? Then it's due right now for a with crud or carbon buildup when
physical. Get with it! Maxie's the best you're cleaning your rifle-especially
partner you'll ever have ... PM-wise. in the bolt and locking recess area-
Here're a couple ways Maxie can get your armorer to help you tackle it
shortstop trouble for you: with P-C-111A carbon removing con-
Any time you run into real trouble pound, FSN 6850-620-0610, 5-gal can.







And if you're having trouble losing S L
front sling swivels, forget what you A COTTER IN...
read or heard about getting it staked. BUT IT ISN'T!!./
Won't work. Instead, ask your direct IT'S STRONGER
support to spread the split spring pin TOO!
with a punch. The pin will take several
treatments like this before it bites the
dust.
Also, if you lose the firing pin re-
taining pin or it gets busted, get your
armorer to give you the new type ...
FSN 1005-999-1509.



SPITBALL ARTIST?
'Tain't legal to use tobacco juice, emery or slippery
/ elm or sweat out there on the mound, but you sure as
heck want to get something extra on the ball when you're
trying to strike out rust and corrosion in your XM16E1
B especially in Rice Paddy Park. 'Bout the best thing
around is Lubriplate rifle grease (FSN 9150-754-0063
... 1-lb can) -the stuff in your li'l ol' lube case.
No big trick to using this stuff-just spread on a thin
film with the applicator or your finger (like shoe polish,
yet!) and then rub it in.



YOUR JOB: Front sight post
screw, detent
d prg. Selector lever,deeni
I and spring.





Friction surfaces on the bol and carrier Pivot pin, Iokedown
especioly the bot cam pin. This pin turns the detent and detent
bolt, gets more friction than any other part. spring. and spring.
Never neglect it.
21














vr% 6A.1 7r r'r' a nd a snuer realmng

spring. sp ig. gS


(OVER YOUR CORNER ONLY *

Some guys really spoil a
play by reaching out for
balls not meant for 'em.
Bumped heads and lost
games result. 4


Same ground rules apply to the carrier and key screws. If these 2 screws get
sheared off or loose, turn the weapon in to DS. They've got to be torqued and
staked-a mere pop fly for DS, but an impossible play for you.
FOR AI.J
BUT, CONNIE, EXPERT,
IT LOOKS YES-FOR
--T-FIK. -YES...FOR
EASY TO FI1,



A JOB FOR DS





Ditto for all parts of the upper receiver assembly. If any part gets bent-like
the ears around the rear sight-or any part comes loose or busted, fgoshsakes,
don't you try to fix it-nor you, either, Maxie! Turn the weapon in to DS.
And still one more: Natch, when you're field stripping your rifle you'll be
careful not to drop the carrier and key assembly or bump 'em against anything
hard. The carrier key bends pretty easy-and then won't line up inside the
weapon. But, if they do get bent, don't you or your armorer try to straighten
'em. That's a drive too hot to handle. Let DS fix 'em.
You're bound to have a good season if you stay on the ball with your PM.







TELEPHONE E__
SET WET?
COMMUNICATIONS \S E WE T?'---- -
You say moisture's muscling in on your TA-43/PT or TA-312/PT telephone
set and knocking out conversation?
Sorry 'bout that ...
Your best bet's to beat that wet worrier on its own ground.
MAKE SURE Al GASKETS ARE PRESENT AND IN GOOD SHAPE.
ESPECIALLY
BETWEEN A cracked or missing gasket
HOUSING / is an open invitation for a wet
PANEL & wrecking party inside the tele-
PANEl SCREWS FSN 5805576-5453 phone case.
PANE HOUSING SUB-ASSEMBLY BATTERY COMPARTMENT



_____ I ______


If
you
little
inside


moisture really hasn
mouthing, tape a
packet of silica gel 11
the case

DESICCANT
,/1 !


Space is limited, so
keep it avai from con-
racts or it might soak up
the dampness and short
our the phone set. MIL.
D 3i46-i pe desiccants
are listed in C 6800-IL
I an 661 on pages -.66
thru 4.69.


Rubbing a light coat of silicon compound (FSN 5970-195-1598) ...
... around the panel and hous-
ing assembly gasket will go a
long way in warding off water
I II snuggle up the panel and
1 housing case

\ hen %ou hacs the telephone tied to a tent pole.
or the like, be sure there's a sag in the \\D-I/TT
field wire coming into the binding posts. Cause
wiring angled down ro the telephone set makes for
a rain dripping track that could lead to trouble.
23




































So Charlie dropped around and laid a bunch of mines between the mess hall
and the can yard, and you've got to find 'em?
You've got the right equipment with that transistorized mine detector. But
you'll have to handle it right on and off the job, if you depend on it to keep
you in one piece.
Fact of the matter is, that mine detector won't work right on the job if your
between-hunts care isn't all it ought be.

OFF-THE-JOB TIPS
FIRST, keep the set in the case when it's not being used.
Lay it down, even a few minutes, and somebody's boots will
clobber it. If it's being carried in a 4-ton or other set of \
wheels, using the case goes double-otherwise, just one
entrenching tool thrown in on it or one tie chain over it, and
there goes your detector set, wham! NO FOOT REST
24


SECOND, let nobody leave those mercury) batteries in
the container after use. When the set's taken apart to
stow, even overnight, the batteries come out.
When left in the case, they start soaking up moisture,
then bulging a little, then soaking some more, and then
dripping chemicals into the case. They stick tight in the
case, and the inside corrodes.
Result: one ruined battery case and one useless mine PULL BAERIES WHEN
detecting set.N IN U
WATCH THAT THIRD, take care of
WIRING ESPECIALLY that wiring and cable.
& .THE QUICK PI1CONNECT .
COUPLING/! Keep oil off it and make
sure that cable still can
do the job. Dry rot could
let it break right in the
S middle of a minefield.
25 M F






PO bYOU THINK
WE CUGHTA CHECK
SOUR. TOOLS?
^^SUM'^Or


When your Easter egg hunt is over
and Charlie's gifts all gone, you need
right away to check your tools over.
If there're scars from bumping into
rocks, check two things.
FIRST, that rubber bumper around
the search head has to be on tight. Glue
is the only way. Just any stickum won't
do; takes special non-metallic adhesive.
Clamp it or tie that bumper in place
with a tent guy line until the glue sets.
Simple.


USE THE
PROPER GLUE


SECOND, paint up nicks and scrape
marks and don't worry if it won't stick
on the search head. For that you'll use
non-metallic paint. The stuff you'd use
on a truck or footlocker is out, and
using it on the detector set would put
the set out, far out. Before you paint,
take a rag and wipe off all dirt, grease,
and moisture.
Then you can go inside the box while
the paint and glue dry. Check the mod-
ules in your receiver-transmitter (TM
5-6665-202-15, page 29). Make sure
the pins are all straight and the innards
of the case clean.


If you don't seat the replacement
right when replacing a module, it bangs

SEAT MODULE
PROPERLY -

THIS


into the case top and ruins the water-
proof seal. So use the butt of your hand
to ram 'em home. That whammy is in-
surance against moisture leaking into
the case top.
When a pin's gone or bent so you
can't straigthen it easy, a replacement
is the only cure. Those module prongs
are brittle. If you never took care of
anything before in your life, do be care-
ful of those pin ends.
Another life-saver must is keeping
that headset always protected from
whams and bams. Moisture inside is
bad, dropping it is worse, and anybody
who throws it around is on Charlie's
side, not yours.






To HELP YOUR HUNT... HERE ARE SOME UPPATEP FSN'S

0 ITEM STOCK NUMBER
Detecting Set, Mine (P-153-and P-158) FSN 6665-966-9071
Detecting Set, Mine (MD-M) FSN 6665-966-9072
Battery, dry, mercury cell, BA/1389/U or equal,
Part No. 13200E2684 FSN 6135-961-3603
Wiring Harness (receiver-transmitter) FSN 6665-996-0570
Cable Assembly (control box power wiring) FSN 6665-996-0573
Insulation tape, 34-in, 108 ft roll FSN 5970-644-3178
Glue, non-metallic, kit, 2 oz
(Epoxy catalyst actuator type indudes Mfr code 04633 (3M Co.)
EC-2216-B and 2216-A in carton) Part No. EC-2216-B/A
Paint, non-metallic, vegetable base, O.D., 1 gallon FSN 8010-297-0560
That tape is for emergency repair only. Cracked or broken
wires you have to replace. Otherwise moisture'll ruin you.









But wherever you are, remember your ears will
play tricks on you with this outfit. That 1000-cycle
tone causes what's called "audio hypnosis," so's you
can't hear warning beeps right nor much else except
the base tone, even when you take the headset off.
Some people's ears give out on 'em in 10 minutes. .
Nobody, but nobody can use the set over 30 minutes
and be safe. When that hum gets hypnotic, you could
walk right up on a mine too big for 3 Charlies to
carry. A.
The cure's simple: take turns with another opera-
tor every 10 to 15 minutes-no more.

CHARLIE'S AMMO
When you capture or find a cache of enemy ammo, hold up before you blow
it up. Ring up your outfit's Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) guys. Let them
take a look at it for its intelligence value; they'll dispose of it for you.
27



















A msfctd ;;i ol r -nt pubrtfiucno
. mna uren o Organuronal l Ms.s.
naoe Peh nne rhis s a id aompdld
ifon r.onls Adidufon Gesral Duan
bison Csr I BJ.huIh For ruMpleur
deulfib DA Pum 210-. and Ca 1
Il4 O 661 sd D0 Par .~ 106 and
Cr 2 II Jan 61A
TECHNICAL MANUALS
IM -IOH-'llC-.4-20 CS. lo-
0. 73
IM 5-389S-202.25P. No. 'puadeu..
Aggregale: Towed. I4 Pnu..
frire. 8 Ff Spwd Ily;, Mal VI

IM 5-6115-726-75P. Nov. G n 5.e.
Ga nq I I KW. DC 2B9. Tubular
F.rae Mid. I(Wnpoer. Mdl G 1521
ZA016O (rless ngnel
IM 5-6115-235S-.P. Dc DED. Gen
Se. 4I5KW, AC, 120/20B, 2401416
V. Skid Mid.
IM -611i5-240-75P. De. Gen S.e
DED 45 KW. AC. 1202101 V.
240 4166 V. ICmmi.n Mdl
IS-6.C0 4 W 400 Cyclu
TM 9-1I0052I-12. C2. D Muckh.e.
Gun.. M60 rd Mou..r .MI
IM 9-1010-70S-12. Cl. an.
launcher Grenade. MA7
TM 9 1100-204. C3, Dec. Amln I.
Irco.ll" M R.nl
IM 9.1400-46112P. Jan. GML M I2
IM 9.1400-465-ISP. lnn. Shllelagh
TM 9-1410-375-12P/. No..
Pershing.
IM 9-1430-250-1SP/2/, Dec. 'Nie-.
H'I
TM 9-1430-70-.ISP/S/1. D.
Nik. HI c.
IM 9.1420-21-1 SP/12. De. Nin
Hen Isp
TM 9.14J0.7S44lSP/I. De. N'le.
Herr imp
IM 9-14340-SO-ISp/ .. DP ..
I 91440-50-1P/3/1 Du.

TM 9.14 S. 500-20. No.. Hwtk.
IM 9-4935-253-25P/3/1, Dec.
Ncke-Herc.
TM 9-4935-376-1 P/ 1. De.. Pertun g.
IM 9-6920-42-14. Dec. REDEYL
IM 10-.510-101-251. De Laundry
Un.I. Single Ira.Inl Mid wrCanol
Cor. Airy Tyve MS3i2 I[dl Mdl
ill 91j


t' 1imi9-0l42-M "NTri Uo To 7b1.l n 9 /2 1 De., Dec.. Wihe.
-.Fotr, DEP, gi l TIfraln. 40Oq IB s 750-91-1 C1. Jl. Jao.
Ca.l AeIlhoy di MIT 6 A Ily: Wng.
MHE.200. lrysle Mdl MLU 6 C0. Tn 70-931-1/2 CL. tb. b. Bo
Arml Mdl MHE .02. i Wng.
"TM tal.1W269,.5lp, Him 5
lam ighl. C'L Semt Wpae.g:. MODIFICATlON WOl OOI
Tl' I1..S?--P. Dec. Tuliu ," YMWO 5-.410-09-20/1. De. TMcd..
Tml5 d ASITC., ..0. full-TrA .d. 1. Sped. Di Engo Mad
r0Frt-; orl hlu Evil. COalil dllng Trcd. 74

TM II-l'o-412-2n.5 Du Aii 1' 'IHO6M. I.n;Il Nryml Oil Fill
Ned Gs.rd.
M 11-140-293-12. Osd, Aifmi-" MWO I.4IS..4.10/2. Jam. ENTAC
a a.. 0. Ir I. ". M g 9-4940-252-30/I1/34. Jan.
SIM I l-5o40-414-5SP. NikuH ls i rclmp.
..lthiopu Rc-. g rML, MWO 55s-1510.2044-4/53. Ju.

.10 d AN'MO.10IA mdl e, MWO 55-1510-20-34/1. C3. F b.
TIM tIU..B40II2NP, A' -1.
S746/MPO IO Fmr S ppi .. MWO 55-1520-M02-40/1, Ja.
:IM 11-.6 4llo -i c 0C CHf-4.
f LrSp 0 Ybll S il~l*' U, WO 55.15M20oo-30/4, J ..
M 'l rA.SsII ME 'i OH 23

S164623 4 s. MWO 55-.150-20920/52. Cl. Feb.

Ti US-i-eS-P, l.. U.i MWO S5S.1S209-310i/2. Jib.
ft g2s5sos.t-6 Dc. SG.


Irs i ai O i ,55-152 '0-2 J-,0/ Cl.
r'1-~m' Gloo lk.. .. '-I i. I D l=.
,1. j 30/34. Fub. WI IA-,l.
TM 5C-1510205-4p, (3. Ji. U.. MWO S5.152g-211-30/12. hb.
TMxS3-1A20201h, aD. CN 34. '3 U-I-A IL
ITM 2IM320-r640 Cr |JN,
04. 23 MCN
INM -.IS20-i09.29 Ci, C No. A 1-32, Ja. DA F9 12 9
CH. 47 Admh.nl.loe.
I5 l-209.20. CW & A 40-.127. rFb. Da farm 129.
MudicSl.
mI -3-i slo2-2s9-. crP. CI J DA CI 4 .., mall..
Heal Inuju.
7.S5C5d..ih7e2-2.-DFMP. N. ',.% DA a, 10-27, in. No Mlilki

ICM .21-20 2 L *- dl adio Pl
-20Pmp Nov. UH.IA.I : FILM 24-I, Des. ld sd hiy
TM Il-s 40--3s2.-SP. Dec. PP. Ihniqs.
74I/MPQ-10A Pofr Supply. SC 5420-9-CL-123, Dec. Kid C-.
R*nioe S51. RaMd Sods. Through
TECHNICAL BULLTIMS I Trui 1231 FI 153 R 9 1 San.
TI 710,931-1/1. Cl, Jie. 1Fsd IB AVN -645. Cl. Nou. Fid snd
Wl.g. lor Wieg.
B 750.931-1/i. C2. H ed I AVN 24-16 -. NF. id ed and kir
Wing. 'I '*. Wing.


A HANDS OFF


Do you see handy VC ammo souvenirs? Real enticing, huh? Well, better keep

away from them. Some are real mean ... such as one made just like a regular GI

hand grenade. You squeeze the handle which you think is a safety lever and

P-O-W! You bought it.

































CHou-ol! J.-G You
PHAN. HOW-FAR- COMPREN-
CLICKS 1D 20 AVITV
DIN6H BAT F


WHEN THE NOISE OF
YOUR VEHICLE IS HEARD
BY V C YOU AND
JIP" ARE
NUMBAH YOU KNOW
TFN /.N"wAr rlITr


YES!! BUT USE
BUFFALO GREASE
TO QUIET NOISE IN
YOUR MACHINE.


E MEAN!
LUBE."


r FOOEY.'
WE AIN'T
60T NOTIME
FOR A FANCY
L 0
LEXERlISE-


e- rsiok







CI-o! YOU SPEAK
.I HASTE...OUR COUNTRY'
Is As yUR TM SAYS,
UNUSUAL OPERATING
coNC5orNos!


! NUMBAH TEN PLENTY, PLENTY
u. EHOT. ER...AS YOU SAY..









ALSO PLENTY 8OO -co
SAND AND IT. FORDING IN FRESH
AND SALT WATER.


BIG DEAL! I JUST
6OT HERE'N'I DON'T
THINK THE CONDITIONS
MERE ARE HARD TO
LGET USED TO. -


PhaiC 'CAUSE I'M A
'SHORT TIMER'AND I
GOT USED TO IT, NO
SWEAT. .-,-


AHHH SO! BUT...
YMOUR EQIPMENT
CAN'T AVJUSTi!
YOU MUST MAKE THE
XLLO WANCES FOR IT.








HOLD ONE! KNOCKIN'
OUR GEAR SOUNDS LIKE
"CHARLIE" TALKING !


YOU SEE, WE CROSS SO) s OT?
RICE PADDYP WHEELS
ARE COVERED BY
WATER...


NO CHARLIE" VERY SORRY..,
COME WITH ME AND I WILL
\ SHOW YOU, NUMBAH ONE!!


ALL YOUR MOBILE MACHINES
HAVE SAME-SAME PROBLEM..,
WATER. AND MUD RUIN LUBE
IN PARTS THAT ARE ...ER
SUBMERGED.


^--------
VA KNOW, WE OU6HT TO
EYEBALL THE GEAR AFTER
RiPIN 1HRU 5TUFF
L-IKE THAT. -


SUPPEN SHOWER
SAP FOR
LUBE... NOTICE
BOO-COO WATER .


S3
31








Your LO tells what, when 'n' where.
It's dandy where weather is fair.
But it's not enough
Where conditions are rough
So give your equipment more care.


Pr


IF YOU WANT TO DISPLAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, UFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.


W1E14 T4WD yD
hASK MEP
m^/s^A







MUP 15 NUMBAM TEN
PROBLEM,TOO. MUD IN
PAPPIES AND ON ROADS
AND SWAMPS...QUICK- QUICK
TAKE LUBE OFF PARTS
IN MUD...
mI.


w~=;


YESSIR.'OL' NG PHAN IS
NUMBAJ ONE AGAIN... LOOKIT
THESE HUBS... THE MUD WAS
FORCED INTO THE LUBE ANP
RUINED IT. BETCHA THE SAME
THING HAPPENS WITH OUR
VEHICLES.


-r -

HOW COME I lAHHH-.5000 I'VE HEARD
YOU KNOW rIHAVENUMBAH THATOWE...HE'LL
' 50 MUCH IONE INSTRUCTRES5.IPROBABLY SAY
ABOUT N tE RnOIE RODD
TH 15 inc ceZrTZri
aP: ZZ 1!s


PLEASE YOU MEET
MISS CHOI 01
PEN-FPAL OF
CONNIE ROOD.


A,~


F THANK YOU... NOW! AH!
AS MISS ROPD HAS INFORMED
ME, PERIODIC MAINTENANCE
IS FINE STATESIDE ... BUT
HERE, THINGS ARE QUITE
DIFFERENT,'


L







NOISY VEHICLE HAS HAP
EOPIC MAINTENANCE AND
LuRICATION FOR NORMAL
CONDITIONS LIKE THE
LOAN P TM SAY5!


BUT REMEMBER...
CONDITIONS IN THE ORIENT
ARE MISLEADING... THE' RE
NOT NORMAL FOR
YOuR EQUIPMENT.


/.OUR MACHINES A D EQUIPMENT
ARE MADE OF STEEL... IT
NEEDS EKTRA INSPECTIONS,
LUBRICATIONS AND
SERVICING.


YOU CAN ADJUST TO THIS
COUNTRY: BUT YOUR EQUIP-
MENT CAN'T-- YOUMUST MAKE
AD.r srT ENT FOR IT...







KNOW ANY
MORE POINTERS
WE CAN PO
TO BEAT THE5E
CONDITIONS?


KEEP ALL LUBE
EQUIPMENT CLEAN.
THAT GOES FORALL
FITrINGS,Too! .


5 WELL, THAT CUTS 1
rrT. BACK TO BASE
CAMP FOR A GOOD 60IN'
OVER... Y'KNOW... WE 4
GOTTA KEEP IN MIND
W'RE CONSTANTLY' OPEeATI4I
UNDER UNUSUAL
CONIpmONS. meA f


L xIy ONS
NNACt LAI+
16


36 PLEASE SAY IT AGAIN







SHIP REPARABLES

I SHIP-SHAPE


SIKCKM I MAKE
'RTS THEY li i I, ftAAli 1 B
5HIP FROM IMERANG
ZGAN17ATION a 4 WORK FOP. You!
LEVEL?


Anytime you ship parts be sure they're cleaned, preserved and packed
right or they'll go to pot in transit.
Take a carburetor, for example. Fuel left in the chambers will oxidize (mix
with air) to form a corrosive action that eats away the metal ... can ruin a
$$$$$ carburetor just sitting there.
Best be sure you drain the carburetor and squirt some engine oil (MIL-L-
6082) into the fuel passages, according to the poop in TM 55-405-5 (16 Sep 66)
on Aircraft engines. SB 38-100 (28 Sep 66) on preservation and packing mate-
rials has a good listing of all supplies needed by DS units to do the job.
Pack accessories such as starters, generators, carburetors, fuel pumps and
instruments in sturdy containers with plenty of packing on all sides including
top and bottom. _--\ / as 1111111


THEM
WITH LOTS
OF
FPAPPING/

You'll find the word on using the
preservation and packaging supplies in
TM 38-230 (16 Dec 63).
One more point before you close the
lid on any shipment put in all the
necessary paperwork.


.* m u i l MA. A L ,
CHECK YOUR PUBS





SPR l VA'rION
PACKA I(;, ANDM)
PACKING OF
MILITARY SUPPLY C
AND EQUIPMENT
*--0
'7 -

































That's the aircraft mechanic's maintenance problem -contamination from
weather. With your bird in the open it takes a lot of savvy to beat the elements.

EYE MAINTENANCE PUB
Suppose you crew a Huey. TM 55- FRIENOS
1520-211-20 (20 Jan 66) on the A, B OR.
Models and TM 55-1520-210-20 (28 yO F0
Dec 65) on the D Model has all sorts ENEMIES
of goodies on how to stop the contami- F7 EPENPS
nation villain in his tracks. ON ~
Fuel, oil and grease are the breeding K .V
ground for the brute.-
You'll contaminate a bird system bs
using fuels or oils other than those
listed in your maintenance pub and TB
AVN 2 (27 Oct 65). Be sure you use
the right one.
You'll contaminate the hydraulic sys-
tem if you use left-over MIL-H-5606


hydraulic oil from open cans. This dirty
oil ruins seals, clogs strainers and causes
leaks which will sideline your bird for
maintenance.


There's a good chance contaminated
hydraulic oil will show up in the form
of leaking servos in the 3 cyclic flight
control hydraulic cylinder assemblies.
To head off contamination, open a new
can each time, fill the reservoir and toss
the oil and can ... no sense asking for
trouble!!
Then there's the T-53 engine and
transmission synthetic oil, MIL-L-7808
- that stuff gets contaminated by water
if you look at it cross-eyed.


To be on the safe side, pour the 7808
oil into your bird thru a 10-micron filter
to get rid of any lint, metal slivers and
dirt that might have entered the can
during manufacture. Your pre-oiler
does a first rate filtering job and you
can also store left-over oil in it for short
periods. Whatever you do, never store
the oil in open cans.

S MAKE FINE COOKING
POT.. RUT NO. 10
FOR STORING OIL!



% -


%P


Ar






KEEP BIRD CLEAN
As for dirt and gook caused by clouds of dust on a big lift, use a brush to dust
all places where dirt might seep past seals.
In particular, dust around the top of the 3 cyclic flight control cylinder assem-
blies. There is also a rubber boot, FSN 1680-923-2926 in TM 55-1520-210-35P

AND CLEAN
(HECK HERE THE BOOTS'
FOR DUST THE TOTS





(Jan 67) that covers these assemblies to help you in your battle against the con-
tamination villain. MWO 55-1520-211-20/32 (19 Sep 66) puts the boots on
your B Model.
He's sure to show up in bearings, which is the reason why your maintenance
officer may increase the frequency of lube jobs.


LUBE HANGER BEARINGS
How about those Huey tail rotor driveshaft hanger bear-
ings, P/N 204-040-615, that run out of grease after a couple-
three hundred hours ... with no grease fitting to plug a gun
into yet??
No sweat. You might dust off your copy of TB 750-931-
1/2 (28 Dec 66) and focus on page 44, para 68. By using a
little know-how you can braze a modified No. 16 or No. 18
hypodermic needle to the grease gun adapter and give those
bearings the needle.
Another way to lube the bearings is to use a hypodermic
syringe according to the poop in para 7-100, page 7-33 of
TM 55-1520-210-20.
If you have the new hanger bearings, P/N 204-040-623-1,
these babies are sealed with Alfa-Molykote 343X lubricant
and can't be lubed.


42


PURGE TRUNNION BEARINGS
Getting the contamination villain out GET THE
of bearings can be a bit of a chore, espe- OLP GREASE
dally on oscillating bearings such as OT )
the Huey tail rotor trunnion bearings.40 '

40 -^


THE
M4EDIC


's






The tail rotor only twists thru a 12-
degree angle during operation, which
means a lot of grease in there is not
being used. It can build up and harden
like a rock. Then each time you purge
the cavity with new grease the old
grease won't budge so your grip bear-
ings get short-changed. You know what
that means-shorter bearing life ..
maybe a frozen bearing which doesn't
make for a healthy situation!!


DISCONNECT UNKS
AND TWIST
BLADES 10
PURGE T
OLD
GREASE

^5G


PURGE TAIL ROTOR GRIP BEARINGS
How do you purge the bearing cavity? Well, how about disconnecting the
pitch change links on the next Periodic and rotating the tail rotor blades 360-
degrees 3 or 4 times for a real purge job? That's savvy, man!
For any good purge job remember to
GRESE.E make with the grease gun until you see
..-. or feel the old, dirty grease coming out.
Like, for example, be sure you make
FEE OLD GREASE the finger test on the swashplate outer
(COMIG O ring when you make with the grease
gun. Then you know it's greased.
Remember to follow your lube charts
to the letter, for example, "two shots
Only" at the tail rotor cross head will
prevent excess MIL-G-25537 from go-
ing into the 90 gear box.


It doesn't take long for an on-the-stick mechanic to come up with solutions
to dirt and water problems in an exotic, tropical land. You stay soaked from the
inside-out during the dry season and from the outside-in during the rainy
season, which means your bird is also taking it on the chin.
41 sm E>






When it's pouring cats and dogs, get your bird under cover if you can. If you
don't have cover, be sure all cowlings are closed to help keep water from getting
into critical bird parts. Use your all-weather protective covers at the tail pipe,
forward cowl, pitot tube, nose section, forward cabin, aft cabin, main rotor
blades, stabilizer bar, pylon assembly, tail rotor blades and tail rotor hub.


SUSE YOUR ALL WATER
P OTEC VE COVER


'Course, when you're operating in wet weather you just grin and bear it.
Now, here's a tip on keeping the main generator dry on your T-53 engine.


If brush cover, P/N 30010-1035, is bolted together with the opening at the
top of the generator, slip the cover 180 degrees so that it's at the bottom. Then
water won't leak into the generator and short out the works.
FILTER FACTS
During the dry season, with those clouds of dust, be sure you've got a good
thing going for you-filters!







Here's the number game for requisitioning screen mesh kits for your Huey
B model T-53 Engine air inlet screens.

Screen Mesh Kit P/N 204-706-073-1, FSN 1560-921-6507
For
Screen P/N 204-060-217-1, FSN 1560-923-6027

Screen Mesh Kit P/N 204-706-074-1, FSN 1560-915-5964
For KEEP
Screen P/N 204-060-210-101, FSN 1560-956-9920 SCREEN
MESH CLEAN

You may have the screen mesh on
TAKE OFF your Huey B Model, or an air-inlet filter
FIIRP S on your D Model to protect your engine
I OR from FOD, but they both have one
(I[ANING point in common. They collect dirt that
Shas to be cleaned off so part of the
-- engine air intake is not blocked off.
Detergent soap and water, followed /7
by a dear rinse should do nicely for USE BRUSH TO
cleaning the screen mesh and air inlet GET DIRT OUT
filters. How often you make with the
soapsuds will depend on the dust kicked
up in your area of operation. They
should be cleaned at least every Peri- 1
odic.
You'll find the filter cleaning poop
for your D Model in para 5-51 of TM
55-1520-210-20. Remember, tho, don't
use compressed air to speed up the dry-
ing because it'll damage the filters. Let
'em air dry.

YESSIR-EEE, YOU NEER
ALL THE SAVVY AT YOUR
I T COMMAND TO FIGHT THE
AIUI- L I-ELEMENTS IN VIETNAM.
THAT'S WHAT IT TAKES TO
s. J) t BE A NO.1 MECHANIC.





























:" .. T S -

So you're a hot pilot now and can wheel that Huey of yours around with the
best of 'em? Right?
Still, you want to play it close to the vest and fly by the operator's manual.
Otherwise, bent-up bird parts and special inspections will keep that valuable
bird sidelined from the fracas.
AVOID HOT STARTS

One of the big maintenance prob-' 0
lem is caused by hot starts. E
So, when you crank 'er over be sure TM
you eyeball the exhaust gas tempera- 7 0
ture gage. If you get an uneven or inter- O
mittent acceleration with a rapid rise A
in EGT avoid the hot start by shutting
down the engine rightoff and check for 4 3 S
the reason. YR EI

t o KEEP YOUR ENGINE IN THE GREEN


'Iu




The main reason for parking your
Huey facing into the wind is to permit
a greater flow of air into the T-53
engine and to prevent the wind from
blowing hot exhaust gases back into
the tail pipe, causing a rise in EGT and
a hot start.
Hot starts can also be caused by an
obstruction- rags, paper, grass--in
the air inlet... your walk-around check
is mighty important.
Other causes of hot starts are a low
battery (when you press the starter
trigger and the voltage drops below 14
volts stop the start and have the battery
recharged or replaced), starting fuel
solenoid valve fails to shut off, or the
fuel control is faulty. By-the-book start-
ing procedures are a must.
During your start or acceleration the
maximum allowable EGT is 760 de-
grees C. If you go beyond this temp one
time a hot-end inspection is needed.
If the EGT goes about 620 degrees C
for more than 5 seconds on the T53-
L-5, L-9 or L-9A engines you've got a
hot start that has to be recorded on the


DA Form 2408-13. After three of these
starts a hot-end inspection is needed.
But if you exceed an EGT of 650
degrees C for more than 5 seconds one
time on the T53-L-11 or L-13 engine,
the hot-end gets the big look.

OK, LET'S
TAKE A LOOK,





LEAVE ROOM TO MANEUVER
When you set your chopper down in
strange places you've got your hands
full looking for level ground, duck-
ing trees and man-made obstacles plus
whatever Charlie lets loose with.
Still, you want to leave yourself room
to maneuver. So, when you hover don't
back up because you can't see behind
you ... more tail rotor blades get chop-
ped up that way! Instead, rotate your
bird and head out where you know the
flight path is clear.


Other tips on keeping your bird out
of the maintenance shop? Your opera-
tor's pub is loaded with them.
Remember-there're old pilots and
there're bold pilots. But there're no old
bold pilots ... they never read the book!

,' V lHS JURY-RIG6EP
>- WIEAPONS RT-LP OJ'
t yUR. AIRCRAFT


6M 80NNEFF






YOUR TRUCK ...

.3 If .ou do right b! our truck. t'll

-" f sure do its best to help 'ou accomplish
your mission. to get out there and back
and to give Nou a feA headaches. But
S poor operation and maintenance habits
will just naturally backfire-giscng
you trouble hcre .ou didn't has an)
before and making big problems our of
W, little ones.
Here're the things sou can do to keep
b your truck running--so she doesn't
-" "-". break down on sou without warning
P wv .ra d ., .


Like one nins mosquito can yank the rug out from under
Sa big, healthy man, so can one bad habit cripple-or kill -
your rugged. powerful truck.
S As tough and modern as it is. your truck still depends on
you, the drier. It's as helpless as a baby against sloppy
driving and maintenance habits. W .|.


./,'4 /PA// .sFR/IS Fo, 'F#,S

i| '/,--PA<'-TE A/ SEV /7" O T//E



46r M
~1/CA7~RY/~'P4'k


Under the hood with and without the engine running, look for any leaks, water hoses, hydro ulic
connections, oil connections, fuel connections; loose or broken air cleaner tubing; loose air cleaner oil
pan; ready to break V-belts.


6MO:R:E








Service your fuel fillers eery day, oa least.


I~'~


V
A rough-running engine may be
traced to something as simple as a dirty
air cleaner. Whether you've got the oil-
type or dry-type, your filter has just one
important duty--to keep dirt out. But
air has to get thru. Your engine can't
run without air. This filter needs clean-
ing or replacing more often in dusty
operations.


SPECIFIC MUSTS...

FUEL
Keeping fuel right up
to the mark cuts down
on the space where moist
air condenses. Clean the
hose or can nozzle and
around the filler open-
ing before refueling.
Look for breaks or clog-
ged holes in the tank
fuel strainer-clean it
or replace it.







OIL
Check crankcase level
at least once daily. Start
the day with your oil up
to the FULL mark. In
heavy operations, check
more often and add oil
if it drops below the
ADD mark. Keep an
eye on your oil pressure 4
gage-a sudden drop
means a quick stop to ST(
see what's wrong.


COOLING SYSTEM
Even with the pres-
sure cap on your radia-
tor, tropical heat and
operating heat manage
to evaporate a lot of/
your coolant. Add water
(the cleanest you can
find, like rain water) if
it's low. Take the cap


TIRES
Hir c\re tire in
our daily\ round
SFeed 'em jir if their
e4 need it -a soft trre
Sin the morning ma
be completely trla
b afternoon.


Clean the bugs, leaves and


off slowly so you donr y one or unK our or me oo I-
off slowly so you don't Ing fins. Straighten bent fins
get a snootful of hot and look dose for leaks caused
water. by cracks or bullets.

Rust or a lot of messy stuff in your radiator calls for draining and flushing
the cooling system and refilling (let 'er cool before putting in fresh water).
Add corrosion inhibitor (FSN 6850-753-4967), but dissolve it first in hot water
or it'll plug your radiator. Use 6 ounces of inhibitor to every 12 quarts of
water. Give your cooling system this treatment at least every 6 months and it
may not need any more. m L

Real bad case of cooling system constipation may call for use of
dealing compound (FN 6850-690-5561). / ,J s+
TB ORD 651 (Apr 64) tells you what to use and how.



49o


.i.






BATTERIES
The same heat that sucks water out of your radiator works
at sapping your batteries. Add water (again, the cleanest
you can get) if the electrolyte's down to the plates.
SSpecific gravity (SPGR) of tropical electrolyte must be
between 1.200 and 1.225, like it says in TM 9-6140-200-15
(Jul 58), the bible on lead-acid storage batteries. Any higher
than 1.225 will make for too much heat and cook the stuffing'
out of your battery.

WHEN MINING Your stateside electrolyte SPGR is 1.280
STRONG ACIC. -too strong. But you can make tropical
POuR IT INTO electrolyte by diluting 1 gallon of that 1.280
v.TER ANh K VEAR electrolyte (FSN 6810-249-9354) with 1
PRCTCTION! quart of distilled water.

SIn cast ouu're issued straight sulfuric acid (1.835 specific
S grasi inst ead of electrolyte (1.280 SPGR), you can come
up % ith tropical electrolyte (1.225 specific gravity maximum)
b% mixing I1 parts of distilled water with 3 parts acid.
SDo the mixing in an acid-proof container, like
S- glass or hard rubber.
PUT WHITE DOT HERE
When your battery's fixed up with tropical elec- ~... '
trolyte, paint a 1-in diameter white spot on top of
the battery near the positive post (that's the fatter
post). Then, anyone checking the specific gravity
will know it's supposed to be between 1.200 and
1.225.
Moisture and dirt are 2 other big enemies of your batteries,
so keep 'em as clean and dry as possible. Use baking soda /
(FSN 6810-264-6618) in water and a brush for a good scrub- t,
bing and then lots of fresh water for rinsing. Clean the '
holddowns and other nearby metal parts too and keep 'em -:i j
painted. Match batteries-no more than 25 Specific Gravity -.
points or 0.2 volts difference. \

GAA is good enough for coating the battery connections, but asbestos grease
(Sealing Compound, FSN 8030-598-3059) is even better for heading off corro-
sion and blocking moisture.
Tight connections are a must-the battery's got enough against it already
without trying to feed juice thru loose connections. Po






BUT, I'VE BEEN
OPERATION GIVG ER GOOP
MA~IN TE N ANCE-


All the good maintenance in Vietnam won't do much good if you don't oper-
ate your rig right. Here are the main points to watch--

Starter button-f f your truck's
got a compression ignition engine
(Mulifuel or straight diesel. your
starter's got a big lob and needs
all the juice you can feed it So
don't be afraid of hurting the
starter button when you press it
push hard all the time A light
touch or a slight lelup will bum
out the switch Give er a breather
-about a half-minute- if it
won't start right away.

Instruments Every gage and
indicator is mighty important, tell-
ing you whether everything's OK
or giving you a warning if some-
S\thing's wrong Give 'em a good
onceover before you take off and
then every few minutes while
you're rolling.


Air brakes No air means no
brakes. a real hair-raiser in an
emergency So, if your truck has
air, or ar-over-hydraulic brakes,
wat for that buzzer to quit, before
taking off, so you know you ve gol
air. This air has plenty moisture m
it; remember. your air tanks
have to be drained at least once
a day. You'll be surprised at how
much water can build up in those
tanks.

MFMORE>






SHIFTING
A real pro knows that dutch pedal is no footrest.
After he shifts gears, he gets his foot back on the floor.
Riding the cutch pedal will burn out cutch facings in
nothing flat. Got the dutch pedal free travel your TM
I'M A CLUTCH calls for? If not, you're sure headin' for clutch trouble;
NOT A yell for your mechanic if it needs adjusting.
FOOT REST!
F.OTl BE SURE YOU'VE
REAP YOURC GOT ENOUGH SPEED
LET UP ON THE II'I TO SHIFT IN...
CLUTCH E-A-5-Y OR...
AND STEAIY--
50, YOU WON'T
SHAKE: UP THE i/1 FOR PROPER.
DRIVE TRAIN! SHIFTING
SPEEDS!

Downshifting at too high speed can bust some engine parts. In a multifuel
engine truck, frinstance, flyweights in the injection pump will go to pieces
from the shock and that's a dub-behind-the-ear for your injection pump.

.... S OBSERVE HE USES
DOWNSHIFTING AS
/ .- SUBSTITUTE FOR THE
k BRAKES... .35,Gt
THROWING ALL THAT
:. -WEIGHT ONTO ENGINE
5(REEECH cLArNK AND PRIVE TRAIN 15
CRANc A r,/NrlL RUINING TRUCK!

It's an insult to a good driver to remind him that he should wait until his
truck has stopped moving before he shifts from first to reverse or reverse to first
-but, believe it or not, some drivers butcher their trucks this way.
Just as bad is shifting from first to reverse (or the other way) with the throttle
out. If you're stuck and trying' to get out by rocking your truck, wait until the
transmission's gears stop spinning and then change gears. With 4-wheel drive
or double-sprag, you can get out of most places with a slow, steady pull.

THIS IS
I I PROPER
(rss a ditch or gulley head-on when possible. W AY!
(rssing at an eagle puts a twist on the trudc mad
even some mounted equipment. Such strand can
dagethe fr and ear things apart. ,







IT IS WRITTEN, "A HALT!
SCREECHING HALT IS AS
MUCH A SIGN OF NO. 10
RIVER AS A JACK- -.
RABBIT START... 8 o

Park your multifuel or diesel truck in neutral with
the parking brake to hold it. If it's parked in gear, an
accidental bump from another vehicle could start it.
Hydramatic trucks are parked in neutral too just in case
somebody jumps in and starts 'er up without checking.
It's just good sense to block the wheels when parking
any truck on a hill.
Before shutting down, run your truck at idle for a
couple of minutes to let 'er cool off slow.
A few minutes of inspection after you climb down
could be the most important of your life. You might
have to roll out of the sack in a hurry and get going
with no chance to pull a before-operatons check. If
there's anything wrong-flat tire, low oil, radiator or
battery leaks and so on--you want to know it now, not'
when you've gotta go.


INA
N PARlK

NEUTRAL

PUT
SON
PARKING
BRAKES

IDLE
TO
COOL
LOOK
^. THE
VEHICLE
OVER*

AFTER OPERATIONAL CHECK


MAINTENANCE


There's more to a clean truck than bound to get sc
just "look nice." here 'n' there,
Dirt works into bearings and other you get in the
lube points. Dirt dogs vents and filters. cleaning and fn
Dirt hides loose and broken parts. So
wash it off. If you drive your truck into F
a creek for a wash job, find a shallow
spot where you don't have to go in -_
over the axles. Deep water will flood
your wheel bearings, U-joints and other
lube points that don't take kindly to -
water.
Dirt hides rust too. It's tough enough
trying' to keep up with little rust spots,
but you'll go nuts fighting' rust if it gets
a real headstart. It'll spread under paint
and eat deep into the metal. Paint's .-
53


raped and chipped off
but it's no problem if
re quick with a good
esh paint.

AORE BETTER YOU
NO SHALLOW SFOT...
To AVOID WATER
IN SEALS.


SMOR:






STAYING
Even rubber parts and waterproofed AHEAD OF
canvas can stand only so much batter- MILDEW SURE
ing by heat and moisture. Dust covers KEEPS A
and boots rot, letting in the dirt and 6uy BUSY/
moisture they're supposed to keep out.
Insulation cracks and lets moisture in
to short out wires. Mildew is like cancer
to canvas and other fabrics. So you 'A
clean and repair and replace--as
needed.
HEY KIP,
T OUTTAI Trailers need a lot of the same atten-
THERE! tion trucks get-tires, wiring, lube,
paint and brakes. Trailers with air-
over-hydraulic brake systems have an
air line filter that needs regular clean-
Sing. Open trailers with floor drains
should be parked wirh the drains open
,- ro ltc rain our. Those without drains
'r are parked wAith the tailgate end down
so water'll run out.




HOLD IT--REPORT IT
HOPE THIS
Except in a real emergency, stick to your TM, your ONE IS IN AS
Maintenance Allocation Chart and your local SOP. Small G6OO SHAPE
problems can become nightmares if you try to fix or AS THE ONE
adjust something you don't know anything about. 1 PREW
Look high, low, in, under and around for trouble. YESTERPAY^
Then, if the repair or adjustment needed is not your job,
make sure you report it!
Nobody is more familiar with a truck's special be- --
havior than the guy who drives that truck. Although S ". '
regularly scheduled maintenance services will catch most
troubles early, operation in tropical conditions puts a
big job on the driver to notice and report problems.
Even if you're not assigned to the same truck regularly, :
it's your baby while you're the operator. Make sure it's
in top shape for the next guy-you'd expect him to do .:-
the same for you. '. "'.



















Charlie's deadly trick of dropping a rubber-banded hand grenade with its pin
pulled into our fuel tanks was finally stopped. As you probably heard, this
type of delayed action bomb blows up some time later after the fuel dis-
solves the rubber and lets the grenade handle fly off.
Our "solution" was made with 2 pieces of 1'/-in angle iron and a padlock.
We put angle iron on the gas cap and gas tank strap like this.
Now our troops rest a little easier when being transported.


ia7
.HERE'S THE .
SET-UP


(Ed Note-The savings on just one blown truck would pay for a whale of a
lot've cap locks.)

STAY AWAY
A big bang brings crowds. Just make sure .ou don't join the crowd when
there's been a VC-made explosion in %our area. Charlie has the friendly habit
of seating up a second charge to go off about the time all the curious knuckle-
heads gather to see what happened on the first explosion. Get it? Stay away
and you won't.




























Your HD16M Tractor got sudden
stage fright, chokin' up and running
rough or not taking cues on steering?
The thing is, your HD16M has to get
steering hydraulic suction screen clean-
out and fresh brake-steering filter cores
at 50 working hours after new break-in


TM 5-2410-209-12 TELLS
YOU ABOUT SERVICING
THESE. FILTERS.










or major overhaul, and every 1,000
hours after that. But if you've been
working where there's lots of dust


blowing or the dirt's thick and pow.
dery, you'll need new cleanup and cores
lots oftener.
The right word is in )our TM 5-
2410-209-12 (Sep 65), pages 123 and
126, Fig. 64. But just don't jiggle that
adjusting screw on the brake relief
valve. That's there for parts replace-
ment or repairs only. Best check-it's
your neck.
CHOW-LINE TROUBLES
If your rig is just simply choking up
or jerking, either the fuel filters or the
air cleaner element could be clogged up.


*a^]t-


A quick look at that air restriction
indicator under the instrument panel
every morning can help. It's easy to

RFD BAND
WARNING
SHOWS HERE


forget. But if it turns red--so's your
face. Unless you've kept a good sched-
ule on that air cleaner core, put one in
anyhow when you change brake-steer-
ing insides.
The other bit players in this drama
could be your fuel filters. They're twins,
and after a wash-out on No. 1 and an
element change on stage 2, you'll need
one more check.
What you're looking for here is any
fuel-line leaks, with diesel juice seep-
ing out.
If you should get into heavy trouble
and crack a frame on that rig, leave it


alone, and don't expect your unit shop
to weld it either; frame welds except
very minor-are not organizational.
But another thing is, that frame
could be of special triple-strong steel.
Wonderful weight-saver, but it takes
special rods to weld, and special know-
how. It's no job for amateurs.
That steel might be T-1, and it has to
be babied, like not letting it get hot,
and using special low-hydrogen rods
that are 90,000-PSI strength or over.
THAT ROCK SPILL-OVER
One other type trouble you could
have is rocks racking your tilt cylinder.
A recent pub, MWO 5-2410-209-30/1
(Jun 66) can help you. Use the kit,
MEC Stock No. 2410-BOO-0232. And
if you've heard some guys say to switch
the tilt cylinder and tilt brace, nix-
that makes top-shelf Engineer types
apoplectic. Besides, the guide plates in
the MWO do a better job.






YOUR BAKER 6000 FORKLIFT...

1-2-3 FOR YOUR


So where to start? Let's say you look
at-

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
BATTERIES- Case cracked, filler plugs
loose or missing, corroded, water not
covering plates, poles reversed, dead
cells, clamps or cables loose.


-~ s


v-iF'


Tough horsepower with a big job is sour B ikr (1ilf) F,,rklii Likc anm hcavy
MHE, it'll work better if you're on the ball for little things that could
cause big trouble later. That on-the-ball bit you might call Continuous PM,
or Running PM. As a headache-saver, it's tops.
Running PM means every time you work, stop, or just stand by, you check
something. That way you cover the whole rig in two or three days and you know
way ahead before small defects grow into big breakdowns.
Fact is, a sharp eye is one of the best PM tools in the kit. Like when you just
walk up to go to work, you could look things over. To help you know what the
CMMI's will kick about, deficiencies matched to guides in DA Pam 750-10
(Jun 66), the CMMI Handbook, are in bold type.


Deficiencies, you know, have
to be fixed before operating;
shortcomings and suggested im-
provements you get corrected on
scheduled service periods.


SWITCHES- Loose,
wires or mounts loose
or broken, wet


DISTRIBUTOR- Cap
cracked, mount loose,
wet case, cables loose.
shields missing


HEADLAMPS--Broken,
won't work, loose,
cracked or exposed
wires al I


AE






















DON'T FORGET
TO WIPE THAT
DISTRIBUTOR
CAP IN THFi
MORNING!

In damp, humid places you'll want 1r wipe our
that distributor cap-it collects moisture while
parked over night and won't let you start.
COOLING SYSTEM




re top,
or miss- BELTS--Frayed, crack-
ed, badly wora, missinL
deflection over inch.
WATER PUMP-Leaky,
impeller stuck, shaft
wobbly.
FAN--Blades bent or
hitting core or guard,
pulley chipped or bro-
ken.



































SAFETY RACK BOLTS -
Looe, miue, wash-
ers gone.


MAST Cracked, bent
main cylinder scored or
gashed.


KEEP FUEL
CLEAN... IT LL
HELP KEEP
YOU GOING.







FORKS -Bent, braces cracked,
edges chipped, badly out of line.
MISCELLANEOUS

FIRE EXTINGUISHER EAHAUST-Leaky, bro-
Missing, seal broken ken manifold, bolls or
charge low or lost. brackets gone.







61






HYDRAULICS


FILTER-Loose, leak-
ing, joints damaged.


PUMP- oK
Lines 'V
insecure, OVER
leaky, OFThEN '
dented I
walls.


TANK -Leaky, mount loose, fluid con-
taminated, lines bent, fluid level low.


ANP NOW...ON WITH THE
RUNNING GEAR. ,


SHOURMETER-Not working.
OIL PRESSURE-Not up to
between 25 to 35 PSI. ,-


TIRES-Treaj gone,
rubber cut through,
punctured, flat, low
pressure.
WHEELS-Loose lugs,
rims badly bent


















STEERING ILAR-Un-
lubed, not alined, pins
gone, linkage badly
bent.


IUBE HERE


TRANSMISSION -Leaks,
low oil level.


MAIN DRIVE-Shift de-
tents worn, slight nudge
engages gear, drive axle
seals leaky or broken,
castings cracked.


- REMEMBER! MAKE BIG
CHECKS WHILE SHE'S RUNNING.
A SITTING MACHINE CAN'T TELL
YOU MUCH... NOW, FLIP THIS
PAGE FOR SOME. WORK-A-
c DAY TIPS.






SHARP ON THE GO


A call has to go to your unit mechanic
but fast when your eyes and ears tell
you the Baker's going sour.
If, f'rinstance, it overspeeds, back-
fires, bucks and jerks, smokes, over- "
heats oil or water, knocks, cutch slips
or creeps in neutral, it's time for re- *
pairs.
Then one last thing-not how your
lift runs, but how you run-

WORKING HORSE SENSE

LOADING--Never butt into cargo or take RAIN COVERS-Protec switches and in-
on too much. struments outdoors always-they're not
waterproof. Canvas or an old poncho will do
SHIFTING -No direction lever changes the job.
while moving, ever.

STOPS- No abrupt jerks or jams. Always i'
get forks over unload point before straighten- B
ing mast upright.
TRAVEL--Mast always back, forks up for PARKING--Fork down, brake on good,
dearance, and sharp eyes for other people. and wheels chocked on slopes.
On ramps or with bulky loads, always travel
in reverse. Use ramps, don't jump a curb, TIRE CHANGES-Never jack under the
railroad tracks, deep ruts and holes, or you'll 5,000-lb counterweight; it'll fall on you. Get
bust an axle. jack under frame or axle instead.

Now, anything you don't see here is probably in the library-and the good
reading you'll need is in these pubs:

^0OU'R. L YOUR LIBRARY
RJF 060 ARMY MHE 164 FJF 060 ARMY MHE 193
TM 10-3930212-10 (Apr 60) 10-3930-238-10 (Sep 64)
TM 10-393212-20 (Apr 60) 10-3930-738-20P (Dec 64--
TM 10-3930-212-20P (Apr 63) TM 10-3930-238-70 (Sep 641)
LO 10-3930-212-20-1 and -2 (Feb LO 10-3930-238-20 (Sep 64)
That's about it, except for one thing you won't find in the pubs-which is
that your whole job is getting stuff to guys up the line. The payoff on the way
you work is battlefield firepower.


















Dirt has a way of seeping inside your
Bird Dog (O-1D, E, F, G) engine cowl-
ing and fouling up the works ... a pretty
good reason why you want to filter it
out of the carburetor induction warm air
mode. Check with direct support to see
if they have the kits to put on the alter-
nate induction air filter as called for in
MWO 55-1510-202-30/4 (22 Nov 66)
. soonest.


A Natural Bloom
Your M17 field protective mask is not
supposed to have a shiny, black face
blank. So you needn't fret about the
powdery stuff (crystalline bloom) you
find on the rubber surface. The bloom
comes from a built-in preservative used
in the rubber. Inspector-types know the
bloom is not a defect. Ch 2 (16 Mar 65)
to SB 3-30-26 set the record straight on
the bloom.


Get our mwO Indexz
The new Index of Modification Work Orders is DA Pam 310-7. To get your
outfit on pinpoint distribution, send a DA Form 12-4 to the Army Publications
Center, Baltimore, like it says in DA Circular 310-29 (7 Mar 67).


FLASH! AT'TEl'TIO! NOTE!

105-MM GUNNERS: HEED!
Hold it there, you gunners on 105-MM Towed M102 and Self-Propelled
M108 Howitzers!


Word's been flashed to get your mechanic to spotweld a 1%-in plug (made
out of 2-in cold rolled bar stock reduced to 1.615 minus .005, leaving a
%-in shoulder) in the cylindrical end fulcrum-opposite the cutaway clear-
ance. This will let the fork straddle the primer just right.
This fix will do till an MWO comes out to take care of it.


Would You Stake Your Life 'on
the Condition of Your Equipment?





W WHERE ORMA CONDITIONS r
ARE UNUSUAL...
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MUST KEEP PACE.
So, the USUAL routine chores must become an
UNUSUAL program of care and constant check-
ing. USUAL things like lubes, seals, paint, coolant, ko
cleanliness, tight connections and careful handling !
become the UNUSUAL! So ...

S1VE YOUR EQUIPMENT
UNUSUAL CARE! !







SEE THE "UNUSUAL CONDITIONS"
SECTION IN YOUR OPERATOR'S MANUAL
I IML 1 I O