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PS
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00019
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1965
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00019

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6-7
        Page 8-9
        Page 10-11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18-19
        Page 20-21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40-41
        Page 42-43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48-49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54-55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60-61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text



THE

PREVENTIVE


WHO DIDN'T
CHECK OUT
THrESE PARTS
BEFORE TAKING
THEMV1 OFF THE
'EQUIP.MENJ7"'


DO YOU DO IT?
(S pa



r ~ v


JR,
i(: /S~$..


I


\ Do something o te im,1
p today to help .lreain y
- s / citck Cp0bigo





ii'


There's a big push on nowadays to chop down the cost of running
" ^i ~ the Army.


You have a big part in that job. The way you operate and use
your equipment and the way you maintain it all play a part in this
cost-reduction business.
Operate your gear like it should be no banging and slam-
ming. Keep it clean, adjusted, lubed and perking just right. It'll
last longer and won't have to be replaced by a new one so soon.
Saves $$.
Get your unit mechanic in for the tough jobs. He has the know-
how, tools and parts to keep your gear purring. When the job's too
big for him, he gets the support maintenance outfit rung in to keep
you moving, shooting and communicating.
If you're a mechanic, one of the biggest bets for keeping down the
tab is using your test equipment to check for bum parts. Use the low-
voltage circuit tester on your trucks and tanks, for example, or tube
testers on radios. Know, for sure, before you yank a part and replace
it with a new one. Saves $$.
Supply men, too, know what to do: Get and stock only what your
unit needs: No rat-holing for "just in case they're out." No "nice
to have." Remember that when the whistle blows, you go with what
you've got including parts and supplies. You don't want more
than you can carry. Saves $$.


9


I : D l ud.: l r p;intnl g l I InI p, cuji
Ilan nhi DinE ipplhro L) Hl]irdiilsl a
Dparim.nT rat inF Ar'T., 193 fDruar) 19ti
DISTRIBUTION In accoldance wilh re
quwremenIs *ubmitled on DA Form 1 24

'So ~.9o~FH,


*1_ .


REDUCTION



+






[P16,


7-i PR[EILTIVE MAINIENANCE :,.r
issue No. 15a 1 965 r e
IN THIS ISSUE

GROUND MOBILITY 2-19
m,, 2 12 M 'p l 16
.,. 1' ..,-: 13 ,m i, ,e ,.T ] 16
MIlI 14 BIIL I?
C4 : 15 MIoS ..... i.I



FIREPOWER 20-27
P.114 ,Ii. 2025 M M( "2i
M; 6 i


AIR MOBILITY 37-47
bjn nt il' i li5041
l:,',.T[. ', Il,T,,i r: .17 N,, ,:1 ,l." ..ifli : 4 1
iA FOrlm,,l IS 8 I ] 42 43
'rir E 6.r: 3 : 4 4
I. ),I N9VP .. n .,: 4.-47
it. Ra .i


COMMUNICATIONS 48.53
,...'=r,.'3 L, .,nm',I 51
Etin,,;l.,:, [ 4i Arl CA i I I
I .r, T .,rt .'5 51


GENERAL AND SUPPLY
*4 >LTl; .lt u i'jl r d l 6 1 70 C r c1-':,il*.r 63
S n l .,r. PIat 6: 62 FI 50ui 6b
UI.7' Mr. 62 Put.Ii l.,. 28
Lii. ly 13 15 16 25 2r,41 42 50 53


inf -_-X
iw .f


r





Ed


U1









TROUBLESHOOTING,,, Commerci -Tgpe Vehiclese



Jr onTr-IS 15 %A,1ST E\\ILA 194 SSlNG
A %%Or \Li! P pcL TPE T .7 Nli TO
%IAKE B* 0%AmeFESS~3 oN! scr A LIT'rLE
BASIC .N0% -.0W, %% \ILL CA1ZI2N %L' ALOWl;
tA% ALL NEE0 Ae LE A OE%% TOOL'L3. REAL
g~g ~ 'a \ANL' A L I LrrLE COOL-HeADED
Iv-Sr' LIN SL qNST QOD nQ E iZED ENGINE.
.r':5 E TEQ TmE IGNITION oe rmE FUEL
:1 1-EELS 012 AN AR.NN SECIAN THtESE Tm4Di O'sE 6-AltT J~
3.jrIV'. CI.E A r*r; TAR r..LP C\\
ON-
~CE~~~cL( rs~h~' ST~T.r





NcI TOOLS AT ALL.
ff MeeGANT" AT* LEP
"(I\ELL, LET*5 SEE %'LmAT
J'k E C-OT Iry My


r E F T...
`t:~~~ NAI~L I"ILE ,I r
L009 -IT ALL so%%ff COINS. AND I, S nrL6 CAN
Tm,~S CTL'VF /? 91-.E ELSCTIZ-CAL AL%%-kNS NIANAE TCI
iTeAT %E -QE :ARR% A\ J FEk% SI %IDLE
J ~ ~~E*~~BlslE,2rft& 7 6(O TCLS LIK(E...



SAC









2 3./
MORE








MAYBE THE SAGE
I CAN'T SE OUTTA GAS-THE FUEL is ON THE FITZ...
GAGE SAYS I'VE GOT PLENTy. R SHAKE THE CAR
SAND LISTEN rR I
GAS 51.05HIG IN )
THE r Kla.







The way your engine stalled may tell you whether to look into the fuel or
the ignition first. If it coughed and choked to a halt... sounds like the joy-
juice! If it just wouldn't start when you came back to it, then you can't be sure.
So let's check out both systems, one at a time.


Suppose you get little or no signs of life when you try to start the engine.
No starter action, no lights, no horn and no flickering of the ammeter needle
mean you either have a dead battery or it's not able to put out. So you head for
the battery ...


CHECK FOR BROKEN STRANDS WHERE BE SURE CABLE CLAMPS ARE SNUG ON BATTERY
CABLE GOES INTO TERMINAL CLAMPS. TERMINALS AND THAT POSITIVE CABLE IS TIGHT
ON STARTER OR STARTER SOLENOID
If you get a very weak toot out of the horn, the battery is too weak to crank
the engine .. stop right here and go for help.
4







....- T .TS

If your starter turns the engine over briskly, you can eliminate the battery,
ignition switch and starter as suspects.
With only the ignition switch on,
look for a sharp drop to discharge on --
the ammeter. (If your vehicle has an
"idiot light" instead of ammeter, it
will light up to show discharge, but
it doesn't tell the difference between
heavy and slight discharge.) A heavy
discharge means a short in the primary
circuit and there's nothing you can
do about it. But, if your primary's
okay ...
ST,- ri '.; T.' F
5"f':il. 'T ': : T ;." ;. '.',"1 :::7-- *,


To crank engine, you can bridge the starter
solenoid contacts with the handles of a pliers.
Be sure the gear shift is in neutral if the
ignition switch is "on" your wheel may come
to life.




' w a


A GOOD SPAIe'
%%MEN %30 \ 'E liAi.N N
T..i5 TEST SMO\S u%06z
iN,4liriO 'is DOCNG IT i
JCOO. BL'r T,.r FL'EL
5\srE.\5 NOTir ON ruE
.ALL. SO JUMP TO
PAGE NINE...



(\ j c
N'.v


BL'r. NC SPCA@.
AE4N SIGNITr IO TROL/BLE-
SO tE'LL C-G CO TROL.I.H
TLE GIhTiGr.f
r ROLgSLESqPOirNc. 1I


Hir Ihe storlei wiih the ignition on lit s lredy on --
when your starter operates with the ignllion key )
(. A nicker on the ammerci shows your primary circuil
,G is okoy unless the distributor condenser is shot (more on that later)
Go back to where you were lesling for a spark with
the sparkplug wire If there s no spark at the plug
cable make the some kind of lest this time by
pulling the coil to distributor cop wire from the cap.
Hold the cable by the rubber insulation then bring
the metal tip about 'i inch from the block while
',\. cranking the engine -, ,k V ,l ,
"--. A spark here hlos.- thal the coil .
Si4 OI hut orimelhin'-v. urong ini the
di-tribulor. keeping the juice from
Slihe -park plug would d be the rotor'
2gone bail or liIe rap i4 crackedl. leting nioi-lure inile. -


V .VN .


Wipe the inside of the distributor cap clean
and dry Condensation, in damp country or
wet weather, can form inside and foul up the






lmg out the coll-fo-distrbutor wire (not the
distributor cap wire) from the distributor con-
necthon to the block If you gel a spark at





Examine the points. Tickle the starter
until the high point on one of the cam
lobes stops under the fiber block on the
movable ignition point This leaves the
points wide open.
If tllime'r- piled. burned
or dirlt. clean 'eni off .ilh
a -imalil file or the nem t be-
llingl !ou'e\ 'a ol.



you don i get a spark, make sure the
connection' s eight where the movble
point's tension spring and the conden-
ser s pigtail attach to the distributor's
primary terminal /
Now, if you gel a spark ...


Make sure the points ore opening about .020
inch A malchbook cover's thickness is aboul
right the adjusting screw holding the sta
lionary point sometimes loosens and allows
the gap to change.








CONDENSER

ignition switch, see if the ammeter is on or dose col.
to zero-it should be. If you get a heavy dis- /
charge, remove the condenser clamp screw and
hold the condenser out and away from any contact A spark here tells )ou the
with the distributor. If your ammeter now moves coil's done in-and no tra'elin"
up to zero, the condenser is shot. on that coil. But if the coil's
okas .
BL'r IF

,E FROM
STr'LLA
5 o I e, ... TO COIL BA RY
FIBER Put a jumper wire from the ammeter to the other JUMPER 1
BUSHING side of the ignition switch. If you didn't get a flicker
before on your ammeter but you do now, your '
ignition switch is on the fritz You may be able to
Look for a short under the movable point rig the jumper wire to bypass the bum switch for
Check the fiber bushing and the cam follower a temporary fix
block. The follower may be worn down so far 0"
that the rivet fastening it to the movable K THIS COULD BE
point touches the cam. CAM THE (ULPRII

BLOCK II ELL.
4EtGANTH *ALER.
OL'eUDDvI IT STILL
Going back to 'hen ,ou tickled the poinl bile boring the coillto.- O I LET
distributor wire al the distributor. if ou didn't gel a spark E LETS..



Short the pole on the coil where the coil-to-
distributor wire is attached.



You check the "beginning" and "end" of sour fuel ssrtem, in that order.
Then, if necessary. trace back from the end."' II ou'%e got fuel in rhe rank.
go to the other end the carburetor .


SFUEL .. ..GO
wEZE IN
T-i.IS -E 1 TANK? CARBU-
9D-M RETOR

10@MOR E>









Remove the oil cleaner. If you've got a manual choke make sure the butterfly valve opens and doses
smoothly as you push and pull the control See thai the control wire is attached tight. If it's an auto-
malic choke, flip it hock and forth with your finger to show it's free. r
THE C-OkE SHOL.&D SE
CLOSED ttAHEN THE
ENGINE'S COLD...AND OPEN
S tr. \ 3O PA2 TL OPEN IF THE
RFnVF L ENGIE'S EL4B^.


CONTROL

But make sure the throtlle is in full open position before trying
to flip the choke valve-the small choke linkages on -ome carburetors






But if you don't get gas at this point either, hook it back up and ...
5 If you're alone, wrap a rag NO GArv
.5. around the end of the line and CO'M Ae
then see if it soaks up any fuel DOU AT THE
Take off the tank-to-fuel pump while you blow into the'tank. END ONN r'
line at the pump. Blow into the LINE MEANS
tank filler opening to put pres- / LOCkNE5
sure on the fuel.









Remove the short length of
flexible line that connects the
fuel pump to the fixed line on
the chassis. If the obstruction is
in this section, blowing may get
it out.


If you finally get gas through
to your fuel pump ...
7 e If it's still no-go,
70. you're stuck with a
bad fuel pump--and
Replace the lines and try again it'll take a mechan
to start your vehicle. it'll take a mechanic
to get your vehicle
rollin' again.

COMPLIMENTS THANK HURRY SACK, CONNI 60 OVER THOSE TIPS
OF THE 5HERIFF5 VOU, OFICER.. IT GETS LONELY O ON CIVILIAN VEHICLES,
OFFICE, ISS RODD. LUCKY FOZ US HERE. TO PASS THE TIME...
WE'LL SENDA TOW V\ yO PASSED sEE you LATER!
TrUCK FOR VOUR By...





12



















Some of these slase cable assemblies FOR PROPER POARITY
seem to end up with end connectors BEFORE USING (ABLE
installed one of two ways right or
wrong. So when you go to use one, it's
anybody's guess which pin's positive--
or negative--or .
Anyway, if you don't know which way your polarity's running, you can't
swear to it that your cable does not have crossed wires. So the next time you
connect up this cable to a dead vehicle's slave receptacle, you're taking a
chance on belting the heck out of that vehicle's electrical system by reversing
its polarity. This practice also causes arcing at the receptacle.
The positive pins in both plugs should mate with the positive hole in the same
receptacle. If the cable is wired correctly, the same wire will connect both posi-
tive pins the other wire will connect both negative pins.


To be sure the cable wiring is correct,
plug in one end to a hot slave recep-
tacle. Then use a test lamp or voltmeter
to read current flow by clamping one
wire on the positive pin at the other
end of the cable and grounding the
other test wire on the same vehicle.
If the lamp lights, or the voltmeter
registers current, you're straight.
If you get no reaction, take one con-
nector apart. Then pull out the contact
pins and switch 'em.


I LAMP LIGHIS OK ,


GROUND
NEAR
RE(EPIAC(LE
POSITIVE PIN

NO REACTION TAKE
NOT OK APART AND...
SWICONTACT NS
CONTACT PINS







M151 SEAT PIN

Gold is where you find it and so are front
seat retainer pins for your 1/4-ton M151 truck.
These pins aren't in supply at least, not -- -
where you'd expect to find 'em. But you'll find NOT TIGHT-
that a good substitute is the pin used in the BUT A GOOD SUB
1/4-ton M38A1 truck's clutch linkage. Ask for
Pin, Straight, Headed: FSN 5315-054-4190.


GAS CAN GUARD
SSo your five-gallon gas can gets dented up
because it bounces on the left bumper of your
M151 1/4-ton truck?
Well, that's easy to cure. All you need is a
couple feet of rubber tubing. Tube, rubber:
compounded, ID 7/32-in, is listed as Item 2 on
page 65 of your TM 9-2320-218-20P (Dec 63).
You order it by the foot as FSN 4720-203-2668.
It only costs six cents a foot.
Make a continuous slit along the tubing with
a sharp knife and then press it in place along
the top edge of the bumper.
t Now your gas can (which costs $2.25) will
')ll ride on a rubber cushion (which costs 12 cents)
and it'll last longer.
RUBBER FUBE
ACTS AS BUFFER SMEAR GREASE
SEALER SEAL SMEAR GREASE
ON GASKET -^- ,
It's general knowledge that the M151 1/4-ton ,
truck's oil filter gets changed every 6000 miles or
semi-annually. But it's not generally known that
when you're putting on a new filter, the sealing
gasket should first be soaked in oil.
Some gaskets may become dry and hard while
in storage. A brittle gasket can tear, break or leak.
It's also a good practice to put a thin smear of GAA
on the filter's sealing surfaces. This'll let the seal
slide in place while the filter's screwed down tight.








BY THE EACH


You may get short-
changed when you order
replacement spark plug
cables for your 3/4-ton
G741-series trucks if
you don't dig your -20P.
Page 41 in TM 9-
2320-212-20P (Feb 60)
lists Cable Assembly,
Power Electrical, FSN
2920-620-3964, for five
spark plugs. This FSN
will not automatically
bring you five cables.


2v 3PDEO TwE
C. A8ES INl QuAN~rITES
ar ONE O3 RMOR-E
uP TO PIVE. THE
PSN IS FOR A SINGLE
CABLE AND NOr T
SET OR Kir.


3/4-TON U-JOINT NUT
Are the prop shafts
on your 3/4-ton G741-
series trucks doing the -
twist because the uni- /
versal joint bolts are _
working loose?
If so, then you need
a new self-locking nut TrO ve ,1E TO
that comes under FSN o- ,os.
5310-057-7080. This'll
keep the U-joints tight.
These new nuts get
torqued to 40-50 foot- \
pounds.
The nut is not in supply yet for SNL G741 use. Have your support people
order them from the US Army Tank-Automotive Center, ATTN: SMOTA-F,
Warren, Michigan 48090.







M35A1'S NEW DIGITS


Yep. That's right! LO 9-2320-209-12 that came out in May of 1965 is the cor-
rect LO for the M35A1 multifuel truck.
No doubt many 2Y2-ton jockies are wondering why the M35A1 is now
covered by this new numbered LO. Well, the M35A1 has been put in the G742
series group this "G" group and the LO now cover all the straight stick
2 /2-ton trucks.
This means that all future publications on the M35A1 will come out under
this 9-2320-209- number instead of the old 9-2320-235- number.


HIT THE HOLES cuT
H FAn !
Some homemade guides can save you a lot of sweatin' ROUN
and cussin' when you're lining up holes for reassembling OFF TOP
equipment.
Use bolts of the same size as you'll be using in com- u, viLu
pleting the assembly. Cut the head off with a hacksaw, ACROSS TOP
round off the top with a file or grinder and cut a slot
across the top for a screwdriver.
Screw these guides in and then you can set the gasket
and carburetor or whatever you're putting together GUIDE
- right down over 'em nice 'n' straight. As you remove
each guide with a screwdriver, replace it with the proper
bolt. GUIDE
You can make different size sets of these guides and r
keep 'em handy for different jobs.







BIIL-OEM-OVM-VT&E...

PRIVATE SHAFT
CAN Vou...
TELL ME WHAT
BIlL MEANS?


TO FIND IT


Where, oh where, are the lists that give the rundown on equipment and tools
that're supposed to be on your tactical wheeled vehicle?
You know, the basic issue items that some pubs call BIIL (Basic Issue Items
List) or OEM (On Equipment Materiel) or OVM (On Vehicle Materiel) or VT&E
(Vehicular Tools and Equipment).
Well, that list can be found in several places-where it is depends on the
vehicle. It could be in the operator's TM-or a change to the TM. The right
TM for your vehicle may be one of the new -10 series or one of the old ones, put
out about 10 years ago, that covers both operation and organizational mainte-
nance.
Before you start looking, it's best to know the G-series group of your vehicle.
If you don't know it, you can find your vehicle's G group in the front section
of TM 9-2300-223-20P, the Consolidated Authorized Organizational Stockage
List of Repair Parts for Tank-Automotive Equipment.

SHERE'RE THE PUBS THAT GIVE VOU LISTS
1 OR MOST OF THE G-SERIES TACTICAL WHEELED
VEHICLES:
VEHICLE SERIES PUBLICATION
-740 -ton (M38) .............................ORD 7 SNL G-740 (Jun 56)
G-758 /4-ton (M38A1, etc.) .....................................Change 4 (11 Dec 59) to TM 9-8014 (Apr 55)
G-838 1/4-ton (MI51) .............................................TM 9-2320-218-10 (Oc 62)
G-823 /2-ton (M274) ...............................................TM 9-2320-213-10 (Jul 63)
G-741 /4-ton (M37, M37B1, etc.) ..............................Change 8 (Moy 65) to TM 9-8030 (May 55)
6-742 21/2-ton (M34, M35, M35A1, etc.) ....................TM 9-2320-209-10 (Feb 65) Change 1 (Moy 65)
G-749 2/2-ton (M135, M211, etc.) ............................Change 7 (Feb 65) to TM 9-8024 (Oct 55)
G-744 5-ton (M41, M51, etc., including the
wrecker and trucks with multi-fuel engines) ................Change 3 (Jan 65) to TM 9-2320-211-10 (Mar 63)
G-792 10-ton (M123, M125) ......................................Change 3 (Jan 65) to TM 9-2320-206-12 (Feb 60)







FOR MORTAR MISFIRES...

MUZZLE DOWN,
BREECH UP

If you have an M106 or M106A1
mortar carrier, listen up.
Change 7 (Oct 63) to TM 9-
2300-224-10 (Nov 61) points
slightly off target in para 161,
page 42, where it tells you what
to do if the mortar misfires.
Change the range like so and
you'll be target center when you
read para 161 for effect ...
In c(3) on page 42 of the Change
7 it tells you to elevate the mortar
as high as you can. What they
mean is depress the mortar as low
as you can.
In c(5) on page 43 it says the
third man raises the breech end of T
the mortar to a horizontal position tuht
so the round will move down the hori
tube toward the muzzle. Actually, ar
with the breech end of the mortar the
in a horizontal position, the round muz
won't move. slid,


THIS'LL

(PIVOT) { \
STEER

YOU
RIGHT -
The pivot steer on your M106 or
M 106A I mortar carrier is the handiest
intention since girls but. like girls,


it can be dangerous if ou don't handle
it right.
Thing to remember, when you pull
back on a pivot steer lever you lock the
Struck on that side. This is OK if you're
going slow. like under 10 miles an
hour. But if iou pull on the pisot steer
when you're going fast. you make sour
vehicle a portable disaster area.
If you're luck\ you merely throw a
- u-track and break a final drive. More


likely .ou'd also reck 'our differen-
tial. If 0ou turned over there could also
be heavy damage to the human com-
ponents of the schicle.
So wh) make business for the medics
and the repairmen?
Pi.ot steer is for s-l-o-w turns (under
10 MIPH) Use your regular steer han-
dles if )ou'rc going faster.
With pioot steer you'lll get best re-
sults ith ) our shift in 1-2 or 3-4 range.







M14 RIFLE TALK-


L.Jr


'1 awohl.
How loose is loose?
And how right's tight?
Those are right good questions
when you're talking about some
parts of your MI-i or M14E2 rifle.
And knowing the right answers
might save you a gig or. worse yet,
she won't fire when the chips are
down.
To cut the suspense, though,
here're )our cues:

The gas spindle talke wants to
I be loose as a goose.

The gas c) linder plug ought to
be no more than snug-right.

The gas ) kinder lock's got to be
just right neither loose nor tight.


And the operating rod guide?
, NW'ell, looseness is no problem as
i long as the operating rod works
OK.
20 -------I- .


RODGAS (YLIDER LOCK
GUIDF G[AS DYLNDCR IOCK


OPERATING ROD


SPINDIF. VALVE


Loose as a goose on the gas spindle valve rmniens ou can turn it with your
thumb to vertical for normal firing and to horizontal for grenade firing.
If you hate to use block of tood to get the val\e to go in and pop out. or if
you noted a coin, cartridge or your combo tool,' blade to turn it, brother. ou !-
know right off the carbon's building up bttteen the spindle valve and the gas
cylinder. Short recoil' lust around the corner.


I ~ .* -. MORE







Smart operators keep the valve loose
by exercising it at the end of each day's
firing or at inspection time. Right .l
they push the valve in and out till it's .-
loose, then they turn it on and off a -
couple times. This'll get rid of the
carbon.
You don't have to worry about lubing the back end of the pin, either. It'll get
plenty while you're coating the outside surface of your weapon with the lubri-
cant prescribed in your TM.
Just don't forget to end up this exercising bit with the valve slot up-and-down
for normal firing ... or your rifle'll end up as a one-shot Lucy.


PLUG JUST


There was a time when a real tight gas cylinder plug
was believed to be necessary to keep from losing gas or
the plug. Not now. Experience shows that if carbon gets
on the threads of a real tight plug, it'll freeze it tight.


There's only one right way to hold the Ml 4 when plugging or unplugging
it. Put your left hand over the barrel and cylinder, or if the bipod's attached,
hold on to that. Of course, if the barrel's hot, you can stick a screwdriver
between the barrel and the cylinder for a little leverage when removing the
plug. But, don't ever tighten the plug when the barrel's hot. You might
never get the darned thing off.







And, for Pete's sake, to remove a stubborn plug,
never grab hold of the handguard or you might bust
it. Also, never brace the butt between your feet to
get more heft on the plug or you'll bust the stock.
It's OK to plant the rifle between your size 12's like
it shows in the old TM, but don't use your feet like a
vise. If the plug's frozen that tight, let your armorer
go to work on it.

/INCIDENALLV, yOUR COMBO roo
PFN 4953-768-0211., I THE ONLY
GADGET TO USE ON THE PLUG. PLIUES
AND WRENCHES WILL HURT IT BAD.

A couple more tips on the plug: Never take it off till you have to ... and
when you put it on be sure it's good and dry or you'll be inviting the big
carbon freeze. And watch those threads. They're real fine. You could cross
'em up if you're not extra careful.
As a general rule, you'd only remove the M14's gas plug if the gas piston's
on the bum meaning so dirty it won't slide, or it's installed wrong.

NOT / CHECK THM
HERE ^ You don't have to take anything apart to see if the
piston's working right. Just lock the slide to the rear,
then turn the weapon end for end, keeping an eye or
ear at the exhaust port (not the drain hole). If the piston
slides freely, good; all is well. If it won't slide, you've
got a cleaning job.


Sound's kind of nutty, but it
To check for correct installation of the could happen that the piston'd be
piston, take off the stock. The flat side in there wrong and you wouldn't
of the piston must be facing upwards toward be able to tell the difference by
the barrel. If the round side's up, the piston looking at the assembled weapon.
can't work, 'cause the gas port'd be blocked. Of course, this'd mean that the
plug threads would have to be
-- crossed and the plug overtightened.
FLAI SIDE Very bad. This'd lead to a burring
inside the cylinder. Very, very bad.
So, get that flat side up every
time when installing it, huh?
23
MORE









r\ ^ 2 /YOU CAN TELL By LOOKING AT THE ASSEMBLED
/ M* 14 IF THE CYLINDER LOCK'S ON RIGHT.


f i the front bhiead Here's the sure-fire way to get it right
over the lock, the every time: Thread the lock as for us it'll go,
earsto be counter- then back off enough (soy, half a turn) so's
ong. Which rmeons you cn insert the cylinder plug through the
.ht in the cylinder lock into the cylinder.







-a RODPOD
C r r--3-_ --------==^Q
Looseness of the operating rod guide's no problem as long as the operat-
ing rod'll slide without binding. To check this out, though, you'll have to
strip your rifle a bit further. You already have the stock off, right? Now
remove the connector assembly, the operating rod spring guide and the
operating rod spring.

OK. With the rod in place, attached to the W
bolt, tilt your weapon end-for-end. The bolt BUDGE!
should move freely under its own weight. If COULD E
it does this, everything's under control'. soT tFF


But, if you run into any binding whatever,
you'd better make a thorough check. The \
trouble could be minor- like dirt or twigs or
burrsorstuff in the coming recesses or on
the operating rod. You or your armorer can ,
take care of these. .


But, if it's worse than that--like if the long slender part of the operating
rod's cracked or bent, or the rear locking lug areas are chipped or burred
bad-let your armorer carry the ball. Don't use the weapon.
Now, during this test the operating rod guide might look loose. But don't
let this shake you up-and your inspector shouldn't get excited, either.








A guide that's real loose in the disassembled stage like this could be plenty
tight enough when the weapon's assembled since the inside contour of the
stock would hold it in check.
So, don't let anybody tell you you ought to tighten that guide by peen-
ing its spring pin. Just 'cause somebody can see daylight through the pin
doesn't mean it's loose or damaged. The new split-type pins all look that
way. The old pins, of course, were solid. As long as the pin's in place, leave
it alone it'll do a better job if you don't irritate it.
In other words, you keep loose, ja?

NO LUBE
Of course, you know you don't ever put any lube at all in the M14's gas system
parts. You assemble 'em absolutely dry-and clean. These parts are made of
corrosion-resisting steel that don't need lubing. Matter of fact, oil'll only invite
trouble-dirt, corrosion, sluggishness, no-go!
But sometimes it's pretty hard to keep oil out of there when you're cleaning
and lubing the rest of the weapon. So, here's a little trick to protect the cylinder,
piston and plug before you start cleaning and coating the inside of the bore
with prescribed lubricant:
-q
S1. Lay your weapon on a flat 2. Turn the cylinder valve off This way, if any oil
surface, like a bench or box, ...so's the screwdriver slot's from the patch should
then rotate it so's the cylin parallel to the barrel happen to sneak into the
der sides on top--trigger opening in the cylinder
vup, tt i. alve, Gravity Gerty'll
Sdraw it back down so's the
Spatch can wipe it off next
e time through. No oil will
reach the cylinder plug
This way, that's for sure.
But, again, don't forget to turn the cylinder valve upright when you're
through.
Your TM 9-1005-223-12 (Feb 65) is chockful of dope on correct methods for
cleaning the M14's gas system parts pay hard attention to it. Especially, don't
use steel wool, a wire brush or scrapers of any kind on these parts. You might
change some of the critical dimensions and ruin your fire.
Use CR bore cleaner (FSN 6850-682-6835-2-oz can) for normal cleaning
and carbon removing compound P-C-llla (FSN 6850-620-0610-5-gal can)
for real tough carbon deposits. In a pinch, you can try dry-cleaning solvent or
mineral spirits paint.cleaner, but never use gasoline, benzene or high-pressure
water, steam or air.






















There's a place for muscle-but it's not between the ears and definitely not
on the wrench that comes with your M79 grenade launcher.
Too much heft when you're installing the firing pin retainer or when attach-
ing the receiver group to the stock could put your weapon on sick call.
Like, f'rinstance, unless you seat your wrench just right in the retainer's holes
and do the twist real easy, you could snap off one or both tips. A busted tool's
only part of the woe, too. Worst of it is, the tips stay in the retainer--and it
takes a long trip to support maintenance to get 'em out.

So, next time, try it this way: Put -
both tips all the way in the retainer N
holes by flattening the face of the tool Flo
against the retainer. Then turn the -
wrench real slow till you meet resist- iI.
once. Then seat it firmly. Remember,
any extra pressure at this point could
bust a tip or two.
To save your M79 some major surgery for a split stock, stow the heavy hand
when you're tightening the pan-headed machine screw into the stock.
First make sure you get those two
washers on the screw in the right order
like in Fig 22 of TM 9-1010-205-12 )
(Feb 61). Next, run the screw up till it's 9 ,
snug... then add about a Va tum with
the wrench. Enough, already!
And here's a special tip to guys who've been using a screwdriver instead of
their wrench on this job. It's OK to use a screwdriver if you're having wrench
trouble, but be sure the blade's wide enough-and, easy on that muscle!







GLOVE IN HAKE THE FLAKE
PLASTIC BAG
FIRST AVHEN iNO3
De-r ditoar I CASEi
aaoybe you'd like
Before you hit the field, put your asbesos itten i a pfs!i a b* before dsow-
ing it in the carrying crse wif te spare barrel. Ths'U keep the pesky whl'e
asbestos faikes from getting info Che nie oCfe boer. Alse, ii' npsfe the glove
ast longer.

(Ed Note-Crackerjack idea.) PO New York 90


HEAD TO THE REAR... ALWAYS!
Want to save yourself some face?
Then put this first and last on the
pre-firing checklist for your M60 ma-
chine gun:
Make darned sure the gas piston's in
right-with the head facing the rear -
toward the trigger.
If it's the other way around, you
could get an explosion when you press HEA OF GAS
the trigger. You may be lucky and not PISTON /MUST
get hurt, but your weapon'll be dead. FACE TRIGGER.
'Nuff said?

DON'T BUG YOUR RIFLE

Oops, hold everything! If you've HEy, SAO E UGE
THIS Oil I USED
been tempted to use a 2-oz plastic in- DOESN'T STOP vUST
sect repellent (bug juice) bottle to hold roEEPS u'r IT
your rifle oil on maneuvers or other- BUGS AWAy.
wise- hold one! It's hard to get those
li'l bottles absolutely clean and dry in- Ti E, STCK
side, and if you don't, the water and % TE S'4ED
acid from the bug juice can contain are OIL CANt
the oil and foul up your weapon's in-
nards! So, better stick to the 4-oz metal -
oil can that's issued to you unless you're
absolutely sure your plastic container
is clean and dry.











7Vehice Pubst 9 Pia-Poeit








Vehicle publications dated after 1 Nov 65 will be distributed by pin-point.

Get your unit's requirements in (thru channels) before 10 Oct 65 to the St.

Louis Publications Center on-

DA Form 12-37 for Tracked Vehicle Publications.

DA Form 12-38 for Wheeled Vehicle Publications.
DA Form 12-39 for Trailers and Dollies Publications.
See DA Circular 310-38 (30 Jun 65) for the word on this new pin-point

distribution.

Any forms the Center receives after 10 October will get delayed in getting

set up on the pin-point system, so beat that deadline.


A selected list of recent publications
of interest to Organizalional Mainte-
nance Personnel. This is a list compiled'
from recent Adju1tnt General's Distribu.
lion Center Bulletins. For complete de-
tails see DA Pam 310-4 with latest
changes.

TECHNICAL MANUALS
TM 1-US-5, Mar, U-i.
TM 1-10H-23C-4-20P, Apr, OH-23.
TM 1-225, Apr. Fixed & Rotor Wing.
TM 3-1040-206-20P, May, Flame
S ech, Main Armament,

TM 3-4240-224-20P, Apt, Breathing
Apparatus, Cqmp Air, ABC-MISAI.
TM 3-4240-241-12, May, Filter Unil,
Ga-Particulate, GED, 300 CFM, ABC-
M6AI and EMD, 300 CFM, ABC-M6AI.
TM 3-4240-241-20P, May, Filter Unit,
Gos-Parliculate. GED, 300 CFM, ABC-
M6AA i:. .: -.it: I and EMD,
300 ,:,: s : :.,
TM .. :Li,2 '2 -pr, Pershing,
Power Gen Equip.
TM 5-1450-203-20P, Apr. Pershing,
Power Gen Equip.
TM 5-2805-203-14, Apr. Eng, Gos,
6 HP; Mil Sld 4A032-1.
TM 5-3431-217-15, Apr, Welding




IM i. S1. ) ;,l OP ,s r i ,,
An :j -' -, t- `9 Wrenching





IM:
7 : s ..




rM :.l 'j luf,2P *i-, C.-p ii
M si)t lss E.Pen.
r u F r 1








IM 1 1- j7.22sF Apr, Gea Set,
% d -,: j :." .i Md CE


IM t.t* 211. 5 .s
DEC .o-. s.

iM I i .t .., ,;: eile en
.. ,, r I j 1. 'l
M114At; Howitzer, Med, Towed;
Ax P I : 5 _i Is AsO
TM 9. :i..- .:j 2/) H:2 k,
Sys De ..I.r ...
TM 9-1410-375-12P/1, Apr. Pershing,




, -s i,- !". : -l r. ,. i
.; I :1 :.. I I / s I






Here (imp) Ground Con Equip
TM9-1430-250-1 ,11-1 i, i






iMl P / N ;

r r. -,-, i, ,
IM 141 0.; l-.PI i r r 1 s-




IM 4.l r l 2p.- ] -,; j *r ,.1
M'sa isd t. wi




IM o. ,i0 C I s,01 ,r ,3
SM i4 s i..ils.1P' S 2 t -


M.* I. C:r EW c.


, 6 r.. .au :
iM 0 14i 2OS 'P|1/1 N. ,
im sa -44 7;. Pc 0 C sL.I


.*p 4 ... l f
SM '.15 j ?2o.l 5P/2/1 w. N-,.

28


Herc, Nike-Herc (Imp), Ground Hndig,
Spt & Svc Equip.
TM 9-1440-250-20/2, Apr. Nike-Herc,
Nike-Herc (Imp), Ground Hndlg, Spt &
Svc Equip.
TM 9-1440-375-12P/1, May, Perch-
ing, Ground Hndlg, Spl & Svc Equip.
TM 9-1440-500-12/3, May, Hawk,
Ground Hndlg, Spt & Svc Equip.
TM 9-1450-375-12P/1, Apr. Pershing,
Ground Hndlg, Spt & See Equip.
TM 9-1450-376-12P/2, May. Persh-
ing, Ground Hndlg, Spl & Svc Equip.
TM 9-1450-377-12P/2, May, Persh-
ing, Ground Hndlg, Sol & Svc Equip.
TM 9-1550-200-20P/2, Apr, Target
Mil, Ground Hndlg, Spt & Svc Equip.
TM 9-2300-224-10/3/2, Apr, Part
Two, Carrier, Cmd Post, Lt, Armrd,
M577, M577A1.
TM 9-2300-224-10/3/3, Apr, Port
Three, Morlar, SP: 107-MM, M106,
M106A1.
TM 9-2300-224-10/3/4, Apr, Part
Four, Flame Thrower, SP: MI32,
M132A1.
TM 9-2300-224-20/3/4, Apr, Part

M132AI.
TM 9-2320-209-20, Apr. Chassis, Trk:
M44, M44A1, M45, M45A1, M45C,
M46, M46A1, M46C, M57, M58,
M58AI; Shop, Trk, MI85, M185A1,
M185A2; Cargo; M34, M35, M35AI,
M36, M36C; Trk, Dump: M47, M59,
M342; Trk, Moinl: Earth Bar Setter,
V1 7A MTQ; Trk, Tnk: Fuel Ser 1,200-
V1IA/MTO; Trk, Maint: Telep Constn,
Ga[, M49, M49C, M49CA1; Trk,
Tank: Wir 1,000 Gal, M50, M50AI;
Trk, Trac: M48, M275, M275A1; Trk,
Van: Exp, M292, M292A1; Trk, Van:
Msl Firg Data, XM472; Trk, Van: Shop,
MIO9, M109AI, M109A2, M109C,
MIO9D, XM567; Trk, Wrecker: Cr,
M108; Trk, Wrecker: Lt. M60.
TM 9-2320-223-10, Mor, Cargo Car-
rier, M116 Amphibious.
TM 9-2320-223-20, Apr. Cargo Car-
rier M116, Amphibious.
TM 9-4935-303-12P/1, Apr, Sergeant,
Test Equip.

















H.Q.
KVETCH'


IT WILL BE
SIABOLICALLV
SIMPLE... THE
MERE SUGGESTION
CAN START AN EPIDEMIC
OF REPLACING
SERVICEABLE PARTS.
k urc WC14 -


'...BUTUULl/VrllNKf
THIS 15 DASTARDLy / IT
COLLD RUIN THEIR
COMBAT EFFECTIVENESS.
IT'S WORSE THAN THE
CONTAMINATION BIT...


is, Enemies, Terrible Collection of Humans)
29




















* Against Unnecessary Nonsensical Trading and Swapping (of parts)


YOU KNOW '5S... IT WILL RIGHT IT'LL IT'LL OVER-
WHAT WILL HAPPEN NDER KEEP PARTS LOAD REPAIR
IF THIS "CANCER TE READINESS FROM GOING SHOPS WITH
IS ALLOWED TO OF OTHER OUTFITS WHERE THEY'RE UNNECESSARY
CONTINUE! AS iAELL 45 BADLY NEEDED. WORK... AND
THEIR O0"N. SLOW UP THE
fr NECESSARY...


L.RNS UP MAINTENANCE: OUR
COSTS, USAGE RATES MECHANICS
AND CREATES GET ROBBED
SHORTAGES BY DRAINING OF A CHANCE
OFF SUPPORT'S ON- 1 TO EXERCISE
SHELF STOCKS FASTER REAL SKILL
THAN THEV CAN THEY'RE
BE REPLACED. TRAINED
'" %,"_ \ FOR.







..FIND THE MAN WHO 15 INFECTED
WI-tEN I LOCATE I. M. THE
1EST 15 E45'.


And ro. next da.....















1. Endangers combat
readiness of your
outfit.
2. Keeps good repair
parts from going
where they're REALLY
needed.
3. Overloads repair
shops, making them
spend vital time
checking out turned-in
parts that are O K...
while the really bum
parts wait.
4. Builds up paperwork
and log book entry
chores.
5. Gives a false
picture of parts
usage and makes
PLL lopsided.


JOIN UP


AGAINST


UNNECESSARY


NONSENSICAL


TRADING and


SWAPPING

(Of Parts)


How To Spot A
WIanion Paris
Swapper
1. Leaves lest equipment
lying around unu-ed.
2. Ne'er u-se maintenance
manual keep- "em
on -helf.
3. Never uses -pecial lool_
and tool kitl.
4. Unfamiliar wilh
IRONw) .
5. Make- no effort o run
down real cau-e of
equipment failure-
but -ub-4iliute part
uilhout lesling until
equipment uork_.
6. Replace part- but doe-
no preventive
maintenance.
7. Sw ipe- part from
other good equipment
%ilhout concern for
the -uppl. situation.
8. Turns in large amounts
of parl for repair .
many of them in good
-erieeable -hape.


Ir ruu wanr iU ulriLAT ImIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, LIFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.































After Chow...

USE'S STILL NOT BACK, NOT QUITE!
SOS' WE LOST NOTICE THIS
UNUSED
TVW. COP A
MAINTENANCE
,L SHOP. THAT'S
KIND OF
UNUSUAL!



AROUND
DON'T
WORV.34









34





GoTCHA!
Syou
SAB-BUT-TOORI



A^b3







SPECIAL 11H! Hwr
SHOCK HAPPENED?
METHOD.. V'Ow HELLO.
SARGE! WOTCHA
DOIN'WERE?




HOW DOES
ONE GET
H,'PNOTIZED
Back at KVETCH. .


I





CO0SES!
FOILED AGAIN
Ba A.LLN.T. S.
GRr... GNASH!



AG l'1l FCR ',EARS YOU...W
GET ME OUT! GOLDPINKIE. HAVE TAUGHT
GEALT MEPOI U5 TO 5l\4 PARTS AND
MAN! MECHARNCI SUCH. AND 50 NOW...WE
DO SOMETHING HAVE LOST ouE SCH LlA
.AS ECOANIiS
FROM LACK O USE.


SORRY
BOSS.


-'IC.


I i

























A baggage compartment is not a gar-
bage compartment ... whether it be an
Iroquois (LUH-lBI or an\ other type
aircraft.
It's not the appearance so much. al-
though a trashy look doesn't sa) much
for your ship during inspections. It's
the unknown weight penairs ou pay
in flight for thnt trash. You also take
a chance on loose rags or papers in-
terfering wa ih internal operating com-
ponents of sour aircraft where the
compartment does not have a solid
partition surrounding it.


P EI.E iT ITEMS %%MICH HkE 4 PLAE IN
OcvU SH-P-SUCH As A :.ENERA1
ViEC.tANiC7S TOOL C1EST OR PIRE E1NTINUirwHER.
HiWE TO BE DQOPERL% SECL)REQ. LEST TH-E%-
SHIPT AROUND IN FLIGHTr _


Besides baggage compartments, trash
can accumulate in cockpits and cabins,
or etcn in our-of-thc- ay places like
a Hue) hearer compartment after the
heating unit was removed. In other
words. just about an% open area of the
fuselage is a potential dump.







OVERHAUL WISE...


WHO J IT?


r-I-


SDA.S.1407

There's nothing like a well informed
Army. So the fact you just fired off a
DA Form 2407 EIR on that aircraft
part that just failed doesn't hack it
unless you've done right by Block 35,
item 4.
TM 38-750, para 3-7.4e(3)(b)4, says
to "name" the activity that did the last
overhaul or manufacture. Sure, you're
allowed to put down "N/A" or "UNK"
in there. But that doesn't help the types
at the big maintenance hangar too
much.


Remember, the prime manufacturer
or contractor does not always overhaul
his own items and the government does
not always buy all the smaller parts
from the prime manufacturer of the
aircraft. So AVCOM has to know who
to contact on each EIR.
No sense trying to stick the prime
contractor with a failure that belongs
in somebody else's lap. The best way
to get the most out of your EIR is to
"give" with the right contractor's
name, sure 'nuff.


'R BS:. F.LY LOWER

While dirt on the skin of an aircraft
won't slow it down anywhere near as
much as extended flaps or external
stores, it does have the same effect on
T/ a smaller scale. Over a long period of
time you pay for an unclean bird with
Increased fuel consumption. Think on
'rr%1 -V lan I it awhile.









Shoving bulky general mechanic's tool chests into light aircraft cockpits has
always been sort of a weighty problem during field exercises.
Stripped down flyaway tool kits are a lot easier to handle around outlying
helipads and field strips. This is not a subject to be taken lightly when you stop
to consider all the necessary field gear that has to accompany your Sioux
(OH-13), Raven (OH-23) or Bird Dog (0-1) on combat, observation or admin
missions in the field.

HERE'S A FLY-
AWAV KIT CUT
DOWN To 16 TOOLS
AND 30 CALIBER
MG AMMO BOY
USED By A SloUY
CHIEF .. WEIGHS
ONLY 3-4 POUNDS J
4T Ai1ST.




S But you'll want to choose your own tools, after think-
S ing about what you normally use every day during and
between dailies. A .50 cal. MG ammo box will carry
S even more tools. However, on larger aircraft the space
S problem disappears and you can carry the whole
chest of tools around wherever you go.
-r BBetter get your CO to give the OK on carrying a
reduced kit.

"DIAMOND
-:. '"JI-M-UNLOA
S, -, ,. .._ _. -. .THAT "ICE A
Finger rings, including wedding bands, don't be- SyfOU E
long on the flight line. It's too easy for them to ON THIS BIRD
scratch fiberglass canopies and windshields, or the
soft metal surfaces of the fuselage. Even on harder sur-
faces, a ring can nick the paint cover and let corro-
sion get a foothold. Besides, you can hurt your hand
if that ring catches on some projecting part of the
aircraft or hangs up in a tight corner ... not to men- /-
tion what can happen if any hand or wrist jewelry
comes in contact with certain parts of an electrical / /
system.





























Hit 'cm a lick here.
Hit 'em a lick there; .
Hit 'em a lick everywhere!
This is "SOP" when, grease gun in hand, you're making the appointed
rounds called out in the lube chart for your bird.
But there's a little more to lubricating than hitting one grease fitting after
another. In many places you want to pause and see that a bearing is getting a
full quota of grease before going on to the next fitting.

A GOOD EXAMPLE IS THE MAIN ROTOR FORK BEARINGS IN THE RAVEN (OH-23).
GREASE ,* GREASE
During an Inlermediate you make FITING TlNG
with the gun until you spot clean grease j i'
coming out of the relief hole. like
the lube chart in IM 55 1520-206-20 '
(Feb 65) says. A little 'savvy,' gained
from experience, also comes in mighty
handy here. Like having your buddy
rotate the collective in the cockpit while /
you're shooting the works to give you\
fully packed yoke bearings.


'Course, this look- Nhen- ou-
lube advice also goes for the tail
rotor blade and )oke bearings on
sour Rasen.
You should shoot the grease
until \ou spot a trace coming thru
the seal. Don't use muscle po er on
this firing tor an% fitting for that
marterl because too much pressure
can force the seals out of place.
Oj-= 4a


Now, suppose you're pumping
away and Iheic's no sign of grease
at the seal. The grease has to go
someplace More than likely it II
go inside the blade root itting
cavity if the 0 ring packing in
there is shot.


LOOK FOR
GREASE
TRACE
HERE


Dear Windy,
I have observed sev-
eral crew chiefs and
aircraft mechanics stor-
ing hydraulic fluids in
plastic (bleach) bottles
and jugs. Is this prac-
tice accepted?
Capt J. W. F.

Dear Captain J. \V. F..
Hydraulic fluid should
not be stored in a plastic
Ibleach) bottle or jug.
These bottles, in man.'
instances, contain small
slivers of plastic whichh
come from the manu-
facrurng process. The
sliders and anm other
foreign matter in the con-
tainer can cause mal-
functioning of hydraulic
equipment in which
clearances are vetr small.
/.


You can tell a tilled ca' in right-
otT nhecn the bird is cranked up.
You'll get a high freq vibration in
the rudder pedals from the out-'of
balance blade.
So. v.hat are other pitfalls to be
on the lookout for during a lube
job.? The Scrciie Notes in \Oiur
bird lube chart list them a
little 'sa\-' ,ill resist them.







CARIBOU CHIEFS...


as ootin THIC
nWhen .ou put the replacement in INTO
according to TM 55-1520-204-20 13 GROOVE

cHANGING A THERMOCOUPLE? LOOK-ALIKE WON'T


It's surprising how much look-alikes aren't alike... when you eye them side-
by-side.
Take the engine thermocouple transmitter in your Sioux (OH-13).
Either of these babies will fit into the cylinder, but each uses a different
method of transferring temperatures. The one will work only in the OH-13E
and G Models while the other one is used on the OH-13H and S Models.
So what's the rub?
Just this. Page 2-287 of TM 55-1520-204-20P (7 Aug 64) lists Transmitter,
FSN 6685-557-3786, for the E and G Models but it's really only usable on
the H and S Models.
Transmitter, FSN 6685-526-8650, is the baby you want for the E and G
Models. But there's a hitch! In order to get it you'll have to requisition Lead
Assembly, FSN 6685-332-4665, listed in TM 55-1520-204-35P (12 Aug 64).
Your support will cooperate with you on this one.
Yessir, when you change a bum thermocouple you need more than a look-
alike, or even a fit-alike. You need one that works.


Apr 64) Para 12-102 you want to put
the thick edge of the tachometer shaft
into the drive sleeve slot. If you don't
the job will have to be done o\er again.
for real.
If the engine is cranked up and the
unseated tachometer shaft is suddenly
seated in the slot snap!!! Another
tachometer headed for exchange ~ ith
a broken shaft.
So-o-o-o ... shaft that groove. man!


A puny pitot tube doesn't have a
fighting chance against a sturdy Cari-
bou tC.V-2) crew chief's stand and a
forgetful mechanic.
So .ou''e got to be extra careful
%.hen preparing to work net to, the
firc all with the engine side co''ling
thron back.
The safe %ay to approach an engine
compartment job isi ith the stand
jacked ti a lo" position. This let- .ou


WORK
FSN 6685-526-8650


see the rube extending out below the
open cow ling so the "ork stand won't'
Strike the pitot rube as %ou maneuver
it into position.
\\hen you're certain the platform
vill clear the tube. jack it up to nork.
ine Ic'cl. If sou use a rigid rnpe stand
instead of hydraulic. better round up i
second man to "atch the alt end and
help you manhandle the stand au a
from the tube.



















There're times when it pays to be a switcher.
Like, say, a training mission calls for firing blank ammunition in your chop-
per's M6 armament subsystem.
Any M60 ground gunner will tell you that he has to mount the M13 firing
attachment to shoot blanks. That's because there isn't enough powder in the
ammunition to give the needed recoil for automatic firing. The attachment
partially blocks the barrel to give the necessary kick.
The problem with the M60C, of course, is that there's no barrel front sight
to mount the M13 attachment on.
The solution? You guessed it-switch to an M60 barrel. You can even use
a shot-out barrel!
Fact is, if you use an M60 barrel in the M2 subsystem on the Raven (OH-
23) you need a shot-out barrel. That's because 3/4 to 1-in might have to be
taken off the front sight to give you door clearance.
Just have your direct support remove the flash suppressor, take off the bipod
and put the suppressor back. Mount the attachment and you're in business.



__ _/ REMOVE REMOVE
4. SUPPRESSOR BIPOD






PUT BACK
SSUPPRESSOR MOUNT ATTACHMENT

Remember, tho, once the blank firing mission is over, you want to switch back
to your M60C barrel for live firing.






















~"L' AB.
Like as not you crew chiefs, mechanics and 427's
decide the success of your Huey's mission even before
it leaves the pad meaning those M60C's hafta
be ready to deliver when the man aims and fires.
Here's some key spots you might re-doublecheck
- and fix between flights:


L~MOREs







The rubber pads in the buffer work like the
brakes on your car. Get oil or grease on.'em and
they'll grab or seize and the buffer and other
parts of your M60C take a beating. Smart operators
make sure they keep the insides of the buffer clean
and dry by servicing it after every firing. And to
play safe, they rotate the pads after cleaning, too -
the top pad always takes the worst punishment. Just
be sure you assemble it right when you're through
(rubber side of pads to the front of the buffer).
Change 1 to TM 9-1005-243-12 (Oct 63) shows you
how to use the assembly tool.

GAS3 C'i.lID[ER P LUG O -iy, nmetal pa
!r :ey p-, ad s ,


You want the plug just snug
enough to hold finger-tight
PLUS 1/32-in more with your
combo wrench. This'll save
wear and tear on you and the
plug and the cylinder.


BOLT ASSEMBLY --
L ugs chipped.
extractor broken,
bolt piug pin missing;
.. il and!t sprilng
busted:
actuatir assembly
puot oi


Any or all of these'll give you
real trouble. However, you won't
lose that plug pin if you assemble
it with the roller to the front and
not to the rear. There's a hole
directly opposite the roller shaft
when it's put on wrong that could
let the pin slip through.


O'course, your bolt'll last lots longer if you keep up with your homework -
like stoning chipped and deformed lugs that do harm to the barrel sockets. So,
keep close tabs on these critters.








OPERATING ROD --Roller needs lube frozen, worn, out of.
round, tapered; forward end bate our mush c ed.
These're the main parts to watch. Lube the roller
regularly with MIL-L-46000. You should be able
to turn the roller with your finger. You can fix the
forward part easy by stoning.

7 ROD S'RIY r
Measure it. If it's not at least 24-3/4-in long, it's NG. Flex it to check for bro-
ken strands, and eye it real close for flat spots that got flat by rubbing against
the inside of the receiver. Most of the kinking, though, comes from hard han-
dling, so take it easy, huh?
OTHER FREE PM TIPS
HIIPL.ILr I CHAPRC P',TO :, f r iA p ,

STOW r rl ,_;, ,.h lh i ti- c UP, :r, tihe r ,ma.e j- L.
lihi ..L, ith E h ; !I I rt' .:, i1f ii r tI,











any morir adjistnits thian you ihve to ... and be sure to l-e h
electrical system .arm up (say, about 15 minutes) beore f- ,-.
you do any adjustig,
Sl \ '', ** I i s e sio n iiiitar : i sii hr ti






l ~station torque at 12-5 inch-poands. Since
n: i 1th.e s aHie boresiiht-d in r'dii ion-





_ro-~,~,,nmai.i aiabi e isisois in atbe sighting
STOW ii i pr o PANEL mal
any more adjustments than you have to aid be sure to aet





Selctrical system wrm u (o dbycheck 'about 5 prtes) befoe p
byou do any ad fr adjusted
S- al; nuts
on suIspension hlnkaue of the sighting:
.station torqued at 12-15 inch-pounds. Since
.; the s are boreswlhted in relation to ,
:' command variable resistors in the sighting
,staton. it s leal I portarnt to have all hinllage
in the supporting arms torqued the same,
'a mount.
(Also, doublecheck procedure in para
-Ib(2) of your -12 TM for adjustment of
counter-balance.)








THE TWIST


I^^^
4e5.


ifie iriI;-o;ee lei! ~ -

ijci,. C :7>c
art a'i;i~il;,~r --


a- liee 7.ql he ro-wvy c-
"or;ami, jack. wA1 m-J ? : lip, higs 0i fhe


A final reminder: The jack is made of soft metal and can't take much punishment. Don't treat
it rough when the connector's off.


S P PS Magazine is written for-
s PS Me? UEf'S of equipment (Drivers,

FOR Operators, Crewmen, Gunners).

M E ? I- at the Organizational Level
(Mechanics, Repairmen, Armorers).
Sometimes PS mentions "Support."
S' 'That means Field Maintenance, the di-
.-', Q rect support unit in your division or
: '- ~on your post.


I~ T
i





ol


,::~:- I~fc/


ittsr!<.(







LOOK-A-LIKE PAIR BEST

S L'ST L'7E.
O WNN'ECT092A
0 AD CnrNACS...
;rAPeFE'
4~F~


Likes attract and unlike repel is a lousy law for magnets, but it works won-
ders when mating the U-185( )/G plug with the U-186( )/G and U-187/G re-
ceptacle having matching MX-3227/G contact assemblies.
Always connect connectors with look-alike contact assemblies. That'll keep
terminal-type telephone, telegraph and teletype equipment putting out at peak
efficiency along your 26-pair cables.
It's no sweat to see the difference between the old and new connector and
matching contact assembly.
Just hold one in your hand and focus your eyes on it.


(Dec 63) stamped or painted nearby.
E-%OSED AND RO.'NDED





Don't jump to conclusions, though. It may have come through with the lat-
Tr. GCQEEN PLAJST-
CONNEC TO.E.



Not so with the modified ones marked MX-3227/G. Using this same eyeing
routine, you'll notice the peaks of the pins are covered by a rectangular piece
of green or gray plastic. You also ought to find "MWO 11-5935-205-35/1"
(Dec 63) stamped or painted nearby.
Don't jump to conclusions, though. It may have come through with the lat-
est connectors marked MX-3227/G.
Sure, any of 'em will pair up at least for the first time. After that, don't
take bets, 'cause one or more of those contact pins will get forced, and be bent
or broken off. And that means the whole cable has to be replaced, like it says
in SB 11-569 (Dec 63).
While we're on the subject, care is your key when you connect up for com-
municating. Gently squeeze the connectors together straight on. If you pair 'em
up at an angle, you'll damage 'em.
Another thing, if your outfit has any of those receptacle connectors and con-
tact assemblies around that haven't been modified, get the word to your support
unit. They'll take care of the job.







TO THE RESCUE, CAP IN HAND


I


6a,' Tait 126 6' I -wU-10 ov 2


C~s Otaolr iol Nd s rownj
re~ ~~ 0-pi;;, 's in~ C'~jk
00:a 0:c .opi-i~f ot.cpus


(Ed Note: Good deal!)


Dear Editor,
Wi'fee you know, the note of ;'e~ jop of pogs
efels you to use clear celophane tep''su.L r
of hie IV-93'UI dosimete.

Just po~it you) b oose cers fowra ie e
somne of the thrcbv.-avcUsops whih, praisfe" f
plug cables, W~ihen the new ;b es ae nwrarp
Lihe pyaste cops ore tossed.

they were m ,do for tI--.. hi st'es s;o;:'c, *..:
the cops iSSbed v/f'riif "i desir^ f ,"s !j

On'e iec i .'i A4;s i .s Ee-:c -o. ;ce :rn':, -i: c


for the sporr:eiug v/ire cp,, +hi'ose s;lodEs s:i'i;
get f(o wrap it /with cellophane rcpls. BE.T, Ehal'
tape by itself.

lfce you knovw fhe dositefer cosp; Siie orh
they're not in the supply system.
.se a.

r-



















Don't let the dumbbells of your AN/GRC-3 series radio sets make you look
like one.
That kinda situation can burn up both you and the dumbbell in different
ways.
Like you know, the dumbbells (CX-1211 and CX-1213 cables) connect the
power supply to the RT-66, -68 receiver-transmitters and the AM-65 amplifier
to the RT-70.

BEFORE CONNECTING THEM -


Before you connect them, make sure
the set's power is off. This avoids a
revoltin' jolt whereby the pins of the
connectors get fried sometimes so
bad that they keep you from commu-
nicating.
So like the man says, get smart about
your dumbbells.
And since you already saw the con-
nection to the power supply, consider
this point on the PP-112:
Bad thermal resistors (R-24, -25, -31,
-37, -38 and -40) in the power supply
can throw off the RF readings of your
RT-66 thru -68.
Next time your RF reading is lower


CHECK FILAMENT E
READINGS ON M301
i E .. --.? POS .. 7'- ,

r INIDE
SEA CkAWT
IF READINGS ARE
NOT MID-SCALE,
SUSPECT RESISTORS

than you know it should be and you
can't bring it up to par have your
support check out the resistors.
First, tho, check for abnormal fila-
ment readings on your M301 meter. If
the readings aren't mid-scale, suspect
the resistors.


















Maybe smoke hasn't gotten in your eyes yet, but you can bet too much heat's
getting' to your T-302 transmitter if you're burnin' out more than your quota
of tubes.
The filter's the thing... whether you inhale or not. But first, a word from
Toby the tube tender.
Watch out for a hot-headed transmitter in your AN/TRC-24 radio set if the
T-302 or -302A tube types (like 7259, 4X150A and 4X150G) and the 3CX100-
A5 start goin' bad a lot faster'n they ought to.


%%O'wT'L% CLE.5IN&N0 31 CrLTE
AILL. 9 E TL'SBS.












You can cool that action quick most times with a routine organizational PM
chore. Slide the transmitter from its case, take a gander at the air filter in the
top of the case ... and 9 times out of 10 the filter'll be so clogged with dirt and
dust that almost no air gets through it.
Result, the transmitter head gets over-heated, the tubes get too hot, and, blip!
The pity is that regular PM chores easily prevent the whole mess. Like,
Change 5 to TM 11-5820-287-20 (Jan 61) makes cleaning the air filter a
monthly duty and para 52, page 113 of the TM tells you how to clean the
filter.
Natcherly, if you're in a dusty or sandy area, you clean the filter as often as
is necessary.

























So what's with the new supply status
report?
It's an up-dated reporting system de-
signed to tell how your specific unit
stands at any given time on reportable
stuff it is authorized, needs, uses ... or
is hurting for. It's a souped-up version
of the old "212" report, and it gets the
message across fast by using such new-
fangled things as punch-cards, trans-
ceivers, processing equipment and
stuff like that there.

rI's A SOUPES-UP
VERSION OF T HE
OLD 212 REPORT.





It gets to be real siple. For exam-
ple, if you're stateside, Active Arm\.
Guard or Reserve, you submit an ini ia I
report, and afterwards you report onli
the changes in your supply status -
about an hour's work each month for
the average unit. From time to time, of


course, you may be asked to review a
complete list of your reportable equip-
ment to keep your info current and
complete.
And, all units overseas up-date their
supply status report by sending in a
complete report quarterly.
Your report gets into the hands of
the big brass planners real fast just as
you submit it since the reports are not
consolidated along the way. Each unit
gets a master file at the National Major
Item Data Agency -identified by unit,


type, TOE designation, location and its
report code assigned by the unit's Army
headquarters.
With up-dated and accurate info
feeding in, the supply planners can give
you better service all along the line.
They'll know what you have, what you
should have... and what you don't
have.
With this info, they can:
Locate a replacement item for you
fast (maybe from a unit near you);
Reduce the number of non-compati-


ble makes, models, kinds and types of
equipment in your unit-and thus re-
duce a lot of maintenance, supply and
paperwork headaches; and
Generally support you and your unit
in a manner to which you'd like to
become accustomed.
OK, OK, OK! So tell me more!
Well, wrap your hot, horny fist
around AR 711-5 to get a bearing on
the reporting procedures. Then grab a
look at AR 711-140 to see what items
are to be reported.


Active Army outfits report only those
irems in the A R. National Guard
and Reserve units report the AR items
plus the other items listed in the supply
siaiius SOP of their higher headquarters
isec para 6g and 6m, AR 711-5).

MORE







ABOUT REPORTING ALLOWANCES
All Active Army units, Guard and Reserve outfits always report their 100 percent TOE or
TA allowance for an item.
Other allowances are reported like this:
O = LERTC GO Active Army units report current operating allowances. This
080 TRUCK CARGO 3/4-TON 4X quantity represents additions or deletions made to a 100 per
965 BURNER ASSEGBLY SPACE EAT cent full strength TOE or TA allowance, by an activation or
CABINET TOOL AND SPARE PAR
550 COOK SET FIEL re-organization order, by a movement document or by spe-
780 FLAG SET M-238 .
GOGGLES SUN 2 PLASTIC LEN cial issue.

I ,J. -.A.. That is, if a change adds 50 to a basic
;. authorization of 100 items, the modi-
S'- fed quantity reported is 150. If the
..r '' r.change cuts 50 from a basic authoriza-
V / tion of 100, the modified allowance
S. ,reported is 50, etc.
: ..... 1 ;'' On the other hand, if the modified
*'H p--2%', I3 -."C\ .' quantity is equal to the 100 per cent
., ..... '1 TOE or TA quantity, the identical
Quantity is reported for both allow-
i -. :L." I.ances.
V ,, '.- --- ......- And, in any case, a unit's report will
.I.- .'t'";ALL"....:.-.:l L,. .. show the quantity allowed under each


088 BAYONET KNIFE W/SCABBARD FOR 7.62MM RI
248 INOCULAR 6X30 MILITARY RETICLE
965 RIFLE 7.62-MM SEMIAUTOMATIC LT BARREL
670 RADIACMETER IM-93/UD
675 RADIACMTFRJ IM-lOa/PD


authorization, or else zeros will be
used to show that no quantity is
authorized.


SET TA-i/PT MR ... OEG...?
THE QUANTITY WILL SE
Active Army units report on item's Mini- EITHER EQUAL TO, OR
LESS THAN, THE 100
mum Essential Training Requirements (METR) PERCENT TOE OR
allowance exactly as published. If on item TA QUANTITy
is actually authorized to be on hand under SporED.
METR, the quantity will be reported.


And, as with other allowances, if the item isn't authorized under METR, a
report will show zeros for this allowance.
Guard and Reserve units report an item's Organization Equipment Guide
(OEG), as published (by USACONARC for reserves and by the National Guard
Bureau for the Guard units).
In event no OEG has been published, the quantity authorized for training


f







will be reported as the OEG quantity.
And, like with active Army units, if an item's actually authorized to be on
hand under OEG or for training, the quantity will be reported. And, the
quantity will be equal to or less than the 100 percent TOE or TA authorized
quantity.
If the item's not authorized under OEG or for training, here, too, zeros will
explain the lack of same on the report.
MULTIPLE LINE (ML) ITEM ALLOWANCES
You report your authorized allowances under the ML's generic (basic) LIN
only. And, for the separate makes and models you have under the ML authori-
zation you simply report the quantity on hand.
That is, your authorized allowance belongs with the ML LIN you report,
because you have no exact authorized allowance for each specific make and
model. You simply list the quantity on hand for each make and model in LIN
sequence, and with FSN and nomenclature, directly under the ML item.


MORE






REPORTING DELETED ML'S


When you lose your authorized allowance for an ML f
item you report the deletion under the basic LIN for the
ML item. Then you list the separate makes and models
as "on-hand", "unauthorized". You continue to report
the separate makes and models that way until they're
turned-in and deleted from your property book.
Back at the agency, you see, there's a separate card
for each different LIN'd item your unit is authorized, or I HO
which you've reported. To get each item scratched off DO I O Os-
UNALAUT.OIZ.EED
your unit's record you have to say you've given it up. TEstS.
ON THE SUBS
You report substitute items by LIN, FSN, identification, quantity on-hand,
etc., just like an authorized item. The report must say exactly what a substitute
item is subbing for. And, remember, a sub item must be related in some reason-
able fashion to the authorized item.

ARE--- so WHAT IF
,2 'T'S NOT THE
LATEST MODEL
IT LAUGHS,
HELLO TAL S AND
SWEErT WALTZES.








If you're using a sub item which ISN'T reportable for an authorized item
which is reportable, your report must say so. Ditto if it's the other way around.
And, incidentally, an item that's classified Standard B is not reported as a
substitute for the preferred, or the Standard A model of that item. If you're
authorized a 2V2-ton truck, for example, and you happen to have the older
(Standard B) model ... you have the authorized item ... not a substitute.

4 ITEMS ON LOAN
You don't report reportable items you've borrowed
_iI from another unit, or an installation, etc. The items con-
GV IT"sy .So tinue to be reported by the owner. If you have something
MN / out on loan, of course, it remains on your report.






YOU'RE THE TRIGGER, MAN ..
A report that starts out wrong at the unit can feed
wrong supply scoop all the way up the supply line. It /
might take you and everybody else concerned a good f
spell to finally set the record straight... and, in the mean- -
time, the original goof could lead a lot of people astray, "
mangle-up a lot of important supply decisions, trans- sur
actions, and the like. And, before it's over it might even HoW COME
come back to hurt you in the form of shortages, overages, 'ou 'E 50 soRE
ABOUT ONE
bottle-necks, and similar sad inconveniences. L TTLsE boor!

Normally you'll get your info on reportables from a master list provided by
support, but sometime you may work right from AR 711-140. Along with the
AR, of course, you'll likely have your supply SOP which'll spell out the details
on how you tally-up your changes, when you send 'em to support and how.


MOREi;~







KEEP A RUNNING SCORE
An easy way to keep your supply status info up-to-datr and ready to report
at any time, is to make the changes, as they occur, directly on your copy of the
master item's list, or on a copy of your previous report which you get from
support.


S- Specil designation (Identlfes kind
and location for support info)


.-LIN I

: Type authorizolion tode TOE
TA other authorization

A two symbol (ode sl letr=
item type tlassificolion standardd
A. B. etc I 2nd letter identifies
c ommodity mgr s


You make the changes on the listing just as you post 'em in \our prop-
erri book. That is. add the authorization code, authorized allowance. on-hand
quantirn, LIN. FSN. item description, ctc on '&hateivr %ou gain. Or else line-
out in red pencil the items you're lost.


Pro~soing code (support info)
I Type of Activity code (stateside,
active Army, STRAF, ARSTRIKE R~.
serve, Guard, overseas units, etc I

S Insallolon code

/ I ." -FSN

,, |. Nom indalure
/ -DPU Idola processmg unt)


SWEAT SAVER
And. last but not least, here's an
important time-and-swat-saving tip.
When a LIN ,-r FSN on \our authoriza-
tion document and in your property
book disagree 'iith the item's LIN or
FSN in AR "11-liO. sour report lakes
the F'N and LIN % which is pro% idid by
support from the iem's master card file.


- Tionsocion code, lsuppon info)
See AR711-5, APP VIII, foi
complete info on codes

o1


".'uOLo 'i003

.""001 .""00)i


A ... .I .


.... (jul!111111


31; I' 7 :*

15- 16!-- 7 37


(..).'001 ('".or.I I,. ; .7


L LL':(! B-.G3MTN LGE B

6 I l .I T i .lETEh AN/URM-10 B

..i- l ''l.F'.J T 3A-312/PT B

P:, ', i Fi TUBE TV-7 B

.4 ,, i-! TT I L-159/U B

f 0 MR


3,N WAv'/ OF

%tofiH~ CHAW-
r, .'.l iil *',.R MA
I5T 0F
*~ I +POnTABL.(
r -EMS ...
I OU LIKE IT-
111.1 1111 :1..11_11 \ oSE IT.


IEiNI


.1 ,






HI-LINE CAUTION PLATES
As you know, a high-tension line So, until you get the caution plates,
can kill you if your crane touches it. you'll have to keep reminding yourself
Before you get within yelling dis- of the high-line dangers. 'Course that's
tance of a high-tension power line with a good idea anytime.
the American H&D 2360 or W2360
crane-shovel, better check to see if it
has power line caution plates. 8 TIOP PL rS
The identification plate at the front NEAR THE CONTrOLS
of the revolving crane frame will clue mc E,.o e emiSe'
you. OPgERATOS C49.
Serial numbers GS5810W thru GS- L 'ru... GET EAM!
6679W (Contract No. 88-3-49791-11)
were issued without the hi-line caution
plates. If you've got one of these, ask
for caution plates with mounting screws
and instructions from: USA Mobility
Equipment Center, ATTN: SMOME-
MEB-B, 4300 Goodfellow Blvd., St. f
Louis, Mo., 63120. Give your equip-
ment serial number and mailing
address.
You, there, with the
long, sad face!
SO THAT'S IT! You say the face blank
( of your M17 protective
mask has a crystalline
bloom and SB 3-30-
o 26 (31 Jan 64) para 6a
(1)k says it shouldn't
have ... and that it's a
Type I defect and
that's enough to make
any face sad!

.7 'f Mar 65) to the SB says to
delete that para 6a(1)k.
That powdery film is
supposed to be there to
protect the mask and
/ it's no defect after all.

















That gasp for breath from your Hollingsworth 3-KW generator could mean
that it's overheated even on a mild day. So, maybe it's time to take off the
blanket that holds in the hot air.
There're three generator models that may overheat when the weather is
above freezing (32F) the JHGV3A, JHGV3B and JHGW3C. And the cure
is the same for each take off its heat shroud.
After the heat shroud is removed, replace the screws that hold it with four
new screws.
Use Screw, cap, 1/4-in-20 x 1/2-in, cadmium or zinc plated, FSN 5305-012-
0628. They're listed in DoD catalogs C5305-IL-A, Vol 3, page 582 (Jul 65)
and C5305-ML-A, Vol 1, page 14 (Apr 65).


At the same time, disconnect the oil
pan heating element lead wire from the
connector at the engine base and
wrap the end with tape.


TM guides for getting the job done are:
JHGV3A Para 75a, TM 5-6115-327-15 (Jun 62) and Fig 4(13), -25P (Aug
62).
JHGV3B Para 72a(1), TM 5-6115-298-15 (May 64) and Fig 5(8), -25P
(Apr 64).
JHGW3C- Para 75a(1), TM 5-6115-282-15 (May 64) and Fig 7(7), -25P
(Jan 64).
Parts removed should be kept handy for re-installation when and if needed
- just in case you head for a cold country or have a cold winter coming.
63























You don't have to be a genius to
learn the why and wherefores of get-
ting pubs for your Engineer-type com-
mercial equipment.
Every piece of equipment doesn't
have a TM, LO, or parts manual, but
there's usually a manufacturer's man-
ual or other pub available.
First thing you do is to check your
index, DA Pamphlet 310-4 and all its
changes, to see whether there is a DA
pub listed for your equipment. If you
can't find one listed, then you check
your AG Bulletin. In case you're not
acquainted with it, the U. S. Army
Publications Center at St. Louis, Mo.
publishes a weekly AG Bulletin which
tells what publications were given ini-
tial distribution the week before. They
send out technical and supply pubs that
are listed in your DA Pamphlet 310-4.
Once you've checked your bulletins
(as far back as you can go) and you
haven't found it there, then your next
step is to ask for a manufacturer's pub-
lication.
You order it just like you would a


repair part. Your support will then
send your request to:


U. S. Army Mobility Equipment Center
ATTN: SMOME-STL-E
4300 Goodfellow Boulevard
St. Louis, Missouri 63120.


Be sure that you include the make,
iodel, serial number, FSN, and any
other info which would identify your
particular piece of equipment.

ALSO, yoU 5HOULO TELL WHETHER\
VOU NE A MAINTENANCE
SMAVNUAL, OPERATOR MANUAL.,
0OZ PARTS LIST--OR ALL TRESE.


















NIever Use Gas4otie
Some soldiers and their gear get
burned up every now and then when
somebody uses gasoline for cleaning.
You use gasoline as a fuel only .
in engines, stoves and lanterns. Never
use it for cleaning; any spark can set
it off.
Forget about using gasoline, too, for
that "gasoline-soluble" paint used to
mark Army equipment. PS 151 men-
tioned it on page 57. The people who
wrote AR 746-5 say that paint is
"solvent-soluble." So you can use your
standard solvents.

,4 Swipe it 7ime ...
Light corrosion and rust trying to
buddy up with your telephone set .
like, f'rinstance, your TA-43/PT, or
-312? To help guard against these tele-
phone attackers, use a little dab of
liquid furniture polish (FSN 7930-266-
7121) on a clean cloth after wiping the
outside of the set dry. Extra care is
called for when using polish around
terminals and switches. The quart-size
polish is listed on page 109 in the GSA
catalog, dated December 1964.
Oh, yes, if you're thinking' of putting
a shine on your telephone, forget it.


Perection InteW
Wondering how to get the igniter
for your E510 Perfection Stove 60,000-
BTU heater? It's in Parts Kit, Heater, FSN
2540-656-2315. The kits are at the
depot.

Saee W/13 C2arrie
7Trc Pift 7'1ts
Maybe the squirrels have been stor-
ing them away for the winter. Anyhow,
track pin nuts for the M113 series ve-
hicles are hard to get. So when you take
off one of these nuts do it real careful
like. You might not be able to get a
new one even if you know the nomen-
clature which is nut, extended washer,
double hexagon, part number 8756580,
FSN 5310-655-9863.

to T7ain4n Packag44e4
Those training packages on ESC and
TAERS described on pages 28-29 of
DA Pamphlet 750-6 were distributed to
Field Army units long ago, and the U.S.
Army Maintenance Board has none left.
Check with your local command and
when you locate copies make sure you
update them to agree with current regu-
lations.


Would You Stake Your Life on
the Condition of Your Equipment?








"I"




I IN


'2-5-1 GIVES THE DOPE ON HOW YOU CAN WIN THESE BADGES
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