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PS
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00018
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1965
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00018

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6-7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18-19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22-23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42-43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58-59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text














Y ou
SUPREENDEI
WAINT US NOW?
%O3 5E
CLOSER I 7u

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I!






.30rN 0I "
V .OT 3
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S -- . i ,I



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-a sgn


-a


-I

THE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MONCt
I ,.ue No. 153 IlA6 S r e
IN THIS ISSUE


FIREPOWER 2-27
Ammiraion 2,20 M3 Macr,:ne Gur, 26
M4 MI'4EP RlE 21 MbA 0I-lOTIr. n 26
MIO? M110'P 2225 M6Subt,:;lyeI 27




COMMUNICATIONS 37-41
CK4 PRC6Cr ,cilalSit 3 AN,ulII'
AN vRC.24 AN F C 6 8 3.4 5 40
AT 984,G Arnlina 39 r.A 341 Ci3mra 41




AIR MOBILITY 42-47
U8 42-43 ELur.' sing 44
DA ornm i l 44
Special Feature FlfD,,~o .i In e 1, 45-476-


GROUND MOBILITY 48-57
M5s2A 48 lest Mter, 54
M6A M54J.M246 49 50 M113 M114
Hldiaul.c Fluid 51 M116 55
M34,M135 51 M57? 55
Lubricallop 52 M]I6 MI 56
Padnting rubber 53 MII4AI 56
M35At 53 SP--Pa.rnrin 57 '
\M44L' 51


"4. Responsibilities. a NM, rel nairhi `r ',
- ..r ., rUt.u .r A n li e .v, lN'T1 L nrr .
.are rr-. 'm A -'itj -. AR -1 -


I Cici r.nn, rn iCr. lr .l. g' qu1.", I. ".. n,
an-i platroon r. re-pon .t l: f,:r--
.11 In'uring I I. f ll e'qjirm ni:t 1 lrl I
n ice:. l n.I- ..nd ir a..n rea lvy i.
t,. n S*. ,\AP 7'.1l.-- "1


1'i. -"
* a-c


GENERAL AND SUPPLY
DAFaimlil 5860 DAForn~",?7
Mirinc PM Guide 61 DA F.rm:408 3
SB '03-41 61 AN-M4
iSC5940 51 C.iuprwe,:,ir
Sift Mandua 52 rub licltul
Supply 12 13.14 26 31.44.45.
49.51,54 55.56.51 61.64


-T


Use ol funds for printing of Int. pullci-
tion ha; been approved by Headluarlter
DOparliment of lne Army 19 February 1965
DISTRIBUTIOlN In accordance with re-
quirements submitted an DA Form 124


,. ,. ,j-p


r 1




LIKE THAT COLONEL SAID:

KEEP Y'R POWDER DRY!


/" HERE'S A ROUND-UP ON
CARE AND MAINTENANCE OF
SAMMO FOR THE FIRIl/G UNIT.
-^^^ ^' -> "s "*'Vs^^--


K'~c


~1- ,


T46

it


: -.-- -.... .*.. .- .'^ ....- -,. .
SAnd not onl\ dr,. either Keep it clean and protected against the Veatherr'"
.. and bumps and and ...
But, heck. It s 11 common horse sense. 'our eaipon'll never he an\ better
Than the rations iou ueed'cr. Mold.] oats "ion'r ctr iuC,.h \,u a Derby dinnerr.
.: ans more than frilcd up ammo'll get !ut, the \epertr' medal-or in \ou a
% Bar!
Y's\sir, you're smart to gi'e )our ammo the samei hcads-up care \ou iivte the
arms ,ou fire. c hciher sou'rc an infantr- man, artillcri man or ranker.
S Matcr ot Iact. most of the rules for small arms are the same as for the
higher stuff. ,


DIRTY DEAL
Take dirt. grease or grime as one
f'rinstancc. Slam hume a dirt old
round in the chamber of anm ncap.pn,.
be it a ".-62-mm rilce or a l'5-mm Oun,
and .su'll bL haunted. If the round girN
anmmed in the chamber. you'll ha'e a
job ectrin it out. Or, if it comes out
on irr Inn, it mihbr mean eondbie
"c apon
? .


~11~JIp~ -


. Gq,.pmsp.v


s^ CJ


r






On c oithtr hand. if the chamber or --- '
Sbotre' nm sSLd up a iih gook or carbon f
. buildup. tttn JIc.n .immr aon't hnc e
a chanLc It thei pritcile can't get out -
S(l-ie mutzl end of the t apon. I'll ir
1 [0 buit ,. the ildes of the barrel t I I J
Clean a.mmo and lJe.n weapons Co) "- \
rLg [ cht, r like cheesecake .ind pinups.

Or rLak. he cati of dampness. Fire o I a car ride that's
-been oiter-ceipOC.:.sd t rain. sn.nt. high humidir[ and rhe
like, mnd chances ire i.u II aind up \ith i dud

t1%QC COIE. iE AIR-TIGHT

L 7 NEDS p 7c'rEorwruj -

And one tfinAl sa.mplc ork around

uii:h,, rhing like primers and iuzte
ind. brotht-r. could be \ou'ic had i!
\\ ,h guis on cour side axho don'c ic r
a djrn hoc the\ handle ammo. vnho
need' the cnem '
B.-il it .ill dJ- n. then, and \,- iu get a prcir) sctr.nig ce i' for goid PM mn
tiorage. i-n the imoe .ind in the line.


~E "rr

n- re `-~--u







IT MAY TAxE SOMo POINm
5OAigrAMES iN THE 0OONMOC",,
OUT HEREAE rTHE 314 TrIN
ro TrayY Fo jC


No matter where you're operat-
ing or under what conditions,
proper storage'll shortstop most of
iour .immc crr.ouhlcs

STORAGE
LM-


Pile your ammo in neat

caliber and lot number. ^ *s l K <







II you have any WP or PWP rounds, put
em in a clear area, nith their nose ends up
-except for 3.5-m rockets, which should
' have their noses down. If you have any other
type rockets, like HE, for instance, f'gosh
sakes be sure and point 'em all one way,
v either all nose down or all towards a barri-
code or hill.


As for the rest of the
stuff, depending on kind
and amount, put the
stocks for enough apart
so that if one blows the
-' others wont join in the
fireworks.


,.~-- __


I I
















I'


Put a tarp or an waaterproof cover-
ing octr the stack. Allow about 18
Inches at the top and sides for air space.
The same goes if you're using sandbags
on the sides.
Of course, 'ou'll look for a high
piece of ground to put your stack, but
if )ou don't hase a choice, it's a good
idea to dig ditches to carry the water
off.


.;\\ \- r----- .
Lr THn -
Ale I


CIRC o lEA F
SSpeaking of which-condensa- .ET
) ion's a special problem when (
s, you're storing ammo in tanks. .__* -
A PC's and certain other hchicles.
You'll help keep your powder dr
if 3ou lease the ramp and hatch
Open whenever .ou can to let the .
air circulate around the ammo.


/ And if iour ammo gets wet overnight, nipe it off and
then open the hatch and ramp and let it air-drn. You'll also
get a lot of condensation when the inside of your vehicle's
real cold and the outside air gets warm and moist. You'll
do a lot of u iping and mopping: also, open up the vehicle
to let the ammo warm up to the outside air temperature to
. t'1 keep water from collecting on it.
6
X-_ -


SWhenever you're moving ammo around-taking
it off a truck or stacking it or loading your tank
or field piece, for instance-remember, the stuff's
1exacrly as dangerous as you are careless. This goes
especially for rhe big louden-ge-boomer stuff.

Bumping. dropping, tumbling or the like could blast \ou into space in a flash
. -or it could cause serious dents and scratches that'd lead to all kinds of woe
when oou go to fire it.
-N~y

O'course. this doesn't mean that eeern piece of
Sammo that gets dropped or bumped-or slightly 0
scratched or dented is automatically N G. Heck
no. As long as the round'll seat right in the weapon.
it's OK to use. Matter of fact. a lot of fired artillery
Cases have some of permissible dents and told.
They're the ones that hase been re-worked and re-loaded for re-use. They test
out OK and don't affect the ammo one bit. Good, sound economy, that's all.
But ... whenever an) ammo Nou're handling gets bumped or dropped, f'gosh.
Shakes see hon badly it's been damaged. If iou have any doubts about it, plaI it
Smart. Turn it in to support for a final expert decision. c
;-"'- .7- i R.
-I
...-. ., a


Use at least 6 inches of dunnage
under the pile to keep ammo off the.
ground and \ice sersa. Wood's fine,
but in a pinch )ou could use tree
branches. Strips laid between the tiers -
of cases will keep the air circulating,
too.






Howsomever, if an ammo box does get busted, fix it soonest-and make sure
you get all the markings on the new parts of the box. These markings--and
especially the lot numbers on ammo containers -are real important. Without
em, you can never be sure what kind of ammo you're handling. And

.r--1 -. z ;


the rules sa\ har it tuu .an'r idenr[if ammn. ic auto.maticall) Gradc 3, which
means you don't fire it.
You want to be extra careful, of course, when you're passing the big stuff.
It could mean curtains if you bump a primer, f'rinstance, against your vehicle.














-/ -... ... T SPELL OUT LOUD AND
A P^ CLEAR HOW AND WHERE
1 4 f00' c' STOW ALL THE TYPES
0 Os AMMO AUTHORIZED
: wP OR ITS WEAPONS-
SSMALL ARMS ON LUR
HERE'RE A COL'PLE
KEY THINGS TO









When sto*ing big stufl l
i in the ready rack, make
sure the primer's. seated
in its cups. Then secure it You put rounds in the You put rounds in the
with the spring-loaded stowage rack fuz f first. stowage trays base end
holder. Then secure the hinges. first.
NATCH, yOU MENTALLY
_STAMP "HANDLE WITH CARE"
INSPECTION O ALL THESE OPERATIONS.
Double-checking ammo in storage and as ,u =--
handle it-and especially before you go to 1..d 2 ,
your piece-is a life-saving habit every guy should
develop. Look mostest for dirt and damage and runr i
S On small arms ammo, watch out for short rounds (the bullet too far back
in the case), loose bullets, dents and burrs on cartridges, season cracks in cases,
Corrosion or chemical deposits on cases--stuff like that.















ARTILLERY ANo TANK
V A~4MO,. BESIDES LOOKING


*.' ^ .a "r WOBBLE o'e DENTS I
SEAC, RND TO SEE
r T'5 S LOSE. A SHMAK%
PROJ-ECTILE 5O%1'TDO



S IS A CRACK IN THE PLUG
/ 4AND -*'SM.L% EPLOS.EE STUFF'S
/COMING OUT .. WATCH IT..
WHEN %\oL -%E SEDARATE-
LOADING P JECTILELES STORED p
IN T7E FELD... G3IE A G-3D ..oO AT
THE E EBOLT LIFTING LL'-S. IF Ou




base of the plug, get bus? and lube [hose 1-. S
thread with a thin film of silicone compound or a light rust-preventive
compound. But. like it says in para 11m of TM 9-1300-203 iAug 60l.
be sure it's a thin coat.

Never forget this: if you find any damaged ammo, put it aside. Tell your tank commander

or crew chief about it. On small arms ammo, especially, don't ever try to get rid of it yourself
by "losing" it or throwing it away. Your buddies just might be the unlucky types.






1 CLEAN-UP AND TOUCH-UP




c a"f Cata62. \OeL' CN I T

JL OT v.%IE TO CONTEND


IS oE OC THIS 4 AMM1sO COM5 ESt
'UNCOATED BRASS CAriC;GES O~R

EITHER AN ENAMEL cR A
LACQUER- 'p PAINT.




UN(OAiD ENAMEl
BRASS Il VARNISHED [A(UR C

No matter how they come, though, iou hate to gte rid of dirt and g:xk so
that you can look for defects like ruis. corrosion. paint blisters or bare spots ...
or any of the other things that could -ind .ou up with damage or failure.
-'-< COPPER A brass cartridge, of course, is no real problem. A
WOOL clean rag'll get rid of the dirt and gook and copper wool T

S 4.', with a rag dampened %,ith solvent and let it drs. You
in don't ha'e to norn about touching up the brass.

Coated cartridge cases and projectiles are nags of another color, however.
Here's the dope on cleaning them:
1. Use crocus cloth or steel wool to get point, 2. Finish the cleaning job on cartridges with
varnish and all foreign matter off corroded a' rag dampened with solvent. But- get
or rusty spots on both cartridges and pro- this! on projectiles dampen the rag with
jectiles. But here's one slight hitch: Be sure thinner. Do a real thorough wiping job in
you use copper wool (and nothing else) each instance, though or your sweat'll be
on the rotating bands and fuzes of pro. iI wasted
jectiles. .

Ki --

-- '






I After the clean-up's over, touch up the bare spots if they're not too far gone
and you have the materials handy. If you can't do the job, turn the ammo in
so someone else can. It's important that all exposed metal surfaces get protected
Sfr,:im rhL atmosphere. .


AN EPOXY
TYPE VARNISH
IS THE ONLY'
AL)rHOIIZED
roucH-UP YOU USE
ON STEEL CARTRIDGE
CAeES. IT COME IN
KIT FORM UNDER
\801FS


M i -- LIGHTLY COAT & LET DRY

Out in the boondocks, if you can't get hold of this epoxy-type kit, just cover
the cleaned area with a light coat of corrosion preventive compound Spec
MIL-C-11796A. But don't use any other varnish than the epoxy-type, hear?

r- /f 12 y\ '---=- -- -






To touch up projectiles, pick the color enamel you need to match the area
concerned and follow the directions for mixing, and so on. You can use 'most
any brush handy, but one with a chisel point's best. Use short strokes in one
direction first, then go back over the area with strokes at right angles to the
first. This should give you a smooth, even coat.

1 NO! EE uE. LADV...
/E" 0S'V 47i'*T \ %Ou P.iN ONLY DO 50
11 S k SEBeR I Lv. %liTH BERRY
(OO37m TI~,TSk6 N. I VN.,CE AO RED
( '.\ "CAivn.. W..s -Y \'AER













You want to be careful in this touch-up business that you
don't get the paint on too thick, especially over the bourrelet
of projectiles. This could cause trouble in seating the round
in your weapon. And look out for painting over stenciled
( markings on the rounds. If you do cover a marking, be sure
0ou ri[store it pronto.

. MATERIALS YOU'LL NEED
Here's all the stuff you'll need for cleaning and touching up )our amm'n
You'll 6nd 'em listed in the follow ine Federal Suppi' Caialoes:



iRTrY7'1'j\ h






Crocus cloth 50-sheet sleeve ..F............. FS14 53501925052 r
I r '- Hert're a couple things \ou n int r~> remember r about fuzes:

copper wool-- 5b tube ...................... SNu 5st rc 'em just like ammu- pro-rcted Itrm the su n and everything
Wiping rag, bleached 5 b bag ............. FIN 9702.234.8465 els that makes heat, and tspcLiaill all kinds of moisture.
compound corrosion preventive, Spec MIL-C-11786A 5 Ib con FSN 8030 231 2353 Keep s'p..rltl c i?.isued fuzes the kind ih.a screw into separate-loading
Enamel, lusterless, quick-drying, MIL-E-10687, 1 gol ton pr.'clc,.[lcl s in their airtight containers till just before you're ready to
Olive drab No. 34087 ................................. FSN 8010 297.2116 u.s. cm And i.rce these fuzes s.parF cl so that if the) g ..rff they won't
Blue No. 35109 ..................................... SN 8010.297 2119 it I. dihe am m o, too.
Block No. 37038 .............................. FN 8010297 2122 ----------.-
Gray No. 36231 ................. .................. FSN 8010.2971 2120 R, ,,,rc ..u use the right
inner, synthetic resin: enamel, Spec TT-T-306 Amend 2 r -
I pt can ............................... FSN 8010 160.5791 f u c u. r nch hb n I, u rc f0/- --
1 gal can ....................... ........ ...... FSN 8010 160 5794 ng scparatc-loading projec-
Varnish, touch-up, air curing, epoxy type, FA-PDpMI.2490 Rev 0 kil FSlN 8010 896.1980 ,rlh,. rl' Then set the fuze
nlch tlhe fuze setter that's
nicant t,-,r the job. And ,,n' '
SOU CAN'T TALK MUCH ABOUT AMMO SUPER OUkorr I.. h. :thr the t
WITHOUT MENTIONING FUZES. SMALL ARNiS kindr -. 'uze .hcu'rc hr theling
STUFF DON'T HAVE ANV, BLr TH' BIG STUFF IIME ACIION i tuze u'r in ling
DOES. YOU'LL FIND DIFFERENT INrOS n' n-dJ .kir. Butr h c\[r.*
OF FUZE ACTIONS ON ALL TH' L T ".i i
AND ALL OF 'M TO BE HANDLED TH SA.'E r.SE .c ,ul -., don't .r..identill\
WAY,.,WITH CARE! THAT'S BE.ALSE hn1 hJ e lu hilj you're ov
.ari. c .1 a L1n t /L 'u,hil you're 'B- i 1B
THEV'VE GOT HIGH EXPLOSIVES NI 'Eoc. I


S. PROXIMITY
S. nd remember to set the
-pit^ ILIZin lic directionof increas-
Ing readings. And-if you
want to reset or return the fuze .
NON to safe, keep turning in the di- .,
SNONDY reaction of increased readings.
After the ammo's been
fuzed, don't pull the safety
wire from the fuze till just
9 before shooting away. Then,
DE i f ,.mccthintm .'i,,mc L ip LEt AV
can E fire Ehi riund right .i. SAFETY
r placc the a jtc, irc. imrmc- DEVIES
4 ia lc\lBE.


S_ _____ --\ And, pal, always remember whole rcui a.ty did 10 ihe (al d ei t ry l. -
flH." *lake a fuze apart Only oaulhonzed ammo people (on do holt
-- ,, s
1 4\_ 1 15 S r-
-~_~L[ d s FsLik "V
-~uc~I








PRIMERS ) -,

Primers are another thing that de-
mand your mostest respect. You'll find
'em on all kinds of ammo-small arms" orN'
stuff included. Primers contain sensi- k 5 ME
tive explosives and a charge of black \\EE .
powder. -
This black powder gobbles up mois-
ture the way you gobble up that good L0
Army chow after a long march. Which .S
means you'd better keep an eternal eye
peeled for corrosion on the primer.
Your best defense is to keep all primers P SLUR
-whether they're part of the cartridge .__ _
case (like in fixed, semi-fixed or sep- _
arated ammo) or are by themselves
(like with separate-loading stuff)-in 'E1^'5G
their moisture-proof containers till the L'I-TIL ,L.'
NEED EI.
minute you need 'em or stow them in
your tank.
There're four types of primers- "
electric, percussion, combination elec Ii___ I
tric-percussion and ignition. All take
special care, remember that. i- L



WHENEVER R.A.
YOU'RE HANDLING ALL THE
S' AMMO WITH A PL ER D
1 IN THE BASE, PASS -iE
ROUND WITH TH E E PRa1R
UP AND THE FUZE DON-
OUT OF THE WAY OF
THINGS THAT MIamT
GET IN TkE WAS\.



------










HOUSE C4' (LEAN
ONLY 4..b BE 1, ? YOUR E.
AUTHOPIlED ,D BARRil
ROUNDS /PEAL COOD -
-s BEFORE Nd
AFfER BLAtNII
A FIPINC -1 r *

MISFIRE, HANGFIRE, COOK-OFF
NYou'll rarely) be haunted b\ these weirdo's if ,ou keep .our weapon and its
ammo in top shape and use 'cm right. But when troubic brews.' ou want to
be prepared. That's wh ou want to get thoroughly. familiar vith iwhai your
e tapon s TM s. FM's and AR 385-63 (s Dec 55i hasc to si\ on these sublecti.
A misfire in itself is nothing to get
a P b; stcrical abour. Ir's simple. failure of
COOL. a charge to fir- and could be caused
mEN. Tb a fault.\ tiring mechanism in the
Sea.pon or a detect in the explosive
S -- charge in the ammo.
Trouble is. rou just can't tell right off if it's a mifire or a hanghre And that
mas be something to eorr r about.
\ irh a hangfire there's a delaW in .\ .., ,L'
the explosion after the hamm er hits the S. .,... rr'5 ....CEE
primer. This delay. could be for a split o -
second or ma bc a couple of minutes. C _
Like iaid. trouble is oru just don't -
k no-. r -
So. if t u pull the trigger or lans ard
or press the in atch and nothing hap-
pens, kccp cool- but think fast. Wait -
a spell before opening the breech on "L
artillery\ weapons .or bolt on small r C
arms Keep sour nseapon on target and WIE
get sour buddics to scram awash from
the muzzle and breech ends. For the LI.. I
SA ... AL
recoilless rifle or rocket launcher, espe- D BE6'- N ,
cially. you %iant plenn of emprt space TwEg
to the rear. AN, .C ,'ET

S17
1,4 ~~ (IN
































Aluicrc'n likel the primer or rthe pro.
pelline h-irge % ill c,,,,k off fir'n. And.
i_ f -i[her one d ,oie. Che proiec rlt lr ill
takc o-ff fr,-,m the %.Cap-_,n a"ithoui amn3
Shelp fro-m v,.u Bur. it here's a cook-off
in the bursitinr ch 'ri c \plsne chaiin. .
it could mcn b,-.b% e ,capon

hSo. Vhen tour g,,od sense [ells y yotU' Y .,ui ,ic slrc o( a ,.k.off on
your hands, you want to handle things the sime "an 3 % ith i h intgir. Buc, i
you can't fire the round or remove it, you and our ,re v.. muh h iusc u c, ell m ake
a break and wait for the weapon to cool do" n.


k-V0%% IN ADVANCE <

-- E -Ei .
rM|~ Er'r' S
w'>^3^- 'Li1"^ "'L \r 'aS'v- -
" I-_^^--^--II L I-^ ^


-. grnd


So, if you fire an artillery round or a mortar shell or maybe toss a grenade
and don't hear that satisfying "whumph" of ammo hitting home, here's what
i ,u do
Kep \ h-.ur hand, l icur-cli. but puC )our feet and tongue to work getting
the iword rn the doubk Eo ,-'ur C(-. H II ct in touch with the local Ordnance
,.fficr- he gu: ~ho'll i-'kc it frum [here.
The same rule applies r ani old dud .,.u may run across in training areas.

REPORTS "
1u00 pull the trie.r or rthe linrard JUST TH' F iCT
or prcs, the aritgger sil,, s.h. .and DON'T MUisB
p of! ihc rouCrd l es L off it s it Ic. c s
the muZZlk. Y'.L u\e 9. A pFrumiture
burst. or a horti round, nai be .ii mnal-
fun:tith_,n Irfor sure ic
Aninmmo acidents shouldn't happen. V -'
bui ihc, might nd % hen ch [ do. ou
rI. -an[ oan be read%\ come up nich the.
right answer .

t -

Thatc wh ui,,u'll bc smnr r to r ,,-urtsel and your crew familiar with AR
0')I 00-.. 11 which has ll the so-'p on hI.. r,- report malfunctions involving
mmino and elpl'uite. including hlie missile, scuff.
a You ,:n'r hlc to fill ou[ an\ forms. but :ou'll dish out the dope that goes
into [he report The m.,re facr-s ,,u rell the man who comes around, the better
:,uur chance :of a o;iding the ;sn1e ,mmin, trouble in the future.
Natural hn %,u run inmo nalfunction or accident, your CO or range
,oteer % ill :uspend the arnmo s o(h [he backing of the local Ordnance officer.

9- -&
GROWL























Novi ov 641" Loie.
AItook s, jo .* C9e -H-n -3
ion an D i ruinn o o.

1M 9be30520 ( l W onge
small rms ammunitionn

iM 91950 (Feb 581) / chang -- Roket
TB 9-1300-246 1 (13 Apr 64) which
deals with color coding of ammunition
-ha .- .
IM 9.1370 200 IDec 58) w changes-
Mliltary Pyrolechnics
FM 9-5 Ordnance Ammunition Service
AR 385 63 (5 Dec 55) w/changes-
which talks about omm safety
ASubjScd 6-1 Core and Wouldn't do to end a piece like this without get-
Handling of Ammunition ring in a plug for giving a break to the boxes, barrels
- r 1, C .y '41 and other containers your ammo comes in. It won't
V 4"t1 ) cost you an extra minute to handle 'em gently or
4 O / open 'em right or keep 'em in shape for another
cour with a batch of goodies. The payoff is a steady-
S moving ammo supply line. Besides, it'll save Uncle
some of your hard-earned dough-re-me.
-2















A lot of M14's are still complaining the hammer.
about battered ribs ... so it looks like Because, if you go over the 90-degree
some guys need reminding not to rotate mark and then try to take out the hous-
the trigger guard more than 90 degrees ing, you can beat up the ribs or keyways
when removing the firing mechanism, on the side of the firing mechanism
The trick is to pull straight out and housing. This'll guarantee a tougher
then up on the trigger guard, not job next time you go to remove the
straight up. And stop the arc short of housing.
90 degrees- before you feel any metal- 'Course, it's all spelled out in para
to-metal contact between the cocking 48d and Fig 30 of TM 9-1005-223-12
stud on the guard and the bottom of (8 Feb 65). Why not take a look-see?

LIKE... EVERY 14 DAYS

8%,E H~eV.....
7%%0 \o EEkS. -


Say, hey there, Armorer, ol' buddy, what do you mean by "bi-weekly"-
every two weeks? ... twice a week? .. twice a month?
Don't blush. Even Webster's kinda vague on this one.
But for the sake of your M14 and M14E2 rifles, you'd better get your mean-
ing in line with what the new TM 9-1005-223-12 (Feb 65) means in your PM
checks and services schedule-which is: every two weeks fortnightly, like
Gramps used to say ... or just plain every 14 days.
Yup, your schedule's been changed from weekly to bi-weekly, which means
at least every two weeks under normal operating conditions, but oftener when
you're operating in weather or climate that's real tough on your weapons.
21
























Yep, in weaponry--like in wooing Either one could be more than slight-
and sports and 'most everything-tim- ly embarrassing. So, have a seat and
ing's extra important, absorb the causes and cures for this
A rammer chain that's out of timing untimely situation.
on your MIT0 or M110 tslf propelled
lobs. i'rinsancc. can foul \'u up bur \
good %hen the chips'rt down-or
n hcn chr inspector drops b', RAMMER


HOW IT CAN HAPPEN
All things being equal, you'll only have timing sequence trouble in the
rammer chain if somebody fouls up the manual operation--the operation, in-
cidentally, that's your insurance in case of hydraulic failure.
The moment that anybody sticks a handcrank in the righthand side of the
rammer chain drive sprocket shaft, the crank will automatically disengage the
chain sprocket from its drive train. And every time this happens, you have to
doublecheck to make sure you get correct timing of the entire drive train and
chain sprocket.
Joe Blow over there, with nothing better to do, could do the whole crew
dirt by absent-mindedly poking the handcrank in that right hand opening. Or,
you could be the culprit yourself--just by being a mite careless when you're
checking the operation of the manual rammer while doing your daily, weekly
or quarterly PM checks and services.
Right, you just might run the chain out with power and then retract it by
hand. Then, just because the headlink trigger latches OK at the end of this run,
you might get the idea that everything's peachy-dory. N-e-g-a-t-i-v-e !!!

,I F THAT TRIGGER CATCHES
AFTER THIS OPERATION,
YOU'VE GOT A TIMING
SEQUENCE PROBLEM. BUT
2.1WE'LL GET


AMORE






HOW TO PREVENT IT
Meantime, remember to watch these two things and you'll
shortstop most of the problem:


HOW TO CHECK YOUR TIMING
OK, now supposing you're not sure whether your timing's good or bad.
Here's the way to make sure:
1. Stick the hondcrank in the 2. Reach down and unlatch the Y Ciank the chain out about
rI ghthand sprocket shaft. rammil chain headlink as. 3 feet, turning the handle
sembly to the right, remove the
handcrank
II ^^ iA
I~~I ^Ic., ^














In this case, you can go ahead and complete \
the cycle by re-inserting the crank in the right- '
hand sprocket opening and turning the handle
to the left till the trigger does latch.
But, if the trigger latches while you're oper-
ating the hydraulic lever, then you know the
timing sequence is off and needs adjusting.

NOWe.. HERE'S THE CURE

STARTING RIGHT WHERE VOU ARE -
WITH THE HEADLINE TRIGGER LATCHED
A'TER yOU'VE USED THE HVDRAULIC LEVER
HERE'S WHAT YOU DO TO CORRECT
THE TIMING SEQUENCE !!


That's it. Now you're back in business.
25



















F go'h+',kc,, Mi., keep :.our big'g"f[ fi:,c 'iM [h.ii MN1' rla'h hider nhen
you're climbing your M60 tank's turret. You wanta put the machine gun out
of action?
Sure, a flash hider sticking out like so makes a tempting step. But if you use
it for one, man, your heavy foot's gonna bend the barrel jacket inside the turret.
This in turn will cause the firing pin to strike the ammo's primer on the side
'stead of dead center. And this-as you ought to know-could eventually
wind you up with a misfire or worse.
So, whenever you gotta get to the top of the turret, use the main gun or the


hand rail as a step.

HANDLE IT
There's hardly anything more useless
than a tool that won't do the job it's
supposed to.
Take the spanner wrench, FSN 1015-
894-9583, that comes with the M86
105-mm gun in your M60A1 tank as
a f'rinstance. It works fine in removing
the firing plunger insert collar from
the breech ring when the gun's mount-
ed in the M60 tank. But the gunner's
guard gets in the way of the wrench
handle when you're working in the
M60A1 tank.
There's an easy way out of your fix,
tho. All you have to do is take the
spring pin out of the handle, slide the
handle out of the sleeve and then tack
weld the handle to the end of the
wrench.
With this kind of setup, the handle


THIS WAY


, ----- ,' '

I -- -. .---
'\ I@ REMOVE



S"/ WEL TACK
,! ._wIID


?nn I


IN WAY
OF HANDLE


will swing by the gunner's shield with
no sweat.
The spanner wrench has been re-
placed by Wrench, FSN 4933-740-0447,
which has a longer handle and'll work
on both the M60 and M60A1. Look for
it in Fig B-9 of TM 9-2350-215-10
(Feb 65).


GUNN



















-.- = :- --- W
OK so you've got the latest quad M60C 7.62-mm machine guns with
your helicopter-mounted M6 subsystem.
You know you do 'cause each shooter has a short, heavy, reinforced cable
attached to the firing solenoid, which is also new. It's round.
Trouble is, the guide pin in the receptacle mount on some weapons has wound
up in the wrong place.
In order to put the right tension on the new, shorter cable, the guide pin has
to be in a certain position when it slides into the guidance slot on the cable
connector. And that spot is in toward the gun support.

THE GUIDE PIN SHOULD
BE rE.RE AND CHECK
PAGES 45, -16 AND 47
FOR MOPE INFO ON THE
CHOPPER Art.lMANINT
SUBSYSTEMS :


Will HAVE
RIGHT TENSION

It's easy enough to put the guide pin in the right place. All you have to do is
remove the four screws that hold the receptacle in the bracket .. turn the
receptacle until the guide pin is where you want it ... and then put back the
four screws.
The earlier M60's have a much longer cable so the location of the guide pin's
not so important.










i-3 c. I of recent publications
' ., : Organseaional Macnle-
nonce Personnel. Ths is lils compiled
iu- r :. : nerala Disftribu.
..r- complete de.
,1 -4 with latest
changes.

TECHNICAL MANUALS
TM I.Cm. :a
TM 1.C.k. Cr. r : .: :3.
TM 1 .OH; :I :Hi
TM 1-UH1-5, Mar, UH-1.
TM 3-1040-219-20P, Mar, Service
Unil, laome Thrower. Truck-Maunted,
M4A2.
TM 5-2410-209-20P, Mar, Tractor,
E,... -a *.. ,, m I

IEB-

TM 5-3431-216-15, Mar, Welding Ma-
chine, Arc, Harnischfeger WMG 300 B.
TM 5-4310-218-20P, Feb, Nike-Ajox,
Nike-Herc, Corporal Air Compressors.
TM 5-4310-247-15, Apr, Comp. Ro-
tary, DED, 250 CFM, 100 PSI Joy RPV
250 DC20MSI.
TM 5-4930-206-25P, Mar, lubricating
and Servicing Unit: Gray 251-437.
TM 5-6115-328-25P, Feb, Gen GED
2-KW, DC, 15-V: Eagle Engr CE228.
"M d; I .l 231 .y ,, How, Light,
.,2,: ^. ,-,
TM 9-1430-250-12P/1/1, Mar, Nike-
Here, Nike-Herc (Imp), Msi Operation
& Maint.
TM 9-1410-250-12P/1/1, Mor, Nike.
Here, Ground Con Equip.
TM 9-1430-376-12P/1, Apr, Pershing,
Ground Hdlg Spt & Svc Equip.
1 irrall, A -.

TM B c.r0 .01 12/r a N M.*,
Ground Can Equip.
TM 9 Il'. : .-;u."I .: .s. *
Nike i-c .-,. .' &
Svc Equip.
1M .2ij?7 )ia l2 Cl, Mar, M151

TM 9-2350-215-20 u.r .' C :-
Tank.
TM 9-4935-253-15P/1/2, Apr. Nike-
Here Ni Here (Imp) .`' ia
TM 9-4935-380-12P/1 i. "
Test Equip.
IM -.4-iu Sid'. TP 0*.; sa i .

IM sc.reH 7 1 i //l e s .

Test Equip.
TM 9-4940-252-15P/1/2, Feb, Nike-
Ajax, Nike-Herc, Nike-Herc (Imp),
Test Equip.
TM 10-500-51, Apr, Airdrop of Sup-
plies and s .l. -rrl 1 l a '
Rocket Sysl -
TM 10-3920. 211 .2 s .; i
Fork, Army MHE 184
Clark C40B-1615158-100,
Clark C40B-1615159-144.
TM 10-3930-234-25P, Mar. Truck, Lift,
Fork, Army MHE-188, Baker FJF-040.
TM 10-3930-237-20P, Mar, Truck, Lifl,
Fork. A sF i--


-M l1., 2 CI:.1' w Telegraph

"M- i .jadi.O- Ic Radio Ter-


-M 11l.i.- 4.r4 20P t. 5-J *- Set


C., a u- **.: .* .. C RU-8D.
i 1M 1 .6i i)i C 'r, il ;Cr
Terminal, AN/MSC-29.
IM .1.:935 I12. FP sp.. :- c.

. 1.i C
TM ,Il.E67h. 61612 ., lea .1,'
u G el
iN .i.calS.*0i II M-r 0, ;'r

iM r. II 60. 1 l .s n


ImA .l C-.10, .1 1j. L., C. :

IM ..10c0. c0 1 s .. 13.


TM ". 100.3:0 12.1 Ce CH-37.
4TM I.4udr0jOa0 a. 6 r SGT,

1M 3 10. 50.-:,C 5se OV-I.

M .10 2.,.70 FMI r .: OV-1.
M 1,, 0S0 00 PM" OV-1.
TM 55- u70. 70-.20 Ca e, *..H I
TM 55- 2b. *0261.71 a0 s 'A e
TM :* 70 262 S 0 r.. (C :(



TM ; .. i0 706,.10 Flc rh ;
TM :20u..2'Oc.ICL er. C. ;C
TM 55-1520-210-20, C2, Apr. UH-1,

I*. .. 1 0.?i.I C l -7 Trn
222. 1 1 i .11 C1. .: L. 6x6,T

I 0 .i.9jO.700.2- : I CA-I.

ItiC NI CAL C-L'LLci N
16 tls ( .- a, r g and

0 c.' 11)00.100-2/. An5 Syr-

Is .1 410 2io0.1'l 1 '


IaEa. t
is .1.i 00 io 200.7r ij


16- 1510.5E.-30 -oa C- .
IB ; tI ld 2*:.h., a 6 .- .

M.:,OI iCAIhOrj AGm OibiRS
MO : 1110.23 7201. 41 ;' AP.




MeO S;.ilC0 ?L4.O I/ CI. Ari
MOO 4 ,,i ; l.;.1 S ee.r i/,.



.. 151 281 34/;; C. Apr



C. I



MWO : .Ii 510 .S,-54. /i. 1",.
Mo0 1:e l06 e./1 a9.(! a-.

"WYO 1ijl5Ki.OD i/il .C Ar,


M* O .l:.. C o. l, Cl op
M.o, L i.sl ulu.16 J/L p iC Ac
MWC I ;I 1- 1206 131.9 1p C


MWO 55-1510-206-34/57, CI, Mar,
CV-2.
MWO 55-1510-206-34/66, Apr, CV-2.
MWO 55-1520-201-34/2, C2, Apr.
UH-19.
MWO 55-1520-201-34/7, Apr,
UH-19.
MWO 55-1520-204-34/20, C2, Apr,
OH-13.
MWO 55-1520-204-34/32, Apr.
OH-13.
MWO 55-1520-205-34/11, Apr,
CH-21.
MWO 55-1520-206-34/17, CI, Apr,
OH-23.
MWO 55-1520-209-20/32, Apr.
CH-47.
MWO 55-1520-209-34/89, Apr.
CH-47.
MWO 55-1520-210-20/2, Cl, Apr,
UH-1.
MWO 55-1520-210-20/5, Cl. Apr.
UH-1.
MWO 55-1520-210-20/6, Apr, UH-I.
MWO 55-1520-211-34/10, Cl, Apr.
UH-I.
MWO 55-1520-211-20/17, Apr.
UH-1.
MWO 55-1520-211-20/18, CI, Apr,
UH-I.
MWO 55-1520-211-34/21, Cl, Apr.
UH-1.
MWO 55-1520-211-34/23, Apr,
UH-1.
MWO 55-1610-201-30/2, Cl, Apr.
OV-1.
MWO 55-2800-2000-30/1, Apr,
UH-1.
MWO 55-2800-200-30/2, Cl, Apr.
UH-1, OV-1.
MWO 55-2810-207-34/1, Apr.
OH-23.
MISCELLANEOUS

LO 5-3431-215-15, Mar, Welding
Machine, Arc: Libby Welding Co., Inc.,
LE8-300.
LO 9-1055-202-10, Mar, Honest John,
Ground Hdlg, Spt & Sve Equip.
LO 9-1430-502-12, Apr, Hawk,
Ground Con Equip.
LO 9-2320-222-12, CI, Mar, MB8
Recovery Vehicle.
LO 10-3930-255-20, Apr, Truck, Lift,
Fork, 2,000 Lbs Cap, Baker FTD-020-
EE, Army MHE 197.
LO 10-3930-256-20, Apr, Truck, Lift,
Fork, Electric, 6,000 Lbs Cap, Baker
FTD-060-EE. Army MHE 198. .
C 2610-IL-A, Apr, FSC Class 2610 Tires
and Tubes, Pneu, Excepl Acfl.
SC 1305/30-1L, Mor. FSC Group 13
Ammunition and Explosives; Class 1305
Ammunition, Through 1330.
SC 1340/98-IL, Mar, FSC Group 13
Ammunition and Explosives; Class 1340
Through 1398.
SC 4935-95-CL-A53, Mar, Tool Sel,
Ord Rockel Support Unil 762-MM
(4935.034-8471).
SC 5815-IL-1, Mar, FSC Group 58
Communication Equipment.
SC 5815-1L-2, Mar, FSC Group 58
Communication Equipment.
SC 5820-1L-1, Mar, FSC Group 58
Communication Equipment.
SC 5820-IL-2, Mar, FSC Group 58
Communication Equipment.
SC 5840-IL-1, Mar, FSC Group 58
Communication Equipment.
SC 5840-1L-2, Mar, FSC Group 58
Communication Equipment.
































At 0400, Monday, 458,753 B. C.... The Six Hundredth Night Brigade
moved out of garrison and headed down the glacier toward the fertile
Retch valley below .. .












THEeE SHIPPIN'

7RALEe wTHIS EQUIPMENT
0 -. .. 10 "... .

HA~D OTwEIZ
rwiysS T, Do..~
:3


Oh, They were slick and sly ',
They beat the CMMI -
Into the Valley ot Retch
Rode the Six Hundredth!


* According to the ESC but they didn't even have the ESC to check out their equipment.




















HA.AT -U WHAT
v/ u GL-VS PAPER WORIZ??
DOIN* WHILST WEPLr5 A MESS.
%&E vVAS LAiD UP % DISEASE AIN'T GOT A
ALL WIUTER2 15EABLE REPAIR
p L
-PARr!
~-'--WL


* Prescribed Load List








The balloon is up and Lou're "HOT-!
HLas qour outfit let gear go to POT?
The maintenance qou do
will take care of You:
1'hat you HAD... if You u ent...
\ ou've still COT!!


I


IF YOU WANT TO DISPLAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD. P
// /U I INI


~"~'i
--

j,7'



















SNUTS COULD'A TOLD VA....
TH SE GOES MV YOU USED MOST OF
LASTHEE GOES M YOUR BEST SUPPLY MEN
ATHEM UNIT AND MECHANICS TO
THEM UNIT MAKE TABLEWARE FOR
MECHANICS THE' CLUB WHEN THEy
DON'T EVEN
DON'T EVEN SHOULD BEEN ON
BOER TO TEST UNIT MAINTENANCE.

\I "~E~

IsL,~V


-q1
75% OF OUR GEAR
DON'T FUNCTION... IN
MODERN WARFARE
L I TWI 1 FATAL! ,


NOT ONLY THAT,
BUT, y'DINT BOTHER
TRAINING' GUYS TO
FILL THE SLOTS
MADE VACANT BY
TRAINED MEN WHO
WUZ ROTATED!


WHEN IRE WE W11
GONNA GET THEM
)USH-BUTTrN WEAPONS
I BEEN MEADIN'
1.- AA~UT 2













YEAH, HOW COULD
AND ANOTHER WE MAINTAIN 'EM
THING WOT WITHOUT UP-TO- NOW VOU MAINTENANCE
ABOUT OUR DATE PULS? TELL ME.. WHY I1 A COMMAND
PUBS? DIDN'T VOU TELL RESPONSIBILITY,
Me BEFORE? SARGE... yA
SHOULD CW9CK
i ONCE IN A




35-. HIL ..




























35























Meanwhile, ... Back at the
victor's camp ...


At 1200 hours, Monday, 458,753 B. C., The Six Hundredth retreated to posi-
tions held the day before they never returned because their mainte-
nance know-how never improved and they could never "GO-WITH-WHAT-
THEY'VE-GOT."







IS

I EVERYTHING

..s CRYSTAL

,s-,.' CLEAR?







DUH... I'M
NOT RECEIVING. Dear Half-Mast,

So coUNE NMaa Could you give me the F
xat 0ST PN ITR xP, Pri Crystal Set CK-6/PRC-6, FSN
z C F RF AMP OSC oI t tOG
S 77 77 7. re 1. 76 7 We need some of the crys
472 9 75 76 6 7 7 77 75 76
r74 ` 74, 1, s 751 7, ,k kit, but we can't find the FSN'
476 4 7 7 7 I 7' 73 I wise, our AN/PRC-6 radio s
478 435 72S 7 2 723 73 71 73
-4o 4a 7 7 5, 77 2 7 o 72 short a frequency or two.
482 439 70 70 1 0 70 69 70
.. .. .. Sgt E. (








Dar Sergeant E. C. B.,
510 ,467155 55 155 55 1 1SS
512 1. 1 4 4 1 54 54 5. 54 Yes indeedy. You'll find th
51. 471 5s5 513 5 5 153 2
516 47 ....52 52 1l .51 in Federal Supply Catalog C5!
51. 451 1 5. 1 70 1. and Change Bulletin 2 (C595
52 0 A7 1 49 50149 49 A 505 49
522 791 48 49 4 18 48 495 I June 65.
524 4 71 47 4 4 6 47 47 4 5 47 u
52s 6 4 466 4 46 7 4 467 The crystals are part of Cry
528 s 45 4 4 44 45 45 6 45s
.3o a4 / .41. .4 and you'll find them on pages
511 149 42 4 1 4 1 415 I
573 47s 442 41 23 4 77 4'.r FSC catalog. They're listed by
S4,, 42 41 42 42 cata og. e s
S7 4 1 41 1 41 41 1 14 You can get the lowest frequ
130B 79 40 37 40 40 14 40
so ,477 7 s9 .. 1s3 s -3 i. f'rinstance, as listed on page
542 499 3 6 3 637 38 40 3
I4.4 51 6 6 II i I 892-3259, 42700 kc.
L 545 36 77, J You can tell what frequency
47 2 7 31 3. .5 34 35 15
0 0 0.sso 2 o I eyeballing the chart (Fig 12)
S2. 2 1 0 2 11-296.
2. 20 47 27 11-296.


SN's for crystals in
5955-667-4557?
tals to complete the
s in our pubs. Other-
ets are going to be

. B. F on..


ie individual crystals
955-IL-A (1 Sep 64),
5-IL-A-CB2) dated 1

stal Unit CR-52A/U,
74, 76 and 77 of the
FSN and frequency.
ency crystal (42.7mc),
76 under FSN 5955-

y crystal you need by
on page 15 of TM


J/^49LZ^t






BLOW, BLOWER MOTOR, BLOW



The breezes of Spring are long gone, so it's important to have the blower
motor working on your AN/VRC-24 and AN/TRC-68 radio sets. Right?
That being the case, you have good reason to be
blowin' your top when the blower quits right in HERE S THE TROUBIE
the middle of a long transmit or thereabouts.


So, put that axe down and do not clobber your 'P I
set, fren'. Help is here. Like, it isn't gremlins rob- P WORKD
bing your blower of power. Nine times out of ten, LOOSE
the blower will quit because vibration worked the
plug (P1401) loose from the jack (J1702) on the
mount.
There're a couple' cures-like so:
If you're out in the boondocks, reach down and Zs
tighten the mount clamps on the receiver-trans-
mitter. It should push the blower motor plug back
in contact with the mount jack.
Then, when you get back to the ranch, have your .. FROM J171
organizational mechanic do like this:

Latch onto two screws, a half. Then, get two washers meos- Now, remove the two screws
inch long and with 632 threads during 3/32-inch tick with that bracket the P1401 plug to
and 19/64-inch shoulders, inside and outside diameter, of the blower case.
They re common hardware. 5/32- and 11/32-inch. re Place the washers against
spectively the blower case, and screw the
P1401 back in place through
the washers.

~ T BLOWER
WASHER CASE
(Ah, ha! You guessed ill The FRAME
screws are 3/32 inch longer
than those they replace to
allow for the washer I

Slide the P1401 into the J1702, and you've got it made. Providin' you've
snugged the mount clamps properly, vibration shouldn't bother the connection.
The fix should hold you until an MWO or such comes along.
38




















Been wondering what to do with the AT-984/G i
long-wire antenna for your AN/PRC-25 radio set?
Well, relax and exercise your eyeballs a while. Here's the way you work it:
File down the spade lug of the AT-984 antenna wire and cut an opening in
the lug so's it can slide under the antenna base of the Perk-25 without taking
the base off.







SLIDE UNDER-






TIGHTEN

Then, extend the antenna wire in the direction you're gonna send or receive.
Keep the wire about four feet above ground and secure it to bushes, trees or
whatever with nylon cords.
Remove the AT-271A whip antenna from the radio set antenna support (AB-
591), and unscrew the base until the antenna wire spade lug can slide under it.
Retighten the base.
For maximum range, use the antenna to send to, or receive from, a set with
the same type horizontally polarized antenna as the AT-984.
Meanwhile, if you haven't already seen it, grab an eyeful of pages 9 and 10,
TB SIG 363-4 (Aug 64) for other interesting info on the AT-984.
Coverage of the antenna will be included at a later date in TM 11-5820-398-10.
39






KAPOW UNDER PRESSURE OR...


HIGH-FLYING HEADACHE
Never thought the day'd come when ..... -- SE.ET
a radar trainer would make like a hot E -. .
head and blow its top under pressure.
That's right.., if you're shipping i
the AN/ULT-T2, 3, 4 or 5 by aircraft,
and the relief valve on the transit case's
closed... KABOOOOM!
Damage to the radar trainer's bad'
enough. But, anybody around when it .
makes like a corked teakettle could I- -
wind up a case for the medics.
Changes in pressure outside the NAW, PRESS(
transit case and inside the equipment ,|"l PWER.
make for the explosion. e 1
Best thing's to make sure that relief _
valve has been opened by turning the
knob on the side of training case fully ",
counterclockwise.


r OH yES, THE OLD MODEL
I -2 15 VALVELESS, SO YOU
GOTTA LOOSEN THE LATCHES
AND TIE ROPE AROUND IT.
THIS'LL LEAVE AIR SPACE FOR
K. RELIEVING PRESSURE. -


Like it says in TB Sig 363-1 (Oct 64)
on page 67, an automatic valve's being
worked up to replace the manual one.
Meanwhile, better check to see if that
valve's open before the radar trainer's
sent up and away.






DON'T GO OFF HALF COCKED


WHBE
SURE
Wyou THE SHUTTER
you IN NI
920M LOCKED
NIGHT OR
VI1" DIX %OL1,L WIND
I") IN THE
N. PAR!


Shutter shifting can shatter picture taking when your KA-39A aerial camera
goes kaput from the twist of the DAY-NIGHT mode control selector.
Sure, shifting the shutter selector knob's the thing to do-depending on
whether it's day or night. But, there's a f'rinstance you oughta keep in your
noggin'.
If the shutter's in the NIGHT mode position and you're gonna put 'er in
DAY mode position, make sure the shutter is open-or cocked.




MODE (OIirOOL


Shifting from the DAY side of the control to the NIGHT side's no sweat.
Whether it's cocked or triggered, the shifting's the same. It's the night-to-day
shift that's a dirty bird.
When the selector's set in the n S|IF=Er
NIGHT position, and the shutter's Will
triggered, the firing cycle's only half BEND
completed. With the parts inside the
shutter and lens assembly still in a
strain, shifting to DAY mode'll bend
the A621 day-night mode shifter. The
shifter pin'll pull out of its hole in the P' SHIFTER
shutter. l 1 PlI
Then, the next time you're ready for PUll
taking pictures, your camera's shutter __UT
won't wink at you-or anything.


I






WHEN SETTING

-.0


An aircraft engine hums a pretty
melody when it's run by the book. But
if it gets our of tune the sour notes will
echo-all the way to the depot.
Take the O-480 in the Seminole
IU-8). Teardown of several engines
has shown that counterweight derun-
ing caused them to fold up long before

I'tl A-wEADED
TwE LAST
ROUND-LiP ,



You get a detuning condition on any
recip engine whenever the crankshaft
vibration dampeners are out of phase
with the crankshaft. The dampeners
leave their normal place at the outer
edge of the races in the crankshaft
counterweight and shuttle around the
races in a not-so-gentle manner. This
condition is easily recognized as tem-
porar) "engine roughness."
A rough-running engine can happen 3
to a crew chief cranking up a bird on
the ground, as well as to a pilot cruising
upstairs. Whether or not you put an
engine through the tortures of derun-
ing depends on your use of the throttle
(manifold pressure), propeller pitch
(RPM) and mixture (fuel) controls.


ENGINE CONTROLS, IT'S...

STEADY AS


EAG ON
rMOSE
ENGINE
CON\TRZOL6.

corria~s


SHE GOES...




.0 H1E -0

DE-o orIC?


order to keep your engine humming in
rune. The control is always in the FULL
RICH position during normal running.
During normal engine shut-down,
the throttle is retarded slowly) to idle
and then the mixture is chopped. This
SOP stops the flow of fuel to the engine
while the open throttle lets the cylin-
ders fill with air to cushion decelera-
tion.
7 g PULL TO
~~ ~ J LOSE


This same cushioning principle takes
place when a pilot simulates an engine
failure upstairs. 'Tis much easier on the
engine to chop the mixture control and
/. let the engine slow down gradually.

CHOPPING
rHE THROTTLE.
SuDD-EN-LiKE DE-TtNES
THE ENGINE AND CAN EvF.N
DAwAGE THE SUPER CHARGER
GEAR TRAIN BECAUSE O
THE INERTIA FORCES OF
THE HIGH SPEED 4I
MA~IIGH


Chap 2, Sect II Para 2-45 of TM 55-
1510-201-10 (21 Feb 62) says not to
jerk the throttle open or closed when
you're running up the engine at high
RPM and high manifold pressure. Of
course you don't want to use a high
RPM and a low manifold pressure com-
bination, either. These conditions can
detune the engine for real!
Similar poop is in Chap 2, Sect II,


Para 2-89 of the operator's pub. In this
case the pilot doesn't move the prop
control to low pitch (full increase
RPM) on the final approach until his
speed is stabilized by proper setting of
the throttle. This makes for a good rela-
tionship between RPM and manifold
pressure.
'Course proper use of the mixture
control is also mighty important in


So-o-o-o ... the next time you crank
up a bird remember to move the engine
controls with firm, gradual pressure.
When you do, and you set the controls
by the power charts .in the operator's
pub, your bird will sing a happy tune
-all the way to its normal TBO.






















,/s-uc' r e S c with an an mended DA -
REE'S WHERE V TE INI THL V O











\AGOES TO PUBI A6 PUUCT IONS
(C2 ., =1 r,^ If you haven't teamed--
IL up your bird weapons and -








p 2.75 R.L XM3
You support gs units pubs on the automatic dis- -
., '15S01 tribution circuit, make















use plastic embossing tape as instrument identification stickers.
WIEAotNS Y STEM a OU'sE Form 12-31 for these


















YouThe embossing machuys ine is available from GSA by looking unde to getr FSC Groupmain-
tenance and parts manuals the same way Send in a DA Form 12-31 with






It's a heckuva lot quicker than cutting stencils and easier on th 'es to
use plastic embossing tape as instrument identification stickers.
It's also handy to use as labels where you have semi-permanent type entries
on wall charts.
The embossing machine is available from GSA by looking under FSC Group
74. The stickers FSN's are listed by color under Tape, Embossing, in Federal
Supply Class 7510 of the GSA Stores Stock Catalog (Dec 64).
44






AIRCRAFT ARMAMENT SUBSYSTEMS. .

FIREPOWER IN THE SKY

yt b h ISioCN BiT nWE n r
CE-LAY ST -rnED G ET UN-TUCKRERE
i PATtM D NyOL' PUL Y'R POST-
ruIGtT S P, M ON U'LE-
OL T V-, T" E M








---- .


Sky troops're blazing history today with all kinds of airborne weapons--
machine guns, grenade launchers, rockets, missiles and tomorrow's an eveh
hotter day!
Here're some quick flashes on the main ones, with PM pointers, pubs and
other poop you MOS 427's, crew chiefs and mechanics might find handy. Keep
tuned to PS for more dope on these subsystems and the ones coming up.

SModfM2 (TWIN M60CoS)H3

Modified 7.62-mm machine guns on OH-13 Sioux and OH-23 Ravens


KEY I'M POINTS: Ammo Boxes they
snuggle tight between the mount's frame mem-
bers, so don't bang 'em up or you'll have a
bunch of misfits on your hands Val' e- -
put tape over the openings to keep dirt and diis
out of the charger system whenever you ren-m-. c
the hose.

Pubs
IM 9 1005.247 12 (8 Jon 64) w/Ch I ( Sep 64)
TM 9.1005247.ESC( 13 Feb 65)
LO 9.1005-247-12 (24 Api 64)
IB 55-1520704-10 /1 ?12 Jul 62)
MWO 55-1520211 20!/6IJun 63) I/(hl 1
45


-'R ,rr





: 1CM3 (2.75-IN ROCKETL)SM_
Pair of 24-tube pods, one on each side of a UH-1B Iroquois
KEY PM POINTS: Warhead assembly %V-
be sure to remove the gasket and shim before
you assemble the round, or the warhead'll come
loose in flight Shear Pin use the soft
aluminum type (FSN 1055-994-8932) only. Any
wire with more than 100 Ibs strength could get
the launcher and people hurt. Explosive bolts
- f'goshsakes, be sure and put shorting caps on
'em when installing or removing the launcher.
Pubts
TM9-1055-217-20 (Apr 64) w/Ch 1 (28 Sep 64) ---
TM 9 1055-21712P (Apr 64) -

_M5 (40-MM GRENADE LAUNCHER)
M75 launcher turret-mounted on the nose of UH-1
KEY PM POINTS: Ammo linkage be
sure you get the links on the ammo right. Get
'em on backwards and you've got a feed stop- S
age or worse! Launcher no "but's"
about it, it's got to be field-stripped, cleaned
and lubed after every firing like the LO says,
or you're inviting trouble.
Pubns
1M 9-1010-207-12 (28 Jan 65)
TM 9I1010 207-ES( (18 Feb 65)
IM 55-1520-211-10 (29 Jul 64) w /Ch 3 (2 Mar 65)
LO0 9-1010-207-12 (1 Dec 64)
MWO 55 1520-211-20/4 (7 Nov 64)

_______ _- ~XM14 (50-CAL)-___
Two bomb-like pods, one on each side of a UH-1B or OV-1 Mohawk
KEY PM POINTS: Ammo boxes- worth
a mint to Uncle and your mission, so handle 'em
right ... Pod inside must be real clean, and '
watch out for airline leaks ... AN-M3-50 Gun
- Head-spacing and timing have got to be A-1
on this baby.
Pubs.
POMM 1005-253-24
POMM 1510-204-10 (available only with issued aircraft). ---





M6 (QUAD M60CS)

Two 7.62-mm machine guns on each side of a UH-1B

KEY PM POINTS: Buffer a real brat
unless you keep it clean and dry on the inside,
always Bolt assembly it'll work longer
if you keep up with stoning and dressing chipped
lugs and keep moving parts lightly lubed ...
Ammo boxes keep everybody's big feet off
em, they're not steps! Cartridge Drives -
gotta be clean and lubed to work right .
Chuting eyeball it every chance you get to
see it's in line, clean and lubed.
Pubs
TM 9-1005-243-12 (1 Oct 63)
TM 9-1005-243-ESC (3 Feb 65)
LO 9.1005-743-2 (24 Jun 64)
TB 55-1520-208-10/3 (14 Nov 62) w/(h 1 (5 Sep 63)
MWO 55-1520-211-20/6 (10 Jun 63)
MWO 55-1520-211.20/4 17 Nov 64)



M22 (SS-11 MISSILES)

Three anti-tank wire-guided missiles on each side of a UH-1B
KEY I'l POINTS: Mating joint of
launcher support and housing assemblies -
double check before each flight that everything's
tightened... Armament assembly pre-flight
MUST: see that the arm rest assembly's real
tight.


Pubs
IM 9.1400-461 20 (Feb 65)
IM 55-1520 711-10 (29 Jul 64) w/Ch 5 (28 Apr 651


Hey, you 427's, any time you run into a real snag on repairs and parts -
anywhere on the map remember, y'can always buzz your support and get a
weapons expert a-running to your side. These subsystems, y'know, rate A-i
priority.





















V-V-V-VIBRATION


Vibration is pure murder on many parts of your 5-ton M52A1 truck tractor.
The shudders-set up by traveling at slow speed in high gear and by low
idle speeds-loosen nuts, snap brittle parts, crack body seams and just gener-
ally rattle a vehicle apart.


One victim of
vibration on Another
your truck is the
tractor is the generator
hydraulic pressure mounting
relief hose nipple. bracket. It a
It snaps at the breaks at
hydraulic pump the drive end.
and hose coupling.



Overloading the engine can also bring an early death to bearings and rings.
It can cause cylinder liner scoring, too, and cooking of the injector nozzles.
These and other troubles come from operating in 5th gear high transfer
range at speeds below 35-MPH. The same damaging vibration can be set up
by traveling over rough terrain and not maintaining a minimum of 1700-RPM.
The data caution plate on your M52A1's instrument panel ..
tells what gear you should be in for different speeds, and
you can find the same dope in TM 9-2320-211-10.
Vibration damage from too low an idle usually happens when the M52Al's
engine is set to idle below 600-RPM. Set the engine idle at 700-750 RPM and
you'll avoid vibration damage.






-WATCH THOSE CURVES


Yep! Take a good look at those curves and they'll tell you whether you're
in for a let-down or an easy ride.
The curves are on the rear springs of the M62, M543 and M246 5-ton
wreckers. The leaves should be curved down. If they curve up, the spring's
installed wrong. ,-


The spring should be assembled and
installed with the curve away from the
beam. When the spring is mounted on
the wrecker, the ends of the main leaf
should curve down and rest on the
bearing plate inside the guide bracket.

Some parts pubs show the spring
leaves curved up in relation to the
spring beam. This is OK for identify-
ing parts but they shouldn't be installed
that way.


Check this bearing plate for wear at every semiannual inspection. As soon
as the plate is worn thru to the point where the main leaf starts to wear the
guide bracket, replace the bearing plate.
The Plate, Bearing, Guide bracket, FSN 2510-734-9652 is listed on page
127 in TM 9-2320-211-20P (Mar 63).


/rF I LEAVES CURVED DOWN





BOOM SAFE LOAD


RADIUS IS RIGHT
"Operation of Crane" in TM 9-
2320-211-10 (page 51, para 23c)
has been changed by Change 2
(Jun 64) to read:
"Note: The crane load capacity
is inversely proportional to the
boom radius as measured below."


SAME RADIUS...
SAME CAPACITY


BOOM PIVOT POST


VA


HOIST HOOK-W
WI1' MEASURE 1
'--RADIUS HERE
The safe load radius for oper-
ating the crane is the horizontal dis-
tance between the pivot post center-
line and the hoist hook, regardless
of the boom angle or length.
How the radius measurement is
used is shown on the Safe Load
chart or Crane Capacity chart.
HERE'S THE DATA PLATE FOR THE M62



RAIU LOA INL. OA I LS
0 [FT. 1000 6TO
Iff1 FT 80 50
12 F-lT. IO 50
13 F. 630 460


Al'_ ,







HIT THE BRAKES

Slow down when you read the label HEY/
on a can of hydraulic brake fluid. Look THIS MUST B
THE WRONG STUFF...
carefully. HE SAVS HELL EAT
Does it say "Non-Petroleum Base" THE RUSER OW'D
IN ANY HE GET IN
or "Non Petro Auto"? If it doesn't, Hyo AULICC BRAKE THAT CAN
never put it in your hydraulic brake SYSTEM...
system!
There's hydraulic fluid and then
there's hydraulic fluid. Some guys are '.
putting' petroleum-base hydraulic fluids
in their brake systems and really lous- -
ing up the works -causing damage to
brake components, bringing on brake
failure and endangering the lives and
limbs of drivers and anybody who may
be in the way of a brakeless vehicle. S -"
Hydraulic brake systems want "Hydraulic Fluid, Non-
Petroleum Base." It comes in pints (FSN 9150-190-0932),
Quarts (FSN 9150-190-0933) and gallons (FSN 9150-231-
"Brouuc 1 9071). Don't be surprised if you can't latch onto the quart-
o VPTRA size, because it's not being restocked after the present supply
70oo is exhausted.


TRAILER TOWING TIP


When you start matching up 21/2-ton
trucks with IV2-ton trailers, keep these
little tips in mind.
Use the M135 and M34 trucks to
pull the M104 or M106 trailers. All of
these vehicles use the same 11:00x20
tires.


WHY DON'T WE
GET A TRUCK WITH
T1E SAME TYPE WHEELS?


A


Use all the other 2 V2-ton trucks with
the 9:00x20 tires to pull the M105
and M107 trailers.
Having the same size tire and wheel
on both your truck and trailer comes in
handy when you have a flat or other tire
or wheel trouble in the boondocks.
1

















WITH GREASE GUNS...
TAKE IT EASY

(C...nd,,ir,' the muscle in your
arm and the leverage in the handle,
even a hand-operated grease gun
can push that lube out under sev-
eral thousand pounds pressure. If
you've got compressed air behind
Ith grejT a heavy squeeze on the
operating handle can mangle a seal
in nothing flat.
If you've got neiprcnc su-al lh
in universal joints, a little over-
lubing won't hurt. They're built
to let grease out and then go right
bick inu plact In fact, youcan uit
a little more grease with ne,.prenc
seals to help force out all the old
grease.
But a quick burst can pop Lrn
a neoprene seal.
Old style cork seals, though.
really have to be babied. Th'll
?* -ut quilk > ith o%,rlubing or .
>hrp blasi o' grease.
l''" ind crsi does it 'You I
only lose the race if you rnkt
time contest out of mnakin' the lul
point rounds.

























d r. ,' '. >,::
Dear $crg-anc J. A. B ..
We won't gum up the answer by stretching a point or bouncing the facts
around. You can't erase para 88 (d) of TM 9-213 (Jul 62)-"Rubber surfaces
are to be left unpainted ."
You don't paint the rubber on your tracked or wheeled vehicles. Also, you
don't varnish it, you don't shellac it, you don't enamel it, and you don't rub
it down with dry cleaning solution.
SVO JUST WAS5 IT CLEAN
.. AND THEN VOU LEAVE IT ALONE!

The only exception is that before long-term storage, rubber-coated parts like
tank wheels and tracks get a protective coating of rubber preservative. This
does not apply to rubber tires, either mounted or unmounted. They do not get
the preservative coating. f//l-W -



No need to swear and itcn if .our M35. 1 21 'ron truck came 3 thout an air
i| rET T Lchlaner rcsrriciin iggc. Sonic h.,e 'cm and some don'r
FRET NOT TIM 9-220-'23-2i I lan i21 rclls hen .ind h.nd to
change the air filter iihout a glage PS 1-'. "ith a Spcc:i.l aruce on (lit
Sl M AI41. rcll huo the ggce %w.orks and gi\cs more on the air c.lr-e.r.
53-
























Youi do (he job %icth
cintitac ic compound.
FSN 64d;i-icir-522. Or
%ou cin ust ofic i't chc

con rnp ,uund,.


TO RE-(OAT f "-

But firs wash the plot. ',
Sh. ovr w,rh o oh damp cloth
S [add a mild dttEqgnl to the
waler and qUltiee he 1o fllh
faily dry)


Thin cool th.- ploatr, coe.r with ii-
onot ioIac cr.:mprovd Apply the corn
pound ri. ly writh o nrw clion 1Luch
OF 4pr'od it on ivrrtlly with a oftl 11M
fri- (oton pod (nol both Aedse ofl the
(O v s r m ( .c pr i h rm .-Ft F ,o l l I t r o l pd u n it.
north) _


Whrn ihe Trrinnq is complclely dry check Ih, meter aonl atlc prol cron aoain by rubbing the
(o.,r br kly mith a srJh clean cloth II the diyrng time lo Iihe compoundd ,n t quot-d on the conlamer
leI the coorinq dry foI 30 minurlie
i OBSE1eE. NO \ sOe NEEDLE _i
Sv1ir.NGJ. NC. iiE r .V8B THE
PLASTIC CCv.g BZ SK.L-. ^ t\ f

If you did a good coating job the meter won't go wild when you rub it.
54






FILL IN ON ROAD WHEEL FILLING

^ .LY Lube in the road heels c
of your M116 cargo carrier,
your M114/M114A1 C & R carrier
and your M113 PC vehicles is a
good thing. Right? '
( / e p lorl RIGHT); ',


If these road wheels are overfilled, the pressure can blow the seals or even
break the sight glasses after the oil gets hot and expands,
Check the oil level daily but don't fill higher than it says in the LO for that
particular vehicle. MI 4- 3
For the M116 the level is cor ret. ."
when the surface of the oil sh.i" C
through the sight plug. CcrrctE ir
level for the M114 is near the cen-ii ",r
ter of the sight plug and for the t
M113 family the oil must shiw
halfway up or higher.

M577 COMMAND POST CARRIER PARTS




Need repair or replacement parts for your M577 command post carrier?
You'll find 'em in Part Two of TM 9-2300-224-20P/3 (Nov 64). The two
electrical cables for extension lights are included with the other parts of the
covered extension and mounting kit.






M106 MORTAR CARRIER PLUG POOP
Dear Half-Mast,
How many drain plugs are there to check before fording the XM 106
SP mortar or the M 13 PC? The -10 TM says seven but we can only
find five.
PFC T. M. B.

XMIO6 AND
LATE M113S
HAVE FIVE CHECK THESE BOX
Dear PFC T At. B.., PLUGS BEAM PLUGS ON
Good quc4rion.
For all Ml06's and the later model M113's there are five plugs. For the
early model M113's there are seven plugs.
For all Ml06's and all M113's PC's you check the three hull plugs and the
two final drive plugs. In addition, for early model M113's only, you have two
box beam plugs to check.
Early model M113 PC's are serial number F4783 and below.


M114A1 ROAD WHEEL ARMS
On your M114A1 (or M11'4) command and reconnaissance carriers there are
three different kinds of road wheel arms. Until you get your new parts manual,
here's the scoop:
FRONT
Road wheel arm Road wheel arm
(left side, front and rear) (right side, front and rear)
FSN 2530-991-1993 t FSN 2530-991-1994
(10925969-1). (10925969-2).



Shock absorber Road wheel arm
(direct action) (intermediate, both sides)
FSN 2540-010-0293 I FSN 2530-816-6454
(8738117)- (10922810).
after stocks of
shock absorber
FSN 2540-981-8612
are exhausted.


1







SEE GREEN?


No, you're not going colorblind if
you were issued a hull-type tracked
vehicle that looks light green inside.
Some self-propelled howitzers and
other members of the "hull-type com-
bat and special purpose vehicle" family
have come through green instead of the
white called for by AR 746-5.
The color as issued is okay, and any
touching-up should be with the same
color and type of paint.
If that green needs touching up, FSN
8010-598-5648 will get you a quart of


the right semigloss enamel, and FSN
8010-527-3197 is for a gallon. This's
the same green paint used inside the
M113 and M114 full track carriers and
the M108 and M109 howitzers.
If your hull-type vehicle is semigloss
white inside, per AR 746-5, you can get
touchup enamel by the quart with FSN
8010-087-0107 or by the gallon with
FSN 8010-297-0584. Gloss white en-
amel can be touched up with FSN 8010-
515-1596, quart-size, or FSN 8010-
664-9088, gallon-size.


GOT AN XM474E2?

Here's good news if you
ha\e an XM474E2
missile carrier TB 9-2300- .
1 224.20/1) 1 Dec (4) gives : /
|-J you three more areas
to co-,vr n irh non-skid
paint. And it tells \ou to apply
a "no step" warning near
the extc'rnal fire
- i tcinuis'hcr handle. Zvln PAIMT










































Of course, you can get rid of things in different ways ... but, the easy, sweat
and cash-savin' way to get shed of unneeded stuff is with DA Form 1771.
The form's made special for telling top-side providers about any problems
you may have with excess baggage, or unnecessary items they may be loadin'
you with.
DA Form 1771 is called "Recommendation for Elimination of Equipment,"
and the authority for its use is AR 700-11 (14 Nov 62), "Reduction of Equip-
ment Requirements."


*I* S' For example. 'ou can use the form to submic rcomn.mendaurions for dJleling
or reducing an Illo)anct of equipment v.hi:h

S Is not essential to your mission, to the mission of o given unit or units, or nol essential to
the mission of the whole PT lovin' Army, period.


Is a duplicate item, or is comparable to another item which is just as good or better for
the designated lob.


S1 1, .- '" I -- ;-' W ,
WA an '-." )- 4 1 '
li is i A~elQ 0L~ gwio~Ue ( n ep t: and~a~q
:I4s.


A--u






FILLING THE FORM
You use a separate DA Form 1771 for items belonging to separate agencies,
and you tell on each form the type of recommendation you're making.
The form's easy to fill. The AR gives detailed info on filling it out. It doesn't
take a letter of transmittal, but it's made out in duplicate. And, you dispatch the
form according to the Type of recommendation you're making. Like so:


'I"S EASY
TO P(ILL.






or reducing its allowances in a











Type I- specific document (E. A, etc.). Type I s for deleting n




S. It goes. through channels, to Ihe item or reducing its allowances in
head of the agency or agencies more than one authorization dots
Sf meant but, not tossing the
Ihing completely out of the supply
system and goes through channels
to the head of the agency responresponsible
sible for the tem.

All a DA Form ype 1 -e Is fi r deleting an dem
or reducing its allowances in a.
specific document (1OE. A, etc.). Type III- Is for deleting an
D It goes, through channels, to the item or reducing its allowances in
head of the agency or agencies more than one authorization docu.
responsible for authorzmg he meat but, not tossing the
ingdocument Whe recommend n- item out f the supply system It
dolhlon concerns documents cov. goes, through channels, to the
ered by the AR 310-series, a copy head of the agency responsible
also goes to the agency respon. for the item.
sible for the tem. ,

All a DA Form 1771 needs in the remarks department are brief statements
explaining your reason for the recommendation. If you got plenty to say about
the problem, use a plain sheet of paper and add it to the form.
So-what are you waiting for? Go fetch a copy of the AR and start thinking.
60






UP-DATED MARINE PM GUIDE






Your latest guide on Floating Craft Preventive Maintenance is TB 55-1900-
202-12/1 (Oct 64). It's for use with DA Form 2404 and other records required
by TM 38-750 (Jan 64) until the organizational maintenance manual for each
item of equipment is published or up-dated. TM 55-507 (Dec 59) was rescinded
by DA Cir 310-22 (Dec 64).

CODES GALORE OVTTA
:- IFORM 12-34
FIRST.




Your unit may need SB 708-41 (Oct 64) and Change 5 (Apr 65) when filling
in the manufacturer's code on DA Forms 2408-7 and 2408-8. If your supply
people or library don't have the SB, order one on DA Form 17. If you need
future changes or revisions, better send in a revised DA Form 12-34 so you'll
get 'em on automatic pinpoint distribution.

LUGS, ANYONE ... ?
The "unit of issue" column for some 12.000 FSN's
in the FSC Class 5940 (lugs, terminals and tcrminal i
strips) has been changed from Each to Package. E
So take care you specify PK instead of EA. I "' L...
And, it's very important you trim dosn the 'i0 EA. ... 0
quantity accordingly. That is, if you're used to '"10 B3 Es.
ordering 10 Ea ... be sure you don't order 10 Pk.
The item could be packed 100 to the package. If '
supply support doesn't catch your goof. get ihe
picture?
You'll be suffering' from over-loading,
and helping to create a big fat hole in
stocks at the supply center.






A ROSE IS A ROSE...


f l-J -flOiDlANGE-
If you have Ordnance Safety Manual SAFETY MANUAL
ORD M 7-224 with all its changes,
better hang on to it. That manual's still
being used. It is now AMCR 385-224.
All you have to do is scratch through
that ORD M 7-224 and add AMCR
385-224. That AMCR stands for Army
Materiel Command Regulation. -ORDNANGCEGORP6S, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
You'll find the authority to make 1951
that change in AMC Pamphlet 310-1
(Jan 65). the Field Army directs that the infor-
The latest Changes are change mation in the AMCR 385-224 be used,
11 (30 Oct 64) and change 12 (9 he will usually do it by a local SOP
Nov 64). and will provide copies or reproduc-
The safety manual is distributed to tions.
Army Materiel Command elements on Department of the Army safety in-
a need-to-have basis. structions are published in AR's of the
When a major unit commander in 385-series and TM's.

DATE LINES
Whether you check 'em early or late and whether you do the job in one day
or two, depends on your set up time, convenience, SOP. But all your record
of demand cards (DA Form 2527) are due a monthly review.
And, that's a calendar month, friend not a month from the date you started
the card. See AR 735-35, para 31a.
Even cards started in the middle of the month, or later, get a review line at
the scheduled monthly review.
The review lines make it easy to tote-up six review periods (180-days), which
give info for adjusting PLL allowances so don't skip any cards.





IT'LL EAT UP YOUR -3's, SO ... ...Z?
DON'T LIST COMMON HARDWARE
When you're reporting repair parts usage on DA Form 2408-3, you can save
yourself a lot of sweat, pencil lead and umpteen -3's by not listing common
hardware parts and items cut from bulk stock.
Common hardware items are specifically excluded from block 11i of DA
2408-3-as spelled out in para 4-7c(21) of TM 38-750-when you record
repairs accomplished as called for in para 4-7a(1).
So you ...
| ST ONLY
High-cost repair parts and assemblies specially designed for the equip-
ment and identified by FSN (or manufacturer's part number) in the equip-
ment parts manual (-20P, etc.), and those time change and condition items for
aircraft as listed in TB AVN 23-65. Also list electron tubes, fuzes, resistors, swit-
ches, indicator lamps, capacitors and such--even if they're not high-cost items.

/48r 24 irw s ARMoR, 8SE AP/O76Z4E WYORX.fX Als34+V /82020
ANK \'23'0020 M4BaZ4 2 3SSo-346-75S'6P Vr cs" I"O'


1 9 o068 A o00 0 'OAI6TR .3.0 6680-76 -0396 21-/ /80 780 51070
0 0 99 A 070 rO, j/o, 4ItR 4. 23s'0-763-59& / 233 80 780 ja73
o 7 quA': 7Te, y /2.__0, a-_ /4S 1 8607 1.S0
..


(TM38 750) s

OMIT...
.. Low-cost expendable common hardware--like nuts, bolts, screws, cot-
ter pins, valve caps, lead seals, washers, shims, spacers, pipe plugs, lube fittings,
clamps, rivets, grommets, retaining clips and rings and other items of standard
shapes and sizes-normally used on several types of equipment.
Also, omit items cut from bulk stock-like hose, tubing, rope, webbing,
safety wire, sheet metal, metal rod and glass..:'I-' Q I L.rd
Generally, these items will be listed under functional group code 9500
(General Use Standardized Parts) in your applicable parts manual.
CAUTION
A word of caution, though. When you use one of these items to do a repair
action or a service required by the equipment TM, you record the action in
block 11 of the DA Form 2408-3 (including manhours required) even though
you don't record the specific common hardware or bulk item used.


I1 )


j























"AI


Like it says in LO-3-1040-210-12, the
Walter Kidde AN-M4 compressor will operate
safely ONLY on internal combustion engine
oil, FSN 9150-753-4667.

The Stewart-Warner AN-M4 compressor,
however, can operate on the above, like it
says in LO 3-1040-224-12, or it can use in-
strument lubricating oil (OAI), FSN 9150-223-
4129. The OAI is covered by MIL-L 6085,
which is quoted on this compressor's data
plate and in its manual, TM 3-1040-224-12.







6 B RIaE FS


ebde 1#t 4 aZ"


7Nt 39-750 &4"oe 2


S Like AR 18-50 (3 Apr 65) says, the new Change 2 (18 May 65) to TM 38-750,
Unit Identification Code (UIC) is to iden- Army Equipment Record Procedures, is
tify a unit for any administrative or now out, hot off the press. This change
management purpose. It went into effect brings you the latest word on keeping
1 July 1965. Codes are listed in AR your equipment records up-to-date. Or-
18-50-10 (7 Jun 65). der copies you need today.

T ac7 7Talk No Win, N*o (Chi

Been searching for the FSN's to get When you get Change 3 to TM 9-
the tachometer parts to keep your tach- 2320-211-10, you'll notice that the BIIL
ometer perkin' in your M35A1 multi- (OEM) listing can be interpreted to mean
Sfuel truck? Just pick up a copy of the that all 5-ton G744 series trucks are
new TM 9-2320-209-20P (21 Jan 65) authorized to have Chain, Utility, FSN
and turn to page 268. You'll note that 4010-473-6166. This is not so. The chain
vehicles with engine serial number 6551 is only meant for 5-ton trucks with a ,
and up have tachometers. Action's in front winch. So turn in all chains that're
the mill that'll put tachometers in the not teamed up with a front winch.
earlier M35A1's.
...O Ro g Pet act...
To improve your maintenance or sup- /
When you pull a part off your equip- ply know-how, take a look at DA Pam
S ment and turn it in to supply for over- 350-60 (Jun 64), the list of Army exten-
haul, be sure it's in one piece. Holding sion courses. Also, look over DA Pam
part of an assembly for a rainy day 350-10 (Feb 65), US Army Formal
(that never comes) costs Uncle plenty ... Schools Catalog. It supersedes the old
in time and money. School Catalog, Pam 20-21.


Would You Stake Your Life -ron
the Condition of Your Equipment?




USE YOUR
GRIPESHEETS!