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PS
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00017
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1965
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00017

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4-5
        Page 6-7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10-11
        Page 12-13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16-17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22-23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38-39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42-43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46-47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56-57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text







UH ak To


DOLL. MS --N
",.E .,AS BUSTED,
10 1 JuSr TOOK A GuESS
OSE 'O10' IOiv MUCm FUEL I
C4AJZLIE. Y HAD... SO. I \,'US vtONjG...
f % EFN C'%iOk DOLL BAB. BE
'l NAATCH REASONABLE.
HE THIJNKS AIhr
rHERE GOES DIALS AND AARNNS LOPI1s:
BuM-GAGE CHARLIE. LIGHTS ARE ?aiM
ME PULLED THE SAAME NOT hNG, ON 5 ON /
DEAL ON A TANK. VEHICLES EE. -
WkST %vEEK!


- -


,,as~
"'
"'


--r





If you ever have to turn in a fire
alarm, you don't want the firemen
to have to gas up, check the oil, fill
the radiator, load up their hoses and
ladders and then hot-foot it out of
the firehouse. You can bet your burnt
britches you don't.
You expect them to fall into their
boots, hit the starter and be roaring
on the way while they're still putting
on wet-gear.
That's the way it is with you and
your outfit. Uncle Sam may have to
turn in the "alarm" any time.
He expects you to be ready. He
expects your equipment to be ready.
Instant readiness is what he's got to
have-no "Hold it while we get every-
thing fixed up."
You've got to be able to go at any
time with what you've got. And in
this jet age, that could mean you'll
be shooting, scooting and communi-
cating in some spot 10,000 miles
away tomorrow morning.
You can keep your equipment
ready to go with the right kind of
operation, care and maintenance.
Keep it adjusted right. Never bang it
up. When something goes wrong that
you can't fix, get the word to your
unit repairman. Keep your gear's
records up-to-the-minute so you,
your sergeant and your CO can see
its condition in black-and-white.
Also, keep your equipment's tech
manual and Equipment Service-
ability Criteria (ESC) TM handy;
know and use them.
So, to go with what you've got, be
ready. Don't wait to get ready; it
might prove fatal.


NSTATREADINESS

(Takes Hard Work)


1'


,1


/v


iE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MONTHLY>
I Nue No 152 1965 Ser',e
IN THIS ISSUE

FIREPOWER 2.11
.It HN rruie 29 Hna, 10 11


GROUND MOBILITY 12-27
TRACKED WHEELED
MI4 1214 da74) .'r 1611
M60 5 Ar CrcI 18
MII3 15 MIA iAI I lpIr II
GENERAL M,.54l 19
Sl., lzi Pooi 25 Dr, ,1 Tijrr h n. 2121
Er icE..r,, DIop 27 Mil 21
1741 :Ce,1 6212


AIR MOBILITY 37-49
IUH ID 37 D. wr-,.10i 4244
1H Ii 3-39 .ijrkF lIur. i
A-.,rchl Sietl, 39 M. Mii 45
Cr 04,. lrbks 40 Or' Cne1,, 46-4B
OH1 23 1 0l I 49


COMMUNICATIONS 50-55
SB. l I PT 50.51 AT'i 53
li.l Sel 52 'Hl Sr,.llli 54-55
ircult Board 52 Ar., rr.9 P.i-r Cbec 55
raG 'P i.illthji.1 55



GENERAL AND SUPPLY
Special feature HindIirin Fuel [(u.m 5654
Wuppi, 3 5.10 13 15 18 19 2021.
23 24 4 25 268 49 55


Use of tundi for printilng f I.hr public
io hIis been apprared bh Headquarters.
Dedprtmetl i1 tne Anrm 19 Fneruary 1965
DISTRIBUTION. In accordance winh re
quirements submitted on DA Form 12-4.


Jf,/2 |


I L,.-44~m, ,.
.!




.'T.: -2







O\A SS FOR YOUR NIKE-HERCULES LAUNCHER ...
FILTER ELEMENT
Funny the way things will go along
real smooth-like for a long spell ... and
then whammo--troubles.
Take the hydraulic pumping unit on
your Nike-Hercules launcher as a f'rin-
stance. It was a rare day when you
heard a guy complain about the two
filter elements in the pumping unit HYDRAUUC
collapsing. Lately, tho, more people PUMPING
UNIT
are talking about having collapsing
filter element problems.
What gives?
For one thing, dirty hydraulic fluid.
Stuff that doesn't belong in the fluid
clogs the pores of the elements in the
missile hydraulic pressure Buid and the
launcher pressure fluid filers. And if
the fluid can't get through the elements.
the things collapse.
The answer to this kind of dirt fluid LAUNCHER MISSILE
is to drain it at least efen three months FILTER FILTER
-the %a) it sa)ss in LO Q-1400-250-20.
And don't forger that note on page
13-"The hydraulic filter elements
must be replaced during all fluid

h --- -.--' ".




---

-- >- W .,."" :-, .,.".


--a-"
--.- %6, '%.. -
.-. -

7,


FDf0l SIAWL-CD


Another deal that'll give you filter
element woes is the elements them-
selves.
To look at 'em, you'd swear the mis-
sile element's the same as the one for
the launcher. Not so. The missile ele-
ment has pores that measure two mi-
crons and the launcher element has 10
micron pores.
The smaller holes let only three gal-
lons of fluid pass through the missile
element every minute... while 10 GPM
get through the bigger-holed launcher
element. And that's where the rub
comes in.
If you happen to mix up the ele-
ments, the launcher hydraulic fluid will
be moving under too much pressure to
get through the two micron-sized mis-
qv1 sile element holes. Welcome to the
Collapsed Element Club.
The switch would lead to different
troubles for your missiles. The launcher
element, with its bigger pores, would
let stuff get through to the birds- junk
r that just doesn't belong in them.
4.-. In other words, it's a good idea to
be extra careful when you install those


elements. The boxes the elements come
in might not contain what they say on
the outside. So double-check by looking
at the manufacturers' numbers stamped
on the elements. Bendix P/N 033180
or Purolator P/N 54873-1 is for the
missile filter and Bendix P/N
033200 or Purolator P/N 54873-3 goes
in the launcher filter.

LEAVES YOU SCREECHLESS
While some guys are having fits
about filter elements, others are talk-
ing about the screeching that grates
their ears when their launcher is ele-
vated.
It's a good bet that the noise comes
from a mixture of air and hydraulic
fluid going through the priority valve.
And seeing's how the air doesn't belong
there, you can get rid of the screeching
by bleeding off the air. And bleed the
system like it's never been bled before.
Some launchers never develop a loud
racket because of air in their hydraulic
system. Others do ... and it means get-
ting rid of the air whenever the noise
starts.


4J





'a db. I
le A -
A C,

-;4i c t/








Dear Half-Mast,
True or false?
The tracks on our Nike-Hercules launching-handling rail get painted
with OD paint.
SFC W. R.


Dear Sergeant W. R.,
False.
TB 9-337 (Mar 61) says on page 10 to use aluminum
lacquer on "aluminum clad steel." And that's just what
the tracks were when they left the assembly line -
wrapped in aluminum. U/1.1 &97At


IC AP-^ W 9 |TO PLUG GREASE "' 7 < -
-RUBBER CAP FITTING WL
What we did was buy some rubber caps the kind you use on
table and chair legs to keep from marring a floor. The ones we
picked up are 1 V-in across the widest part... ?7s-in across the other
end .. and 1 V-in long. We pushed the narrow end of each cap in-
to the wells. And now nothing gets in them.
SSgt Donald R. Ball
Btry A, 1st Msl Bn, 177th Arty
Michigan ARNG


Your troubles are over ... or they will be once your support unit gets around
to your Nike-Hercules or Improved Here site and applies MWO 9-1440-252-
30/23 (26 May 64).
That's the MWO that puts oil cups on the power and equilibrator cylinders
for your launcher.
'Course, the cylinders already have holes in 'em for shooting in OHA on the
wipers once a month the way it says in LO 9-1400-250-20. Trouble is, rain has
gotten into the holes and sure has fouled up cylinder rods with rust and pitting
- two bad deals that really can chew up the wipers.

SQUIRf WIPE ONCE A
MONTH WITH
IT. OHA-DAMPENEDRA
RAG.


er- The oil cups II keep out water but it's still up to you to go along with the LO
when it comes to keeping the wipers dampened with oil; And the best way to
(Ed Note That'I one iay ito take care of the iilnation. Bitt grease in the rell, do chis is co squirr it in slow-like, so's it'll have time to work its way into the
u ll eat r.way at the rubber. So get rid oi un-needed grease ... and replace the v ipenrsA. And don't stop squirting until the oil runs out the top of the cup.
caps when theta. start going to pot. Of couise, some outlits plug the u'ells with It wtouldn' hurt to wipe the rods monthly with a OHA-dampened rag...
corks ... fill 'em with greaie O ,o rc 'em u ath tape.) nd at lcasi once a week if you're in a spot where the dew hangs heavy.
4 5












So maybe you've given up trying to lube the strut assembly trunnion pins on
your Nike-Hercules launcher because you can't get at them.
You know ... the set screws won't loosen so you forget about squirting pene-
trating oil into the pins monthly, the way the note says on page 9 of LO 9-1400-
250-20.
Don't give up so easily-not when all it takes (most of the time) is a little
doing to get the set screws in shape for removing.






HERE'S WHAT YOU DO
SCRAPE LOOSE PAINT OUT OF THE WAY.


HIT THE SCREWS WITH PENETRATING OIL
You let the oil soak in overnight. Or you
might try some of that commercial liquid stuff
mode for taking the "frosl" out of frozen
nuts, bolls, screws and the like.

After the oil has soaked in, release pies.
sure from the hydraulic system... put a
'/4-in drift punch in the hex opening of the
set screws ...


The set screws should come out during the
last step- when you put a '/4-in socket
head key in the opening and rock the key
back and forth a few times. Before you do
this, though, make sure the key takes a good
bite by cleaning out any point, dirt and what
have you that might be in the opening.


If the things still don't budge, you
need help from your support unit.
No matter who loosens the set screws,
head off future trouble by slippin' the
threads some penetrating oil while
you're working on the trunnion pins.


8
8 -6'
WA+


-,
'W4 STOP is %%.DE FROM
~B-INh. LO;C1B2SON STEEL AND 15
s-kl~ A COAT 09 PRIMER AND
TEme p soE aeEEN PAINT AS A
I-- r_,FvS -NG "rou"M


Tie back the safety devices-that's
what you're supposed to do when you
remove the rack assemblies and then
raise and lower your Nike-Hercules
launcher.
As you know, if you don't tie the
safety devices out of the way while
you cycle the launcher, they'll get clob-
bered by the erecting beam cylinders.
And the devices themselves slam into
the air bleed valves, making the valves
look like they had come face-to-face
with a sledgehammer on the move.
The trouble with winding string
around the safety devices to keep them
out of the way is that it's a temporary
deal. What you need is something that's
built to last and here it is--a stop
that takes the place of the flat washer
on the safety device assembly and is
left there.


WITH STOP OFF,
VALVE GETS
CLOBBERED.


LUBE THEM- BUT
Something else about those safety devices. LO 9-1400-250-20 says on page 9
to hit the rollers and bearings with PL monthly. Actually, it's only the bear-
ings for the rack arms and the sleeve bearings in the rollers that get lubed.
The rollers want to be coated with green paint.


~
















Dear Editor,
The Nike-Hercules batteries we sup-
port were having troubles in spades
with the male contacts on the J2 plug
of the missile's transponder control
group. You know .the contacts
would get bent, making it darn near
impossible to hook up the cable as-
sembly (P/N 8521613) between the
J2 plug and'the JI plug on the elec-
trical test set (P/N 9034602).
We came up with a pin straightener
that has kept more than one connector
from going to the junk heap.
All that's needed are some V1-in
drill rod, about 4-in long, and a sal-
vaged rubber or wooden handle.
Consolidated Fid Maint Shops
Ft Devens, Mass





It's an assembly right enough .. but
when you requisition the ventilator as-
sembly, it doesn't mean you get every-
thing you need for connecting it to
the BA-485/U battery in your Nike-
Hercules missile.
You've gotta order coupling tube
nut, FSN 4730-887-9061, and compres-
sion sleeve, FSN 4730-779-6022. sep-
arately if you want all that's needed to
do the job. Like the assembly, the nut
and sleeve are listed in TM 9-1410-250-
12P/1/1 (Feb 64).


TO GET THE JOB DONE
RIGHT ORDER THESE ALSO:



NUT SLEEVE
FSN 4730-887-9061 FSN 4730-779-6022






XM504 LAUNCHING STATION:


Shudder! Gasp!
No matter how big a hurry you're
in to get your Sergeant's launching sta-
tion emplaced, don't make this mis-
take:
Don't get caught dead using the
static grounding cable instead of the
grounding cable and stake.
A mistake like this just might carry
the death penalty. And no kidding.
The static line's OK, maybe, for
draining off static electricity when
you're opening a rocket motor con-
tainer. Then you simply battery-clip
the cable to the ball study on the aft
end of the rocket motor container.


But it sure won't suck jolting juice
from a charged-up launching station
the way the grounding cable and stake
will ... if you rig 'em up right. Which
means doing what it says about em-
placing ground rods on page 114 of
TM 9-1440-301-12 (Mar 65). The
ground rods mentioned in the TM re-
place the ones you've been using and
are in a kit that comes with MWO 9-
1440-301-30/25 (19 Jan 65).






'O^iE ASI HEADSET *
REPLACEMENT
When the headset (TDH-39) for the azimuth-speed indi- e
cator console in the Hawk's battery control center needs
replacing, here's what you're to ask for:
Headset, microphone, H-144A/U, battery powered, FSN
5965-682-2769. You'll find it listed on page three, TM 9-
1430-501-12P/1 (Nov 63).
S This is the best headset in the supply system for the ASI
console.
IDLE TALK
You confused about just how you're supposed to check the
transmission oil level on your Hawk loader-transpore-r.
Tossing a
four-bit piece ...ENGINE AND DRIVE ... WHILE (HE(KING
gi es you a 50-50 IDLING SELECTOR THE TRANSMISSION
chance of being right,N NEUTRAL
bur you'll be right
100 percent of the
time if you have the


NOT NEEDED
If \ou haven't had any trouble yet, maybe
it's because you've been lucky.
But \ou could be next on the list ... so beat
those snake eyes to the punch by taking a gander
at the rotary pump in your Hawk AN/MPQ-39
rad r.
a\ hat you want to look for, and hope you
don't ind, is a plug on the chamber between
the pump and pump motor.
That thing is strictly a shipping plug and
"ants to be removed when the pump is
installed in the radar. REMOVE
If an\ coolant leaks and gets into the pump IT
motor a without any way to get out (which is
whar happens with the plug in) ... ps-s-s-st
c homes the sound of a motor burning out.
to "" -'t lo


~--
----^ ^ -- .___-_-.^- .



ROUND GROUND
If there's one thing that'll turn a Hawk crewman's face red, it's to pull a
missile from its container without the bird stopping along the way-like it's
supposed to. Before he can say "terra firma," the missile is on the ground, with
a few dents it didn't have before it left the container. And the components are
left feeling like a pair of ivories that have been bouncing against the wall dur-
ing an all night session.
If the stops that're made for bringing the missile to a halt when it's partway
out of the can are missing from the container, you can pull out the round with
some steady tugging. Just because some guy didn't install the stops is no real
good excuse for the missile to wind up on the ground.
Instead of rushing things, listen and feel for those two drops the missile takes
as it comes out of the container. Those slight drops are built into the container
as part of your decanning procedures.


. RUBBING IT IN


Who'd a thought it would happen?
The stable local oscillator in your Hawk
AN/MPQ-35 radar gets put on rubber
shock mounts. And the oscillator vibrates
the way it should. But when the pulse acq
is fired up and the oscillator is vibrating
away, it rubs against the coolant line. And
all that rubbing puts a hole in the oscillator
cover.
If you're having this kind of trouble, ask
your support people to move the coolant
line support clamp up two inches. This'll
put the line away from the oscillator with
room to spare.


I- I


i






GROUND

FOR MORE CENTER GUIDE LIFE..


Take the right-hand track '
and switch it to the left side...
and the left to the right. This "'
puts the outer guides on the
inner sides of both tr.icks -
Don't wait till the guides are --.
too worn down before you make the in itch.
This small PM action is the ticket for man
more miles on the guides.
If your carriers are operating where it's dr.,
you may not run into this uneen %ear.


kMXOBILITY --


RECTIFIED RECTIFIER
Dear Half-Mast,
We're still learning new things about our M114
C/R carrier. Right now we'd like to know the pur-
pose of the rectifier we see on page 136 in TM 9-
2320-224-20 (Jan 65).
What can you do for us, Sarge?


e4-



r- -- '


THE RIGHT GOES TO -
S \E E
THE LEFT AND... =- C E
M114A]Di\E Ej
That's kerrecr! With this bit of guidance ou can almost ACE\ VEN.
double the life of the track center guides on \our -
M114- series Recon carriers. -
Here's the trick- Keep sour ee peeled ,
on the outer ru)v of center guides r
for signs of unusual wear.
Seems that under some condi- -
tions speciall mud the
outer row will wear fastr -
than the inner row of guides.
Not only should % ou eye the
guides for I~ear. hut once in a
"hile take the time to finger
feel'em for size. If ou find the
outer guides are almost worn
thru make with the switch.
FINGER FEELS GUIDES FOR
SIGNS OF WEAR .


I


j


Dear Mr. G. W. H.,
The rectifier picks out the correct
warning light when trouble hits.
It works like this: When trouble
makes the master warning light come
on, you immediately look at your indi-
cator panel to see which one of the four
warning lights is beaming.
If the rectifier wasn't in the electrical
s) stem they'd all light up and you'd be
left in the dark-it pin-points the
problem area.
If you ever need one of these recti-
fiers, just ask for Semi-Conductor assy,
warning light 10913771 FSN 2590-
9"3-11'S. It's on page 67 in the
Ml 14's newest suppls manual, TM
9- 220-224.25 P.

I hs/M-/'W^


'7 1






M114

TENSIONER
TROUBLES


-SOB: 'AN
*THAT'S My
PROBLEM.


Dear Editor,
The belt tensioners on M 114-series vehicles tend to work loose after about
2,000 miles of operation which makes the engine run hot. You can improve
the belt tensioner by doing this:
1. Pull the cotter pin from the 2. Unscrew the clevis from the 3. Put a jin nut over the devii
devis and slip out the re- belt lenioner assembly and shaft and run the nut up to
toaing pin. I Iremove the adjusting nut the end of the clevis.


4. Now assemble the clevis, the adjusting nut
and the belt tensioner again and put the
retaining pin and the cotter pin back.
5. Adjust the belt tension. When the adjust-
ing nut is positioned right, run the jam nut
down from the end of the devis until it
butts up against the adjusting nut.

That's all there is to it. The jam nut will keep the adjusting nut jammed into place.
SSgt M. C. Page
APO New York 09039

(Ed Note- Good idea. A new tensioner for the fan drive belts is part of MWO
9-2320-224-20/3 scheduled to reach you sometime this year. The new tensioner
is supposed to keep your belts at the right stretch all the time. Meanwhile, until
you get the MWO, this jam nut will keep you out of a jam.)























LOOK BEFORE
YOU POUR


(BUT T 5&S
C'NPAL PAE l|.)v


If \ou don't look
real close before )ou
oil into )our
M 113 personnel
carrier transmission
you'll goop up
the works for sure.


l, at page 11 of
LO 9-2300-224-12
(May 63) and get
I. the wrong idea
thar 30-weight oil
goes in the M113
transmission.
Look again
and you'll find
on page 18
that the M113
transmission takes
10- weight oil.
That's right,
use OE-10 at all times
except in extreme cold.
Then \ou use OES.


TRACK
TENSION

TOPICS






PARE" THAT SPRAG

;PARE: THIT SPRAG'


If a big, powerful horse had another pair of legs to reach out and grab a-hold
when his dther legs are havin' trouble getting' a grip, he'd be better off.
The workhorse of the Army, the six-by-six G742-series 21/-ton truck, has
got those extra "legs," on account of its overrunning clutch, or sprag unit. It
automatically pours power up to the front wheels when the intermediate and
rear wheels lose traction.
This sprag unit gives your truck extra muscles when you're bogged down in
mud or snow, and it should get the respect it deserves, 'specially in how you
operate your truck.
Si..,k rr nrvi shih inlo irvcr:e when Ihere s any forward mrition (ome
., a dead stop before ;hov'n rhal gear hrlt inlo revi i'.e

$~-'- THEM SHIFT
-1'


Or.2 f your engine s conked out and you
figure a low will get you started shift the
Transmission into fifth speed and shift the
transfer into HIGH (up) ranges 0 course, you
put the transmission in reverse if you re be.
ing towed backward but forward towing is
preferred The Iransfer slays in HIGH either
way. though


And. someone's goin' to think a Mis-
souri mule s kick is Irke a love tap if he
tangles with windup in the truck's power
train. This windup comes from letting the
truck drift forward while in reverse gear lor
backword in forward gear). When the power
train unwinds, it's like yanking a light main-
spring out of an ole' alarm clock-only a
heckuvo lot worse-and whoever s working
on the truck when ii lets loose can be hurt
bod



.. ,,- T .)



16


If you've let your truck pick up some windup going forward, just back up
the same distance. Driving ahead takes out the windup you got drifting back-
ward. If there's no room, or there's some other reason you can't move, jack
up one front wheel to get rid of the windup.
You can guess your truck's got a bad case of windup if you have trouble
shifting ... or your gears are slipping ... or the steering's hard.
If you want to know whether your transfer case sprag unit is adjusted right,
your jacked-up front wheel should rotate easily in forward direction only when
the transmission is in neutral, second, third, fourth or fifth gear. When the trans-
mission's in first or reverse gear, the wheel should lock.
TM's covering the Reo's power train
are TM 9-8023-2 (Mar 56), TM 9-8621
(Dec 53) and TM 9-8000 (Jan 56).
Workings of the overrunning sprag
unit are given in para 210, page 324
of TM 9-8000.



1 \HELP SGT HALF-MAST

S\\ JNonmenclature
SM1odel
SWheu vou fire off a note to FSN
SSg Half-Mast, be sure to include some Manufacturer
dope on the equipment you're Serial & Contract
talking about, like Nu.nbers


The equipment's data plate
or TM can give you some of it.
Help Half-Masl to help you.


~'~Cli






PAINT FOR SAFETY .

G7E47.7
Dear Half-Mast, .T'Su
I've been trying to find information n OL'
for the painting of air connections on Arrr -r
2V2-ton tractors and up.
On some vehicles the service air
connection is painted yellow and the
emergency air connection is painted
red.
If you could tell me the regulations
covering this information, it would be
greatly appreciated. I
PFC J. R. P.


Dear Private J. R. P.,
There is no DA regulation directly
authorizing the painting of the connec-
tions. FSN 2590-740-9721 FSN 2590-774-4284
The vehicle couplings and trailer
hoses are supposed to be marked with PAINI SERVICE YELLOW
"Service" and "Emergency" identifica- PAINT EMERGENCY
tion tags. If they're painted over or .. RED
missing, you can get 'em by using FSN
2590-740-9721 for the "Service" tag
and FSN 2590-774-4284 for the "Emergency" tag.
Painting the connections, like you've seen, isn't out of the question, tho. The
area CO can issue a local SOP under AR 385-55, the safety AR on prevention
of motor vehicle accidents, and allow the marking of couplings with colored
paint.



TRAILER BRAKE PARTS


Your support can get repair parts for the
M101A1 trailer brake system by citing the part
numbers in MWO 9-2330-202-30/1 and using
the MWO and SB 9-150 as their authority. Parts
aren't in TM 9-2330-202-14P or any other sup-
ply manual.





WITH A GOOD TIGHT BOLT...






AA,









This is for all you proud owners of the 2V2-ton M35A1 multifuel truck.
Now! Right now, is the time to get out and get under and look over your
steering-gear mounting bolts.
Some steering-gear cases were mounted with locking bolts that don't have
the tensile strength to keep 'em put. Y WOKING LOOSE A&D
CALS'NCG ELONGATED MOUNrING


MOUNTING
BOLT


THIS IS
BAD
Look 'em over good. And keep all mounting bolts tightened to 60-65 lbs-ft.
If any loose bolts or egg-shaped holes are found, put in all new locking bolts
-but only those with FSN 5306-022-0724. Use this bolt only ... a sub won't
do the job.
And pass the word along ... keep the bolts torqued to 60-65 lbs-ft and check
'em out at every "S" service.






which h curring-and-welding torch ser
\ does sour 5-ton wrecker hae?'
SIt should ha\e any one-but onl
Sone -of the three sets listed in Change
5 (Jan 65) to TM 9-2320-211-10.
This goes for all four wreckers, M2-f6.
1 M2. 15 -i and MSi3A2.
Two of the sets ha\e the manufac-
turers listed National Cylinder Gas
Company) and Victor Equipment Com-
panm. Not identified b) name is the
Dockson Corporation set. Like it sa.s
TmESE ABE TmE REPLACEABLE
P nRTS FOR '*Ou DOCKS r10C SE T.


NuT. Lu NIONT (18075-C-37)
FSN 3433-357-6422

SEAT, HI6H PfHisuR[ (18075.C-2)
FSN 3433-378-4331.

E[AT ITuBBEF. HIGH PP[i,UPE'[
(18075.C?.2A) FSN 3433-357-7206.

~ITEM VALVE ASSEMBLY
(18075:48-0 FSN 3433.357-7430.

TIP OrCGEN A(:MT1E (. unilNG,
drill size 65/55 (18075.2(
FSN 3433-378-4341.

TIP r TtAN AntniYLENE CUTTINGG
drill size 61/49 (18075 3CI
FSN 3433-357-7557.

TIP. VYYC[N ACETYLENE. tui lNG
drill size 61/43 (18075:4(1
FSN 3433-378-4344.

lIP OxTYCEt AC([rYLEN WELDING
drill size 73 (18075-2E)
FSN 3433-357-7635.


Ill


wi


II



L






on page 23 in Change 2, Dockson
equipment is identified by the symbol
18075 following the part description.
As complete sets, all three have the
same FSN. That's why you would have
any one of the three. But component
FSN's differ from one set to another.
FSN's for all parts of the Victor and
National Cylinder Sets are listed in
Change 3, but there's none given for
the Dockspn parts.
Here's a complete list of replaceable
parts for the Dockson Corp. Model 4EC
W/C-4 Torch Set, FSN 3433-294-6743:


TIP, OXYGEN ACETYLENE, WELDING:
drill size 58 (18075:4E)
FSN 3433-357-7638.

TIP, OXYGEN ACETYLENE, WELDING:
drill size 52 (18075:6E)
FSN 3433-357-7642.

TIP, OXYGEN ACETYLENE, WELDING:
drill size 44 (18075:8E)
FSN 3433-357-7645.

TIP, OXYGEN ACETYLENE, WELDING:
drill size 36 (18075:10E)
FSN 3433-357-7648.


UNION ATTACHMENT: (18075:(-36)1
FSN 3433-357-8149.

WASHER, HIGH PRESSURE: (18075:C-7)
FSN 5310-357-8207. I -

WRENCH, TORCH AND REGULATOR: (00741:28)
FSN 5120-449-8179.


Ar


TS ARE FLIP









New nuts and bolts-in.
stalled the right vwa --ma)
be what your 5-ron 15 I dump
truck needs. Some vehicless got
through with the dump bod.
hinge bracket mounting bolts












installed %ith the nuts on the
inner side of the bracket in-
stead of the other n a\ around.
With side shifting of the dump
body, this can cause interfer-
ence with the sub frame. If
this happens, get new bolts
(FSN 5305-29"-0"03i and
nucs (FSN 5310-050-33311
and put 'em in ,ith the nuts
oncheouter side of the bracket.










* TGHTS 1 f &^9^ rn

A little too tight or a little too loose is enough to put your M151 14-ton
truck's wheel bearings on the road to ruin.
Here's a new adjustment procedure that'll give longer life to bearings and
seals.
Your own fingers are important in getting this adjustment just right.
Before you start adjusting, mount the wheel on the hub, then:
1. Tighten the flange nut to 2. Rotate the wheel a few 3. Back off the flange nut until
30 ft-lbs torque, joggling times to make sure thebear- it can be turned with the
the wheel as you go to seat ing assemblies and seals are fingers
the bearings properly snug __ _


For adjusting the flange nut-in addition to your fingers-you'll need:
e -- Socket wrench adapter,
3/4-inch-square
male end andt w-in- -ins with
- Torque wrench, 1/-in square-drive, square female end. 1/4-in scet i
S/4-in square-drive.


Many outfits make sure their 4 -ton Jeep's folded down
windshield doesn't get busted up by strapping it snug
like TM 9-2320-218-10 says in Para 32.
They also make sure guys keep their packs and other
gear off that windshield. Glass wasn't made to cradle a
bouncing pack.
Then, when the situation gets real tactical, some out-
fits go one step more and leave the windshield stashed
away with the doors, sides, canvas and bows. Real
streamlined for combat. No glass around to give enemy
air an eye-filling flash.


I






WHEEL BEARING DRIVER

gt BIG A LPE ON"
PAGE 189, BUT
A NO1 DIMA4ENIONS
'~IJ Ill


On page 189 of TM 9-2320-218-20 (Apr 63) Nou'll spy a small tool being
used to replace the outer bearing on the spindle of the M151 1/-ton truck.
What you don't see are dimensions for making up the tool, so here they are:


2"oo








You'll need a small pipe (alloy aluminum preferred) that's 4-in long x
1%-in ID x 2-in OD. For a base to hammer on, use a heavier metal piece of
approximately 21/2 inches square. Round off the corners if they're sharp.
Center-weld the pipe to the base plate.
The same tool can be used to loosen and remove the inner bearing cup and
seal from the wheel support that's step 2, page 189 in the -20 TM.
Try 'er for size.


S MM151 REAR SUSPENSION
If you're havin' trouble with your
M151 /4-ton truck rear suspension, see Arm, assembly, left, FSN 2530-979-8896
your support. They've got the word on Arm, assembly, right FSN 530979-89
these replacement parts: pushing kit, FSN 2530-979-8898
these replacement parts: Krt, modification, FSN 2510-973-2507


THESE PARTS'LL. BE ADDED
ST TM 9-2320-218-20R
REAR SUSPENSION FAILURES
MOST LIKELY IN MI15'S
\ WIT SERIAL NUMBERS
BELOW 2E8934.

24





T TE NEW BEARING
ivtA%? ,?











An all-around improvement.
That's the new wheel-bearing puller in your
MI 51 %-ton truck's B Tool Set. Because it grabs
all around, it's just about impossible to damage
the outer bearing when pulling it off the spindle
hub.
Except for turning the two bolts that bring
% the jaws together before you start pulling, you
b work this puller the same as the old one, like it
shows in TM 9-2320-218-20 (Apr 63).
FSN 5120-56"-2i92 is what you ask for to
get this new tool as a replacement for the old
st)le puller, FSN 5120-02--7161.


MINDING THE STORAGE?

/ Got so many vehicles you can't mind
/ the store? Maybe your major com-
mander will authorize you to put some
of them in administrative storage. TB
Ord 1045 (Sep 62) gives all the info
Syan organization needs on this. It tells
you why the vehicles can be put in
S storage and how you inspect and care
for them while they're there. This TB
Goes for both tactical and administra-
.' tive vehicles.
25





















Dear Half-Mast, "
We have a batch of %-ton G741-series trucks and every one has a strap
dangling from each side of the cargo body about two feet to the rear of the cab.
We don't know how to use 'em. An old timer said they're to tie prisoners
to by their wrist so they can run alongside when the cargo body is full.
I'm sure he's pulling my leg, but what are they for?
Pvt O. T. L.

Dear Private O. T. L.,
That old timer was just spoofing ou.
The straps are for securing your dismantled root
bow assembly. The bows lie full length on top of
the cargo rail and are tied down with the dangling.
straps.
Keep the straps in good shape because when
you've got to take your dismantled bows n ich you, (Adv'
the straps come in mighty hand.
When you need new straps, have 'em made up
from Bulk Web Strap, FSN 8305-263.2i'9. The
bulk strap is in Federal Supply Catalog C8300-IL-A
(Feb 64), page 83, Index 41730. "/l/U4


100 AMPS FOR %-TONS

If a lot of common equipment on )our M37 or M3'BI 3/4-ton truck really%
loads down the electrical system. then you need more than those little 45-amp
batteries. TB 9-2320.212-20/2 (Oct 621 authorizes 100-amp batteries and gives
with fabricated carriers to handle those bigger batteries.






SUFFERING'

WATER (

PUMPS!



When you have the 100-amp generator system mounted on your %-ton M37-
series truck, the fan belt tension adjustment should be no guessing game.
Too many ruined water pumps tell of bad guesses. Too tight is usually the
trouble maker.
Like it says in Change 3 (Oct 62) to MWO ORD G741-W12:
1. Put a torque wrench to the 2. When it takes 20-25 foot-
generator pulley nut while pounds to make the pulley
putting tension on the fan slip on the belt then lock
belt with a pry bar... the adjustment arm nut.
PRYA.-: ... NOW
020-25. LOCK
FOOT HE
POUNDS.. NUT.


For a pry bar to push the generator against the fan belts, a tire rim tool is
about as handy as anything.

KEEP 'EM MOVIN' r Er EXCISED
PERIODICALLY AS
Rip Van Winkle hardly twitched a WILL you BE PER TB 9-3001/I.
muscle for 20 years but could still ABLE TO MOVE APTE HOW AOUT VOUR
SLKEPIN' FOR VEHICLES?
get around when he woke up. That's nT ENr 2
fiction.
Let your tracked or wheeled vehicle ,.
sit still for long and it's apt to freeze
up and just generally go to pot. That's
fact.
Maybe your equipment's out of ac-
tion just because it's missing some part The dope on exercising equipment
or is waiting for minor repairs. If it's in storage for 90 days or more is in
deadline for 90 days or more-either TB 9-300-1/1 with Change 2 (for
up on blocks or on its wheels or tracks combat vehicles) and TB 9-300-2/1
-it's supposed to get exercise to keep with Change 2 (for tactical wheeled
parts from rusting or seizing, vehicles).
27













R




- 0 -,\p : a"




AMMO R .,, '.

If a candy lass has hustle in the bustle, it's like a 30-day pass. But if the

turret bustle on your M60A1 tank hustles (like straight up into the wild blue)

a bustle is the end your end man.

So dig those three live rounds out of the turret bustle before they dig you -

(six feet under).

It's official now .. no live rounds of ammo to be carried in the turret bustle

tray of the M60A1 tank until a kit comes through to make the latches work better.

The kit may be ready around October. The official word is out as TWX ATAC

Msg TT19570 dated 22 Oct 63.

For the 10 per cent who didn't get the word, THIS IS IT.


.. ", .*a' ,. .., .i --. ,.
0 .;r Ci.'ir. h."a i :' twns,,'T

changes.
TECHNICAL MANUALS
IM I..I.1A.Il 7 AO C: 1 U
IM j 4 30.203.17 sr2 De c.I -
:. 4 s p0FJc

TM i.37)0.701.2 P Fb .i F ,
Ie., Ca IEr, ja F CmI i. C 1
Ca, 1040 Fi 1 1
IM 2.i98.5. l ,d 1 A oe F a .1
S n -. r-'' ., ,00 -G ,,



IM J13 1310 707 0P r, C:- i

I. ...a F r | F
IM -.4]20-II.102P iea r.-a C-
0e CEliO d -na C Dr er- i:
TM '.4! 0-.I. Fli Fer Lab n 1.
L.0.- 16 CF" Co-r CiO C ., .

TM .6l11 i.07.20P. Fe. Cc. Ic
D -CE' E.el q iJ a,. .r.ie
F.COA
IM 9 1005.223.12 Fer, lirJ &
uI4E: A ,
FM 9 10I1 r.2l. ipC l- j irn r

IM 9.1430 7j- 1 P/2/1 i.. .1le
aM. I roa he'-. IFFp0
IM 9,:430-511 12P/1 Feb n
IM 9.140.750.1o P/3/I1 ao N.a e
HI e N Ia? -r" IF-ir i
IM 0.1440.301-17 mib S;F
IM 0.141.]3 01 .125/2 i.o b 1


TM9 1450.376.12P/l Ma-o Pen.rin
;M 9-1450.377.12P/.1 Mar Pe,-h.ng
IM 9-2350715- 0P. JI Far.e M60
IM 9-493-30-.12P/2. Feb Sg'
iM 9-493i-305-12P/2 Feb. Sgl
IM 9-4AlS-38I..1-P/. Mia Pe'ihnq.
rM 9.4940-250.IP/1/ll. Fe N ke
Alar Nke 'recs
rM *-49407-50-15P/7/1 Feb. N-.k
A.a .'...e a e : Ni.e Hrs limp)
IM H 1940 21.S1P/2/1 Feb N k.
Aa. In.ie -e', Nike HeIc jlrpI
IM .6920.) i.n?2P/, Mar. PpFe.ir.
TM 920 1.I.17P Fen GMI M;C
1M 6920-461.-2P. Fen E.nlGc
IM 9 ?072 C0 Mar
TM c.dl140 :i-12P/I Ma', Peshr,.g
IM 10-270 i. Ceaneral RenaO. QO

'.liO.- Ca'qIol I .

IM 10-500.20. Mar Jror :I q..;p

IM 10.1930.2l7.27P lson i e. LilI.
icil Gas 0C,,0 -es .::"- r e aln.
'mo *.e MYFRA On.mCV r M
MIOfMC 9I. F,'n rI MMF" 'I
I TIP
TM 10-3030-2?6-10 Feb. :'- d lub
be. I.es ro100f It, : -; f1.198.
Ad.-r rID 0o EEI
TM 1J-3920-.23-10. Fjt. Soli P.b
be- T.-e, 4o00 'b Car, MnE.196,
Bcln fID 0,- E3.
TM 10.4 730-207.1 Feb. Dlol-.'q
Orlil. F'*.'3r 0. Co s; QM
IM 10.8415.204-1 Ftb. P.olIe(IIe
CI F,.,Fig
rM II.-520 524-20P, Feb ana.o For
n.all Se AN, iTC Q10
IM 11-6130-717-1 5.Fere. 4, CFia ae
FP Ild'U
rM 55.110022b6-12-6. Cl Feb CV-

28


TM 55-1400-375-10-18, Feb, Pershing.
TM 55-1400-300-10-5, Feb, Pershing.
TM 55-1510-204-10, Feb. OV-1.
TM 55-1520-204-20PMD, Feb, OH-13.
TM 55-1520-204-20PMI, Feb, OH-13.
TM 55-1520-204-20PMP, Feb. OH-13.
TM 55-1520-206-20, Feb. OH-23.
TM 55-1520-209-10, C4, Apr, CH-47.
TM 55-1520-210-20, Cl, Feb, UH-ID.
TM 55-1520-210-20P, Cl, Mar,
UH- D.
TM 55-1520-211-10, C3, Mar, UH-1.
TM 55-1520-211-20, C2, Feb, UH-lA
& B.
TM 55-1520-211-20P, Jan, UH-1.
TM 55-1905-203-12P, C1. Feb,
Marine.

LUBRICATION ORDERS
LO 5-3805-218-15, Feb, Scroper,
Towed: 18 Ca Yd Le Tourneau
Westinghouse CT-4.
LO 5-4210-205-12, Oct, Truck, Fire
Fighting: Powered Pumper; Foam and
Water 500 G.P.M.
LO 5-4310-245-15, Feb. Compressor,
Recip: 8 CFM; 175 PSI Kellog-Ameri-
can G-321-P8.
LO 5-4320-217-15, Feb, Pump, Centr:
Peltr GED, 500 to 1400 GPMF Brielle
Marine Industrial Equip Co PPl13.
LO 5.4930-206-15, Feb, Lub and Serv
Unilt 16 CFM Comp; GED, Gray 251-
437.
LO 5-6115-312-15, Jan, Gen Sel.
GED: 5 KW Hol-Gar CE-56-AC.
LO 9-1025-200-10, Feb, How, Towed:
155-MM, M114 and M114A1 and
How, Med, Towed: Aux Propelled,
155-MM, M123AI.
LO 9-1030-203-10, Feb, How Heavy,
Towed, 8-Inch, M115.







In o nappened 1/1 ':"'E E,4 PAD!...3LE9P~c
To ELEIAE"T mo'VES OUT
019 Bedsv 3 rFrTEENJ MINUTES.


DOPE -k


















vo u C, v..;
.WE GOT A
MISSION.
FLL IN!



























ALL GAGES,
)ICATOZS, WARNING
16TS, MAN YOUR
ATTLE SrATION /
ONSI04


















































CAN'T CIZAP OUT ON
THIS MISSION, JUST ON
ACCOUNT OF ONE
LITTLE GAGEf


rHMM.. .BAT V-GENE2ATOR
ILLNDICATOR IS STILL OUT .. .NOT EVEN A
ILICKER... I'M NOT SUPPOSED TO
EVEN MESS WITH IT... IT'S SECOND
ECHELON STUFF.. .BUT I'LL SET
AJOu0VO TO REPORTINtG IT LATER.







We could' told you in time, good oP friend-
When she first showed that troublesome trend
But through your "oversight"
We lay helpless and quiet-
So you were bound to get creamed in the end.



WARNING DEVICES ARE FOR REAL
00IL PRESSURE GAGES CAIR PRESSURE GAGES
TEMPERATURE GAGES O WARNING LIGHTS
O SPEEDOMETERS 0 BUZZER ALARMS
C AMMETERS 0 FUEL GAGES
OTACHOMETERS 0 FREQUENCY METERS

KEEP 'EM WORKING!!
KLm up -


IF YOU WANT TO DISPLAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, LIFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.








EMERGENCY! MEDICl
BATTERY-GENERATOR INDICATE
Is MALFUNCTrIONING!!
QUICK! TELL ME YOUR
LAOT READING.


OHHH! WE CANNOT
CONTACT THE DRIVER.. AT
THIS RATE HE WON'T HAVE
ENOUGH JUICE TO SYART
AN ARGUMENT, LET j
ALONE THIS TANK! A


STEER. OR THAT
OVERHANG... 'N'SHUT
'EM DOWN...WE ARE r EA!f THEN
TO OBSERVE THE T ADIO IN GRID
POSSIBLE AGGRESSOR COORDINATES
ROUTE OF ATTACK. TO "DIVARTV" 'N'
SECOND ROM THAT HIGH TAIL IT OUTTA
ECHELON! POINT. HERE SEpORE THE
WHERE Ax H.E. ARP"rEs.'
poALuv"


PLATOON LEADER WE LOOK OUT!
ARE IN POSITION. HE'S CONVULSING.
THEN WE WAIT 'N' OH-OH... WOT'S HAPPENING,
WATC... GOT IT? CAN'T TELL. WOT WOT HAPPENING,
MYrcw,, ATTEIS AE BATTERY-GENERATOR

C'MON! AHHH.,. THWE OR..CU NT
ATTIES MUST HAVE FOR RADIO... THE
A 6000 CHARGE FROM RASRA ENGINE IS
THE ROAD MARCH. O#~... BATTERIES ARE
So, NO SWEAT/ WAY DOWM..
(r HOPE.) AGH H.








GASPF THAT LAST TRANSMISSION
DID IT... IF HE DOESN'T START
THE ENGINE ON THE FIRST GO
AROUND -CASP, THAT'S ALL
SHE WROTE... WE'VE
"A SOUGHT IT.


KXEEP YOUR EyES
PEELED. THEY SHOULD
3E COMING ANY TIME
m-. NOW.


DF1UL, A LIUCr~Il
ED THIS ON MV 2404
LAST WEEK... THE
WRENCH JOCKEY
WOULD'VE HAD THIS
BUM INDICA TOR RE-
PLACED by NOW...
FOOEy... ANYWAY,
THEM BATTERIES
ARE OK (I HOPE


DAD! THAT INCOMING
BAGGAGE WILL CREAM THIS
WHOLE AREA IN FOUR MIN-
UTES... BY THE WAY, THE
"RT" WAS KINDA WEAK.
HOW'S OUR BATTERIES?


OH, WHV DIDN'T HE
GET THIS "CAN" OVER
TO HIS MECHANIC...OHHH...
HE NEVER "HAS THE TIME.'
...TOO MUCH BOTHER....
bm OHHHH _


y HOLD IT! IT'S 9
/THEM! WE ARE Ii1HT
IN THE LINE OF MARCH!
CALL IN A FIRE
S MISSION. -


P ER... THE
BATTERY-GENERATOR.
INDK.ATOWSB EEN
L ACTIN' UP. f
L READING! 1







WHAMATr .ffa! I
GET THIS THING STARTED
AND GET US OUTTA HERE!
WE'RE DEAD IN TWO
MINUTES IF WE STAY. 1


WHEW! WAS THAT VEAH...ME TOO... OK, OKISPEEPOMETER'S
CLOSE! WE GOT AWAY HEY DRIVER EASY B EEN BUSTED FOR A
WITH ONLY A COUPLE ON THEM BUMPS... WEEK. SORRY 'LL SET
OF CUTS 'N'BRUISES... SLOW DOWN. SECOND ECHELON TO
ALL THIS ON ACCOUNT OOK AT IT NET
OFF A LIL' GAGE. WEEK MAYBE.
BOY! AM I GONNA
MEND My WAYS.


















E.SAT'riE P JTus As_"" L':MA7TH HIMV1- !-E
RJ-Oe SU'E GL iP QE'E3\'IBS T... "
-. JUST HALF-FULL


It never fails! Ask anybody for "just
a half cup" of java and you'll get two-
thirds-three-quarters-even a full
cup ... no sweat.
But this liberal bit definitely doesn't
go when you're feeding the main rotor
blade grip reservoirs of your Huey
(UH-1D) on a Daily.
Para 2-51, Chap 2, Sect II of TM 55-
1520-210-20 (1 Oct 64) says to fill the
reservoir half-full with lubricating oil,
MIL-L-7808.


If you fill 'er to the level of the filler
plug hole, there won't be enough room
for expansion when the oil heats up.
Then the relief valve will become
plugged because it vents air, not oil.
'Course when the oil starts pushing,
something has to give. In this case it's
the reservoir packing seals. Leaking
seals mean grounding the bird to put
in new ones.
So how full is "half-full" on the
transparent reservoir?
Well, how 'bout using the center
.iraching bolt as a half-full marker
Il', a natural!

FILLER PLUG,








-I
r.


Sioux (OH-13) servo cylinders can
be mighty deceivin' when it comes to
deciding' if you've got a bonafide leak-
or just a normal seep.
Even when you decide it's a sure-
enough, no-doubt leak, you still have
the annoying job of figuring out if
that leak requires grounding your bird
... ASAP or after a wait-and-see period
of time.
When it comes to normal operations,
your best leak indicator is the Daily
Inspection-since the Daily calls for
a check of the reservoir fluid level any-
way.
If your dipstick reads LOW each

HECK RESERVOIR
FLUID lEVEL DAILY.

`7 C


MARK
Daily-or every other one-you'v
definitely got leakage. If it's only
seep, though, there's no noticeable loss
of fluid over a long period of time-
even though it may look worse thar
the dipstick shows.


It's normal to find a light smear of
fluid around the piston shaft at the
outside of the cylinder body. This is
caused by the action of the scraper ring
on the piston shaft each time the cyclic


LIGHT SMEAR OF FLUID ON
PISTON SHAFT IS NORMAL.

control linkage is moved. So the more
you maneuver that bird, the more fluid
seep you get around the piston shafts.
On larger aircraft, like a Chickasaw
(UH-19), the loss of either power servo
would be more critical due to heavier
feedback pressures on the stick. But, as
Project #2819 (UH-19) of Change 2
(5 Oct 64) to the EIR Digest points out,
the important thing is whether the
leakage rate increases from one flight
to the next.
The comments on the same EIR proj-
ect put the emphasis on determining
the amount of leakage that can be
tolerated without being a hazard to
safe operation.


fluid loss. After all, the fuel range of
this ship won't let your bird stay air-
borne for longer than 21/2 hours at
most. And the full 1/2 pints of hydrau-
lic fluid in the reservoir can't possibly
drain out in that short time unless
a line ruptures.
Even if the hydraulic pump hose
should bust in flight, the irreversible
valves would prevent excessive cyclic
control feedback. The driver could
override the remaining stick pressures
with a little extra effort and safely
complete that mission.
With the larger UH-19, for compari-
son, the stick pressures would be too


j










~0


Comparing the OH-13, the situation 00
can't really get too critical from servo i '
38 4 IV
<^fBS-^-'l.'^^^i^


strong to control the ship unless auto-
rotation was entered as soon as possible
after the line ruptured. But even larger
aircraft can be flown safely with a
servo leak until almost all the hydraulic
fluid is gone.
Something else to keep in mind on
servos. Many times an aviator will com-
plain of a sloppy or tight cyclic just
after you've had one of the cylinders
replaced. This sometimes leads to think-
ing that there's a bind or a fluid leak
in the cylinder. More to the point, it's
probably the result of an uneven "feel"
on the stick-because the fore-aft and
lateral cylinders were not installed as
a pair, with a chance to grow old from
wear together.
OK, then... once you've decided
you've got leakage, you've still got to
decide when it reaches the point where
grounding the aircraft is required. If
you replace servo power cylinders at
the first drop of hydraulic fluid, the
supply system will never stand the
drain.


"DON'T TAP OUT






S There's a place for shoes with caps on 'em but it's nor around a big gas
i bird where a spark could ruin your ~hole day.
Paragraph 25b of TM 55-405-1 18 No\ 61, on general praciices, sa.s that
3 when working around aircraft you should wear shoes without metal taps or
protruding nais.
Those %ords of wisdom apply to the ground-.rpe "ho rftuels a bird, the
mechanic who maintains a bird and the pilot who hits the draincocks before
he flies a bird everybody!
"-- lk -y -'39


e
a
s






NOT A BREATH BELOW 50








Dear Windy.
What is the minimum registered pressure that the oxygen tanks for U-8D
and U-8F type aircraft can show before they must be recharged?
SSgt C. R. A.
De.ar Sergeant C. R.., .OXYGEN DURATION CHART-U-8D
The absolute minimum is 50 PSI
Persons Duration in Hours at Following Altitudes
according to paras 10-224 and 10-247 Using 8000 10000 15000 20000 25000
of TM 55-1510-201-20 (Mar 62) for
the Seminole. These are the two para- 1 17.7 14.4 9.4 7.1 5.7
graphs which tell when to purge both 3 59 4. 3.1 2.4 1.9
the "D" and "F" oxygen systems. 4 4.4 3.6 2.4 1.8 1.4
The absolute ideal, of course, is to 5 3.5 2.9 1.9 1.4 1.1
have 1800 PSI in the oxygen cylinder OXYGEN DURATION CHART-U-8F
before each takeoff, just as para 4-93, Persons Duration in Hours at Following Altitudes
Chapter 2, of the -10 (Feb 62) says. Using 10000 15000 20000 25000
From a strictly maintenance point of 11.4 10.5 9.7 8.9
view, though, the oxygen system should 2 5.6 5.3 4.8 4.4
never be allowed to get below atmos- 3 4.3 4.0 3.6 3.3
pheric pressure. Because then impure 4 3.5 3.2 2.9 2.6
air will force its way into the system. 5 2.9 2.6 2.4 2.2
And that means purging the system 6 2.5 2.3 2.1 1.8
before you can use it. So you add on a 7 2.2 2.0 1.8 1.6
safety factor such as the 50 PSI spelled registers below 1800 PSI. If the re-
out in the -20 to keep the system well quired amount is not available prior to
above atmospheric pressure. any mission which could require higher
From a flight safety viewpoint, there altitude flying, hunt up a replacement
should be enough oxygen left to match cylinder.
the requirements of your aircraft's next If a spare cylinder is not available,
mission. This you find out by checking and there's no equipment available to
the oxygen duration chart in the -10 recharge the old cylinder either, then
manual. But since the chart is based on the driver should be advised of this
a fully charged tank, you have to do flight restriction-both orally and in
some arithmetic whenever the pressure writing (on the -13 maintenance form).






'OUR WEAPONS


.OK..
7/IS TIME
1%,rL4 THAT WRENCH
^== -MP"C" RATION CANS. --.*



When a Raven (OH-23) pilot returns from a mission and says that he couldn't
hit the broad side of a barn with the M60C (7.62-mm) machine guns, there
might be more to his report than meets the eye.
No, it's not likely that a trip to an eye doctor will cure the problem! When
the pilot can't even hit the target it's probably because of an elevation problem.
'Tis easy to figure when the M2 weapons system is put on and taken off,
depending on the nature of the mission.




K'~1


FORWARD R

REAR Vl t I F HI.1i

When the forward support upper hole and the rear support upper hole are
used to pin the support to each bracket on the chopper, your guns will be right
on target.
But using the lower holes, or a combination of upper and lower holes, will
make the weapon shoot low or high and cause the pilot to miss the target by
a country mile.
'Course the stenciling on each support should show that the two upper holes
are for the M2 system and the two lower holes are for the XM1E1 (30 cal) sys-
tem. If the stenciling is painted over, tho, you'll find the hole poop in Chapter
2, Section III of TM 9-1005-247-12 (8 Jan 64).
SIOUX ON TARGET?
You can get the same low- or high-firing problem with the M2 weapons sys-
tem on your Sioux (OH-13H or OH-13S) where mounting plates are used in-
stead of brackets. In this case the right way is with the forward mounting pin
in the top hole and the rear mounting pin in the bottom hole of the plate.
So-o-o-o ... the next time the mission calls for using a weapons system, mount
'er in the right hole and you'll be on target-every time.







DISPERSANT


NE OIL
CHAMP!


The search for a better mouse trap is a never-ending one that's progress.
Small wonder crew chiefs are anxious to latch on to the newest advance from
the petroleum industry for aircraft piston engines -dispersant lubricating oil.
When it comes to keeping engines clean, dispersant oil, Specification MIL-L-
22851, has it all over MIL-L-6082. The dispersant has an additive which pre-
vents pre-sludge particles from forming into harmful deposits.

KEEP SLUDGE TRAPPED
When the sludge villain finds his way into bearings and oil passages it's not
long before the engine folds up.
Engineers are aware of "01' Sludge" and that's why holding plugs are in
engine crankshafts to trap him! 'Course he gets chased out of there at every
engine overhaul. A r .
/ STILL SLUDGV, ) r
*- FOAMY.




If you're using MIL-L-6082 oil right now, chances are Sludge is inside the
engine. You wouldn't want to set him loose in the oil flow either-that would
be asking for it!
Take the recent case of a Choctaw (CH-34) on a cross-country.
When the pilot was offered a detergent oil that was "guaranteed to keep his
engine clean" he figured this was just what the doctor ordered.
Now this-here detergent oil happened to have a large amount of cyclohexa-
none in it. And for cleaning, this chemical has the white knight brand beat a
mile.
Two quarts of detergent oil and several hours later the bird was back at
home base where SOP called for eyeing the engine oil screens.
Well you could have bowled the crew chief over with a feather! Sludge
42


had done his dirty work with a thick coating on the screens. Another few
minutes in the air and the pilot would have had an in-flight failure. 'Course
sludge's vacated home-the sludge plug-was clean as a whistle.

USE DISPERSANT OIL
The big difference between detergent and dispersant oil is that dispersant will
not let Sludge loose in your engine. MIL-L-22851 oil will increase engine life
by preventing new deposits. That's why it's taking the place of MIL-L-6082
oil listed in your maintenance pubs.


FE IE SE) AO.ETE
#q~t ~ -FE S.~AES 3B5OLETE ~7-~~~


YOU CAN
When you're actually ready to use
dispersant oil, don't de-sludge the en-
S gine. You want deposits to stay put.
The first step is to clean all the oil
strainers as outlined in the maintenance
pub for your bird.
Next, add MIL-L-22851 oil to the
MIL-L-6082 oil already in the crank-
case. They get together just fine so you
can mix them in all proportions.
Then, after every 10 hours of opera-


I MIX 'EM
tion, it's a capital idea to eye the strain-
ers for cleanliness until you reach the
50-hour mark. From then on, follow
your SOP of cleaning the strainers at
each oil change, sure 'nuff.
Once your bird is changed over to
dispersant oil you'll really have Sludge
on the run. Don't give him a chance to
get started again, either. Use only the
oils listed for your bird-no matter
where she roosts.

S43 4-Z *O A





But before you head for the supply catalog keep in mind that the stock of
MIL-L-6082 should be used up. Then you can make with the requisitions for
dispersant oil.


COMMERCIAL
USE THEN USE EQUIVALENT


Lubricating oil, aircraft piston
engine, Spec MIL-L-6082,
Grade 1065
FSN 9150-231-6671 bulk
FSN 9150-255-3929 5-gal pail
FSN 9150-231-6670 55-gal drum,
16 gage
FSN 9150-231-6669 55-gal drum,
18 gage


OR USE

Lubricating oil, aircraft piston
engine, Spec MIL-L-6082,
Grade 1100
FSN 9150-682-6695 bulk
FSN 9150-682-6696 55-gal drum,
16 gage

FSN 9150-682-6697 55-gal drum,
18 gage


Lubricating oil, aircraft piston
engine (ashless dispersant)
Spec MIL-L-22851, Type III
FSN 9150-965-2302 bulk
FSN 9150-965-2303 5-gal pail
FSN 9150-965-2304 55-gal drum,
16 gage
FSN 9150-965-2305 55-gal drum,
18 gage


THEN USE

Lubricating oil, aircraft piston
engine (ashless dispersant)
Spec MIL-L-22851, Type II
FSN 9150-753.5059 bulk
FSN 9150-753-5060 5-gal pail
FSN 9150-082-2449 55-gal drum,
16 gage
FSN 9150-753-4937 55-gal drum,
18 gage


Aeroshell W-80

Esso Avn Oil E-80
Enco Avn Oil E80








COMMERCIAL
EQUIVALENT


Aeroshell W-120
Aeroshell W-120 (1)
Esso Avn Oil E-120
Enco Avn Oil E-120
Ashland Volvoline
Super Aero 7000
Gulfpride Avn Oil AD-50






"NO MORE MASSIVE PLUGS? FINE!"








W hen )ou requisirion massive electrode spark plugs for the engine in your
bird and get them-good deal.
If you requisition massive plugs and get fine wire electrode plugs, tho, no
sweat!
The massive plugs have been downgraded from "A" Standard to "B" Alter-
nate. No more will be bought.
'Course you want to continue to use the massive babies listed in the parts
pub for your bird, until the supply on hand is used up.

M24 PROTECTIVE MASK










Caution air-types-
Better heed the real important warning which is packed in each box of your
M24 aircraft protective masks.
The note deals with the mask's eyelens, which is made of flexible vinyl and
is easily distorted. Among other things the note says to handle the mask care-
fully-no rough stuff at all, like it says in Chap 2, TM 3-4240-219-15. The
eyelens must be protected against greasy smudges, scratches and distortion.
Also, the M24 may take some getting used to. 'Cause, when you first put it
on you'll note some loss in depth perception when you look through the bottom
section of the eyelens. At first you may also experience slight vision distortion
caused by the flexible vinyl eyelens.
IPlAY ii COOLn i-, TRY YOUSNA IT [GES, BEORE YOIUGUP






VA HEMMAK THE "OP" CHECK


There will be times, no doubt, when a flightlne radio mechanic can't get a
peep out of the set in a bird. But a silent black box isn't a signal to decide that
the set is kaput-not by a long shot!
There's no need to suspect the worse until you've made the operational check
called out in the avionics section of your bird's PM pub.
Take the Beaver (U-6A) with an AN/ARC-55 UHF set. The "Op" check
is spelled out in Chapter 2, Section XIV of TM 55-1510-203-20 (29 Aug 63)
... on page 14-20.


GUARD Y
But before you climb into the cockpit
remember that with an "assist" from
the crew chief an auxiliary power unit
can be used in order to save the battery.

BEFORE THE APU 5s PLUGGED IN
THO. REMEMBER THESE
MIGHTr IMPORTANT STEPS.







A set can also be put on sick call if
it's turned on before a bird is started.
'Tis easy to figure when the voltage
surge built up by the starter energizer
lets go... the tubes and transistors take
it on the chin!


OUR SET

1. Turn off the GEN switch on the electrical
switch panel.


sTr A e

2. Turn the master switch on the starter panel
to OFF. If the switch is put ON, both the
battery and APU voltage is fed into the
master relay and all that juice will weld
the relay points together.
----- I


Of course you never want to over-
look the obvious-switches set in the
wrong position. This is the reason for
the control switch position table in the
avionics section.
This is quite common in the Bird
Dog (0-1) with the AN/ARC-44. If


the pilot uses the set for homing he's
using the AN/ARA-31 antenna. So, the
RT-294 can't be used for voice trans-
mitting and receiving if the switch is

BE SURE
SWITCHES ARE
SET RIGHT.



HOMING A


COMMON j
left in HOMING instead of COMM,
sure 'nuff.
Another switch that has been the


cause of "radio on the fritz" write-ups
by a Bird Dog pilot is the HS-33-
H-101/U. If you're using a pair of
old style earphones you don't want to
leave the toggle on H-101/U, or the
pilot will get the silent treatment in
his helmet.
When you're making the Beaver
"Op" check be sure the FM power
switch on the radio panel is on, con-
necting you into intercom. Otherwise
you will be broadcasting on the AN/
ARC-55. The tower operators take a
dim view of small talk!!!
To prevent this same type of revolt-
in' development on the AN/ARC-55
in the Iroquois (UH-1) and Raven
(OH-23) the power switch is set on
the interphone communication system
(ICS).
No matter what set you're using in
the Beaver tho, be sure to adjust volume
control at least 3/ turn and then adjust
the volume on the SB-329/AR audio
distribution panel. If you adjust these
controls basackwards, you'll get too
much feed back because the pilots and
co-pilots microphones are close to-
gether.
47
RE c






--0C(HECK CIRCUIT BREAKER EYEBALL CIRCUIT
The first item in your Beaver "Op" check is the mighty BREAKER
important circuit breaker. If it has "popped" you'll get the
silent treatment in your headset. 0 o O
The circuit breaker can "pop" due to an electrical over- UHF
load. You may get this surge when the bird engine is cranked PR
up. So, if you can't turn the set on, unbutton the right rear O 0 O
compartment of the cockpit and push the button.
EYE FUSES
If the set still doesn't turn on, don't pull it! Instead, take
the cover off. One of the two fuses in your RT-349 may be
shot.
[ You'll find two spare fuses at the rear of the set.
Once you have juice to the set you can go on with the "Op"
. O check until you find the trouble.



SQUELCH LOUD AND CLEAR?
No matter what set you're pulling the "Op" check on, tho, one adjustment
that should be on the money is the SENS control.
The adjustment poop for your Beaver is in Chapter 2, Section XIV, Paragraph
14-152 of the organizational maintenance pub.
So, if too much background noise, or none at all, is the problem with your
AN/ARC-55 the squelch adjustment is probably out of whack. An adjustable
wrench and screwdriver is all it takes to put 'er in the A-OK category.


PULL THE SET
Of course when you get certain conditions, the operational checklist calls for
removing the receiver-transmitter and sending it to your support.
When the set does go back, tho, it won't be for a fuse or a simple adjustment
by heck- because you've made the "Op" check.






LITTLE MOUNTING TIP







S5INCE you< uy's ARELOOKI/N
CHECK YOUR VIPRtTIOMN
MOUNT/NO5 ON YOUR A4/ARIN2e2
SRAPAP 6LT/IMETER -




Better make a check right away on the RT-160 vibration mountings of the
AN/APN-22 radar altimeter in your Mohawk (OV-1).
Been some word to the effect that the magnetron mounting is sometimes
found loose or separated from the vibration isolator mountings. A screw or
two on the loose, you might say.
To really sew up the situation, you can replace the mounting screws with
fillister head screws, FSN 5305-059-3404, which come with drilled holes. Then
you can safety wire the screws together.
Your TM 11-5841-216-25 (Jan 63), with Change 2, tells you in Item 21,
page 26, to check the vibration mounts quarterly. But unless you've got 'em
snugged up and safety wired, you'll want to eyeball 'em a little more often.


AN/APN??2 RADAR ALTIMETER






BE YOUR OWN INSPECTOR ...


NOW REPEAT AFTER ME-PULL
PM FIRST ON YOUR SB-22( )IP;


Cussin', Cousin, 'cause
things aren't buzzin' like
they ought on your SB-
22( )/PT telephone
switchboard?
Stop running' off at the
mouth and lend an ear.
Start using your eyes to
be the wised-up type on
proper care for switch-
board wear.
Keeping dust, dirt, cor-
rosion and moisture off
electrical contacts is a
must. They can shorten...
or put a stop to a lotta con-
versations at the wrong
time.
Another thing to keep
in mind is REMOVE those
BA-30 batteries when not
in use. They can eat at
your SB-22 quicker'n you
can say "hold one!"
Faster than you can read
this, you can check your
SB. The bold type items
are real serious and should
be taken care of before the
next plug-pushing time.
Your TM 11-5805-262-12
(Dec 60) with Change 1
gives you the word.


CORD-Frayed; wire
exposed; mildewed; dirty.


HEADBAND Bent;
dirtI, rrai:ed, mildewed.


CONNECTOR Bent;
pins dirty, missing.
WITCH- \


DIAPHRAGM -
Cracked; missing.


HANDSET-HEADSET H-8A I U
OR H-144 ( ) /U






SB-22 CASE


CASE-Dir,; milJew~l d. c,:rro:ded
**-.. jaB~


i, "ER LATHE ---Bent; loose;
tail to make tight connection.
f /_a /


RAFA DOO' R ATCHES-Bent;
broken; missing: binding.


STRAPS- Milde.ed, torn; frayed.


TA-222 AND TA-221 CIRCUIT PANEL


TRAFFIC DIAGPAM-


HaC E i j li

JACK REEL-- Trn i a
weak. not holdifio


(AF IIE SCREWS-Loose;
t hiit, missing.


HANLi E MEAT'R -
Hspndln b-- m i bi n : o


CAT'S E 'E I OVER S --
Cracked: lcw. missing.


PLUGS-Dirty; bent.
CORDS-Cut; frayed; spliced.


GiASKETI Cut
BATTLF ~ L~3E tifib d CvriI'


BATTER v C .leaE LIleng;d r. Caided
corroded; contacts dirty.


BATTERIES-Leaking; bulging; corroded.






DON'T FLUNK YOUR TEST SET

Lea ing the dry-cell batteries in test sets, such
as the TS-26 and TS-352. when you store the IIl/ 'r
equipment can flunk the sets out quick-like.
You shouldn't store the sets with batteries. N ._
And inspect the batteries for swelling and
leakage before .ou use them. If they're not in
good condition, replace them.
A point on the T'-'/U tube tester: Those
jobs get a lot of field use, where dirt, sand and
grit get inside and hurt-especiall when that
gonk hits the switch contacts. Inspect the cases
after use. and get the dirt out.



THE CIRCUIT BOARD WORD
Next time you're tempted, and the should have the TK-105/G tool kit
job looks easy, don't! (FSN 5180-610-8177). SB 11-574 (4
First, grab a look at Change 1 (30 Jan 64) revises the TK-105 to include
Dec 63) to TB SIG 222, Solder and a soldering iron with a temperature-
Soldering. That should change your controlled tip, solder removal syringe,
mind fast. and a circuit board holding vise ...
Like you suspect, we're talking about WHIC OUEED
circuit boards and soldering irons. O'ALL O W VO RI NED
There's a trick to mating one with the
other. WRONG
If you don't have the know-how and
the right tools, the best you can expect
is wasted time. What you'll probably -
get is a wasted circuit board. Having \
the authority to repair the boards helps / e '
considerable .. since, in that case, you
probably have the right tools. RI
If you don't have the right tools, R
chances are real good you'll botch the
job. Instead of helping you'll be hurt-
in'. Bet on it.
If it's your business to repair the
boards, TB SIG 222 is required read- -
ing. And since the right tools help, you






Care's the word
when you're
purling up,


WHIP IT

BUT

GENTLE

LIKE


0


Handle that AN/PRC-8, -10 antenna right and
she'll handle a lotta communicating for you.
53


For puftin' er away just hold the
folded antenna firmly in hand and put
er snug like into the CW-216 canvas.


pulling
down or
purting away%<
the AT-271 antenna
f your Perk -8.-10 RadiJl t



Best way to stretch it oul for com-
municatin is to hold the base of the
antenna and flick the wirsi whip like ,^;
Maybe you II have to coax a section or
two Inlo place with an extra swish .
or a gentle lug. No sweat

Taking it down s a snap, too, if you
start at the top and gently separate and
fold the sections at each joint. That
inner nylon coid II go along with you
No strain Slartin at the base puts too
much tension on the loas couple sec-
lions It II weaken or break the cable


W














NO SWEAT NOW



Nice thing about ur I141 shIct-rs
is that they're snug and tight n which
is OK .cirhtrisie but not so good
other%% ise.
Since the 're ~o %ell sciled "hen
the.v're closed up and not in use, con.
densation fornis on the inside of the
shelter "hen the outside air undergo-es
t-mperature changes In no time at all
tou end up ith mour damp trouble
than ou can shk.e : cl,.th at
Here's what sou can d,-, to head of
this materiel murderin' moisture:
'Take our the filters and lea'e the
\sent doors slightly) open.
Open the doors eer) da) to alloAu
fresh air to circulate through ihe shelter
and carr3 out the trapped air Just don't
do it in a rain) da., though.
If there's an% a. at all toi hook on
to some co-mmnrcial poter, rig up a
IK)- to 200-%att bulb and lh-a\e it
burning Ahen the ,h-lacr's closed
No saC.1t.





11A






THE SHELTERED LIFE
Only a kook would bust the gusset of his S-141/G or S-144/G common shelter
via the bang, poke, pop and pull route. Right?
But you, you'd brush up on your shelter handling technique as per TB SIG
354 ... and never even give a thought to jerkin' the shelter off a truck. Or...
popping' its seams by splattering it on the ground. Or... tease it into place with
a forklift. Of course not!
What you would do is:
1. ift tFe shhlter up or down by its lifting 3. Tie the shelter down snug before tans.
eyes. porting it. but not so light that sway
would snap the cables.




2. Use 2 x 4 s and guide lopes to ovoid side- 4. Patch punctures soonest to keep moisture
sway and stam on sling cables. from see ing in.





Natcherly, being the shrewd type, you've got a pretty good idea just what
that lightweight shelter can take-and you treat it accordingly.
Right? Right!

UNTANGLED CABLE FSN'S
Stop pulling your hair out, HarrN, l9-484-i listed in T I 11-5820-295-10
over those Angr)-19 power cable as- (Jun 6)1 is for CX-1852/LU cable as-
semblies. You can get CX-2583/U semblh. The cables are getting straighi-
,iteh FSN 5995.'52-1282. FSN 5995- ened out in a TM change.
POWDER RUBBER PROTECTOR
Those supervisory signals on your oughta to trip the signal. Pour the
SB-86/P switchboard not tripping powder like gold dust, though. A little
when the cord's lowered in the plug will go a long way. '1 A -
seat? No sweat. Put talcum powder on YU P /,' '
your pinkies and rub it around that ''
rubber protector at the back of the jack. J
It'll slicken 'er up and make it slide
back into the keyshelf section.like she 1,







"TnESE ',TELL'-BEANS. 9
ARE ToE GR ATESr TWN6
SINCE G'AE LLONCANS COQ
FRONT LIVE QM.-EINLS
r~alfEQATOk s. M


-~ -
-11 -//- -
Yo s C -t ea i es
.. .. .


7/






On Arrival


First off, take it easy when you're
taking the drums out of their original
boxes. Snagging 'em with a bar or lever
right at the beginning "ill put you out
ol business before you gel underway.


After taking 'em out of the box and inspecting 'em, be sure you mark the
drums like Military Standard 161 (Marking of Bulk Petroleum Standard) says
with the right identification for the fuel they're intended to hold. This is real
important since you can't switch fuel containers without cleaning 'em and
changing the marking.
You stencil yellow bands and the fuel name on the end plate of the drums
as follows:


Cleaning

AE R AH Any time you change the type of fuel
OTHER to be stored or transported in the drum,
S r FUEL. you have to clean it real well to remove
/ 5~ F all traces of the other fuel.
As a f'rinstance, all traces of diesel
r/ fuel must be removed from a tank that
is going to be used for Avgas or JP-4.







Before Filling


EVEBALL\ Go over the drum assembly care-
B eOE fully. You want to tighten all loose
OU connections and check the elbow cou-
L pier valve for leaks or malfunctions.
Be sure to clean and inspect all
couplers and dust caps for missing or
damaged gaskets or chains.
Eyeball the bag closely for cuts,
snags, pinholes, or punctures.
Give the pressure shutoff control the
once-over for missing, loose, or dam-
aged parts.

(HECK
ELBOW
COUPLER
VALVE



V INSPECTT

/ FOR MISSING
OR DAMAGED
GASKET.
During Operation

Keep an eye open for leaky drum fit-
tings or elbow coupler valves.
Inspect the cell walls for cuts or
punctures. A small hole can be repaired
with the emergency repair kit while
the drum is full. If you can't repair it,
you have to empty the drum fast.
Mark any weakened spot or swell for
closer examination when the drum is
HOLE empty.
Put a container under a leaking
coupling or valve until you can empty
the bag.
59






You never try to fill the drum with-
out using the pressure filling control-
the drum is not vented, and you can
overfill it to bursting.
Check the pressure shutoff control for
any leaks or malfunctions. If the con-
trol shuts off too soon, press the FILL
pushbutton. If this doesn't correct the
trouble, shut down right away. If the
control fails to shut off after the wrin-
kles leave the drum, press the STOP
pushbutton to stop the flow. In either
case, get the word to your section chief
immediately.


CHECK FIlL
CONTROL PUSHBUTTON
AOR
LEAKS.


S.lAfiter Filling
SAfter it's filled, wipe off the drum, fittings, and elbow
S- coupler valve, and look it over closely for leaks.
Then. drain the pressure shutoff control and wipe it
v-. with a clean rag.
Put the dust cap and plug on.


Dust
Dust can be a real problem at both the filling and discharge sites ... especially
when you combine loose sandy soil with aircraft prop wash.
It's easy for dust and grit to settle in the drum fittings where it can be drawn
into the bag during filling. This will not only result in filling aircraft with dirty
fuel, but will cause a lot of wear of the check valves and valve seats.
Using the dust cap and covering the filler opening of the fuel tank of the
aircraft with a moist cloth during refueling operations will help, but you've
still got to be might careful. -1'S .-.'"-. -





S "






Towing The Drum
While you can tow the filled drums slowly for short distances, keep in mind
that they're not intended to be mobile gasoline stations.
If care isn't taken in towing 'em, you may not get 'em back next time around
-they'll be in the salvage pile.
REMEMBER:

SNEVER tow the drum more than 1/4 mile at any time.
NEVER try to tow 'em when they're empty or only partially filled.
NEVER tow 'em over rough ground, stumps, rocks, or any sharp obstades.











You use the yoke for towing-you don't use tiedown straps or rope. The
straps or rope will bind and won't allow 'em to roll. Dragging only leads to
cuts and tears.
Towing a bag without using the towing bar or yoke is pure murder. When
the vehicle stops, the only way for the drum to stop is to crash into the back of
the truck. This not only adds to the wear and tear on the drum, it doesn't do
the truck any good either.
Since you're transporting flammable fuel, leaks or ruptures in the bag could
make for a dangerous situation-especially if it goes banging forward into
a hot exhaust pipe when you come to a stop.

Using Fork Lifts

Fuel drums are also damaged when
picked up by fork lifts for loading onto
an aircraft or truck.
Never attempt to get the tines under
the bag ... you could puncture it. You
and your buddies can roll a filled drum
onto the tines. --






Handling Empties
A lot of damage to the drums can
be caused by careless handling when
they're empty. Sure, they weigh a
couple of hundred pounds and are
awkward to maneuver. But, fork lifts
can give you the boost you need to lift -
them onto trucks or aircraft. -
Move 'em to the landing strip or filling site on the beds of trucks-not
behind 'em.
Dragging empty drums and partially empty drums behind vehicles across
rough terrain only means cuts and abrasions and maybe the scrap pile for the
drums.
When a partially empty drum is lying on the ground, it follows the contour
of the ground. Again, don't try to put the fork lift tines under the bag. It'll
Duncture real easv.


Use the tiedown as slings tied to the ends of the tines. Lift the tines and trans-
port the empties that way. Or, better yet, make up a T-bar for the fork lift
which would allow the drum to be suspended. .

t... 4 Extreme Heat


-_ The maximum operating tempera- i"
re for the 500-gallon collapsible
drum is 135 F. Gasoline will vaporize ,.
*in e~ reme heat, and build up pressure
Sichin the drum. .
SIou can prevent this by:
Covering the cell with a tent or a .
tarp. being careful not to block the
[ rcularion of air.
Placing the drum in the shade or i
covering it with leafy branches or other
plPI-u


vi?.


(




.da
q









SWhen the mercury drops below -20 F, it's time
to shut down. Don't attempt to use or handle the
drum or hose in temperatures that low.

B.RR.R .....


Tie the drum down or bank dirt around the sides
of the drum in strong winds to prevent rolling.

Storage
Store drums inside when possible. If you can't, put them on dunnage and
cover them with a tarp. Before storing drums inside, you should air purge 'em


to remove flammable vapors.
Drain the drum real well and re- I.
move the coupler valve and check-valve
adapter. Insert the air line through the
opening in the front closure plate and
blow air into the drum for 10 to 20
minutes. You can do a better job if you
suspend the drum by the rear shackles. --
Since this operation causes flammable through
mixtures, you should keep all fire or collapse
spark away from the area. Finall,
To remove the air from the drum, move it
you replace the check-valve adapter in and put
the front closure plate of the drum and For lit
connect the elbow coupler to the check- tape the
valve adapter. Open the coupler valve tie the v;
slightly. Fold and compress the drum fold the
to force most of the trapped air out natural

r "- f -- "


s-i .


'Ir


the valve same as you would
an inner tube for patching.
y, close the coupler valve, re-
from the check valve adapter,
the dust cap on the adapter.
united storage of the drum, you
opening of the coupler valve,
alve to one of the shackles and
drum. The ends of the cell fold
y towards the middle.

" S .. -v"

F^h' L:-,,"


MORE






Put the front closure plate end down first. Then life the rear closure plate end,
and fold over the front closure plate end to protect the check valve adapter.
Don't stow the drums on top of each other except for very short periods.

Repair Kits

Kits are available for emergency re-
pair of the drum cell, but are limited to
holes no larger than 3/ inch. Even more
care in handling the bag has to be given
after it's repaired. The sealing plugs
can be forced out real easy.


Maling Repairs

IFirst, put on the protective hood to
IIN THE protect your face and eyes from escap-
Sing fuel and use the wood plugs to
Sstop the flow temporarily.


















ea&in All 5264
Better run a check right now on your
quart cans of MIL-H-5606 hydraulic
fluid. Batch Number 5264, fill date of
August 1962, has been condemned by
the US Army Petroleum Center. If you
have some of this batch, turn it in as
salvage.


'&ot OE bt o0e
The lube to use in the booster brake
cylinder on all your G742-series 2-1/2-
ton trucks is OHC. Note 20 of the lube
chart in TM 9-2320-209-10 (Feb 65)
makes a point of this. Put a little OHC
on the threads of the plug so's to keep
it from freezing and rusting tight. OHC
has an anti-corrosion ingredient in it.


Nzo Kitting Around
Before you shoot in that request for a
winterization kit for your vehicle, you'd
best check SB 9-16 (24 Feb 65). The SB
gives you the complete scoop on req-
uisitioning and using winterization kits,
ranging from the personnel heater kits
to Arctic closure kits.


For Macine Guns
So you've been using LO 9-1000-228-
12 (Apr 64), which supersedes the LO's
for nearly all Army machine guns. It's
real handy because it covers all kinds,
7.62mm, .30 caliber and .50 caliber -
everything except aircraft mounted and
submachine guns. One thing it doesn't
mention about the M60, tho, you leave
the gas piston, the buffer assembly and
the interior of the gas cylinder dry (un-
lubed) like it tells you in Change 3
(Jan 65) to TM 9-1005-224-12 (Oct 63).
The chrome-plated piston on the M60
doesn't need oil.
This is a good example of why you
should keep updated on the operator's
manual even tho you know your gun
inside out. The manual may have lubri-
cation poop that's later than the LO
itself.
Wipecvp 7cme
The Army is encouraging use of the
GSA-supplied paper wipers FSN 7920-
823-9772 (13-1/2 x 22") and FSN 7920-
823-9773 (13-1/2 x 16") instead of
rags. See the word in DA Circular 700-3
(Dec 64).


Would You Stake Your Life Aon
the Condition of Your Equipment?









YOU
NEED
ALL
THE
\ /WARNING
YOU
CAN


MAKE SURE YOUR GAGES,
BUZZERS, LIGHTS, INDICATORS,
AND OTHER WARNING DEVICES
ARE ON THE JOB AND
WORKING RIGHT!