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PS
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00016
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1965
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00016

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4-5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8-9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12-13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24-25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30-31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34-35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38-39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48-49
        Page 50-51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60-61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text




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--- .


ONE!


inE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE Mu.NT .
is-.e No 1I1 96'. 6r.e
IN THIS ISSUE

FIREPOWER 2.11
M2A1 FI .t Mi.9i H..,r .r
ThlJr l ? j iOl ll ii
M4St-,'- u'l 3 J tqu, ,-l, i '-11.
Sr, [.:.. i i 4-5 MUO Mi,'h;n.- r.;., 11
MWiAI 6 I M l 11


GROUND
,ll :ir: I
1i. : .


Stop a minute.
Think.
Why do you have to keep your
Army equipment maintained right?
Ask around your outfit and you'll
get lots of answers from different
guys. Most will make right good
sense, too.
Soldiers know that a Modern Army
has to have two things before it can
fight and win: Men and Equipment.
Both must be in good shape .. ready
for combat.
You and the other men in your
unit are in good shape. You keep
physically fit, and you get plenty of
training on how to use your weapons
and other gear and how to do your
part in various tactical operations.
So, physically and mentally you're
sharp.


Now, your equipment. A winning
outfit is one that can shoot, move and
communicate. Your weapon won't be
much good with a busted firing pin.
You won't move far very fast with
only your feet; besides how would
you get heavy equipment, fuel, am-
mo and common gear where it has to
be? And you won't get the word up
or down the line if the radios and
telephones conk out. So, you see, it
takes top-notch men and top-notch
equipment to make a fighting outfit.
The kind of operation and main-
tenance you do on your equipment
will tell if you win or lose.
So, stop a minute. Think.
Will the operation and mainte-
nance you do now keep you going
in combat?


MOBILITY 12-19
u, Y... Iur b
M114A1 Scout
M113 PC


AIR MOBILITY 20-27
.V 2 2 I cilr. H :
uL.D 21 'H ':if :'.
rH 1? ?;2 u IA
CH ? .' 2 U i
U-I :


COMMUNICATIONS 37 47
Rill r' 3 Ai-n. I
ABS''P : 39 A N fht I
" rhel'i A I uJ h R113'11A
riiFyo .t. t J.i Ah Tfi ': 2
Sli 18 Ji i.ii,: iP
AN VR C 1 42 Fir 1i'1


U"









a12~


GENERAL AND SUPPLY 48-63
CorioiG 1hr t3i I-r : 61
i rA F ? I02 5 Pi, & r r,'u, Ccr-r llr 61f
ElT D ie:i: '0 Mlr 'S -.rlniilr Blbh U
G:. ilB Muk Cjr3,. 6-id -I
r,: .,',l 5l MI I M;i:& &
PAl rtrfoi 'a r. tinr r .,I,] inlndni 4,
DA rFn Ni,4 9 N Pub h:], ;-


DISTRIBUTION In accord re wih re
qion ujs otpn pprumid b HeadiAuilr 1
Depirlneril at ISe CAr. 19 IEoria'1 1965
DISTRIBUTION In accordance wilh ie
quiiements iubmilied on DA Form 12 4
e <4K..4,
Ni, Y(up;.n
'to'.:' (f









A RECENT DES16N WILL GIVE A LATER RETAINER
YOU AN /MPWOVEO PACKING A VUS
-ErMAINEQ. Ir LOOKS LIKE THIS... I E T'


Even when everything seems to check out OK... does the M7 gun on your
M2Al-7 portable flame thrower still suffer with run-away problems?
Well, could be its barrel-and-inlet body assembly is stuck ... stuck with an
out-dated packing retainer.
Here's why you can suspect retainer problems:
Your gun could have packing retainer, FSN 5330-292-9894, which is being
washed out of the system. Reason being that under some conditions the retainer
doesn't support the molded packing well enough. And, when the packing
aren't held firmly in place they can cant when the pressure's applied, and cause
the needle valve to stick open. C


The latter retainer works a lot better, but it must be installed right. It's
chamfered on both sides, but the widths of the chamfer are different. You have
to know that the side with the wider chamfer faces the packing. When the
packing and the retainer are assembled you can easily see that only the wider
chamfered opening (approx 1/32-in wide) will let the retainer seat properly
in the nested, molded packing.
If this retainer is installed backwards the packing won't be properly sup-
ported, and they'll jam up the works when you apply the pressure.


Its 1/-in-long neck stabilizes the packing keeps 'em straight when
pressure is applied.
And, too, when your flame thrower's gun has this retainer, installation prob-
lems will be out the window. 'Cause with its distinct design, all you have to do
is check that its neck rides inside the springs.
This packing retainer (FSN 5330-045-1990) will eventually take over com-
pletely .when stocks of the neck-less retainer (FSN 5330-968-7222) are all
gone, that is.

FEEDING A

DRAGON -

LADY

Sure an M4 service unit'll feed cial fuel and air hose connectors it
your M132 (10-8) self-propelled flame needs to service the M132's, M10-8
thrower. But, before you sidle up for flame thrower system.
service, be sure the M4 carries the spe- The M4's standard hose connector


-- FUEL HOSE
REDUCER COUPLING
2" TO 1-1/4"
FSN 4730-198-8810

NIPPLE
S1-1/4" X 3" LONG
SFSN 4730-196-1527
SNAP TITE COUPLING
FSN 4730-010-5265


fittings (used for servicing the M7A1-6
SP flame thrower) must be swapped for
feeding the M132.
Without these new fuel and air hose
connector fittings, an M4 service unit
cannot repeat cannot service
your new self-propelled flame thrower.
The fittings are available through
normal supply channels, and they'll be
stashed in the service unit's accessories
box .... just waiting for you to call.









More than likely your
M28 or M29 Davy / r, NOW. IT'S YOUR
Crkett's been itn TURN. HEIE'RE SOME TIP5
Crockett' been cn TO HELP VOU GET THE MOST
some -30/ p. 1pt ) OUT OF THESE /MPROVEMENT
modifications larcly
-or will get 'ern
soon. Like, for
instance, a new
cross tube and leg
locking struts for, i i
tripod...or a
replenisher tube
assembly and
cocking lever for
its spotting gun.
or a forward lanyard .
guide for its recoillr,k
gun.
Fine. Great. It means direct
support's on the ball.

MWO 9-1000-200-50//7


MWO 9-1000-209-30/8
You guys with M29's sure hit the It goes without saying that they did
jackpot when support installs MWO 9- Davy a favor by putting the cocking
1000-209-30/8 (4 Aug 64). The mod lever at the rear of the firing mechan-
kit reduces the number of parts.. .and ism 'stead of down under. But, even
provides more convenience, less break- though the lever's better protected, you
age, easier cocking, and so on.
The curved rolled replenisher tube,
f'rinstance, lets you boresight the spot-
I I
CURVED f-I


AT ...'STEAD
SREAR... i Of UNDER

ting gun without even touching any still have to be mighty careful about
pesky screws on the side of the bracket dropping Davy.
assembly. In fact, lockscrews now re- The MWO also re-tapped the drain
place the screws you used to have to hole in the outer tube-but don't you
loosen. The new curved tube's made of worry your handsome head about this.
stainless steel which flexes easy-not It's still support's job to remove the
like the old straight-type fragile offset plug when draining the recoil oil from
aluminum tube that often cracked or the recoil cylinder during PM on the
broke before it'd cooperate. recoil assembly.

MWO 9-1000-209-50/9
You won't be bothered with tangled tween the beads on the rear of the
up lanyards or busted triggers after sup- lanyard guide allows enough snap dur-
port applies MWO 9-1000-209-30/9 ing recoil of the spotting gun.
(4 Aug 64) to your M29. The for- Just you be sure, though, that there's
S a 3/2-in space between the beads. If
not, get yourself a new lanyard with
FSN 1010-885-5743.
GUIDE Yep, Davy's an easier guy to get
ASSEMBLY IBEADS along with after he's been MWO'd. Try
ward guide assembly keeps the line out to keep him happy by taking care of
of trouble and the 31/2-in spread be- his new parts.
/ ^ ___^ -______--- '






M60A1 TANK GUNNERS...

YES/NO = NO/GO


A *
A;-


IL'~EQ.ELE~ 47*I3~
rL'BI 4'lLL
EL


Sure, any gal may say nay and mean yea and get away with it. But, gunner,
ol'boy, just you try saying go and whoa at the same time to a mechanical critter
and see what a mess you'll get.
CIRCUIT BREAKER
/ N SWITCH

SUPER -ELEVATION
INTO YOUR
M60AI TANXS
COMPUTER WHILE
THE MAIN GUN'5S
SIN TRAVEL LOCK
AND THEN FLIP
THE SWITCH...


Something's bound to give. And nine times out of 10 it'll mean a busted
capscrew in the main gun super-elevation adapter... on the actuator shaft to
the flexible shaft from the computer.
Yeah, it's only a capscrew ... FSN 5305-043-1487 ... but it's in a hard place
to get at.
So, save yourself some gosh-n-swear and wear-n-tear. Make it second nature
to check first to see that the main gun's not fastened down before you try that
super-elevation bit.


~g~

'-"-i6~5~~
~Lc~r

A-,--







NEXT BEST THING


Dear Half-Mast,
Our outfit has graphical firing scales for the towed 155-mm howitzer, which
would be all right except for the fact that we do our shooting with the M 109
SP 155-mm howitzer. And we can't latch on to any scoop that'll tell us how
to get the scales we need.
What say you? CWO W. E. B.

Dear Mr. \\ E. B.,
I say that you and other M109 shooters are in the same fix, but it's one you
can get out of thusly:
As a temporary deal get paper scales that can be glued on the towed howitzer
scales and then coated with plastic spray.
The paper scales can be had for the asking by writing to:
4;= Commandant ;* ., ,
*= t ll, ,ili19 US Army Artillery & Missile School i,,in,'ll l, ,ll
an ATTN: Graphics Br, R&A Div if ..-.
r m In ni l ut Fort Sill, Oklahoma 73504 ,,,,7,,,-,, ..,
The regular scales will show up in the supply system soon. q-/*/


MEDIC

O.O "O5N OF A OUNf"I


No matter what you say after you've
done it, you sure can skin your knuckles
when operating the rammer tray in
your M109 SP 155-mm howitzer.
There just happens to be a screw
under the handle-in the perfect spot
for you to bust your knuckles.
You can beat the problem, tho. Take
out the screw and washer that goes
with it.
Howitzers that'll be hitting the field
will be minus the screw and washer.







Te ISSUE TISSUE'S the Issue, So... Please Dont Scratch Your Glass


keeping a camera lens polished and dirt-free so's to get sharp,
clear pictures is a must. You know it. The same's true for a
good view in fire-control equipment.
The way you do that preventive maintenance chore is real impor-
tant. The wrong way can put your lens right out of the picture. And
maybe you, too.
What you never use on the lens of a
'Us camera, projector, binoculars, gunsight
ostt se1 or what-have-you is a silicone-treated
lens tissue. Silicone is an abrasive, but
\ e 1dj there's more on that later.
Tissue The big point here is to stick to the
lens tissue. Eyeglass and other tissues
can do more harm than good.


v iDon't settle for less than these:
LENS, TISSUE
FSN.6640-393-2090,lightweight,
100 3xS-in sheets
G FSN 6540-597-6745, heavyweight,
50 4x6-in sheels
FSN 6540-285-4694, light-heavyweight, 100
I 7xlin sheets, Fed Spec UU-P-313E (Be
sure to have the spec number here, because
the FSN also gets you silicone-treated
tissue)

LENS, PAPER
FSN 6640-559-1385, lightweight, Fed Spec
i \ 0 S-\ UU-P-313E, Type V, 100 7xll-in sheets
S J-J' / FSN 6640-559 1384, heavyweight.
100 711-in sheets
S G S A FSN 6640-285-4694, heavyweight, wet-
strength, 100 7x11-in sheets

8


NO SCRATCH, BITE OR GRIND...
The soft, absorbent lens tissue won't scratch, bite or grind the lens or the
coating of magnesium fluoride on the lens. Silicone can wear the coating clear
off and scratch or wear the uncoated lens.
But first, before you use the tissue, blow the dust, grit, etc. from the lens-
with a syringe if you have it.
A fine camel's hair brush works great in getting stubborn dust and dirt from
a lens. The tissue is for the big cleaning and polishing job.
If you get a tough smudge, the tissue may even need an assist from a lens
cleaner such as FSN 6750-408-5175 or FSN 6750-737-0811. You can get best
results from the cleaner with tissue FSN 6640-559-1385, Fed Spec UU-P-313E
Type IV or Type V. Types I, II and III are for "dry" cleaning.

One caution: Never use more than a drop,
and never put the cleaner directly on the
lens. Put it on the tissue so's you can avoid
/ a dirt-collecting film. I


u





FIRE CONTROL OPTICS
Fire control equipment lenses call for
an additional step or two, so peel an
eyeball thisaway a while.


First, don't forget to add that Fed
Spec number on tissue FSN 6540-285-
4694 and elsewhere as mentioned, so's
you don't get the silicones.





Also, on fire control stuff, the wheels
like tissue FSN 6640-559-1385, UU-P-
313E, type V for best results.



As for tissue FSN 6640-559-1384,
use it when you can't get cotton for
those stubborn films and stains. You
might also grab a look at TM 9-254.


And, Joe, alcohol is the preferred
cleaning liquid for fire control optics.
In the field, except in freezing weather,
you can use Cleaning Compound, opti-
cal, lens, liquid, FSN 7930-227-1887.


GET
YOUR
PENCIL
READY '




poi4i MoA1MA
C.a... ...


SEND















Would'ya use steel wool or crocus cloth to clean
your jalopy's chrome job? Heck no, you say. Well, -
same thing goes for cleaning the gas piston on your ,
M60 machine gun. The piston's chrome plating's
only skin thin and'll soon wear away if you use
rough stuff. This'll leave it wide open for a case of
corrosion-and an untimely death. If the piston
slides easy-like, you don't even have to clean it a-tall.


Here're two more interchangeable parts for the M1 and M14 rifle that
you can add to that pin-up in your arms room the one published in
PS 145. -
EXTRACTOR, PIN, Straighltheaded,
Cartridge r' Trigger
FSN 1005-554-6003 FSN 5315-501-3669
(5546003) (5013669)
Like all the other items on the pin-up, you'll find the Ml parts in TM 9-
S1005-222-12P/2 (21 Aug 61) and the M14 parts in TM 9-1005-223-20P
(16 Mar 62).


Been wondering about the selector lock (FSN 1005-856-7587) of your M14
rifle's -20P manual? Forget it. Ain't no such animal- and never was.


If you're authorized automatic fire, like it
says in para 6 of Change 1 (22 Jan 64) of
your -12 manual, your weapon'll come to you
with this selector.


If you're not authorized, it'll come with
this selector shaft lock.








TF1 M :1:


Every guy has his own SOP with the
gals, but there's only one right way to
handle spark plugs.
Reg'lar inspection comes first-
usually every 6,000 miles. But, mis-
firing... spark knock.., poor idling
... or hard starting are signals to eye-
ball them plugs. Don't just throw 'em
out and ram in a set of new ones.


Then, take 'em out and clean the electrode
end of each plug with a solvent (FSN 6850-
264-9066) to get off any gooey-type fouling.


You regap the plugs ...


S. after smoothing off the electrodes with
a fine file or sandpaper.


When you put in new plugs, double-check
to make sure you've got what the TM calls for.
And-you use only new gaskets with either
used or new plugs.





A tiny bit of anti-seize compound on the
threads will make it easier to get the plugs
out next time around.


After you dry the plugs with a shot o' com-
pressed air, give 'em a go-round on the clean-
ing machine. This blasts off the hard carbon
and other crusty stuff. This'll make 'em work
better if they're still good, and it'll uncover
whatever defects are there.


BE CAREFUL, THOUGH LIKE IT SAyS
TM9-8638, SEC VIII.





Then they go on trial in the tester-and
you ought to give 'em the benefit of a doubt
in reaching a verdict. If they test GOOD, they
go back on duty in the engine. Even if they
test only FAIR, they're better than nothing, in
case there's a shortage of new plugs. If the
tester reads REPLACE, it means just that.

------


Regular preventive maintenance on
spark plugs is too easy a job-and too
important-to let slide by. Each step in
the routine is just as important as the
other, too, so just pull out TM 9-8638
and see what it says.
Keep in mind, too, that you wouldn't
toss out your truck or even its engine
if all it needed was a little cleaning and
adjustment, so don't junk spark plugs
until you're sure they're really shot.


C;I I


_1CI?-
~sse~

1
~URP \ i el~T


IA I ,


















Like the sun breaking through a cloud of diesel exhaust smoke comes the
straight dope on oil and fuel filter elements for your 5-ton trucks (M52A1,
M54A1).
You've probably noticed, in checking TM 9-2320-211-20P, that the filter
element FSN's mentioned are for the gasoline-operated trucks only.
So here're some diesel digits and filter facts:

OIL FILTERS ,
In ordering the element for the front, or pri- There're two fuel filters, too, of course.
mary, oil filter, ask for FSN 2940-580-6283. e primary fuel filter is located under the


The rear, or secondary, oil filter element is FSN
2940-141-9026.
Be careful in servicing the primary
filter. Be sure: The spring is seated cor-
rectly at top of case; the sealing cup is
properly located at the top of the ele-
ment; and that the base plate seal is
properly seated. ---
~- THESE STEPS
{ ARE IMPOR7TANT/r


ELEMENf
FSN 2910-974-7445
uj sr-E ----I -
To get the element for the secondary
fuel filter, located on the left side of
the engine, ask for FSN 2940-067-
7625.


FUEL : FILTERS
Dail.. before the engine is starred.
ou drain the primary fuel filter. If 3n\
A arer or crud comes out. drain the
s ccondarn tilter, too, to make sure none
of that stuff gets through to raise cain
in the fuel injection system.


If you find anything besides fuel
coming out of the secondary filter, sing
out for your organizational mechanic
to change both filters. It's important,
especially when changing the secondary
filter, to prevent dirt particles from
getting into the fuel-to-injector pump.


WINCH PARTS

NEED LUBE
lI I////lll/ I// / /l/// II / /


Proper oil lecl in sour -iton.
6 x 6 trucks tfr.onc- nch end.
frame is just belo" the drum seal.
This's o the oil aon'i le.k our thru
the ical hen the % inch isn't bein
used
This means the shatr. jia cljirch
and other parts aboe the oil level
are sirrin' high 'n' dr\ i fir as
lube's concerned. Unless oil cesi
up there once in a "hilc. those
parts rusi and the hole n.orks
get stiltf or esen paralyzed or
ruined.
Operation i' %,hai gets the oil
up there.
So run the % inch ,it le.ist once
a month to lubrircae anJ protect
all the parts in the endifrime.





CHECK POINTS


Dear Sergeant J. S. M.,
First off, it's next to impossible to come up with a go no-go system of meas-
urement in that area. Wear on the roller bearings would be nil due to their
durable quality.
But, here're some good guides for checking out the base plate and pivot post.
Look for:

Leaning pivot post Excessive wobble of
during lifting or lower- the pivol post during
ing operations. rotation.


repairs.
16 Holt-*90t






GIVE 'EM RELIEF


You may have one o' those 5-ton trucks that came through without breather
vents on the transmission and steering gear housings. This'll most likely be
found on those vehicles furnished on Contract DA-11-022-ORD-4235.
If built-up pressure isn't relieved, you may find the shaft and control valve
oil seals popping.
You need two breather vents and one bushing. The Breather (Vent) Assem-
bly (5196397), comes under FSN 2520-287-4673, and the Bushing (444027)
under FSN 4730-640-6530.


BREATHER VENi V F-- BREATHER VENT
WITH BUSHING VENT FOR
FOR STEERING TRANSMISSION
GEAR HOUSING HOUSING

If your truck doesn't have these breather vents, you'll find plugs where the
vents are supposed to be. The only difference in installing the two vents is, the
bushing goes with the one on the steering gear housing.
17






3/4-TON TALK



CAPS ARE BUM "
Ignition trouble with the M3'7BI .4-ton truck may
be traced to a distributor cap that's too thick on the coil
side. This tears up the insulation on the primary circuit
wire from coil to ignition points. Also, the spring and
carbon pile retainers in the cap are loose. These bum
caps came through on Contract Number DA-30-069-
ORD-3520 and are to be turned in.



(SOUND At
If Iou need a new horn OFF,
contact insulator for %our -.N IEED
A N rt\
*,-ton truck, sound off. oN CONTACT
It's at sour suppl\ depot I FYOIUa ArO5.T
waiting for lour requisi
tions. Ask for FSN 2590.
5'5- 299. It's for the SNL
G'41 series trucks. That
li'l ole' insulator a ill come
truckin' on don. and
then \our truck'll be -
soundin' of like it should.




WHY SPRING SPACERS?
E\er wonder vah there're spacers
under the left front and rear springs
of the '.-ton MNi', MN"'BI. Mi4 and
M-NiBI trucks but none on the right
side? They compensate for the slight
list in the \chicle body ith the added
eight of the spare ire on the left side. -
For either front or rear. the spacer is
listed as FSN 2510' .'-6829 IG'4l).
^_____________ __ *:*.3-I


r'/.




/ o


*r






M114AI PILLOW BLOCK TALK


(Ed Note)-Sounds real great but help is on the way. The fan shaft bear-
ing is being replaced in new vehicles by a different fan shaft bearing assembly
which has a lube fitting and a seal. The new bearing should be available in
Supply soon.

M113 PC CAULKING COMPOUND

Some of your M113 PC's deadline because you need caulk-
ing compound to seal the grill door after changing an engine
or radiator? Well, don't sweat or fret, just order general
purpose caulking compound, Type 1, Spec MIL-C-18969,
FSN 8030-577-4741 for the one-pint container. After you
get all the old sealing compound off the hull and grill door '
surfaces you put on the new, using enough on the grill door
contact area to make sure the seal is watertight. Page 65 of -
TM 9-2300-224-20 (Dec 61) clues you how to install the grill.
19






CARBURETOR CROSS-UP CLOBBBIS
'; CARIBOU COWLING-OR...














The engine backfired-just once! But that was all it took to tear up a Caribou
(CV-2) cowling with the carburetor air switch in the wrong position during a
start.
This just proves you don't want to start up your CV-2 engines with the toggle
switch at FILTER. Since this closes the ram air butterfly-type valve, carb air
enters through the filters on both sides of the intake duct. So the full force of
a backfire is blown back through the filters with enough power to tear pieces
out of the top engine cowling surrounding both oil cooler ducts.
DON'T START UP
ENGINES WITH SWITCH AT '
FILTER POSITION... WHICH ... OR YOU CAN GET
CLOSES RAM AIR DOOR ... .- HIS KIND OF DAMAGE.





Had the CARB AIR switch been at RAM position, though, the ram air door
would've been open instead of acting like a baffle for the backfire.
Even when sand and dust have to be considered, it's safer to place both toggle
switches in RAM position during starts. But if the area is extremely sandy or
dusty, you'll want to flick to FILTER as soon as each prop begins sucking up
gunk into the intake.
Generally, the best time to slam the ram door shut-by switching to FILTER
-is when your rpm is stabilized, you've gone to mixture and the engine primer
has been released, OK?
Now that you have the picture, you can see that backfires can be just as
troublesome as sand or dust particles during starts.
20






rir~ ~ I / J1.~ c

~~ ,


A missing nut leads to a loose bolt. This missing bolt was the same one
A loose bolt soon becomes a missing that was supposed to be holding the
bolt. And a missing bolt leads to nose gear chain sprocket to the cross
trouble! shaft torque tube. Even using the emer-
In this case the missing bolt hung agency gear handle didn't do much good
around the scene to watch the action, with the bolt somewhere else.
What it saw was a Seminole (U8-D) Obviously, the self-locking nut called
co-pilot hand-feeding the nose gear for in the parts manual would have pre-
drive chain into the down and locked vented this aggravating state of affairs.
position, so the driver could land the But let's face it-that missing nut is
ship. hard to spot the way the torque tube is
situated. So you've got to deliberately
check out that tube when you're in-
BOLT FELL specting the rest of the landing gear
OUT OF HERE during each PE.
After all, missing nuts can be em-
LOOSE barrassing-not to mention flight safety
BOLT considerations-when you're trying to
run an airline without turbulence.


HAHMMM,
WONDE
NOW ICAN
GET THE CHIP
L'.G1T TO \O
t LEiaSEE Murphy's found one more way
Sw to cause a false chip detector warn-
ing in your UH-19 install too
S long a wire lead to the plug. That
way the hanging loop can be
pinched accidentally between the
Sclamshell doors, and the light be-
./. gins to flicker in flight. Clever ..
eh?








Dear Windy,
Here's one way to stop giving your favorite Sioux
(OH-13) a boot in the engine basket. Make yourself a
work platform like this one.
The idea itself isn't new-but the ladder attachment
makes a more stable work area. By contour cutting the
bottoms to fit the skids, the ladder acts as a brace for
Sthe outside end of the platform.
And joining them with two removable pins allows
you to separate the ladder from the platform for easy
-storage.
S CWO John Wootress
Co A, 4th Avn Bn
Ft Lewis, Wash.








REMOVABLE
PINS.




BO TOMS

TO FII SKIDS.


(That's a pretty nifty work aid. I'll just pass it along for any other unit that
wants to make one.)



Overspeeds are hurting our OH-23 engines. That VO-
540 mill is red-lined at 3200 rpm and anything over that -
may point to future engine failure. This area is so critical
that any overspeed above 3500 rpm automatically means o- -
engine replacement. The authority for reporting these/
overspeeds is ... Message SMOSM-EELOH-23-09-1366'/
(18 Sep 64).














Webster says that a yoke is a clamp have no defects. That's the only way
that embraces two other parts to hold you'll get a good seal.
them in place. But this embracing bit But when you put the filter back to-
can be carried too far. gether and tighten the bottom retaining
Take the ever-lovin' fuel strainer on bolt, make it finger tight plus /2 turn
your Bird Dog (0-1) engine, with a wrench. Any further tightening
Sure you clean the filter element and to stop a leak will crack the yoke, for
make sure that the two gaskets, FSN real.
2915-515-4082, are not hardened and If leakage is still a problem new
S gaskets is your solution ... no yoke.




OVER-

RETAINING
BOLT

Q CRACK FINGER IIGHI-
BOLT YOKE PLUS 1/2 TURN
HERE WITH A WRENCH


YOU'RE ALLOWED A BREAK-


The time to replace a Teflon hose is sure Hose and Hose Assemblies Tetra-
when its steel jacket has 2 or more wires fluorethylene (Teflon)" just in case
broken in a single plait (braid)--or you missed it.
when 6 or more wires are broken in H ok
either the whole assembly or within MANY WI ES
any one-foot length, if the assembly is GoTrA oTBE urED
O ORDER TO
over 12 inches long. So sayeth para 7b REPLACE T i -1
of TB AVN 23-73 (May 64) ... "As- .-
sembly and Inspection of Medium-Pres- \ .











Dear Windy,
TM 55.1520-.26-25/I (Oct 63) for the ON-23F
Raven shows the bolts connecting the forward lip
joint to the tail rotor drive positioned with the
heads toward the rear of the helicopter. This is
against safety rules for aircraft hardware: "Heads
up or in the direction of rotation or motion."
We ar e using ig 24-1-1 and Fig 24-1-3 as guides.
ut somehow I get the feeling we are dead wrong
on the subject, since these bolts could easily be
installed the opposite way without interfering wth
any other part of the helicopter. SP 6 M. R. O.
SP 6 M y.R.0


a '~ aq P
A%.


Company A of the ~th Aviation
Battalion at Fort Lewis awards a
"Ship of the Month" placard to
display on its best maintained air-
craft each month. The selection
committee considers the actual con-
dition of the ship, its log book rec-
ords and the quality of work done
by the maintenance crew. Then the
winning ship's crew chief and me-
chanics are rewarded with 3-day
passes. Not a bad way to encour-
age good maintenance.


Dear Specialist M. R. O.,
You're right to follow those TM
pictures. And there's a good reason for
these bolts facing aft ... you can't
hardly lay a torque wrench to the nut
proper-like the other way, leastways
not a big shouldered issue-type torque
wrench. In fact, you're liable to find
bolts facing aft on some of the older
OH-23's for the same reason.
Since there's no safety of flight con-
dition involved here, there's been no
official objection to reversing the usual
bolt installation. For that matter, this
safety rule you quoted generally has
two more words on the end: "... when
applicable." In this case, I would say


the slip-joinE housing would
intererre waith corquelng the
)ou laid the torque trench
a karrmwampus angle.
By the t ay. the old NA
being replaced 'ith an M
nut. This one's made of li
steel and has a real slight ov
shaped.ID for self-locking.
across an%. be sure to instal
old or all new nuEs on the
joint assembly-for balance
member to reach for a '/ 16
to fit the smaller hex diame
L6 nut.
And that's the way the b


Definitely
nut, unless
in there at

S6"9A6 is
S21042-L6


ighrleigh One Army headquarters and
al. or egg- certain Army depots send out a
If you run monthly "recap" of all TWX's
I either all received on aircraft subjects. Then
same lip all subordinate aircraft users and
Also. re- maintenance officers can check the
-in wrench "recap" to see if they missed any
ter of the messages. Copies are available
through their message centers.
olt points. How about that!
4 r25


.' (


[




















Dear Captain W. D. J.,
Some of the tools seem to have become collector's items!
Actually, most of the items are now carried in other tool kits and shop sets.
The engine kit never was supported by the supply system and tools had to be
requisitioned on an individual basis.
So-o-o ... message SMOSM-ECU-1A-02-1342 (6 Feb 63) lets the maintenance
officer remove the kit (if he chooses) from the aircraft inventory record, DA
Form 2408-17.



It's a capital idea to be on your guard when you yank the RT 349 of your
AN/ARC-55 out of a Seminole (U-8F). Otherwise, the nose wheel chain guard
will take it on the chin!
THE BSACKET, ON THE SET MOUNT,
IS THE LITTLE CULPRIT.
BRACKET HITS
THE ot ,
CHAIN
GUARD.





If you try to follow SOP on a non-radar "Freddie" model by sliding the set
out, the bracket will smack into the chain guard. 'Course a guard bent toward
the landing gear chain would cause quite a stir.
So, don't be a loner when you yank the set. Get your buddy to lift the rear
of the set while you lift the front-straight up and then out ... misses the guard
every time.








Whoever said that "time was money"
sure knew what he was talking about.
Say, for example, 20 mechanics in
your outfit are due to have their general
mechanic's tool kit inventoried. This
chore takes the better part of a day, so
multiply 20 by 8 hours and you get a
total of 160 man-hours.
With your CO's permission you can
cut the inventory time by 75 per cent
if you'll latch on to a 4 x 8-foot sheet
of pegboard, some common hardware
brackets and nuts, and a suitable label-
ing or stenciling machine.
Put all the pieces together and when
each mechanic fills the board it'll take
only seconds to make the check. Using


/ 1 i I- -
this method 20 mechanics have been
known to make the inventory in 2 hours
flat... 40 man-hours.
The time you gain with this set-up
can be mighty valuable-when you're
on a tight maintenance schedule.


0-1 OIL LINES...


A free floating line from oil pump to oil sump just can't stay away from
chafing against some other part of the Bird Dog (0-1) plumbing.
It's obvious that line has to be braced, laced, clamped or covered. For quality
control purposes, a brace on the standard clamp support rates higher.

S BRACED / lACED I (LAMPED COVEREDD








4 .erl.in d I i :l rf; ..i .i.Cl.c-t.
-s ..,o es* we Or'. r r.I.aQ .. ni'l

I P.' r' i .t.b cal i r
ba. Cu' Ar I. .. ic,.ci ec



IECHNlAL MANUAlS
rM TI 21.T Cl feb 1C- 71i
IM 1 119.5 Cl i.' 3 i t
TM I Ohl .: lai 1 i 11
IM 5-.33 :. 1-1 i ira."
IM 3 I -- and '
MoiT ar .t cu.* -n.beldod
Tric. ihtC.C rimjuCuFiiG
IM 5.1BI?10 72 20P Io- C' .
Ire. l. I=. -' 0 Ton e :

IM 13.B3u ..-tT C Nt M
'hicer.n.a n.: C Cr.r .e i bali ":
i Eilr. .uip Cer. GiO '':".
C .A :'r e' ., U .. Argg.Ti. e ".
ITP
IM 5-43102 44.15 Jir. Co."p ',.
Coup Ar 5 cdO 717 PT Pci*...
r.Me ,;r. B jl7 B 31' C
IM 5-4110-T4S51S Ji Coi *-i
co, Re."p A i Cfi 17 P'Sl
0111 cn A -i rn C.-J;.-F;
IM 5.bflST IISS. Dr. G r T
Dilcil JD KV leis MD 30181. .
TM 5.6230-704-15 Fob Seaulcrl ii
OC. 28Vail 100 AMP Xenon ic;
IItioarn o-id c.*i.Ie Sore Mf.
In,
TM 9.1010-207.1 a1- )MS

TM 9-1400-46 20 Feb G MI *M
IM 9.1410- IO012P/ Jaon.
Sigr.ani. FMP. MsI Operafi: &

TM 9-1410-375-12P/I. on. Persh.li
IMP Aimr'unilli. I oihr than AOomsil
Wpni,. Mil Ore.rc.nor. & Mc nI
TM 9-1410S500-1/PTI Ion. Hick
IMP. M OC.r c1.o1 & M-T.31.
IM 9 14.0-50- 12P/7T. ar.. Nile
Her" Il MP c. 'a". d Cor Equip
IM 9.1430 .50.1?P/10/1. Jon. N.en
Her (Impl IMP Ground Coi Tea'p
TM 9.1430.2.0-17P/i1/T.a ft.N.ile
He, (Ial. 'MPC G-rnd Cnn i .ip
TM 9-14302O0.17P/12. Ia. ies
he'c lip1l IMP Crmuna C.. Equip
IM 9.1430-126-1721 Dec. Nile Hcrc
flnIpl. TM Grourd Car Equ.p

IMP GCroLi.n Hacorr,, Apl & Swc
Eq.uip
IM 9.4310-503-1.P/I Jo- M ,n
iMP. Ground Car. EqucD
TM 9-1430-504.-1P/1T Jan ca-h.
IMP, Gro';.; Con Equip
rM 9.1430-510-12P/1, Jos Hols
IMP Giouna rCan Equip
IM 9.140.500-11P/1. Jan nr-k
IMP. Ground Handling. SpI & Sac
Eqi.p
IM 9-2300-324-ESC/6, fan Cin r
Peri lull ir Armed, M. 1JA
TM 9.7300-274-ESCj7 Jon MaOI,
1lib.mn. SP. 106IAI
TM 9.2300.224 ESC/8 Jc. Ca'e,
Co"a.and Pu.s Lqi 1Ti M5 1AI
IM 9.2300-274-ESC/9 aIn flma
Inro ,ai. SF. l 2JA l.
IM 9-2320-209.10. fab Cr.oa I. Trk
2 ., Tan 6 6. -m4 M44AI, M4S
M45A M4C 6 Md6 M61. M4b6C
MSP MS8 MIBAl Repair Slap. Tri
MTD c1lgs MIBSAI MIBISA. Tit.


Caoio Mid M.j MI35a. M36
M36C Ilk Dump Mre MSQ dM3j.
I'k Ma.-r v.IBA.MlQ, rII M.,l
' ion. a6 o V9 t4 .M0, Ti.
lrrk FI.eI Se I iTO-Gal iMa MnsC.
M49CAI, III Icnk Water I 000 Cc,
McSt MiOt4 Irt T Io0rc M4d
Min5. M7S"l, rfk VoT E, p Mi'?
a2?0 Al. 1TI Va. Mil tiirg Comp
kM7? Ir tVan ira. MI09
MI10O9 M109A? MIO9C. MIG9D
XMS67. Iil. Woreker Crana M1iBI
M60
TM 9-2]30-211-ESC/6. Ian ik IT'c
-r HMI2Al
IM 9-2320-211-ESC/9. Ion Trl If o
ajr M!?AT
M 9-230 211-5FC/T11. Jon.
Wri aj43j42
IM l.i20.224-20. Jon. Car.er
Cca i.acon. A-d.*Tl14 MIIIA
TM 93130-708-ESC. Jan. SemiI-oiter
'ri aIJIA? MIJIAJC
TM -.230.272.14 Feb. SIr..a ,l' r
Tori F .-1 .000 Gota a WIl
MI I SJ enIlrollel. lonk i nl
S e. jii.' Gal. A Whi MIIA4C-
TM 3?]i0-?lt 10. Noo, Ho" lie
lit r Ii.MM. MlOB and hiOll.
.: -.1 5 P. liS M. M109

IM Ar.3j10.217-SP/1. Jop SPH
MI 'i .'j M109
TM oJ910-431-I.10. n. Cleance
ITe S54rl Plug
1M 4.49 j -.303- I P/2, Jar.. 5erg'a 1.
ITF T"ii Equ.p O1'do
IM 9-1935.304.12P/1. Ia ,.;l.
io. Tlest lquip lOi'd
iM 9-4935-3n7.I2P/l ai Per -
lTMP Tell Eq.p (OCdl
IM 9-4935-461 15/1 2 1. FTo
GMI M?2
1M 9-495-461 -15/7 r ie inl.

IM 9-93 -461 -1S/3 F-c En'.
IM letl Equip fOrdl
IM 9-4935 501.12P/Il i" s .-
rMP. Toal EqNip (Ocrd
TM 10-500-71 Jan, R MG I:.1
ing Wh TyIpo. 1.000 C,t Il s"
IM 10.500-114. Jc' 1 'ggic i1.
A.TN PS 33 iaar Sr< A 27 C. i.
Bag and In IMhe MP.
TM 10 170-126-23 f e Parer*
Cao. ICAI Reaor 3 ii D. N,..-
Carnop. MA.l Coya.: oa .ri e

IM 10 3930-714-20P. J' irthk.
IllI. Fork Ga CIak Corloade,
D 71960D, cHH 161.
IM T 3930-229-20. Jan. Truck. Lift.
rc.l Cis. li.OOo.Itb c OClk
ia.dli 15O 3 15 MHE 15T
IM 10-3930-25S-1D, lob. Tr.ck. Li
o k. Elec. 2000 IO cup MHE-197.
Br.e, nFID-00 IE.
TM o0-8340-20.7-4P Dec Howk, TM.
Irnlage
IM 11.5805-349-14, Jon. Nike Al.
r i-* i'r Nikl hea. (Inl laIqel
Mil. Ml Mr..-o. ItM. Iteephn
TM 11.5B1 2497SP. Jao, plo Ala..
Nike Here. Nlkaehar (I.p)l. HaMk.
lorges Mil. MI ManineT. IMP Tells
phone.
IM 11.5182040320P loi C 1296
Intercom SOl
TM 11 5840-185-12P. Jon Nilr-Ajua,
N.hk Hart, NIke Hae, I'mpi. Toagel
Msi Msi Monitor. Holi, IMP. odor
TM 11-5895.357-14. Jan. Rodam laer

28


minal Sel AN/MRC-102(V).
TM 11-5935-203-15P, Jan,
U-186A/G, U-186B/G connector.
TM 11-6710-201-25P, Jan, Camera
Set, Motion Picture KS-5(1), Camero,
Motion Picture KF-2(1), Photog Accy
Kiti LF-1 (1), and LF-1 (2).
TM 11-6740-215-20P, Jan,
PH-680/U, Photo Printer.
TM 55-510, Jan, Amphib Lighter
Operator's Handbook.
TM 55-1510-201-20P, Oct, (-81).
TM 55-1510-202-20P, Sep, (O-IA).
TM 55-1510-204-20P, Jon, (OV-l).
TM 55-1510-206-20, C 6, Aug.
(CV-2).
TM 55-1510-206-20, C 7, Oct.
(CV-2).
TM 55-1520-203-20, C 3, Dec,
CH-37A, CH-37B.
TM 55-1520-204-20, C3, Jan,
(OH-13).
TM 55-1520-209-10, Dec, (CH-47).
TM 55-1520-209-10, C1, C2, C3,
Feb. (CH-47).
TM 55-1520-210-10, Cl, Jan,
(UH- ).
TM 55-1520-210-20P, Jan, (UH-1).
TM 55-1520-211-10CL, C1, Jan,
(UH-1).
TM 55-1925-202-20P, C3, Feb.
Marine.
TM 55-1925-205-12, Dec, Marine.
TM 55-1925-205-20P, C1, Feb.
Marine.
TM 5S-1930-206-10, Jan.
(LARC XV).
TM 55-1940-204-12, Dec, Marine.
TM 55-2350-200-12-1; Jan. Air Tran$,
How, SP, M108 & M109, in C-124.
TM 55-5410-200-12-1, Jan, Air Trns
of Shelter, S-141/G by C-l 19, C-123,
and C-130.
TM 55-5410-205-12-1, Jan, Shelter,
S-144/G, Mounted on Trk, M37
w/Winch, Tramn by C-119, C-123,
or C-130.

MODIFICATION WORK ORDERS
MWO 9-1005-243-20/2, Feb. M6.
MWO 9-1440-301-20/5, Jan, Ser-
geant, MWO, Ground Handling, Spt
& Svc Equip.
MWO 9-2300-216-20/4, Jon, Gun,
Field Art, SP: 175-MM, M107; How,
Hvy, SP: 8-in. MI 10: Bry Comp Door.
MWO 9-2300-216-30/4, Jan, Gun.
Field Arty. SP: 175-MM, M107; How,
Hvy, SP: 8-In, Ml 0: Vent Hole Head-
light Mounting Baoes.
MWO 9-2320-218-20/12, Jan. Trk,
M1l5; Ins Brake Spring.
MWO 9-2350-215-20/23, Feb, Tank,
M60 and M60A1 Reinforcement of
Ammo Racks.
MWO 9-2350-215-20/25, Feb. Tank,
M60 and M60A1: Removal of Quick
Disconnect Coupling from Gun MIs.
MWO 9-2350-217-20/1, Dec, Howit-
zer, Lgl S-P: 105MM, MII0, Howitzer,
Med. S-P: 155MM, MI09; inst Paro-
ramie Telescope (M 17), Stow Box
Bumper.
MWO 9-2350-224-20/1, Feb, Tank,
M48A3; Mod Gas Port Filter Fr.
MWO 9-2350-224-20/2, Feb. Tank,
M48A3; Reloc Turret Pump.
MWO 10-1670-203-20/1, Feb. Para.
chute. Cargo, 15-FI Dic Nylon Canopy.
MWO 55-1500-200-34/1, Feb.
(OH-23).
MWO 55-1510-201-34/5, C2, Jan,















GOLDEN

. MONSTER

WOMEN
LoTn I o A CAST or o


~'- I -Iw


EETGA SONA
BO0NI TINA TO
ATTAKA D'pOLDINO
GORLS...
CHIECV-
D'GEAP-A







MORTA BELLA UNO FORTI ANTI PASTA
BELICINI FIoE ANGELINOI1
MAMA MIAi












'Onc, Over %\ith a I inu-t ll 1.011, 1)

MIO COLOMBO I MIO PONTI#CORNO BELLAI
ErSA FJINEir


,"n3.m..q


UNo Fl)A A7ASHADAPAPA
MINORO, SIGNOR \E'VMOUrA!l
ROCCO?l








D e a

101111 l- f


IF YOU WANT TO DISPLAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BO


When gear is removed for
repair,
Protect it from more wear
and tear;
Be gentle and pack it- I
Don't dump it or stack it-
SAnd then when it's needed
it's there!


. OPEN STAPLES. LIFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.








FINO BOCCI S11 k Jj APONTE JUSTOBARIT
MORTA BENNO. LOLLAB1IGITrA 0 P
SONOG *
a












ESI MIOIb I A'SSF-IADAPPA!


ANn PASTA
FILADOLMO
r+, e rOSTA MIA 7'





Jus ynk't ff.. li-0
dI~~ Puw ~p






5~r MLAMA MIA!!)


P LORT PASTA --
UN (C2I~Nf U ,\
I AMAEATRO? NON
a S NK NON





-. -' -



.. --- -



34 3





































HEY, THIS DOGGONE PORT SAYS, IT CAME TO
PROJECTOR BLEW AGAIN. THEM NEEDING MAJOR
WHEN WE GETTING' THE NEW OVERHAUL. IT GOT BANGED
ONE I SENT DOWN FOR MINOR UP IN THE TRUCK ON IT'S
EPAIR AND ADJUSTMENT? WAY THERE.

JUST AT THE
WHAT A GOOD PART
TIME TO
-..1 BAH 1




/


Rtmot.c that well-fingered S5 bill from )our jll-
S'i- nd "ple it a th a snappy, new bank note.
Nor. take ,our that dirty old $10 job and replace it with
rin kltt., Pt. eeet-smelling ten-spot. Do the same with
.'iur. rinklJd and ell-used $1 bills .. and keep going
iu replaced as many of the "old" bills as you can.
ln 1, dump chose old bills in any handy container
rc I-,m I the netrcst incinerator and burn them"
'ind ,lllcr-n 'ou-know-what? .
:''u hut some Joes are doin' just abo ut h
Thing .thnih the "bushel basket" technique 4
a"'1 "r- b,. -1 other parts of electronic equiPm we
'~, ali nucty and expensive to discard wrl
,LI. I i s 't burn dollar bills. don t
I, 1, 1"hn '-,u re repairing common equipmenfr t
i. ,. tuff in whilst you're searching
It ilurl tehe tne
'r', '..r re a set with a new part, take ~ h
1.1 r t ith the old one ... and keep Us of
S ir.ubed procedure until you find the real as 0
k That e" "
stad of ay you can use the bushel basket to i os
S Carting off perfectly good parts with t.






THE NEXT CALL MAY BE FOR YO


DOES _5
4-E D00 7


You ever see a telephone operator- switch that can get fouled up by dust.
female type-at work? And the dust is kept out by leaving the
She can move right along, like put- lenses alone.
ting in and taking out plugs and throw- Having a busted signal lens is just
ing switches, without bollixing up the like having no lens at all. And if there's
equipment. one sure way to smash a lens, it's by
More'n one unit would feel a whole letting the plugs fly back into place
lot better if the guys who sit down at instead of easing 'em in.
an SB-86/P would treat this switch- A
board the same way-before, during s Ft
and after handling a call.. ,,
F'rinstance there's the operator -
who sits at the switchboard while ci~zSH I
chomping away at a sandwich that's L\ b .
loaded with mustard or mayonnaise. Playing with the switches to pass the
The stuff gets on his fingers .comes time of day is another bad deal. The
a call ... he grabs a plug and the switches get a good workout as it is
plug winds up sharing the seasoning, without giving'em extra wear and tear.
Things go from bad to worse when the -
plug gets pushed into a jack.


S90 TA'5 Twisting the call and answer cords
r .i 's another way to kill time. It's also
Murder on the cords. The wiring can
take just so much twisting and knot-
tying ... then it breaks.
Then there's the guy who gives in '
to the temptation to take the lens off a /.
signal light or three-maybe for some- ,[ .
thing to do or because he'd like to see -
what's inside. What he can't see is a 4


Some guys also get the urge to draw
or doodle when they sit at the SB-86/P.
And they pick the first thing that's
handy as a drawing board-the log
plate. It's bad enough messing up the
log plate with penciled pictures, but
the joker who uses a screwdriver to do
"etchings" on the log plate is really
going off the deep end.









A guy with a screwdriver can also
foul up the works when he is doing
some wiring. This is what happens
when you try to push wires through the
rubber gasket on the side of the switch-
board. There's no sweat to getting the
wire through by itself if you double it
first.


You can't get into any trouble when
you replace a cord pack-if you watch
what you're doing. That means you
want to make sure the terminal con-
nectors are out of the way. If they're
not, the connectors can get caught be-
tween the pack and the chassis and
that's a good way to batter the con-
nectors.
Those two BA-30 batteries-one for
the buzzer, the other for the talking
circuit-should be removed if you
know that the switchboard's not going
to be used for a spell.



SBA 31 BAKERIES

-ONES EVERY
SSIX MONTHS
I-


There's no trouble in replacing and
removing the BA-30's, but you can buy
yourself some problems if you don't
take it slow with those 10 BA-200/U
batteries in the PP-990/GC power sup-
ply for the switchboard. That is, the
latches that hold the batteries in place
can bust off if you get careless in your
handling of 'em.
























Dear Half-Mast,
As you know, the rubber weather-stripping for the S-56 shelter doors is in a
spot where the door latch and bar damages and wears it.
So wot to do?
We solved the problem by taking the stripping from the door latch side of
the shelter wall and cementing it to the door itself. You've got to remove the
rubber careful-like so's not to break it. It should be glued to the door with a
good rubber cement, like FSN 8040-952-3520 (Adhesive, Silicone-Rubber, 5-
ounce tube).
The shelter's still weather-proofed (you'll never get that with damaged
stripping), and the rubber wears a lot longer. Sgt P. T. K.


/ / E SERGEANT R K,
SOUNDS LIKE
YOU'VE SOLVED
YOUR PROBLEM
HANDILY.
IT SHOULD
MOVE KEEP THE
DRIZZLE
SSTRIPPING nnnR






THE CRACKED UP TT

AN nnU'T nrrce


Tryin' to read copy through a cracked view window on a TT-98/FG or
similar kind of teletypewriter makes for bleary eyeballs.
The safety glass access window'll take a beating, but .... slamming 'er shut,
putting' strain on the pane by using one hand in an upper corner to close 'er, or
using the window for an arm rest can crack it, Jack.
Close the access door by putting' your paws at the upper corners. Use a little
pressure with both hands at the same time. No sweat.
When cleaning the window with a damp cloth, wipe well but keep the
weight off that wrist action.
The strain's not the same on the plexiglass windows. Their worst enemies
are scratchy ring finger operators, pencil gougers, metal button scrapers and
strong cleaning solvent users.
Solvents can give you a technicolor tint which makes it hard for the peepers
to peer through the pane.
Best bet's to keep the communicator window crack-free by keeping the pounds
and paws off it.

HOW TO EQUIP A V-17, V-18 TRUCK

Dear Half-Mast,
We're at loose ends in my unit about what equipment comes with the V-17
and V-18 telephone construction vehicles.
Can you clue us as to component parts and stock numbers?
Sgt A. B. P.
Dear Sergeant A. B. P.,
Be glad to. TB SIG 331 (Apr 58) lists the equipment for the V-17A. TB SIG
332 (Apr 58) and TM 11-2320-200-12P (10 Jun 64) list the auxiliary equip-
ment, parts and tools you need for the V-18A. Each TB has one change.
For the trucks, you need TM 9-8022 with changes and TM 9-2320-209-20P
with changes. H41*






THIS JACK CAN JILT YOU

What with the number of antenna
jacks that've been around on various
comm equipment these many years, -
you'd think it'd sink in that rough is
NOT the way you treat 'em.
Not so.
That stubborn antenna jack malady
has begun to clobber a recent addition
to the communications family, the AN/
VRC-24 radio set.
Some Joes grab at it for a boost
aboard their vehicles... and land
a-sprawl with jack and connector in
hand. Or, they pile gear on it-or snag
it with gear-and do just enough of a / '' '
job to break the jack or crack the in- IAN* LC IT
TREAT It
sulator. GENTLY.
The VRC-24 jack may be larger than
most, but it's the same old material and
gets the same old respect. Handle gin-
gerly-not with ginger.



KEEP THE JOINT CLEAN, JACK





..A shiny bright antenna joint
or jack can make the difference
between good and poor trans-
mission and reception ... and
.they make good checkpoints
when the message isn't getting
through to... or from...you.
Usually, a couple' brisk
swipes with a pencil eraser'll
KEEP 'EM CLEAN do the job on a jack or joint.













Next time you're about to connect the battery of your AN/PRC-8, -10 radio
set take a quick wink at the POWER switch.
The switch should be in the OFF position.
Connecting the battery with power on can blow the IF amplifier cans-among
other things.


'Bout the easiest way to tell if you've blown the IF cans is to try the squelch.
Blowing the cans kills the rushing noise of the squelch. Naturally, it leaves you
with a set that needs some work.


WVVANTED
TUGGER -
THE
TERRIBLE







Never, Never, Never.
No, never use the cord for pulling
the battery plug.
Such non-thinkers are stinkers when
they stretch the cable to shorten the life
line of their equipment.


Take your AN/PRC-8 thru -10 radio
sets, f'rinstance.
A couple flips of the clips and the
battery case is loose from the chassis.
But, when you take to tugging 'er from
there, OUCH! The cable gets groaning
pains, especially around the socket.
Tuggin'll tear up the socket and
plug, too. The angle of the cord's dan-
gle puts lopsided strain on them.
And, before you can say, "Roger,
Roger," you're an old codger. Your
Perk'll quit talking to you. She'll pay
no attention to what you say, either.
To keep her talking, put that big
ring around a couple or three fingers
and gently, but firmly, pull.



















Ever have it happen to you?
Like, your transmitter, or one near
by, starts putting' out with the RF and
blip! ... your R-390/URR or R-390A
receiver quits cold. You can't pull in
a whisper on the band the R-390's
set for.
Well, maybe your support found i
out for you when you took the set to
the shop ... and then again maybe you
too, noticed that the R-390's BREAK
IN switch was shut off when your
transmitter started clacking. The switch
gives you protection when the break-ir
circuit is connected to the transmitter
control circuit.


So-o-o, it's downright important to
have the switch set right. F'rinstance,
if the BREAK IN switch's not in the
ON position when a nearby transmitter
puts out, or if the relay is not connected
into the transmitter control circuits,
RF voltage from the transmitter feeds
through the receiver. With the break-
in relay on, the receiver's protected.
OFF ON OFF


''z SWITCH OFF...
WIH SWITI RF COILS OF
WITH SWITCH 1 CAN GET
ON RECEIVER R390 N GE
IS PROTECTED OUT

When the switch is in the OFF posi-
tion, RF voltage can feed back to the
receiver RF coils of the R-390 and burn
out the coils. Which is a round-a-bout
way to get to the reason why you
couldn't receive on the band setting you
were in when the damage happened.
And, a final point: To cut out the
receiver during transmission--when
the break-in relay is connected to the
transmitter control circuits-the switch
has to be on.
44


s
L

i

t




r


r






TRACKLESS ANITRC's


-- AP -- -
Your Track-24 components need their tracks so's they won't get knocked off
their trolley.
The tracks are in the cases which house most of the components of the AN/
TRC-24 radio set and other such animals.


Like a squirrel stores nuts for the winter, some Joes remove and hoard the
tracks whenever they turn in the cases, or the case and component, for repair.
This could leave the T-302 transmitter, the R-417 receiver, or whatever, with
no place to go.
Since the CY-1341, or the CY-1339, and so forth gotta have the tracks so's
the components can ride in and out, these "squirrels" give their support the
problem of how to scrounge new tracks.
Sometimes it's not easy-and sometimes support has to salvage an otherwise
usable case for want of a track.
So-o-o, removing a track till your case gets back might mean that you'll just
never see the case again. In which case saving the track "just in case," can make
for a mighty expensive case.
Don't be a squirrel.






KEY IN ON THIS TUBE











The ke ,o this puzzle is on the rube.
Find it and you get the complete picture with your T-302/TRC transmitter
and with some of the amplifiers used with Radio Sets AN/TRC-24, AN/GRC-
75, AN/GRC-78 and AN/GRC-81.


Ignore it and you can knock any one of those sets completely out of the picture.
The clues: Focus in on the 4X-150A tube (it also goes by V110 in the T-302
and VI in the AM-912, AM-915, AM-1178 and AM-1180).
See the key on the side, just above the pins? Use it, and there's no more puz-
zle. It's the prime factor in installing the tube.
The key goes into the keyway of the tube socket (again, V110 or Vl).
To avoid damage to the socket, square up the key and keyway slot before you
press the tube into place.
Another clue: Never rotate the tube after the key's positioned.
Finally, after pushing the tube in squarely, you'll feel it snap in place.
Then, and not before, rotate the tube retainer over the top of the tube.
Puzzle solved? Fine. So spread the word on the solution.






CYCLING YOUR PU-126


Dear Half-Mast,
Halp! Get the word out that the PU-126/U motor generator set can be a
few cycles per second off and still do a right smart job in powering certain
radar equipment!
We've got users who turn in their generators for repair when they can't
get the exact cycles per second reading called for in their radar equipment
TM's. Like, maybe their manual will call for 400 cps and the frequency meter
reading of the generator will be pushing 405 cps. And, they can't get an exact
400 cps reading.


II a i4[W '7ffi5 [J 11
Fact is, the reading'll be higher every time-402-407 cps, f'rinstance. Some
deal for higher readings, with less load or no-load. It's the nature of the gen-
erator to vary a few cycles, but it doesn't affect the generator's job.
There's nothing wrong with 'em, in other words, so they shouldn't be
brought in for repair for that reason.
Sgt H. H.
Dear Sergeant H. H.,
You are so right. If there be any doubters, let 'em feast their eyes on page 7
and para 52f, page 63 of TM 11-910. 4 l sot
47































Where there re two ditterent kinds of .;
metal fastened together-welded, bolt- '/; T j ,', b
P t


'Wt 6 tr


A' d
ed, screwed or riveted-"galvanic '"
corrosion" goes wild. The bolt, screw
or rivet may be the "different" mctal c
in many cases. *f
AND WHAT PIECE OF ARM An a
EQUIPMENT DOESN'T HA\'V_. .... p .
METAL IN IT SOMEWHERE? It can o
be any one of 50 or more metals, either t n
basic metals or combinations of them *
(alloys). -" r
48 49


Electronics equipment? There's trou-
le in the air for radio gear, too, when
here's salt in the air. Metal doesn't
ave to be dunked in salt water to feel
he gnawing of water-oxygen-salt cor-
osion.
CHANGE WEAKENS METAL '
What is corrosion? Rust, that red-
ish, flaky stuff on iron or steel, is a
product" of corrosion. Technically,
netal isn't really DESTROYED by
orrosion-it's CHANGED to another
orm. Corrosion changes magnesium
nd aluminum to a white or grayish
owder. That green or black coating
n electrical contacts is what corrosion
lakes from copper or brass.
Always starting on the surface, cor-
osion weakens the metal more and

|g)OE>






more as it spreads. It causes structural
and electrical failure, resulting in de-
lays, costly replacement of parts and,
sometimes, even injury or death to
personnel.

IT'S ALL AROUND
How does corrosion get started?
There's got to be moisture and oxygen
or there's no corrosion. Go to the moon
and you probably won't have to worry


about corrosion, but today's army isn't
going anyplace where there's not SOME
moisture and SOME oxygen.
Ever see or hear tell how the acid
electrolyte in a storage battery "eats
up" the lead plates? Plain ole' moisture
and oxygen are the "electrolyte" when
corrosion turns a truck fender into a
hunk o' rust. Salt soups-up the water-
oxygen electrolyte. Jack up the tem-
perature, like in the tropics, and y'got


d1*, ) V -



_^ ^ y 11/


a first-class "operation corrosion."
Where paint's missing--or even just
cracked, blistered, soft or loose-salt
water puts the bite on. The same hap-
pens where oil, grease or other protec-
tive coatings have been neglected. Let
salt or salt water sit long enough-
EVEN ON A PROTECTED METAL
SURFACE-and it'll settle down for
a meal o' metal!






FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE
So, how does the army fight one of ^
its biggest enemies, CORROSION? f
First off-like in any battle-WITH
THE GUYS WHO ARE THE ARMY,
especially the guys who operate and
handle the equipment. It's up to each
man to fight off the stuff that makes 'I
corrosion or to catch it quick if it does '",
get a start. -
Farther up the line, powerful clean-
ers can be used to lift out corrosion, and
parts beyond hope can be replaced, but
this is time and money spent on repair-
ing what should have been better pro-
tected in the first place. -
Why not just keep equipment a safe
distance from salt water? We can't do
that and have the most ready army in
the world. But, you can keep salt water
a safe distance from your equipment.
Washed clean off is a safe distance, and
the thickness of a GOOD coat of paint
or lubricant is a big help.
FORDING FOLLOW-UP
Any equipment that can be washed,
SHOULD BE-with fresh water and
50


AS SOON AS POSSIBLE-after ford- operating condition, so that contami-
ing in salt water. This includes streams nated grease has to go!
where ocean tides push salt water in- Crankcase draining and refilling is
land. 46 needed more often in salt water areas.
SHE, WAIT, I
AIN'T BEACHED Every operator knows that a gasoline
Sor diesel engine picks up condensation
S'- '- in its crankcase. When the air pulled
'" -L into an engine carries salt in with it,
YOU GET SALT WATER IN YOUR
S OIL. If allowed to circulate in your
engine, this salt water jumps at the
chance to attack bearings and all other
S exposed metal.
Oil and grease HELP fight the bite PENNIES OR DOLLARS?
of corrosion, but even they can't hold Yeah, there's a lot of time, work and
up for long after a vehicle has been run expense in good preventive mainte-
through salt water. A complete "pull nance, but it can be measured in ounces
.LP compared to the cost of cure.
Like that tank battalion after a land-
Sing exercise on one of our tropical
islands. The tanks weren't pulled down
down"-especially cleaning and re- for cleaning and new lube after their
packing of wheel bearings-is a MUST run through salt water. Corrosion got
after fording. Other lubrication points into the metal around nylon bearings
that have been dunked MUST GET in the suspension systems. A year later
IMMEDIATE ATTENTION. $1,400 WAS SPENT ON EACH OF
Water doesn't have an easy time THESE TANKS TO REPLACE PARTS
getting to metal through GAA grease. RUINED BY CORROSION!
A special inhibitor in the grease holds
moisture in suspension. This'll give the i~,an'


grease a milky coloring. Under normal
operating conditions this milky look
doesn't mean the grease needs replac-
ing before the LO calls for it. But, a
salt water dousing is not a normal

a .b_-,: yOOU LOOK
4 PALE:... YOU'VE
ml (; HAD /r. T


Ounces or pennies, pounds or dol-
lars, that was a lot of cure to make up
for a little neglected prevention.


51


'I \~






CHASE IT WITH A WASH
A k41... SN'T / FOOEY!
THIS SALT AIR I I CORRODES
REFRESHING?/ My VEHICLES.





You don't have to wallow your tank
or truck in salt water to start it down
the road to high-speed corrosion. Just
a stiff breeze off the ocean can carry
enough spray to give your equipment
a heavy dose of salt. You can SEE it
when it dries to a white haze or pow-
der. That's the next worst thing to
dunking your equipment right in salt
water. IT'S GOT TO BE KEPT
CLEANED OFF. The more often metal
is cleaned, the less possibility of corro-
sion.
This salt-in-the-air goes beyond vehi-
cles. Ocean breezes carry miles-to
generators, missiles, aircraft and radios.
You name it, YOU'VE GOT IT.

I A YPITFALO FOR PLANES
Those flying machines get around to
a lot of places where they're exposed
to corrosion, but just sitting at night
in the dew will cause pitting of Alcad
surfaces.
And they're sitting' ducks for battery
acids, relief tube spray, smoke, exhaust
fumes and gunfire gases.
Corrosion crawls into the innards of.
these birds, too. Parts are affected along


,A A j -


with sections where foreign matter or
moisture may collect due to improper
drainage or disposal outlets. Where sun .
and air can't get to this trapped mois-
ture, it's up to you to get it out if you
can reach it.
A SUCKER FOR SALT
Operate radar, a radio or any other
electronic gear and it heats up. Shut it
off and it cools down-AND "TAKES
A BIG BREATH." It sucks in air as
it cools and contracts. If there's salt in
the air, those copper and brass electrical

GVEAEALL WHAT
/HAPPENS TO RADIO
S NNARIDS THAT WAVE
7 EA EL POSED TO
PALr FOB LONG


contacts-and a lot of other unpro-
tected metal-are duck soup for corro-
sion. That electronic gear'll get it where
it hurts!
Where it's hot, humid and salty, this
sucking-in can be cut down by keeping
the equipment heated. Electrical con-
tacts and all other metal innards will
be spared a lot of corrosion.






FLUSH AND DRY You use the right solvents and clean-
Fast action's called for if a radio or ers so you get rid of salt and dirt with-
other piece of electrical or electronic out causing as much damage as corro-
gear gets dunked in salt water-and it sion would. You know that ordinary
happens in surf operations. If at all dirt holds moisture-including the
possible, that salt water should be salty kind-so you keep everything
washed off and flushed out with fresh spic 'n' span.
water before it gets a chance to dry.
Cleaning and drying have to be done
thoroughly and carefully. A little dirt A YHHHYH
SOLVENTS 'A'
or moisture left inside can foul up the CLEANERS...
works but quick! COISES!
Pat, don't rub, when drying with a
clean, absorbent cloth. Compressed air's You're right in there with the paint
OK, too, if you take it real easy. If to touch up fresh scratches and gouges
you're out in the field and a hot box before corrosion sinks its teeth into that
isn't handy, rig up some light bulbs in bare metal.
a tent or a box for drying. Watch out i /-
for too much heat if drying in the sun.
Make sure all the moisture's out be-
Sfore turning the set on.

OUTFLANKED-BUT NOT OUTFOXED
So, you're on the ball. You wash No salt's going to get by you-not
your tank or truck off with PLENTY for very long, anyway.
OF FRESH WATER right after ford- But, suppose it does!
ing-being mighty careful, of course, M 5 A WHIZ WEN
HIM? HE'S A WHIZ WHEN IT
not to douse wiring or other parts that COMES TO REPLACING SALT
don't cotton to water. CONTAMINATED
O0L AND
You search in, under and around for GREASE.
those little nooks and crannies where
salt water might be hiding out, and you
flush it out. You make sure drain holes
are open.





-, You spot a little crust o' rust on a
"'--- j, fender, wheel, panel or other part. Or
Sit's a whitish or gray powdery coating
on magnesium or aluminum. Maybe
53 -






you poked a suspicious-looking place
in the paint job with a sharp, pointed
tool (Take it easy there, Boy!) and
found a bad spot in the metal.
Now you throw in the reserves-not
the towel! You haul out the scraper,
e ~ "Lr .. "


wire brush, sandpaper, cleaner and the
paint or whatever grease or protective
coating's called for. Your equipment
may still be a long way from going up
the line for replacement of a part
ruined by corrosion.
You get rid of the corrosion that's
started, and, if you go about it the right
way, you make sure corrosion doesn't
get in another crack at the same place.
Some cleaning and treatment meth-
ods are strictly up-the-line jobs because
of mixing and handling dangerous
chemicals and because of special equip-
ment. A lot of good stuff on corrosion
is in TM 9-247, TM 9-208-1, TM 55-







405-3 and TB 9-337 (the last one's for
guided missile systems). A good deal
of it's for upper echelon maintenance,
but there's useful info in these for
operators, too. You can get the rep as
"that guy who knows all about corro-
sion."


Find out the easy way-by reading,
instead of sad experience-that ANY
METAL SURFACE HAS TO BE AB-
SOLUTELY CLEAN AND DRY BE-
FORE YOU PUT ON GREASE OR
PAINT OR OTHER PROTECTIVE
COATING. Goof up on this and you
just seal in the stuff that causes corro-
sion. It'll keep right on eatin' up the
metal and you'll have a hard time
spottin' it because it's covered up.
Remember, too, about what "differ-
ent" metals can do to each other, so use


a stainless steel wire brush and alumi-
num wool for cleaning magnesium and
aluminum or you'll wind up pushing
"different" metal right into 'em. And
easy on the scraper with magnesium
and aluminum. They're soft and some-




times thin, and you could take off too
much metal.
Three points to write on the inside
of your head are PREVENT corrosion
by washing, painting and lubricating;
DETECT corrosion by frequent and
thorough inspections; CORRECT cor-
rosion by doing it yourself or, if it's
real bad, reporting it.
Engrave this on your brain:
LOSS OF VALUABLE EQUIPMENT AND EVEN
HUMAN LIVES CAN BE THE PAY-OFF FOR POOR
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE AGAINST CORRO-
SION.










GENERAL & SUPPLY









YOUR CARRIER PIGEON
Remember reading about how a pigeon named Cher Ami carried a message
that saved a battalion back in the First War?
Now, there are other ways to carry messages.
Like, if you want to tell about an error--or if you have an idea for improving
one of your pubs-use a DA Form 2028, "Recommended Changes to DA Publi-
cations," to carry your message direct to the people who wrote the pub.


__ M -f O- 203-/.f /t sP63 Leeir-R :ACit /ISY$,tN Mi- $.
RE' 'NUEDED CHANGES TO DA PUBLICATIONS
D-A.. 2028 f-l-'** (U A.A1l- 6.5"-
COASMAHNDI NC '8RAL HQI ,qr"' ,95 ^
#30 9O'ED6Cy^ s.'p rf^^^O^p A'_X

TM Sr-LS25Of.-Z*t2 /6 A(/ bJ A' M3WMC, 1ASO.4M,M'ITA.Y I5\1\
DA 2028 ........... ... .. ..............
If you don't have a Form 2028, ask your company clerk for one. He can order
forms just like he does manuals...on DA Form 17 from your outfit's pubs section.
The Form 2028 has one side for Repair Parts and Special Tool Lists and SM's
and the other for Technical Publications.
When you're putting down a publication number, be sure to include its date.
And include enough info like page, paragraph and line so the people who get
your form will read along with you.
After you fill out your DA Form 2028 (only one copy), send it to the address
listed in the pub you want to change-direct.
So, if you think a change should be made in a pub, let your Form 2028 be your
Cher Ami. Maybe it won't get you the Croix de Guerre, but it'll get the message
thru and make it easier to take care of your equipment.
55






REQUIREMENTS FOR INITIAL DISTRIBUTION OF 6 Sep 65 '. ..f U
ARMY ..,::?: PUBLICATIONS ACCOU.* NU.--U- c.aSe
(NA sIol) 2309 Cna..O...
INSTRUCTIONS THIS FORM WILL BE COMPLETED IN ACCORDANCE WITH INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE SIDE.
HERE'S HOW TO GET 'EM....

THOSE EIR DIGESTS

HERE YOU GO.. -. ^94fl.
EIR DIAESG 9 f -4-'
rto AN kOW TO /h J."'1'



About the hottest items coming out these days are the Equipment Improve-
ment Report and Maintenance Digests (EIR Digests).
The engineers and design guys have been looking over all the EIR's that you
shoot at them. When they've got the word on a batch of problems, they whip
together a technical bulletin which the Army prints up and sends out so you'll
know what's cooking' on your equipment.
To keep up with the latest, here's a rundown on the EIR Digests and how you
can get them. If the DA 12-series forms your unit has sent in to the St. Louis
Publications Center don't get these digests for you, now is the time to send in
new forms.
SBE EURE VOU ORDER\ /(C ',
ENOUGH OF THE |
VARIOUS TBr' ON
VOLUR EQUIPMENT. 4 n-














Dear Half-Mast,
AR 746-5 (30 Jun 64), "Marking and Packing of Supplies and Equipment,
Color and Marking of Army Materiel," says, a white 5-pointed star will be
marked on all tactical and combat vehicles.
Are there star decals for this symbol? If so can you give me the FSN's?
i Sgt E. M. V.
Dear Sergeant E. M. V.,
There are star decals available and you can use them instead of paint.
Here're the FSN's for some of those stars: MARKER, pressure, sensitive ad-
hesive, white, "STAR 5 POINT".'L A
AND, YOU'LL WANT TO GET MOLD
Height, Inches FSN O r 746-931-1 (OCT 64) FOR
IMPO ON MARKING OF VHICLE.
B 6 e 7690-329-1125 ON A O v
10 7690-329-1215
12 7690-329-1260
16 7690-329-1264
20 7690-329-1445
25 7690-329-1447 /
32 7690-329-1463
36 7690-329-1628 N -



PAINT--FOR ON-OFF
If you've been looking for
that gasoline-soluble paint for
markings on your vehicles and
other rolling equipment called
for by AR 746-5, here it is:
Paint, temporary, white (in-
signia), FSN 8010-597-8238
for 1-gal can (in paste form).
You'll find it in Federal Cata-
log C8000-IL-A (1 Apr 65)
and in the GSA Catalog (Dec
64).
57






H/R SIGNING
r fON'T BL'DGE...
SIG&GcE 3Q Te 42q%









Dear Half-Mast,
In a TOE outfit, can hand receipts covering property issued to the various
sections (platoons, maintenance section, mess section, etc.) be signed by the
NCOIC?
We've always had the noncom sign, but now I'm told that hand receipts
must be signed by an officer. (The officers assigned to some of our sections
have the assignment as additional duty only.)
Can you tell me what AR says an officer must sign H/R's?
SP 5 C. L.
Dear Specialist C. L.,
The DA SOP on hand receipt issue is AR 735-35. See para 13a.
The AR says to the extent practical hand receipt issue will be made to the
element that will use the property.
However, since a CO still has responsibility for the outfit's property, regard-
less of who has it on hand receipt, the AR lets him decide how to handle hand
receipt issue.
Another reason the AR doesn't spell out who can or can't sign is that govern-
ment property is used by all types (all ranks, grades and even civilians). The AR
recognizes that the CO having command responsibility for the property book
can best decide who's to sign. So through his property book officer he sets up
whatever H/R SOP offers the best control and convenience for his operation.



CX'CS CA .L 5 GN
a,- 'c. THrE OLCD AN'S
p / r s AS4S 30.





REGISTER DATING


















N O0 KNOWS U
I nOC WE ARE...
..'.E ORPHANS.


Dear Half-Mast,
I have a dozen 5-kw generators with a lot of errors on the ID plates. In
some cases, you can't even read the plates because some brush-happy char-
acter painted over them, then tried to scratch it off.
I don't want to get gigged, but I can't find any info in the parts manuals
on how to get new plates.
I need help. -, Sgt J. O. S.


S----=--- ,1ED 10-58 I | I-3 |
....- J '| -6115- a9- I1
Dear Sergeant J. O. S.,
No sweat, Sarge. Installing and correcting ID plates is the responsibility of
your support unit.
Get the word to them on a DA Form 2407, Maintenance Request. If the
changes are minor, your support people will make minor corrections on the tags
with a letter and figure punch set. If you need new tags, they'll make 'em and
install 'em. H1/0-11/1F4


A, HOL GAR, CONTINENTAL

THE RIGHT The right position can be
POSITION mighty important at times.
Like when you're turning
the fuel selector valve handle on the 3-kw, 400-cycle
Continental Motors generator set.
Seems that a batch of these handles have been in-
stalled so that their position doesn't jibe with the info
on the legend plate. When the pointer of the handle
shows "AUX TANK" or "SET TANK," the valve is in
the "OFF" position.
No sweat to correct the position. Just remove the valve
handle and replace it so the pointer is set 180 degrees
opposite the original position.


SAVE YOUR PEEPERS

l.APS?! W T' Bright sunlight may be the answer when you're trying
EVEN SEE THiE to get yourself a good tan.
GENERATOr'R Bur. it's murder when you're straining to see whether
the '. nhronizing lamps on your Jeta WD301815-WA
30-kvn generator are dim or slightly glowing.
HI N iherly, you can't switch off the sun, so do the next
h1 c thing-take off the milk white lens covering the

\ No c. strain now, even if you're not 20/20.
Once you take 'em off, be sure to keep 'em in a safe,
handd place. You'll want to put 'em back when you're
Sn'r opt rating in direct sunlight.


THE PLATES ARE RIGHT
Hear tell that the w irng diagrams on the ics mounted plarie of tht Kurz .ind
Root 10 k% FERO-I gencraior and the n hiring diagrams in the TM's for the
set don't jibe.
So. until ihcre's a change to TM 5.6115-296-12 and TM 5-6115.296.55,
riu fellow the plates on the generaror--n rmi diagrams, schematici. opera[
ing in,[ructioin and connection. and change-oncr instruction,.

61


- --


W W qVirl" k


1 ^_ 1111 -


I






A SHIOCKWo STORY

i ^^


There's no need to get a shock from
your M1958 8-showerhead portable
bath unit.
Your support people can remove the
sting with MWO 10-4510-201-30/2
(23 Sep 64). It tells them how to in-
stall an electrical grounding system
through a grounding wire in the power
cord assembly.
So, fill out a DA Form 2407, and
send it to your support so they can
schedule the modification in their work
load.


Meanwhile, see if your generator has
a ground rod. If it doesn't you should
order: Ground Rod, FSN 5975-642-
8937; Clamp, FSN 5975-243-5861;
and Wire, FSN 6145-189-6695. This
dope is also in the MWO.




GROUNDING ROD
ICABLE (LAMP


NO STRAIN ON THE STRAINER

"I 'A GOING TO WASH THAT DI0R

%\3OL' IA\ E ro C-NGSE VOLL'Q rL'NE.


If the suction strainer of your M1958 8-shoAer-
u head portable bath unit gets fouled up with weeds,
31'. sticks and such, you're not going to get a shower.
4- Your TM 10-4510-201-10 (Jan 60) gives you the 1
1,- dope on protecting the strainer but here's an-
other approach: Lower the strainer into a large con-
tainer (can or bucket) that's been put into the water
so that it's completely covered.






M1937 FIELD RANGE
Dear Half-Mast, I
We have some M1937 field range outfits. Due
to the high humidity in this area, we have a real
problem trying to keep these ranges free of rust
When in temporary storage.
Our TM 10-701 (Jul 57), tells us to coat all un- /
finished surfaces with rust preventive compound,
but it doesn't give the FSN or nomenclature. Can
you give us these?
SFC L. E. McP.
Dear Sergeant L. E. McP.,-
For temporary storage, use preservative corrosion
preventive petrolatum, Spec MIL-C-10382, FSN
8030-251-5048. This is a non-toxic preservative. It's
a GSA-6 item, and that FSN should get you a gallon. J.
It costs around $1.44 per gallon. You apply the pre- GAL.
servative by spraying-or you can brush it on.

/I-^aI/t /jj

DUNKING AND SWITCHING'S OUT
Dunking in hot soapy water may be all
right for cleaning most canvas and webbing
CLEAN equipment (like it says in FM 21-15), but
SLWATEAR it's out when it comes to the M15 field pro-
'- tective mask carrier. That's the carrier your
S' M17 mask fits into.
Some of these are stiffened with fiber-
S S 14 board and can't stand the hot soapy water
treatment.
Clean the carrier with a brush dipped in
clear cool water.
Better make a note of this in paragraph 29
of TM 3-4240-202-15 (Nov 62), if you
didn't get Change 3 (21 Oct 63) to the TM.
Changing the filter elements (FSN 4240-678-8474) in {DONT
your M17 field protective mask may not be much of a job. RIGHT \-S
But there's one thing you must keep in mind-that FSN LEFT
gives you a pair (a left and a right). When you're putting
them in the mask, make sure the left one goes in the left side, '
and the right one in the right side. OK?























To prevent the plug from being yanked, kicked or otherwise removed from
the wall socket you might try this fix.


From a piece of hard wood cut out a cord
holder like so:


Next, latch on to two 11/4-in wood screws
and mount the holder at least eight inches
from the wall socket.


fDRIL. 2 HOLES
,C'LusING NO. 10 DRILL


I, a 77
..'-L.



















The new DA Form 581 (May 1964)
"Request for Issue and Turn-in" takes
over ammo supply chores as of 1 May
1965.
The new multi-line item form is pre-
pared in five copies, which work like
this:
No. 1 Voucher copy for account-
able officer. No. 2 FIA (Financial In-
ventory Accounting) when needed. No.
3 Due-out copy for requesting unit.
No. 4 Suspense copy for requesting
unit. No. 5 Shipping copy returned
with ammo order.

M"14 andH t1452, r"/
How is the M14E2 rifle different from
your trusty old M14? It's all spelled out-
with pictures and stock numbers and all
-in the new TM 9-1005-223-12 (8 Feb
65). If your outfit has the M14, order
plenty copies on DA Form 17 from the
St. Louis Pubs Center.

Ute4w iVdex
There's a new index, DA Pamphlet
310-6 (Mar 65), for Supply Catalogs
and Supply Manuals. Get yours.


Your inventory of commercial design
vehicles and military design vehicles in
administrative use called for by
Change 1 to TM 38-750 but suspended
by DA message is on again. Details
on completing DA Form 2408-7 for these
iterms are in DA Cir 750-8 (14 Apr 65),
including codes to be used. Report com-
mercial design vehicles by registra-
tion number military design vehicles
in administrative use by serial number.
The circular lists specific vehicles covered.


When you want to get or replace the
30-foot Gage and Hose Assembly used
to inflate the tires on your 5-ton G744
and 10-ton G792-series trucks, order it
under FSN 5210-777-2943. This is a
new FSN for the latest TM 9-2320-211-
10 and TM 9-2320-206-12.

R"ewte44^ 9*e*
Got a training program on TM 38-
750 equipment records procedures? The
new Army Subject Schedule 38-1 (11
Sep 64) can help your plan.


Would You Stake Your Life on
the Condition of Your Equipment?














































.4


.":r%,


IS NE BETTER,
DIFFER ...IT RIDES
SMOOTH ND IS A
TITLE QUI R... BUT
REQUIRES SLIGHTLY
IFFERT DRIVING
EC QU F'RINSTANCE:
P HARP EYE
HE EDOMETER-
LIV Y!!
/HE YOU'RE DRIVING
DA ED-DRIVE A BIT
1W R!!
ARP TURNS. DARTING.
F CY WEAVING IS MURDER.
WHEN ROAD TILTS, EASE
UP ON THE GAS TO KEEP CONTROL.
5. ON CURVES, KEEP
CONTROL BY STEERING OUT
OF THE TURN.
TAKE A CAREFUL LOOK AT
YOUR TM 9-2320-218-10
AND ALSO ITS CHANGE 1
-, r- (MARCH 1963).


-'I'I


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i'
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