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PS
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00015
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1965
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00015

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4-5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8-9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12-13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16-17
        Page 18-19
        Page 20-21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26-27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40-41
        Page 42-43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48-49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58-59
        Page 60-61
        Page 62-63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text




STHE
PREVENTIVE~ I


(00






IN MAINTENANCE...
IN READINESS-


''' Remember the old saying-
,Knowledge Is Power"?
It's especially true if you've got
to keep Army equipment ready for
S combat.
The smartest guy in this mans
Army an't do much maintaining on
a tank or a missile or a radio unless
he has the know-how.
Where do you get it? Training-
in school or on the job-is one way.
But, sometimes questions and prob-
lems will raise their ugly heads that'll
i stump even the best trained man.
So, what else?
Your publications, that's what.
The Army puts out a Technical
Manual on almost every piece of
equipment. They tell you how to
maintain your equipment.
But if you don't have one...
what then?
Getting a pub also takes a little
know-how. First, you find out what
manual you need. The best way is to
use the Index, DA Pamphlet 3104.
Then order the number of copies of
the TM you need on the order blank.


DA Form 17.
If you're the operator or user.
you'll need the TM with a number
ending in .10, the operator's manual.
or -12, the operator and organize.
tional maintenance manual. The TM
ending in -20 is for your unit mechan.
ic (organizational maintenance).
You'll also want the parts manual:
it has the same number as the TM
except it has a P added at the end
... like the -12P or -20P.
The TM may not be the only pub
you'll need. In the Index you'll see
Technical Bulletins. Supply Bulletins
and Modification Work Orders (TB.
SB, MWO). Get all that tie-in with
your equipe-r,r. i. rl... r ,l .r h.
Field Manuals (FI). Find them
listed in their own Index. DA Pam.
phlet 310-3.
Get the pubs--and from them you
*can get the know-how .ou need to
keep your equipment maintained...
ready to fight.
That way you and your unit ran
prove that Knowledge Is Power--to
win in combat.


InH PIR NTIVE MAUIBUNCE MONTHLY
Isu.. No s15 1965 Se.ie..
IN THIS ISSUE

GENERAL AND SUPPLY
PubODsiribntion 23 Niw PouDoiations 7
A Fornn 12.21 4-8 Borl A*.sy
PSwoI ihhEEl Sopply I1. 12, 14.21.
DI Coas 7 24 31



GROUND MOBILITY 8.27
Special Fature--Be You Onn Insrptru
M416 t..T.n Cario Cin i 1IS-1
WHEELED TRACKED
R3jdifor Hos 311 M104'3Pr Hwter 2-21
M35AI 12.13 Mi01P Gun 22 23
M38Al 14 MI3PC 24
Cicu,1 T.Leir 25-26



AIR MOBILITY 37-47
Spieeml Feature-Fr,liihi Chule ChcF 4047
iH.IB 31 On .3G 38
OVI 3B Had, .i. .t 39



COMMUNICATIONS 48-57
ARC. 'S4 4J50 BJe3i. Or. 1 55
E'i C(Lck 51 N-4 -B 55
lo Iln lI i 51 IM rI ii ir 55
PPII? 52 1 .i 2 58
Inc. r.i r.n, 53 M 4 ,7,'IJ 5S
aLNIPM. 54 I-- l


FIREPOWER 58 63
SpecinFeal hre--M -MS i, '.." 58-61


Ol IE luno.fin, idr ailn0 Ia this public
vIln hau shn appliaii or Headqurleri;
teoinntI of lin Army, 19 Feb, lro 1905
DISTRIBUTION In 3crordhnce with re
quirementr oubmited on DA Form 12.4



Si~1 ,


C --


- -


tb, A-
naa!mnai
nnel D.s
31 pubi,

intenance
vi Kc,
























Orders are orders.
You wouldn't want to miss getting
a copy of some order-like one that hit
you with a promotion, for example,
now would you?
There are some other mighty impor-
tant orders-the Army publications on
your equipment .. technical manuals,
lube orders, technical bulletins, modifi.
cation work orders, supply manuals.
supply bulletins, pamphlets, circulars.
field manuals and regulations. You'll
notice that they're signed off by the
Army Chief of Staff and The Adjutant
General. Real top level.
You want to make sure you don't
miss out on any of these that might be
about equipment you operate, main-
tain or supply. To make sure, just re-
member that the pubs reach you by two
routes-


PINPOINT
FORMULA


YOU GET SOME PUBS VIA...

PINPOINT
DISTRIBUTION

To mokr pi"Pon' 011k. your unit
1h o fil out ond ad In these lorm:.
has to foms 12-4, 12-8 ond 12-9--
D o\ Afo" .. .. pubs (pomphl els,
(Ildminslratlive .yp' r oIo ns) I The
ulculal ps MagaoZ^ m7 Palata-.
form 1 sent to the Bqallmore Puiowea
h Mo n n ie l b y O h e o uq u d i s. eno r ate
ithn ba ahon. e pl for separate
compon es

rmESE FORAIS SEr TmE
SM/ SA' REArtENT BurT,
ARE IA1L.eDE ro ST. LOUIS
PUBLICATIONS C NTER.
I AOVD, TAee A9zE &YTU APvfOIr\
FORM. S EiA S He I40e o /
..AA TC\ OeE r\PES Or PUI S
.WATCH FOR 'EM i


SDA Form 12-34-
D -1 Some TB's and SB's. DA Form 12-. 5-


DA Form 12-21 -
r Nule r weapon pubs.
-- -_. . . . /-i -


/-- P '-


-aro rad 1impt-b s p.- -
S Form Fo r- -12-' :






iDA Form 12-31-
Ma,,,,, la s .:.ph,,bros p.,'. L- --".- F---i__ "" --=-

S* ,- '--- !:- ^-'^- F' P P(W Da FipM 1't ii F(pS P% i -




-: -- .pubs.(Indudesthose on .
S_ ..llid ament sub-systems. I

1 F orm .3




ALL OTHERS COME O MULA u L
TO YOU VIA .. IST BUTTON

(THRU COMMAND CHANNELS) out. Real handy for keeping up-to-date.
All other publication' are distributed Order these from your post or division
b) the formula printed in the pub) AG section.
from .your post or di% ision AG section. You've got to send in your order (the
To get on this distribution,you have 12-series forms) to get the publications
\.our Post or Di% ision AG send in DA you need for maintenance and supply.
Forms 12 l nih 12-1. 1- 2 or 12-3, or And keep on top of the latest ones out
all thrue. by reading the Distribution Center
Your ourtit nill wanc at least one Bulletins.
cop) each of the Baltimore andSt. Louis P.S.-There's a real handy pamphlet
Publications Distribution Center Bul- on publications distribution, DA Pam-
Icoins. The 're put out weekly and list phlet 310-10 (May 64) "Guide for Pub-
thr later pubs that ha3t been shipped locations Supply Personnel."







SUPPLY CA

LET'S ao!
GEr YOUR


SCOPY
:- .-- ~-,-- --:=i-- L g OU








DAO.o -.-21-

Hurry! Quick! Pronto!
Grab that pencil or typewriter and
get with it! Opportunity; knocking a;


your door.
You can now tell the pubs people in
St. Louis just what Federal and DA
Supply Catalogs you need, and you
won't have to clutter up your shelves
with a bunch of pubs you don't use.
The good news comes with DA Cir-
cular 310-10 (8 May 64), which tells
about DA Form 12-21 (1 May 64).

Cir 310-10
HEADQUARTERS
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
WAB INGTON, D.C., 8 May 1964

PUBLICATIONS


DA Form 12-21, "Requirements for
Federal and Department of the Army
Supply Catalogs," lists the FSC group
and commodity identification from FSC
10 (Weapons) to 99 (Miscellaneous).
4


.. EDICL.OENT. L
T"'r "' ii


TALOGS


GO PINPOINT


NEWTS FOR FEDERAL AND DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLY CATALOGS (c---. aO /
34. THREE COLUMNS--
3 SPECIAL Ir u USE THEM ALL -
37. AGRICULTURAL MI, H Y M DT LI
38.-TNST. MINIM XC IO HITHWAY MAINT
CONDITIONING ED UIFCNT
41 REFRIGERATIONa
43. PL"'0'. U You'll note there are three columns
on the 12-21. The first one is the -
.^... : '--- .-: IDENTIFICATION lIST. These Il's furnish I I
5...Lu.. ... _" idenlification data. such as FSN, nomen-
--- .- ~~c lature, etc. "
---^ ---T- ----

415920IRCRAFT
4930 LUBRI ..NEL .. ....M Then there's the M GMT DATA
S- ....-. -- LIST (Management Data list or I
...... -. MI s) The catalogs in this cate.
::-.- -- gory will give you prices, unit
... : -- -- of issue, supply status code,
-. .. .- and, of course, the FSN

.' ..." T

: The (ROSS-REF LIST column
TS TELETYPE =AND ICIMILE
.1. T A....... RNE is crossed out and SKO COM-
.I....DIO. TELE *. BOE... PONENT LIST is ritlen in (oc.
8625 sA I on EXCEPT AIRBORNE.... E cording to St. Louis AG Publi-
-30 5ITE 77 ; T A.IBoRNE cation Center Letter AGAM-L,
M,.YSTEM, AIRBORNE
.35 S. RO ..-N EQU 16 July 19641 That SKO Is an
5 RBADAR c NT EXCEPT |RBO.RE abbreviation for Sets. Kits, and
-r L -ALLTC.E. .. Outfits (Most of these will be
... ELECTRIC EEscTm EUPco.UPCO published as DA Supply (tao-
.ELEC WNE A PR ISTR EQUIP
... .-.2 s. .. logs.) You go down the list to
A .. make sure you're ordering what
: .. .. -" you need but don'l gel your
3.3 NR I."L". No-.. ic.s shelves uttered with "nice to
s^'"' ----- have" pubs.
0 SCLLEOU S TOR p E u


RE\ G '.4EHTS FOR FEDERAL AND DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLY CATALOGS (Contnued If O PN


IDENTIFICATION LIST I MGMT DATA LIST I -Rt LIST I


Now that you know
what to expect in the
IL's, ML's, and CL's
(that CL is for Sets, Kits,
and Outfits Compo-
nents), study the list
carefully before you
start putting down the
number of copies you'll
need.
Once you've decided,
you put down the num-
ber you need in the ap-
propriate column oppo-
site the group or class.
You'll probably need
more of one type supply
catalog than another. If
you do, then put the
number down. Before
you make any hasty de-
cisions, you should keep
in mind that you'll get
all the supply catalogs
that apply to the cate-
gory you're requesting.
And, many of them'll
come in more than one
volume. For instance, if
you request IL's for the
53 group, you'll get ten
volumes of C5305-IL
(screws).



5-


I


- ::t


___0159


' COMMODITY IDENTIFICATION
IST EOUIP I SUP


1


VFE>





To keep from overloading your
shelves with extra volumes of catalogs
you don't need, keep your pinpoint
order to a minimum. If you need more
on one particular subject, you can order
the extra copies direct from CO, U.S.
Army Adjutant General Publications
Center, 1655 Woodson Road, St. Louis,
Missouri 63114 on a DA Form 17 (if
you have an account number). Be sure
to include your account number or you
won't get them.


Now that you know about the supply
catalogs, here's how to get 'em. You
fill out the DA Form 12-21 just like you
did on your other pinpoint forms and
send them to battalion for review. Bat-
talion will mail them to the Army
Publications Center in St. Louis.
The DA Form 12-21 rescinds supply
manuals listed in Section II of DA Form
12-33 and the supply manual in DA
Form 12-34 that apply to general sup-
plies, subsistence, and petroleum.


HOW MANY COPIES?


LOTS OF GUYS GRIPE BECAUSE THEY
DON'T SEE PS MAGAZINE EVERY MONTH...
THEIR OUTFIT GETS ONLY ONE OR TWO COPIES.
LET'S SUPPOSE YOU'RE /N A COMPANY
(OR BATTERY)...HOW MANY COPIES
DOES YOUR OUTFIT NEED? TOTE THESE
UP FOR, LET'S SAY, A TANK COMPANY




YOUR OUTFIT
CO and Exec .................................. .... 1 .............
Ist Sergeant ................................ ... 1 ..-.......
Supply Sergeant .... ..... ............... 1 ..............
Com m o Chief ...................................... 1 ............
Maintenance Section ....................... ... 5 .............
1 for each tank crew ............. ..... 17 ...........

Total ................ .............. 26 copies of PS


That's what you put on your DA Form 12-4 that goes to battalion; they send
it direct to the Army Publications Distribution Center, 2800 Eastern Blvd.,
Baltimore, Md. and the 26 copies will be .mailed direct to the company each
month. If you're a separate company, you send the form direct to Baltimore.
No sweat.






THE DI CODES



"lt


Dear Half-Mast,
I La jun A Lf r V p, Ar T~.~ h 14ca 1~..., ~ u ...


carry the document identifier code AOE (requisition with exception data,
stateside) when TOE, TA, or other authorization is quoted on the request.
Others in my supply section argue that if the request carries a good FSN,
its DI code should always be AOA (requisition with good FSN, stateside).
Who's right?
Sgt C. W. 5.






BOTH OF OU--
CHECK FIG 3 OF
AR 711-I7




S.'





Dear Sergeant C. W. S.,
It's a draw.
Both you and your opposition best check Figure 3, AR 711-17.
There's no sweat for the user on which DI code to use on DA Form 2765-1,
for non-expendable items. AR 711-17 mentions DI codes in connection with
the pre-prints for expendable items (DA Form 2765) which support or some-
one else prepares for your use.
On the DA Form 2765-1 (for NX items) the DI code comes into play when
your request is converted to a MILSTRIP (AR 725-50) requisition (by your
support) and the request gets passed on to the inventory control point (the sup-
ply distribution point). And, when this happens, support decides which DI code
to use.


I!














IF THERE'S ONE THING THAT'LL
FOUL UP A LIQUID-COOLED
ENGINE... IT'S A HOSE THAT'S
WAD IT.


Bad hoses and overheated engines
just naturally go together.
Your engine's radiator hoses are ex-
pected to let anywhere from 4000 to
10,000 gallons of water circulate thru
the engine's cooling system every hour,
depending on the size of the type ve-
hicle you drive. A bum hose puts a
crimp in this swift river and your en-
gine starts overheating. An engine that
heats up just three degrees over its best
operating temperature is losing a lot
of pep.


DANGER SIGNS
If you see any water around your hoses, then you know something's wrong. But here're
a few things to watch for even before the hoses do leak. Be suspicious of:

1. MOISTURE OR LITTLE BEADS OF WATER 2. CLAMPS THAT'RE CUTTING INTO YOUR
ALONG HAIR-LINE CRACKS OR AROUND HOSE, POSITIONED TOO NEAR THE HOSE
HOSE CONNECTIONS. EDGE OR RIDING THE RIDGE OF THE INLET'S
BEAD.


This sign tells you that the hose is deteriorat-
ing and has only a short time to go before
letting go.


3. A HARD AND STIFF HOSE.


Never tighten clamps so they'll cut or dig into
the hose. Keep 'em snug but not overtight.
They must always be positioned between the
inlet bead and the hose edge.


L T y e


4. A MUSHY-SOFT HOSE.


-f A mushysoft hose means you've got a rotten
hose It's a good bet that pieces of rotten
This may mean youi hose has deteriorated rubber inside the hose are falling off into the
and dried out Engine vibration can snp open cooling system Pretty soon the system gets
or split a hose in this condition loaded up and becomes cogged.

5. CRACKS ON THE OUTSIDE COVER OR PUFFED OUI ENDS


Sred ce b o tee i


If read correctly, both of these signs say: Lining's shot-geta replacement from supply right quick.


I





OPERATION CHECK
If you have any doubts at all about Please don't get too nosy when
your hose condition, check 'em all with you're watching ...
the engine running. Watch to see if
the hose wrinkles or folds inward. This REMEMBER I
THAT THE FAN
BLADES ARE
WVHIRLIN'
AROUND.


This sort of during-operation check
means it's too weak to hold up when also tells you whether the hose clamps
there's a vacuum inside it. The vacuum are on right. If they're loose, water
comes from the water pump's action at begins to leak at the ends when the
high speeds. pump's going full blast.












tion replacement.
Get a new hose. Make. sure it's the right one according to your vehicle's
supply manual or TM 9-2300-223-20P.
GE THE RIGHT HOSENT SHAS





TEERT WA9








LEITHS AND THICKNESES... ACCORDING OK
NEEDS OF EACH VEHICLE'S ENGINE AN
If your hose is suffering from any of these troubles, it's time for an opera-
tion replacement.
Get a new hose. Make.sure it's the right one according to your vehicle's
supply manual or TM 9-2300-223-20P.

HOSES COMC IN ALL DIFFERENT SHAPES,
LENCT 5 AND MHICKNE Z59... ACCORDING MO
THE NEEDS OF EACH VEHICLE'S ENGINE AN
WATER PUMP.


Normally, tactical wheeled vehicle hoses are semi-soft and flexible. Hard-
type hoses are out and should never be used.
Some hoses must be cut from bulk stock. When this is done make sure the
piece is cut so it'll overlap the inlet and outlet tubes from 1 V2 to 2 inches.





TO INSTALL A NEW HOSE:

1. Suape the dirt and pieces of stuck rubbe
from the inlet and outlet connections.
Clean 'em real good. Any piece of old hose
left on may lick your chances of getting
a water-tight seal.


3. Bend the hose in the middle and ldip each
end on the connections. Then position the
hose so it's centered between both con-
nections.


2. Check the damps for a snug fit on the new
hose. Ship them over the hose before put-
ting the hose on the water outlets.


4. Position the lamps between the connec
tion's bead and the hose end.


n1----~


If you have a water heater, see that
the heater hose has a little slack. Give
it just enough to keep it from getting
taut when the engine vibrates. Too
much slack may let the hose sway
against the hot manifold. And, nothing
melts or dries up rubber like hot metal.
11ND






NEW SWIVEL FOR...


*^ 968-0033. No need to sweat or fret about
SWhen you hook up the new fitting a little play in your M35A1 2-
to the fuel shutoff valve rod, it gets ton truck's engine mounting bolts.
L. fed thru the rod eye with the screw on They'll tighten down only so far
S'the engine side. Your cotter pin goes on account of the shoulder at the
._ .I.. thru the hole on the thinner section of end of the threads. When the rub-
.'. the fitting. ber pads get set with age and use,
SOLD the bolts may seem a little loose
and can be rotated by hand.


NEW

SEE SA.P E'. 'I The control cable goes into the hol
IErE'S \\HE.E on the thicker section and is clampld
RAr .E8, tight by the screw.
ON P AIS Regardless of which swi- el ou ha e.
THE TRoUBLE. watch the muscle power when pull ing
; I the engine stop or throttle handle E[ [ OOS[ENESS O1Y



Dcar Spciulin h T. NT. E rNEi
T.. er repl.acmu en sctp cnrrnl ,.hlcb ask for: As long as l hurc s n l mialinc
--ment at the center of the upper and
Control, Engine Stop, FSN 2990-849-8799, Control, Throttle Stop, FSN 2590-693-0612 lower pads, you can rest easy. If
But just putting on a new engine-stop control cable isn't going to keep it TROTTLE there is misalinement, tho, the en-
from snappin' off again. The problem is the swivel fitting that locks the cable pulls will add life to your present gine may shift to one side. Then
to the valve operating rod. It can't take the operating strain and the cable breaks, swivels and cables, the pads gotta be replaced.
12 13






M38A1

YEP! IT'S AN A\LE FACT
THAT T\\O DIFrPEE-.T
KINDS OF ALE9 NAE
BEEN ISSUED L'rLDEC
FSN 2520-735-1404.

---{-v /


This gave some people the shakes. They can stop vibrating now that a new
stock number is out for the left front axle shaft with the cardan conven-
tional "U" joint. It's FSN 2520-691-3546.
1 .-BFNniX r,P., -.,, & ll &J


The CV joint type axle will still be issued under FSN 2520-735-1404.
Either type is good. If they give you the shaft with the cardan joint you don't
need thrust washer FSN 3120-738-2870. If the washer comes off easy when you
change axles you can throw it away. If it won't come off, leave it there. It won't
do any harm.
This applies to the left front axle shaft on both the M38A1 /-ton truck and
the M170 front line ambulance.

M38AIC TIRE PRESSURE
IT *S T A N r TIRE PRESBURE6
FOR THE
MJSAIC WHEN
Ct A --cr LOADED
~ ,. ARE:


Don't fret about the difference in -
weight with the 105mm RR and the
106mm RR, whichever's mounted on
Highway
your /4-ton truck M38A1C. Tire pres- (CrS Country
sure figures are the same under either Mud, Sand and Snow
load.


Front Rear
25 lbs 35 Ibs
20 bs 25 Ibs
15 bs 20 lbs






1/4- CARGO
BE YOUR O CARGO
OWN
M41m CARRIER
INSPECTOR CARRIER
A riddle: What's like a bathtub only just the opposite?
An M416 /4-ton cargo trailer! The plugs on the trailer keep the water OUT
'stead of IN.
You can shanghai the circus fat lady-or ferry any other load weighing up
to 500 Ibs-and keep your cargo high and dry.


NEVER WOULD
BELIEVED IT...


This little baby's even berter'n a boa, 'cause she'll wheel into one side of a
stream, float like a cork goin' across and run out on the other side. Then she'll
roll right on do n the road or across countrN -with a little help from an M 151
or M-122 t'-ton truck, o' course.
This truck 'n' trailer are a team. esen to hadin' interchangeable tires and
wheels.
Just how long this handy li'l trailer keeps on bein' so handy depends on the
attention she gets. She's rugged and can take about ani thing on land or water
-EXCEPT NEGLECT.
She's got wheels. bearings, brakes and lights, but there aren't man% other
moving parts to go bad.
The M416 isn't vern big. so a li'l walk around her-chcckin' top, sides and
underneath-isn't a very big job. It just has to be done often enough to make
sure even thing looks or is working' the wayv it should. There's a whole TM
(that's TM 9-2330-251-14P, with Change 2) just for the M416.
Walk--don't run-when you're making like an inspector.
---- : ^ -- -^ *-^^R$


I





You can keep your trailer in tip-top
shape by catching' all these gig points,
but the ones inGREyN r p call fr
action-pronto:


LOOK "'R OVER
FOR THESE

HANDBRAKE-Linkage out of ad-
justment Won't move easily to
"on" and "release" positions. Ca-
ble bent or dry at holddown clamps
(both front and rear). Springload
adjustment in handle broken or
frozen by dirt or rust.


...AND EYEBALL 'ER
TROUBLE SPOTS


CANVAS COVER Mildewed, rotten,
ripped. Soiled by grease or oil. Grom-
mets loose. Holddown rope missing or
rotten When not in use, it should be
folded neatly and stored in bottom of
trailer.


INTERVEHICULAR CABLE Drag
going. Hanging somewhere other
than in hook on body. Rubber
cracked or rotten. Broken or ex-
posed wires. Burnt or corroded
contacts Plug cover bent or bro-
ken and won't cap tightly.


LUNETTE-Bent, lammed or rusted in
bracket hittingg for GAA lube) Compres.
sion spring broken. Attaching nut loose.
Hooks and links of safety chains broken LANDING LEG Hard to
(chains may be returned to supply move upand down..Locking
where not required by state law). Un- assembly won't work or
painted metal rusty (clean and coat stubborn (needs lube).
with PL oil). Mounting nuts and bolts
-loose.


TIRES-Low pressure (should be 25 PSI for
highway travel, 22 PSI for cross country,
18 PSI for mud, sand or snow) Worn to fab
ric or worn unevenly. Nails, glass, other
sharp objects imbedded in tread. Valve caps
missing.


WHEELS-Bent or twisted rims. Studs
or nuts loose, missing. Won't rotate
freely. Brakes dragging. Bearings poorly
adjusted, worn or dry(repack bearings
after trailer has been in water above
axle level).


^


MORE>







LIGHTS AND REFLECTORS-Glass
broken. Burned out lamps or cor.
roded lamp sockets (check out with
cable hooked up to tow vehicle
and inspect wiring harness back
to cable for breaks, shorts, loose
connections, rusted or broken
clips)




SPRINGS Bolts (front and rear)
dry and squeaky (need lube, but
not on springs). Loose "U" bolts.
Broken spring leaves. Broken cen-
ter bolt or clips.


BODY AND CHASSIS FRAME -
Paint missing. Rusty, bent or
cracked. Body loose on chassis.
Frame bent or twisted. Tiedown
hooks and corner handles bent or
broken off. Data plate painted over
or rusty (should be cleaned and
given heavy coat of clear lacquer).


I Inspecion "during operation" nill
sho(, up.


S i wandeiing,



shimmying


DRAIN VALVES-Won't open completely
or won't close tightly. Assembly rusty
or bent or plugs deteriorated (replace.
S ments can be ordered by FSN 2510-
732-8336).


pulling lo one side,



alotles. squeaks and


fauir lighting %rrcm iinisp light on
right iide of Mi-i t i(n'r supposed to
\ork % hen connec[.:J r.-. I I truck



Even ii drain plugs are in good shape.
they won't keep out water if you forget
to close 'rm. Just a simple rwist'll seat
erm. T!L gotta be kept open on land,
rho. .' let rain or other water out.
There's no tailgate, so this trailer can't
be parked at a rilt to drain.


N/ot CWECK
,EtE E DeAN r
%AL% ES


- -..:


P


wu


+ `1


-,lo


-"
:~ "'





PANIC WISE...
YOU'VE GOT TO WATCH THIS BUTTON!




!1 .21 "


The over-ride button for the rammer
on your M109 howitzer can do different
things.
Itcan ram a 155-mm round into the
gun or it can break your buddy's back.
All depends how you use it.
If you use it for ramming you'll only
need it when ...

1. The micro switches on the rammer tray
won't work.
or
2. The rammer control box fails.
or
3. You need to complete a ramming cyde
without unlatching the trays so you can
start a new cycle.


If you use it any other time you're
likely to hurt yourself or somebody
else. An MWO to put a guard over the
rammer button is in the works.


-- ---- ___.___I >46~


When you have the master switch
and the turret power switches both ON
-and that is most of the time up on
the line-it takes only a press on the
button for the rammer to ram-jam any-
thing in its path a heavy round of
155-mm ammo or your buddy's head-


mox nix to the rammer.
Just remember that the rammer
doesn't care. It works just as well in
the stowed position and it is not par-
ticular whether you activate it on pur-
pose with your finger or by accident
with your foot.


Some gourmets h% e taken tr sti,"
ing a case of C rations on the shclf be.
hind the door. All connoisseurs of line
food can understand this. but if a cor
ncr of the case pressts dou n on the but-
ton the rammer %\ill ram v hen .ou
turn on the turret power switch
Another thing. The rear tr.;
handle on the rammer looks like a
hind) grip to hang on to xhen .our
Mil,9 is going <-,er a rough ,re'tch of
road Onl d doin do it Dad or sou II
be sad. Just a little bit of do,, n pressure
on the handle %"ill release the lock and
the whole rammer will fall. If the
cable breaks-and it likely will-the
rammer can land on top of you.


One last thing about the rammer.
. Don't press the over-ride button
until you get a reading of 925 (PSI) or
over on the hydraulic pressure gage.
If your reading is OK and it won't
ram after you hold down on the button
for 3 seconds, call a mechanic to check
out the system because something is
wrong.


F


1







LOCK THE LOCKNUT
f-

:9
--S.-
11^~"-11
*^ '^Ey-,


S-ll OESNr THE



Did you hear about the freak accident with an M107 SP gun? It lost its steer-
ing, ran up a bank and tipped over. One of the crew ended up with a broken
leg.
Seems the final drive coupling locknut backed off and disengaged the trans-
mission from the final drive shaft.
Besides the M107, it could happen to any of your M110 SP howitzers
and M578 VTRs.
So-o-o-o, here's the way to make sure the two stay coupled up:
Remove both saddles from the final drive output coupling shafts. ,



















The retainer should rest tight against the /, 4
transmission flange.

Stake it no more than 1/32-in deep (thickness of a dime). Too deep and
you'll damage the nut when taking it off.
The job takes just a short time to do. Get yours done-now.


M108-M109 HOWITZER COOLING FAN

SNGROAN...AM BEFORE YOU
r IA "WRECKED" GO... TELL ME HOW
-OFIER.. rO ORDER A NEW
ONE.





-U- -L~ ~ ./


Cool it, man! the electrical cur-
rent rectifier in your M108 or M109 SP
howitzer, that is.
If the fan motor that cools the rec-
tifier conks out you won't find the stock
number for a new motor in the parts
manuals.
But don't cry ... you can get it with
a written justification explaining how
come the one you had went kaput.
Order it as Motor, rectifier, blower,
FSN 6105-987-9901, (Part Number


10930399). This'll get you the motor,
which costs $19.25.
If you need the fan, order it as
Fan, Commercial, FSN 6150-850-9332,
(Part Number 8720053) for $3.45.






ALL SCREWED DOWN?

Been missing a few screws or inserts that're needed
to hold the M113 PC fuel tank access cover in place?
The ones found on all of your later production
vehicles? To replace 'em requisition:


Screw, Coap, Hex Hd, FSN 5305-576-2121.
Washer, Flat, FSN 5310-809-4058
Insert, Screw Thread, FSN 5340-990 8543.

ACCESS
The insert is replaced by your general support\ OVER
unit.
You'll find these hardware items in TM 9-2300-
224-20P/3, Part I (Nov 64) on page 189.


You M1l1TyPES...
CHECK Tr)I PAGE F' INTERIOR
PERTINENT POOP!
DECORATING

Touch-up time inside your
M113 or M114 armored person-
nel carrier? That light green
paint comes in either quart cans
'~2 FSN 8010-598-5648 or gallons
-. FSN 8010-527-3197.


M113 PC HOSE CHANGED

FSN 2520-055-5979 There's a new and different
filter-to-cooler hose for your
M113 personnel carrier.
If you're needing this hose,
ask for it as Hose, Assembly,
Rubber, FSN 2520-055-5979.
The supply depots know all
about the new hose so have
your support get it for you.
24






LOW-VOLTAGE CIRCUIT-TESTER...
SWITCH BURNING


-- -~-b


The load bank switch on your low-
voltage circuit-tester (LVCT) will burn
out, and you can get well scorched, too,
if you open or close the load-bank
switch during a test.
So, make a note somewhere handy
so all concerned will soon learn this
SOP by heart:
The load-bank disconnect-switch
should be turned ON BEFORE test is
started and OFF AFTER test is com-
pleted.



V

SON-BEFORE
on. 0 OFF-AFTER


During some tests, you get to fooling
with a fairly high flow of current, and
if you open or close the circuit you'll
get a strong arc that can wreck the
equipment, and hurt you, too.
There're some six or seven different
models of low-voltage circuit-testers in
the supply system, but basically, they're
very much the same. This important
operating caution goes for all of them.
(All these models come under FSN
4910-092-9136.)

WORKING THE LOAD BANK
The only safe adjustment you can
make on an LVCT during a test (while
the current is flowing), is with the
variable resistors (the load-bank con-
trol-knobs and the field rheostat).

MORE






Some LVCT's have only one load-
bank control-knob, but others have
two control knobs-one knob for fine
adjustments and the other for making
coarse adjustments. And, on testers
with two knobs make sure you don't
mistake the load-bank disconnect-
switch for the second load-bank con-
trol-knob. You gotta remember that
the load-bank disconnect-switch is a
toggk-type switch. It's not a knob.
Here's something else to remember:
Although the adjustment control is al-
ways a knob-type control, some manu-
als may identify it or refer to it as the
load-control switch assembly.
You can see that the best way to safe-
guard your tester, your equipment and
yourself, is to latch on to the right TM
for the tester you use.

LVCT MANUALS

Each LVCT is also covered by a
manufacturer's manual. And, along
with all that scoop on your LVCT's, the
steps on the next page should help ease
your switch-burning problems.
TM 9-4910-401-12 (Nov 62) and
TM 9-4910-401-20P (Feb 62) cover
LVCT model 10308, Auto Test Inc.,
and model TV 100, by the Atomic En-
gineering Corp.
And, TM 9-4910-402-12 (Jul 62)
and TM 9-4910-402-20P (Feb 62)
cover model 1060, Electro Mechanism
Corp.
Incidentally, a change to TM 9-4910-
402-12 is in the mill to add instructions
for the Ram Meter Inc. Model PN
62F151 and Austin Continental Indus-
tries Inc. Model 1060A.


KNOB TURNING
Forcing or rough handling is not
for any of your LVCT's knobs. Some
testers are made with laminated graph-
ite plates and forcing a knob in the
"OFF" position can cause these plates
to crack or break out completely.
When this happens the LVCT's resis-
tance values are way off.










FM., .. i :. M F-;


iI -A





IF i. l c : i, .:
TM ; C 1- i



IM 3 2 7 m i...i r:-. 1




Ge i ii I






TIM IB I ESC N i r






iTM iBuO lIT 1.E N *i -



,I1.- MJd i **r C--1 bi ti-
r D O l(a 6 r 1- L L





FM 3.,Bboh?1 ESC r.. ii
*i O ..I :oI










IM M .30 I2 MlJ *. oz.
IM di. 00.?I E5fC N j. ir


oIa CG 0r-, Bur:Ianlo 5p .Ingfld
Mid. K I ao. Ga.Ion Mdi T iG
iM l5 300-220 E1C No*. reiiln
He-t B ,... il Spe 410 IO llle
l1i Mdi 'i0 uS Rascmo Mdl 80
TM j 3800-216 ESC N:. Roil
Mi-a Bu.ieo Opl nfid MOI KX 16
C: Gi.o. nMl 31J9G
rM 3 id00O217 ESE No-. Roll
Minc C. ; .. 10 i Co.Gnon ani
i. allon Mli i Fad 0 Moi En.ilo
P, rii4a Mdi Fi 31tC.
TM -.I 00D-213ISC No.. Sp.-pa.


Tio- Br. a,' G.oa Mdl j
SIM 8.3iBGO.2I E.SC, Nc.. Velle.
-i.In. ,Ga D .r 1|i Nid 16C
i 5 ,3 i dl Jn 1 i, ESeC ll Mdl

S e .ci Ar.Mdi O IA er MI 3

Mu C3800.1 E ICle N BoHel I
C. c "rp IBre, Mdi G0 SI"|
I- : Mol :C 5;>m rC...re &-qEhI

3 :0.300-272.ES'C lto,. Ci.r &
N lo 5 I' P.' D.e, & Elor

FM 3 g-f24.iFiC ro n loa.a b.i
i nE ', ,i -n n l i A, BarOr,
Mai .aC ".1 MNil 7.PC
iM 303.231 EiC 'iio. t auaiid ui.
ur,' 3a.'9g Bu.e Cieer'

TM *,ig900.2o00 EC No. Con.Mror
I.n A J0 lI u. i 14 hbcr GCreer



CM D .n -300-0 -El -; -



iuC.. ; r r r :LC :,
F0.0. .l C]on i Co. it
.ed r' Mil a in 1- : MI
To mda lhil M ,-.


IM 5-4300-207-ESC, Nov, Pump, Cenl,
Cr-sofine-D.n, Carter Mdl 504-CW,
ilner Mdl GP-55, Weinman Mdl JC.
IM 5-4300-209-BSC, Nov, Coap,
: 'ly Air; 125 CFM, 100 PSI, ngersoll-
Pnd Mdl GER-125, Joy Mdl RP125
C i40MS-3.
IM 5-5403-ESC, Nov, Comp, Recip,
S., Harris Mdl 53-121 B.
IM 5-6100-210-ESC, Nov, Generalor
*eo, Porl. 45 KW, 120 V, 3 PH, 3
Sre Sert, 1/20208 240/416 V. 3
f, 4 Wire Serv, 60 C, Convert to
j'.5 KW, 120 V, 3 PH, 3 Wire Sor,
:0/208, 240/416 V, 3 Ph. 4 Wire
-.v, 50 C, Liq Cooled; Consol, Diesel
-dl 4070; Cummins Eng Co Mdl JSGA-
.-1-45; Kurz & Rool Mdl Alex Il Con-
. Diesel Mdl 4150; Slewort & Steven-
: I Mdl 54400; Hollingtworth Mdl
toDW45A.
IM 5-6100-211-ESC, Nov, Gen Set,
icrl, Skid Mid, Dies Eng, 45-KW.
C nsol Dies Elec Mdl 4060; Cummings
i- Mdli JSGA-601-45 & JS-6-G,
,.1KW, 400-Cyc Hornilchfegor Mdl
l:0-A; Hollingiworth Mdl JHDX-45A,
.tew & Stevnsn Mdli 26200, 28100,
.?300.
-M 5-6100-213-ESC, Nov, Gen Set,
-vI, 60-KW, AC, 120/208 & 240/
S16 V, 3 Ph, 4-Wire Svc, Convert to
.:-KW, 120 V. 2 Ph, 3-Wire Svn,
i 0/208 & 240/416 V, 3 Ph, 4-Wire
S,. 50 Cyc, Liq Cid, Full Incl by Hous,
Silrd, Cummings Eng Mdi JSCA-601-
& Cummings Mdl JS-6-G (60-KW-
-C).
iM 5-6100-220-ESC, Dec, Gen Set,
. 'l. PU-402/Mi 15 KW, 120/240.
:08/416 V, 3 Ph, 60 Cyc.
iM 9-2320-224-ESC, Dec, Carr, Comd
Sd Recon: Armd Ml 14 and M 14A1.
TM 55-1930-205-ESC, Nov, Opertr.
ohph, Lighler, 5 T (LARC-V).


M i I C I:- ;

aCe.iCiL MANUAL


IM I.18 .iB Lij C.c o 4,r1c
FM 'i.1 10.277.1 D- .C : j.
U. : M i 0 1* r i ie i


IM .51 362I 7 .1 ,- Ci ,





IM i-4710-20: ,12 u i F. r.

, I, l. L:I I '.e .,s,

IM 9.100,. 9.12 o .- r


S* M i. F t


IM J.1340-704d.12 i s iil
GC, & M.ane A-r :- er ir- -
nioril
r 9.1410.302.T1 I :- u e MI
Sp & Mn.,,
IM ,.1430.1!0.',0 r,, i:. rlnk
ne.: i l CF iC dt
IM 0.1430 750.ili/4/l Dle. N be
0*-. Gl Co l. t
IM -m1d30. 3t. Id0/l dn Pe i.
G ra r-dn r.. & 5,. PI...a

0G.-i C.' EA-.i
IM ,1430,50 +, 12F Dec *ar-a

1M 9 1410.301 12P/I Dec Se.-
C.I a aig 5rpI a 1.r fE. p
1M 9..40.0' F IPl/ IJc. Pei "
C .*nMdij 5r' i ET ip
IM 9.2300 7T.OP/J n'o.. mill]


IM 9.2320,7274.?i De. C.r' C..ma
& lern i.-a |Ii J> |ll u
IM 9-233J 246-14 N".- ir. IEre
mElifi I.l "E C l S' a.D
-M34bf I
TM 9 d9ll 2JJ.12P/I/' Dei N-ie
H-er, 1-.4 les, I q p GOrdl
IM 9.4P ]5.s3.1l2P,'2/1, De;. Nite
en ,' IlnpI Irn E[-.ip iO il
FM 0.500-87 Jir. Oid.p oi Sop
& iq,.. Agl: nllo n-lr COj Car'


28


TM 10-3930-238-20P, Dec, Trk, (lt,
Fork Gas, 6000 Cop, Army Mdl MHE-
193, Baker Mdl FJF-060.
TM 11-5805-211-25P, Dec, Manual
Telephone AN/MTC-7.
TM 11-5805-243-20P, Dec, Telephone
Set TA-1/PT.
TM 11-5805-347-20P, Jon, Term, Tele-
phone AN/FTA-15A.
TM 11-5815-210-25P, Dec, Spec Tools,
List for AN/MGC.9 Teletypewriter.
TM 11-5820-353-25P, Nov, Spec Tools,
list for AN/MRR-8 Radio Iecvr.
TM 11-5820-398-35P, Dec. Radio Re-
pealer Set AN/MIC-54.
TM 11-5965-235-25P, Dec, Headset
Mirro Kits MK-400/G, MK-401/G0
MK-525/G, MK-526/G.
TM 11-6130-233-12, Dec, Power Sup-
ply PP-2953/U.
TM 11-6625-218-20P De, Freq Meter
AN/TSM-16.
TM 11-6730-201-20P, Dec, Projection
Set AS-2(1).
TM 55-375, Dec, Military Driving.
TM 55-1400-300-10-1, Jan, Serg.
Grnd Hdig, Spt & Svc Equip.
TM 55-1510-206-1OCL, C4, Dec, (CV-
2).
TM 55-1510-206-20P, Nov, (CV-2).


--ll~'rC-c;- -CIIY-~--Le~l ~I








HEY You


H. A .THAT'S BETTEr1
I AU ORFULJ.CRUO
AND I AM ABOUT TO
CONOUERMW 11PNMIAN1


FISt..I W L T O Y MILITARY EQUIPMENT... WITH
AN ARMY OF A OEBA ST PARTICLES AND OTHER
CRUD..
...SUPPORTED BY THE NATURAL FORCES OF
HEAT, MOISTURE AND OXIDATION-
WHO CAN STOP ME?


So

O'
..fa







FIRS, 'LL ATTACK LUBES,
OILS AND HYDRAULIC FLUIDS...
BY CONTAMINATING VITAL
ANTI-FRICTION PROTECTION
I CAN GRIND ALL
MACHINERY TO A STOP







Meanwhile ... in the maintenance area off Ft. Poppasan ...
LOOK AT THE GUSTS ...WE'RE COVERING
OF DUST...WHAT ARE CANS WITH PLASTIC,
aYOU TROOPERS DOING WATERPROOF PAPER,
ABOUT PROTECTING OR SUCH...HELD TIGHT
UR LUBES? BY TAPE...TILLWE
LOCATE THEIR
COVERS.


CONTAMINATION OF 01IL
AND GREASES USUALLY
OCCURS DURING STORAGE OR
HANDLING...IT DOESN'T 'UST HAPPEN:..
IT'S ALLOWED TO HAPPEN... AND
WHEN IT DOES, IT BECOMES A
DESTROYER OF EQUIPMENT.






NOW AS TO HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELVES,
HERE'S SOME EASY-TO-FOLLOW ADVICE...
KEEP FUNNELS CLEAN...KEEP CANS,
JARS, CONTAINERS COVERED/4

...AND NEVER
DIP GREASE OUT
OF A CONTAINER
WITH DIRTY HAND'
SOR STICKS.,,_ A


WIPE ALL FITTINGS 3 CLEAN
BEFORE FILLING...ON AIR HOSES
AND LUBE GUNS iMt- .LET SOME
OUT BEFORE YOU BEGIN WORK!
KEEP ALL CONTAINERS MARKED
RIGHT.
t w ip







-A 4 D Shwt


Hydraulic fluids, greases and oil,
Tho' not food, will definitely spoil.
Either water or grit
Will male 'em unfit-
For lubi, hg, cooling and toil.
f\or u y


yoM/q


01'


^*. ...tllu

e. 1


IF YOU WANT TO DISPLAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, LIFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.


Cie,'0
^? 0'<


e+
o


CC~1TA~A~J~;;







CONNIE, CONNIE,
T'S HIT THE FAN./


SOUNDS TO ME MORE
LIKE AN EPIDEMIC OF
CONTAMINATION
NOTHING DESTROYS METAL
PARTS FASTER THAN GRITTY
LUBE


WHAT CAN WE
DO TO FIGHT
CONTAMINATION?






I'VE ALREADY MENTIONED
THE BASIC HANDLING...
NOW--LET'S SEE WHAT
YOU CAN DO TO
PREVENT
CONTAMINATION WHILE IN
STORAGE


(REMEMBER, ANY EQUIPMENT-
GENERATORS, COMPRESSORS,
WEAPONS, AIRCRAFT VEHICLES-
WHICH HAS MOVING METAL
PARTS IS VULNERABLE... TO
MAKE SURE CLEAN LUBES
ARE USED, YOU GOTTA CHECK
YOUR STORAGE.

dn J lrw p,


/ rziil


A AND FINALLY-
INSPECT
YOUR STORED ITEMS
OFTEN/

NINr







rjOSTANT VIGIL104CM~isTky F
FOR LIBERTY--AND C~A
...IT'S ALSO A SURE WAY TO BEAT
CON TAM NATION 1











COISFEff ... OH WELL--
THEV'VE ONLY GAINED A
A TEMPORARY VICTORY! ~ F
.. SOONER OR LATERON
bNE OUTFIT WILL RELAX,..



























There're times when togetherness is great and then there are times!!!
Take the two parallel hydraulic lines between the irreversible valve and
hydraulic pump for the collective pitch control on your Huey (UH-1B).
Vibration can cause one line to chafe against the other, which is the reason
the contractor is now putting a clamp between them on Baker models starting
with Serial Number 64-13902. After all, a ruptured line could ruin a pilot's
whole day.
The birds earlier than Serial No. 64-13902 should be getting this fixed up
with a modification work order before long.

(LAMP
\ KEEPS I
THFM
APARI


FSN 5340 990 9300 OR
FSN 5340 993-6245










Dear Windy,
S Let's face it-changing the engine starter-
generator on a Mohawk (OV-1) can be a prob-
leml
You can't get at the attaching nuts, espe-
cially the top one, with an ordinary wrench.
Well, that's the way it was in our outfit, so
we decided to come up with this tool, made
from 3/8-in steel bar stock.
Changing the starter-generator is a cinch
with this little gem.
Paul E. Pellett
Ft Riley










HERE'S HOW
IT'S USED.


SOCKET FROM


SECURE SOCKET TO BAR
WITH TWO COTTFR PINS






"NOW HEAR THIS!!!"









Dear Editor,
"All holds barred"-from the exhaust manifold-has become a slogan
around here when it comes to mounting our Raven (OH-23G).
It took only a couple of cracked manifolds to point out that some per-
sonnel were using them as a hand hold in order to eye the main rotor head
and swashplate area.






WAS USED AS
H...THIS ONE TOO
HAND HOLD...
I guess the slogan has caught on pretty good because we haven't had any
new cracks in a dog's age.
CWO Franklin H. Brown
25th Inf. Div.
(Ed Note-Good going. This proves again that there's nothing like word-of-
mouth advertising.)

CHECK SUPPORT'S HARDWARE KIT


C SB 1-15-14 -
DEPAITMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLY BULLETIN -
HARDWARE KIT FOR ARMY AIRCRAFT FIELD INDE
AND HEAVY MAINTENANCE ACTIVITY ES
ou want your favorite aircraft maintenance shop to keep supporting your
common hardware needs in the manner to which you are accustomed, right?
OK, then, better tell them about the latest hardware kit listing in SB 1-15-14
(22 Oct 64). This copy of the SB updates the supply story and replaces the
outdated index plaque on the container door. So pass the word for your own
benefit.












it's nor hard to check one out quick-like Just a minimum of preflight PMis all
<.)u need to assure yourself that the chute ill do its job .. if and when needed.

ROUTINE (HECK IS MADE
Before issue and eder) 30 days a routine inspection of each chute is made by
qualified parachute r pes, according to TB 10-1600-200.20/1 (8 Dec 6-i).
This check includes eyeing the log record IDA Form 10-421 to be sure that
the chute has been repacked within the last 120 days as called for in Section
V of TM 10-16"0-201-25 (29 Sep 641 "Mainrcnance of Parachutes and Other
Airdrop Equipment. General."


L. BE SuiC If-I\ 41111





After an external look-see by these parachute rspes, the elasticirs and attach-
ment of the pack opening bands are checked.
Next, the ripcord and protector flap is opened and these items checked-
------------- ----------------





RIPCORD PINS-Bent, burred, RIPCORD CABLE-Frayed,
not fully seated in releasing kinked, rusty.
cones. _


There's no such thing as a go-round on a n lon approach. And, unlike an
airborne type, you can't ) ank on a reserve chute if your main doesn't pop right.
But since the free-fall type of parachute doesn't have an. complicated pares,


RIPCORD HOUSING-Tacking
at top of chute loose or
broken; metal corroded, bur-
red, cut, dented.







PACK OPENING BANDS-Un- PACK-Nylon showing, stain-
hooked, loose, no elasticity. ed, discolored, greasy, dirty,
ripped, mildewed.
41
MEMIRE





EYE YOUR OWN CHUTE
'Course once the chute is issued you're all set to pull your preflight PM.
These points apply to both the B-12 free-fall emergency back-type and the
C-9 chest-type chutes. They're authorized by the safety section of AR 95-1 on
a basis of one each for crew member and passenger. By the way, since all passen-
gers are not familiar with this equipment, it's your responsibility to check over
their chutes, too.
F_ _Mmf_


You can either accept or reject a chute based on how it looks to you. Because
of what's involved here-namely your hide-any one of the following defects
is cause enough for rejection by itself.
So-o-o-o... give them a careful going over.
42


43RE














Careless handling of the chute can make you the cause of some of the very
same defects you just checked for here.
So, first of all, always grab that back chute by the shoulder
harness not by the risers. This will keep you from brcak- i
ing the tacking on the ripcord housing.
You can then choose any one of these three correct ways to carry it
1. Wear it on your back or 2. Support it by both shoulder 3. Tuck it under one arm ...
carry it over your shoulder straps... this is the strong- like a bundle of newspapers.
S hise are the bestl ays est part of Ihe harness t Sj


When you handle the chute correctly, there's little risk of .'i -
damaging it. But, for example, if you break the ripcord
tacking by using the ripcord housing for a handle, the hous-
ing is allowed to twist out of line-forcing the cable inside
to kink. This'll keep the chute from opening when the ripcord
is pulled. "
Or just a thoughtless tug on the ripcord handle and you
pop the chute, requiring it to go back to support for inspec-
tion and repacking.


Y! *44 ?? 4 ? le K 4, fi






KEEP IT CLEAN AND DRY


Once you sign for a chute, take it
directly to your aircraft and place it on
one of the seats inside. This is usually
the safest and cleanest place for a chute
while it's inside an aircraft. So any
time the seat has to be removed between
flights for maintenance, return the
chute to the chute room. Or, if the chute
room's closed and you have a personal
locker that's clean and roomy, you can
keep it there for short periods.


The important point here is don't
put that chute any place where it might
come into contact with dirt, grease,
gasoline, oil, water, etc. Any of these
will soak through the outside pack and
seep down through the tightly packed
gores of nylon canopy inside.
Because there is no air circulation
among the tight folds inside, the canopy
stays damp long after the outside pack
has dried out. This is how mildew starts
and the main reason why riggers always
shake out and hang up chutes to air
before each repack.


Please don't let it rain on your para-
chute. Since a packed chute wants to be
kept as dry as possible, even light driz-
zles mean trouble. So, depending on
the distance between the aircraft and
the hangar, protect the pack by using
a covered vehicle or wrapping the chute
in a poncho or raincoat. If the chutes
are already in the aircraft, common
practice is to leave 'em there between
flights. Best of all, place the chute into
a carrying bag.






STORAGE
Because parachutes can be damaged so easily by careless handling or expo-
sure to weather and so many types of contaminants, your storage SOP should
spell out where and how to stow your chutes when they're not in use.
The storage area should be clean, dry, cool and secure. A cool area is re-
quired because long exposure to large doses of sunlight or extreme heat can
lead to dry rot... which is just as harmful as mildew.
You also want to be sure that the storage area lets you surround each chute
with plenty of air space. By using shelves, racks or bins, you can make sure no
two chutes are piled on top of each other.




PIP(OPD 10 PEAR
HARNESS DOWN

To protect the ripcord assembly, each back chute should be stowed with its
harness facing down and the ripcord housing toward the wall. Chest-type chutes
can be hung up by one of the end loops or placed flat with the ripcord assem-
bly facing up and the D-ring end toward the back.




RIP(ORD IS NOT
1--- .A HANDLE

This keeps the weight off the ripcord pins, cones and cable housing. It only
takes one bent pin or cable kink to stop that chute from popping properly. And
if any part of the ripcord assembly is facing out, someone is sure to use it as a
chute handle. So there goes another accidentally popped chute-or else the
tacking on the cable housing has been busted, letting the inside cable sag and
twist.
A PROPER FIT MEANS SNUG
A properly adjusted harness should be so snug you're practically uncomfort-
able standing in it and just barely comfortable in a squatting or sitting
position. After all, you can plan on having just enough time for a quick tightc::-
ing tug on the leg straps, and no more, if a bailout situation happens to stare
you in the face.
And don't forget that you've got hardware on the harness that can bang
the heck outta you just as the air filled chute jerks you upright. So a loose chute
is no laughing matter .. particularly in the leg-strap area.





Making that chute fit snug means
using the 7 adjustment points on the FOR
harness. If you're not up on adjustment ADJUSTMENTS
procedure, hunt up a copy of TB 10-
519-1 (Apr 56) and its Change 1 (5
Jun 62).
PROTECT YOUR PASSENGERS
rHis TB ALSO MENTIONS THE AVIATOR'. RESPONSIBILITY
TO HI PASSENGERS. IT SAYS EACH AIRCFAIA DRIVER
SHOU 1 11


1. Help each passenger get a good fit.
2. Brief each passenger on bailout sign
and emergency exits.
3. Warn each passenger to adjust his che
strap loosely when wearing a life ve
(This is in case a vest is inflated ac
dentally.)
4. Do all of the above before takeoff. (Fi
lowup interviews have proven that "late
is not too good.)

MOHAWK BOOM CHUTES 1


r --
Mohawk (OV-1) ejection seat chutes
are something else again. They're ac-
tually a part of each cockpit seat ..
and they involve a series of safety pin
locks for preventing cartridges from
firing accidentally. So the only way to
check 'em out is by following the book
while you're doing your normal or-
ganizational maintenance.


als

est
st.
-*


a- a '
Sr",,


GO IN STYLE
If you ever have to go, might as well
go first class ... and enjoy the ride ...
with a good-lookin', perfectly-operat-
ing, nylon umbrella that you can
talk about afterward.
Because once you put it on-and it
doesn't work right-all you can say
then is: "Aw heck! It's a..."

qS


.i~1


I


-j


I











SLUMMUNiXQW'
It's real family and far from
junior-size.
The fact is, the latest member to join
the new FM family of radio sets joins
it full-grown and ready to do a man-
sized job.
This latest addition, you guessed it,
is the AN/ARC-54 radio set. Unlike its
predecessors, which get rides in trucks,
tanks or on your back, this one birdtails
it into the wide blue via more than a
half-dozen types of aircraft.
When it's up there, it fills a big
hole over the heads of ground types ...
kinda like a guardian angel that talks
back to you. It's a mighty comfortin'
feeling' when you need somebody to
look over the next hill.
The ARC-54 does more than make
air-to-ground talk, though. Its stream-
lined black box can make chatter to
other aircraft ... or make for airborne
retransmission or take the aircraft
home via a quick look at a needle and
a flick of the stick.
If you're getting' the sneakin' sus-
picion that the ARC-54 has advantages
over the set it replaces, the AN/ARC-
44, you're right. Like, the ARC-44
misses the full frequency range of the
ARC-54 and other new FM sets by a
wide mile.
The ARC-44's range, 24.0 to 51.9
megacycles, is designed for Standard B
FM sets. The ARC-54's range is from


FOR TACTICAL TALK...
TRY A
HIGH- AN/ ARC-54 RADIO SET
FLYING '-


Ilka
04 jg


30.0 to 69.95 megacycles, the eagle's
share of the new FM family range. The
FM frequencies, of course, make the
ARC-54's primary mission a tactical
one.
If that bit of info doesn't grab you
where it hurts, consider this: the addi-
tional frequency range gives the ARC-
54 800 narrow band FM channels
(spaced at 50 kc) compared to the 280
channels of the ARC-44. It helps when
the airwaves get crowded.
And transistorized, modularized
construction makes the new set more
dependable and easier to maintain. It
has only three tubes-compared to 29
in the ARC-44.
As a capper for your enthusiasm, try
this: The ARC-54 gets out 80 miles or
more when you're transmitting-a 30-
mile bonus over the ARC-44. A mini-
mum 10-watt power output makes it
possible.
That little package of goodies is
gonna take a while to get, though. It'll
be a couple' years before the sets are
out in substantial numbers. When your
unit gets a new aircraft in coming
months, the set most likely will be in
it. Look for the ARC-54 in the follow-
ing new aircraft: U-8, CV-2, OV-1,
UH-1,OH-13,OH-23 and CH-47.Start-
ing in a few months the sets are going
9
J^MORE^






in as replacements in the Iroquois, 'NOTHER THIAG--Tr '
-HOMING ADAPrIR AND
Sioux, Raven and Chinook. POWER SUPPLY ARE PA;
Included in those goodies are the oF TE ARC-54 PACK,
ANO NOT SEPARATE A
RT-348 receiver-transmitter, the C- WITH THE
3835 control unit and the MT-1535 ARC-44.
mount.


RT-348

SA dynamic mike gives you clarity
S/ that the old mikes can't touch, and the
S/ set in general provides a crispness and
Freedom from interference that'll more
than match what you're using now.
Operator maintenance is pretty much
limited to preflight checks and routine
T-1535 inspections. And, other than replacing
fuses, lamps and knobs, the organiza-
tional mechanic has little more to do
than make a few continuity checks.
C-3835 AO




The nice part about takin' care of
them is that all the organizational re-
pairman needs is the AN/URM-105 r'.E PvuBS \ou
multimeter and his TK-115/U tool kit. AREED F-o P
(ARE-
Maintenance chores are simple, fast, TM-II-5821-244-12 AN,
and easy to support. TM-11-5821-244-20P
A couple' other nice "parts" about -i
the set are a tone squelch and a new
visual homing system, the latter for
aircraft not fitted with an "OMNI" '*
system. Instead of "listening" your way
home as you do with the ARC-44, the
new homing indicator features a "right-
left" vertical pointer which shows you
the direction to head the aircraft.
50






















STOP STAYING RED GO GREEN


Don't say heck to the ESC check just
'cause you're losing points for some-
thin' you don't have!
Instead, grab a chair and lend an
ear.
Before you common equipment users
fill out your next DA Form 2404 ESC
inspection sheet, check on what com-
ponents you're authorized.
If you don't have it and it's not
authorized, mark 10 points for the
"missing" item as listed in the ESC.
F'rinstance... the AN/PRC-8 port-
able radio set has everything it's sup-
posed to have, except for a "missing"
homing antenna, which is not author-
ized for your particular set. Omit
checks in Items 10 thru 13 and assign
a score of 10 for each of these steps.


This permits the remaining authorized
equipment to be scored and categorized
on its merit.
Whether it's an antenna, receiver,
handset or other gadget, this guide's
good.
Providing all other items in the ESC
get the high count, the equipment'll be
in the GREEN and ready to go.
ESC manuals'll be getting changed
or revised to clarify this.
In the event your TOE agrees with
your ESC, you can't second guess. If
you don't have an authorized compo-
nent, you get zero and a "RED" rating.
To stop staying in the RED rut,
move on the GREEN scene by getting
that missing equipment.


DON'T STICK YOUR NECK OUT
Stretching your neck over a hot radio transmitter may be a necessary bit at
times, but don't stick said neck out by letting your ID tags dangle temptingly
amidst some joltin' volts. Dog tags in the current can make your neck dance like
a cat on a hot tin roof and maybe even short out the transmitter, too. So
tuck the tags in, Tom.








































Dear Sergeants D. & I.,
Your suspicion on the fuses is right. They're not running spares these days.
Also, they don't belong in the spare fuse wells. The -12P, the SIG 7 & 8 changes,
and para 12b of AR 700-18 (Apr 61) spell that out.
However, whether it be the fuses or another ex-running spare, local com-
manders have the option of using the spare storage spaces. Which means that
unless your CO says otherwise, the storage space on equipment for running
spares should be empty.
52114-494






HOW TO WHIP A WHIP,/.'Po


__ 1HEAP' EM
.' Iup... MOVE
'EM OUT!

The flexible whip antenna of the AN/PRC-6 radio set can whip you into a
lather if you take shortcuts when folding it. So don't .. lest you be left with
the sticky end of the stick.
A few seconds of lovin' care can keep your set out of the repair shop and
off the useless line, where it'd be waiting for a new antenna.
A couple' important don'tt" when folding the whip are: Don't twist it,
and don't try to slide it under the closed latches of the radio case. It might
look easier, but the closed latches really make the job tough.
Instead, try this:
1. Open the latches. 2. Wrap the antenna around 3. Close the latches as you're
the case after unscrewing it wrapping the whip.
from the connector.


To remove the antenna, make like so:
1. Slide the tip from the holding clip. ,


A couple' final don'tts" Don't roll the whip into a loop, and don't put
anything weighty on it or let it lay around where it can be stepped on.






TOO MUCH TOUCHIN'

Are you guilty of sending your AN/PRM-15( ) multimeter batteries to an
early grave?
You didn't mean to, but you forgot, eh!
Sure, you remembered to turn the ZERO ADJUST knob OFF 'cause the
L-bracket on the bottom of the cover wouldn't let the lid snuggle into place
when it was on.


Nothing'll happen that is until the cover's on and one of the test
lead tips touches the cover. While you're thinking' the multimeter's batteries
are takin' a rest from a testing chore, they're putting' out power for no purpose.

ANOTHER WAY TO SAVE THE BATTERIES IS SLIP A
PIECE OF "SPAGHETTI" ON THE END OF
EACH TEST PROBE TO KEEP 'EM FROM
CLICKING AGAINST THE COVES
SWEN CLOSED.


Your best bet, tho, is leave the knob off "R" when you put the PRM-15
away.




















U I P
Static electricity will work the meter equipment-like, rubbing it with a
needle of your ammeter, voltmeter or rag, your hand, or whatever.
multimeter pretty much like live cur- Naturally, the equipment can't do
rent .as you may've accidentally the job it's supposed to when its needle's
found out. stuck part way up the scale, and you
There's a big difference, though. A might work up a little sweat figuring
static charge'll stick your needle in one how to get it back to normal.
spot and hold it there since there's No need for sweat, though. Just
no switch to throw or probe to remove breathe on the meter.
to cut the "current". That's right! Blow your breath on
You build up this kind of static it, and the needle will fall back where
charge primarily when you clean the it's supposed to be.

THIS SB'LL GIVE YOU A CHARGE
Your BB-422/U battery and your AN/PPS-4 radar set'll get a charge out
of SB 11-506 (3 Sep 64). It tells you to requisition the MX-4765/PPS-4 cable
assembly set (instead of the MK-557 kit) for charging with your PU-532 gen-
erator set. It also tells you how to get the generator.
THE IM-108 STORY
Hey out there! If you've still got an IM-108/PD radiacmeter, turn it in to
your support for demilitarization. Your authority, like before, is an Army Sig-
nal Supply Agency TWVX RUEPSA 173), dated 9 May 62, nhich went to all
Army commands. Also, if you've got an IM-O18A/PD, return it to Lexington-
Blue Grass or Sacramento Army Depots ... through normal channels. The -108A
was replaced by the IM-174.

















Spinning the bottle can lead to all sorts of goodies, but spinning the dial of
your TS-382( )/U audio oscillator will only steer you to problems fast.
Like so. The main tuning dial rides free 'n easy, and that's kinda like the
way you're supposed to turn it-easy.
A fast twirl can bang the dial against its stops at either end. It slips on its
shaft, and you can't get a true reading from it when you tune for a frequency
range.
Just in case some other Joe bicycled
the dial around when he was searching'
for those cycles-per-second readings, a
quick look might be in order before
you oscillate the oscillator.

MUST LINE UP FOR NO TRUE READING HERE
TRUE READING








Be sure the white dot (or hairline, if that's what you have) at the left extreme
of the dial lines up flush with the fixed hairline indicator just above or directly
over your dial markings.
If they're off even a fraction, you won't be able to dial the frequency range
you want.
Lotsa times you can get the set back on the beam by tapping the dial gently
against the stop on the opposite end. F'rinstance, if the dot or end line is to the
left of the fixed hairline, tap the dial gently against its right hand stop. Usually,
you can line it up again. Reverse the procedure when the dot's to the right of
the hairline.
If that won't work, higher level repair is needed.






THE SLOW APPROACH PAYS OFF




Now,
BABV
COLL.





The TUNING dial on your ME-57/U modulation meter is a little like a lot
of females.
When the end is in sight, take it slow and easy. The big rush may put your
meter, or your romance, right out of business.
Like, when you're approaching the extremes of the frequency dial (20 or
1000 MC), do it real slow so's you don't clunk into either dial stop pin.
A hard smash, or too much pressure, can damage the dial stop or misaline
the dial on its shaft. That knocks your accuracy.
Considering the range from 20 to 1000 megacycles, you'll rarely, if ever,
have to go to the extreme ends of the TUNING dial; therefore, the stops are
next to unnecessary.
Which means take it easy when you do have to go to either extreme .. and
don't get gay and go banging into the dial stops for the fun of it.
When you feel the stop, quit with the pressure.

A FUNNY THING HAPPENED
TO THE TS-352
Funny thing about the TS- 5 21 I/Li O N


multimeter. When you drop it. it
breaks.
If that breaks you up-and you'd
prefer to avoid like-type disasters--tr
lifting the test leads off the ground or
floor when you're lettin' the T-.i2l
rest up.
The leads have a habit of gectin'
tangled with feet and legs and the
case comes tumblin' don n. Narthchrh.
that breaks it up ...


- \ -





TIPS THAT'LL KEEP
IT YOUR EVER-LOVIN.


TIP .
For instance. v iih the loc in a posi-
rion to know, it's the ne A-n pe alumni.
num mjg.izlnc umptccn hundred 1to 0
ouer rhe sciel-rp- thP-at ~airrm c ih the
carl\ models The sctel mags sometimes
caused bolt lock failure and failure. to
feed.
So. t 'I.ou haIt the sitel r pc. turn
it in pronto for the aluminum one.
The\ both rike the same s[olk number


-FsN I(0i05056223'--buc they're
cas to tell ipa rE. Thu one %ou% % ani has
ihrei. sir-1zi:hE cuhe. bhile che one you
" ant it, trcr citar if hli .ris cro d hLbes.


IAI tip .


S-, -

j Here're a fe, cleaning and operating u
tips thai'll help \ou get best results
from your weapon. Some of htese tips
sort of put the accent on stuff \ou'll S
find in the rifle's bible-TM 9-1005- i
2-419.1- 115 Jun 6-1j. Others are hexes
and lixes direct from gu s who've been
It Ing s ith this light-aeight terror.


Speaking of magazines ... etcr gu.
has his uo n idea of ho" lirm or loose
he wanes the holding action of the
magazine catch to be. \\ which is A-OK
a, far as it goes. But rcnicmber this:
The tighter the main's held in the rc.
ceiser. the more pressure i tak.s to
rcleisc it And this. The further the
hafir of the ci Jch s[ick throu.:h t[h
catch bturtn. the riihtr the ma L.zine s
held in the rec:i.er.


q-e r I



N-57


MHi>


-a~isL





So, take a cue from experience. Adjust the catch button so's it's just about
flush with the inner groove or just sticks out a tiny bit. This'll make the
catch firm enough to prevent accidentally bumping the button and letting the
magazine drop out-yet it won't be so tight that you can't pull the mag out
for a quick re-load.

o PFi BUlnO No sweat adjusting the catch the
IN Plr.r Hi' IDE way you want it, either ... and you're
authorized to pull this deal. Just press
r the button on the right side of the rifle
with the nose of a cartridge far enough
so's you can turn the catch on the left
S9side of the weapon. You turn the han-
die clockwise to tighten it and counter-
TURN iATCH ON clockwise to loosen it. Best of all, you
11PPOiITE sIDF don't have to take the weapon apart
to do this.


1. Use a bore brush (a worn
one'll work better) inside
the gas tube of the carrier
key. You can only go in
about an inch.


2. Then clean around,the pro-
truding part of the gas tube
in the receiver with a bore
brush on a rod section.
Work around it good, too.
M- ?f,


3. Put a drop of oil inside the
gas tube of the carrier key,
and another drop on the
protruding part of the gas
tube in the receiver. This
lube'll let the two parts of
the tube mate easy without
J getting stuck.


TIP...
Some guys've been complaining about cleaning swabs jamming in
the bore-and breaking the cleaning rod. You won't have this trouble
if you stick by the book and cut all cleaning swabs into four equal
squares before using 'em. Your bayonet will do the job if you don't
happen to have a knife or a pair of scissors handy.


IrE;E nrI,5AE A
4 EQUAL STAIT 5T" 24 r %% E1
PAQTS? TvE ACT'Of. 5!


The Ilxking lug recesses on the bar-
SelI extension will also give you trouble
"5 fFl l j if Suu don't keep 'em clean. Till thc
.- come up with a special brush for rhis
chore. go ahead and use the brushes
S, ? Wlistcd on page 9-13 of your TM-or
TIP... c in orher brush like a toothbrush, for
Another common gripe zone is the bolt carrier. Sometimes it'll get frozen in nstance Just remember to soak the
place because of an accumulation of carbon in the carrier key and on the outside brush in bore cleaner hrstr though.
surface of the gas tube. You can beat this hex easy, though, if you do like so:


OLw moiHHHHHH_







Here's something else you want to
be real careful about. Don't-like
Never!-close the upper and lower
receivers while the selector lever's in
S the AUTO position.
SMM os E Always-like Always!-point the
F EL lever to SAFE before closing the re-
ceivers.

Here's why If you jom the receivers closed while the selector's in the AUTO position, you'll
force the automatic sear down and damage the automatic sear, and the sear pin, and will
likely rough up the bottom of the bolt carrier.


That's 'cause when the selector lever's in the AUTO position, the rang
of the automatic sear moves to the rear. You can see how it works b.
opening the receiver and turning the selector to AUTO and watching the
movement of the tang of the automatic sear.
So-o-o... do it right ... every time. Point the arrow to SAFE. Then
the receivers will close without any interference.


TIP


But, these brushes are for inrtrim
use only-till they develop and supply
a special chamber brush for the M16
and M16E1.
There's one thing to watch for if
you're using these Ml or M14 brushes,
though. They may have lead caps about
V4-in in diameter or may've been
dipped in lead. This lead cap must be
removed before you use 'em.


You can take the caps off easy with a pair of pliers. Just
pull and twist clockwise (to the right). After the cap's off, FILE ROUGH
file the sharp edges of the wire smooth so that they won't EDGES.
damage the barrel bore.
CLEANING r --I
ROD Incidentally, you can use both of these brushes sideways
by screwing the M11 cleaning rod into their ratchet socket.


- .' .. -I. N\ I4 Vf/ \ % I I
Make a habit of checking the firing pin retaining pin regularly. Some guys've
been losing theirs .which could embarrass the life out of you.
A loose firing pin retaining pin with one or both tangs broken off won't cause
a malfunction. But, be careful that the retaining pin doesn't drop out and get
lost when you're removing the bolt carrier. And after cleaning, be sure you
replace the firing pin. Then secure it with the retaining pin. Check it again
when you're assembling the bolt carrier to the receiver.
Another thing: When you're crawl- sI
ing or walking through the brush, make
a mental note to make sure you don't '
get the flash suppressor caught in a bush.
It catches easy, y'know.
All the way. Educate your sixth sense to flip the selector lever all the way
across to get from Safe to Automatic. In an ambush situation, you just might flip
it only halfway-to Semiautomatic-when you'll need all the fire you can get.
You might practice flipping it all the way till this becomes second nature.
All in all, this M16 and XM16El's a real sweet number. It'll stay that way
as long as you treat it like one.
63


TIP...


For cleaning the chamber of your
M16 or XM16E1, use either the Ml or
M14 rifle chamber brush.


Speaking of cleaning rods-it is a
rod, y'know, not a cue. Some guys're
forever busting 'em 'cause they use
them like they're shooting pool when
they're cleaning their bore.
Here's the best way to do it: When
you're inserting the cleaning rod in the
bore, grab hold of the rod close to the
receiver and over the joint of the rod.
Then feed the rod through the rifle by
moving your hand to the rear of the


START WITH HAND C(OSE
TO RECEIVE... -r ,-


I


..MOVE HAND TO REAR
AS YOU PUSH ROD IN.
rod as you push it through the bore.
This'll stop the breakage.


I




AND SPEAKING OF FIREPOWER...

BOMBS AWAY!r AAo?

'' j


S .. -- .--M NOPE,
S ,, ".- A-NSNO CAP
In N rH9 FIRE j


You may think that bombs away applies only to airplanes, but it's not nec-
essarily so. Aerosol containers pitched into a fire can take off like a bomb, but
the target's anyone's guess.
It doesn't matter what type of maintenance you're doing-painting your
equipment, shining your shoes, patching your skin, or using any of the three hun-
dred other items packaged in aerosol cans-there're some things to remember
about them. a


TOSS STORE IN DIRECT -
EPUNCURtE WN IN SUNLIGHT OR HOT/C ,
EVEN WHEN .~IR,. TEMPERATURES.
.EMP. Y -a-- /. I -








And make sure there's plenty of ventilation in the storage area to keep any
vapors or gas from accumulating and setting the stage of an explosion.
If you find that your metal aerosol container is rusty or the glass aerosol
container is cracked, never take a chance-release the pressure and discard.
When you discard those cans, be sure to separate them from other refuse
and label them so the people who get rid of the refuse will know they're there.
When you do burn them, you should burn them in a cage so there won't be
any danger from fragments.
If you puncture the cans under water you can dispose of them like you would
ordinary metal waste.
64


















NEW ESC LIST
You'll find the latest list of ESC's in
DA Circular 750-7 (26 Jan 65). You need
one ESC technical manual for each piece
of equipment you have on hand. If you
didn't get enough ESC's, then order them
on a DA Form 17 from the St. Louis Pub-
lications Center.

THESE WON'T GET LOST
If you didn't get around to field fixing
that lock spring on your M60 machine
gun to keep it from getting lost like
it was shown in PS 144 don't bother.
Now you can get a newly-designed
spring that'll stay put. Ask for Spring,
leaf... FSN 1005-975-8595-7792398.
It's listed in your new TM 9-1005-224-
20P (7 Jul 64).

LET'S CALIBRATE
Well, maybe that's a job for higher
echelon, but you can get the dope on
how often some of your equipment's
supposed to be calibrated if you get
hold of TB 750-93-10/1 (Nov 64). It's
called "Calibration Requirements for
Test and Measuring Equipments Used
in Support of Mobility Equipment Ma-
teriel."


...NOW TO INFINITY
A calendar that's good forever or
until you wear it out. With the Combina-
tion Perpetual and Leap-year Calendar,
you can figure out the Julian date in a
flash. One side has leap year, and the
other has regular years. It's 8 x 10-1/2
inches, printed on durable cardboard.
GSA has it. FSN 7510-226-5401 gets
you a package of 50.


A REVISED PINPOINT FORM
You missile, rocket, and air defense
people will want to get hold of revised
DA Form 12-32 (1 Feb 65), "Require-
ments for Army Missile, Rocket, and Air
Defense Fire Distribution System Publi-
cations." This revised form is very differ-
ent from the old (Oct 61) version. DA
Circular 310-26 (26 Feb 65) gives you
info about the revised form.


NO. 2 COMMON
There's a new pub which lists the tools
in your No. 2 Common Tool Kit. Ask
for SC 4910-95-CL-A72 (Nov 64). It su-
persedes SM 9-4-4910-A86 (13 Feb 63.)


Would You Stake Your Life on
the Condition of Your Equipment?




HOW b
'N HOWFA
I .




SCOUJLD YOUR
OUTFIT MOVE IF
.. THE WORD CAME ..
DOWN TO
GO?