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PS
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00011
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1962
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00011

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24-25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44-45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48-49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56-57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Page 65
Full Text












Pr EETV
MAINTENA NC
1MONTHLY














.1 ~ ~ ~ ~ P~ EA 7.d~/i ~
.. Om LEAK '=jC4 L C-S!,
S.......


















































There's nothing in his TM that says he has to spit-and-polish-but
you should've seen this guy.
He had the hood up on the truck ... and was sitting on the radiator
-facing toward the rear of the vehicle.
And was he polishing the fuel lines. He had them cleaned like new.
No... that's not right. They weren't that bright and clean when they
were new.
Trouble is... he had to brace himself with his feet while he was
working-to keep from falling face-first on the engine. So he stuck his
feet down around the engine. And as he pushed his right foot for better


V.
d

-s


support, his 12D ripp
wiring right out by t
Another guy had
couple hours to ge
back in shape-time
been spent on import
nance.
It just goes to shove
price of spit-and-pol
high.


Issue No. 112 1962 Series
Published by the Department of the Army for the Informa-
lion of organizational mlnlenance and suppi personnel.
ODrtrDuljn .i Fm3 r fl i nro)ui ririrl pubil.c lon ch a.rel
Warilr I .mr. i f jvailal.lil,. oldir r;:upj mjry be obtained d,
rcr Ir.im PS M i.iile, Rvo n ArE riErjl M.l uid.rin E i* iry
IN THIS ISSUE
SIARTICLES
Features Page
TI. p O R'lu.i..'g Aircraft .2-11
S4-142 Roc:ir MIfolor Ciu lr Tru.:c BYOI 43-45
Lube I.Jsnr.ii.c.r;. Cr.nrr .54-55
rNe. MIG Weii.rg Siet .56-64
Communicahons Equipment
Sailallrn RAoa.c.- .c Verc..l- Imir.prc,.a 19
SHer-rl CuEr."o.-.: '-i. Ins Cit-4r.
Ri 393 Reii Lube iIr. C'E 30 20
Tr.a.i:.rt.in r T 195 iRC' 19 U:e l.r.lanr Fuse 20
TA I PT T.ierr.or.e Ser. Boot Cr.c 21
f RuDntr L..-Ing Fcr D-l':dlae Gear 37
S1Jr G C Comin:, Sneiltr Cr.n.:c Pc.,nis 21 Z6
SB 993 CT 5.iino.:c.rj GiA Larr.p Lam,
AN/VRC-8, 9, 10: Check Mounting Blocks. ... 27
Missile
Nive El- t.-.-i Crc.i.. Fr-ai.r; D-cor. 37
L ] 3 1I, r I. nie AauiL.in.. r.I 7
le J.:y C pp.nr C-.TioDrre. sr 42
Ground M-acdi.g EquiiTr.-tr Lube F i:.gs 16 47
I v. C' GsiC.-. He.ler .15 J-9
Wheeled Vehicles
G741 J, i :,n Truck,- .'J i Tap at SEl r.n 13
Battery CGr.U.-a Cabi-: vner. 1 Daicorinnec
SG7.2 Tru:-t Front LIrjust P-De Toru.nnp 9
General
.Inrl~-ent E ,eh-elJ Warlc inn PutIDner 12
iO lie MahiC--.e Puns H1-O 1O GEt Err 13
SMI00 Pan.:,ra.,.,c TeIacope 14
S 90 MM Ciln tM11] Seven Pe TuDe JODL 15
Ria.oaci..e Teit n-.c,le T 85 16
M.?)25Al] hanr3 rrenade: Sal't Baoi i7
M/ f41 PrrrnDii Fijme TnrGrr 17
M 15 Conr.pre sec A.r 8r* ,nin Acipl raui 18
BAL (Eyre oimeiti 0.5-:3ra From r0 :.AI K-. i8
1.16" & M1.243 Cra 3.cs wrer, Loia Teit 38
Encinei Cc r.-r syier. Care 410
PB-Id A.' Co T,lreXc; i: 41
raci-r & .:r ,r P J:r. i ng Wm.:r, ir :e er A., le 52
Mn P.0 Pro vir FPu--I --1t-on u--is 5152
ted a potful of ri" P .utl' u,sr,: j 53
-he roots! Connie RodDEPARTMENTS ..12
the roots! Connie Rodd ......................... 12
to pend a Joe's Dope ............. ---........... 29
spend a Question and Answer.................... 37
t the wiring Connie Rodd's Briefs......... Inside Back Cover
t the wiring wantsyour ideas and contributions, and s glad to answer
that could've your questions. Names and addresses are kept in confidence.
,_ Just write to:


tanxt maitue-

v you that the
ish can come


S1t -4alA-MaSt,
ps MAylae,
pdaatai 4 r4ensal,
Metc"Csen, New fesey.s.
DISTAIBUIION:
In accordance with requirements subrritted on DA Form 12-4.








POitiVATI'MYEB J


.... .... A r_


7


No doubt about it. if \ou dri e an I-49C or a pump and rank unit or any
other fuel vehicle, you'ree one of the guss dirccdl rciponsible for keeping the
big gas birds chirping.


4,
... ..... .. i UP Wyqtvle see.:
Al
T
F..


You've got to be real hip not only
on your truck but also on its fuel-handl-
ing equipment and on the fuel itself.
You've gotta know why the fuel's got
to be absolutely free from dirt and
water... and why it can be dangerous
less'n you follow the rules on fire,


fumes and static electricity. '
Who does what on fuel handling
chores around tank vehicles may change
according to local SOP, but here're the
things every driver must know Whether
he does the job himself or helps some-
one else.


Use this guide every day when you
do the inspections called for in TM 10-
1113 (Sept 59) and Change 1 (22 Sept
58) to TM 10-1101 (Sept 55) before
you load your vehicle and while you're
loading it.
Just remember, when you handle
avfuel-and especially JP-4-there's no
room for guesswork. The fuel must be
clean (free from solids) and dry (free
from water). The tiniest amounts of
dirt and water that get past you can
ground a plane with a deadly thud.
There's one big difference between
this inspection and others you're likely
to make. Here every deficiency is seri-
ous. You've got to fix it right off...
you may never get another chance. If
you can't fix it yourself, tell the man
in charge. This is no place for secrets.


One more thing: No Smoking is
more'n a slogan, it's the way to live
around fuels. This also means no smok-
ing in the cab. eier.






BEFORE STARTING UP
Even before stepping on the starter to get where you'll load up, make good
and sure your vehicle can travel and is fit to tote fuel safely-safe for people
and safe for the fuel.
Do the best job you know how on all the before-operations PM your rig's
TM calls for. Pay special attention to the power take-off and the pump engine,
i our outfit includes 'em. And cast a shrewd eye over the special equipment
you're supposed to carry. Like these: i -.


COLOR MARKINGS-MI,,
ing wrong color for Ivpe
nrd gra~ d ofl lfu l


GROUNDS AND BONDS
GROUNDS AND BONDS


Right here, before you stir another
muscle, is a good place to give a healthy
thought to static electricity-the hidden
enemy. Knowing how the enemy works
is half the battle.
Static electricity is actually electricity
at rest just waiting to pounce. It's
caused by friction-any friction (even
liquid flowing through a hose or pipe
or just falling free) and its charge
stays on the surfaces of the object or
liquid that holds it. You can't prevent
static electricity. All you can do is con-
trol it-keep it from arcing or sparking.


It's this sparking that's so dangerous
around any gasoline fumes, and espe-
cially jet juice.
Like was said, you can't prevent static
electricity. But you can drain it off or
equalize it so's it won't do any harm
by using the grounds and bonds your
rig and the loading station are equipped
with. Unless the static charge is drained
off, it could build up to the sparking
point IWHA4
















The most dangerous "sparking
point" is when you go to open a man-
hole cover on your truck or remove a
filler cap on the aircraft. It's at this
exact moment that you have all the
makings for a first-class boom-gas va-
Here's how you connect up the bonding and
grounding under the different fueling opera-
tions.

AT THE LOADING RACK:
1. Ground the truck to the permanent ground-
ing post at the loading rack.


PERMANENT
l GROUNDING
POSI
//1 7"


2. Attach the bonding wire from the loading
arm to the tank shell.


pors pouring out of the tank and the
static charge set to spark as you touch
one metal surface to another. Less'n you
have your grounds and bonds hooked
up first, you'll get a boom you'll never
hear the end of.
WHILE FUELING AIRCRAFT:
1. After parking in front of the aircraft-and
at least 20 feet from it-stop the engine
till grounding and bonding is completed.
Leave the driver's door open.


BONDING
WIRE TO10





But, whether at the loading rack or
at the aircraft, be mighty sure you make
the bonding and grounding connec-
tions before opening the manhole or
filler cap.


2. Ground the truck and plane by clipping
one end of the Y-cable to the ground stake
and the other end to the aircraft, using the
landing gear or other unpainted part ex-
cept the propeller or radio antenna. Then
complete the bonding by attaching the
nozzle bonding wire to the plane's frame
or wing-tip jack plug.
r A -


"0*^


.--* -- .......... ..... .,-l ,ll ... ........ l ,. ....






BEFORE LOADING
With the thought of static electricity notched firmly in your mind, make these
inspections next. A sharp eyeballing at this time can keep you from behind the
eightball later on.

TANKS AND COMPARTMENTS Dirty, rusty. GROUNDING AND BOND-
have old fuel in 'em. Use an eIplosion-prool ING WIRES-Missing,
flashlight IFSN 6230-117-0928-Eng) or exten- frayed; clip missing,
sion light (FSN 6230-268-9246-Eng) togive the broken, installed wrong
insides of the tanks a good going-over. Be sure,
though, you attach the bonding and grounding
wires first. And keep the cable attached till
the last manhole cover and filler cap are put i
back. Also doublecheck to see that any fuel
left in the tank from the last time is the same
type and grade as the stuff you're gonna load. SUCTION AND DISPENSING HOSES Bulges,
blisters, cuts, gouges, soft spots: static wires
"missing, broken.






NOZZLE ASSEMBLY-Cracked, threads worn,
rusted; spout dirty, denied; cap missing,
MANHOLE COVERS- threads fouled up; ground wire broken, not
MANHOLE COVERS- hooked up righl; clamp, jack plug missing,
Gaskets missing broken, badly rusted lever and parts bent,
(replace quick): broken.
cover not seated oke
right. 7
/ght. You ought check your hoses at least once a
I month-like it says in Para 9a(3), TM 5-679
/ E( /- (Nov 46)-to see tht the internal groundwire's
STIS OK. All your other grounding and bonding's
for the birds if the hose grounding's NG. Check
'em with a test circuit and bell and dry-cell
'battery. But first make sure the hose is free of
,I vapor and not in a hazardous area.
GASKETS.
-LIGHT OR BELL
SIGNAL
BATTERY



INTERNAL GROUND WIRE HOSE






ItEATirff ELiTI~ j
.'1AAE TRk3WZLE.,


~h )k j L


EMERGENCY VALVE CONTROL LEVERS-Sturk (open
or closed!.


DRAIN VALVES-Frozen (in cold TANK FAUCET
weather), cracked, leaks, stuck. W/QUICK COUPLER
Always leave drain valves open -Rubber gasket
to keep water from collecting, missing.
If they're frozen or stuck, never
force 'em. Get help if you need it.


FILTERING AND SCREENING


Your nozzle, filter, water separator
(filter/separator on some units) and
gasoline meter are the gadgets that
make your vehicle fit to carry aircraft
fuels-if they work right. You have to
use 'em when taking on fuel at the load-
ing rack and again when dispensing
fuel into the aircraft.
What you've got to understand is


that it takes only a teenie-weenie
amount of solids and water to clobber
that plane. Bits of rust, dirt, sand, dust,
lint or rubber even 20 times skinnier
than a single hair from yon bald head
can do it. They'll clog up the aircraft's
fuel filters, selector valves, flow meters,
capacitor-type fuel gages, shutoff
valves, fuel pumps and injection
I t -):BB*


IBI1B~






nozzles any one of the tiny openings As the fuel goes into your tanker, the
through which fuel flows in the plane's nozzle keeps out solids bigger'n 37
complex system, microns in size; the filter, meter screen
As for water contamination that's and water separator remove smaller
just as bad, if not worse. The water solids (down to about 5 microns) and
witch works in a couple of nasty ways water. Provided, that is, this equip-
. as free water and as dissolved water. ment's clean and working right.
The water separates when the plane Like it says in TM 10-1107, you
hits different ranges of temperature- should inspect and clean meter screens
every day. All avfuel must go through
JUST WAIT'LL filter separators to get rid of water and
S HE Hi/rs CODER fine particles of dirt before it goes into
i ALTITUDES. ^- aircraft. Filter separators have pressure
Sgages to show drop in pressure between
FLZE. the inlet and outlet side.
F Z The pressure drop should increase
slowly and gradually, but don't let it
WEL .exceed the manufacturer's recommen-
7TH-EM1 CiRZY nations because the screens're apt to
-- bust if you do. Keep a daily record on
W gethe drop in pressure.
Incidentally, filter elements in units
of refuelers with uncoated tanks should
be changed every three months. And
like when it picks up tremendous speed elements should be changed annually
or enters sky-high altitudes. Water has if the tank shells have been rust-
a further nasty habit of collecting bits proofed. CHECK
of solids and even a special kind of Thenozzleyou've
bacteria that scums up jet juice. already checked and
But, any way you look at it, water's the filter and sepa-
dangerous ... as the pilot may find out rator you'll check
when he's breezing along and ice starts while they're oper-
to clog up the fuel lines, etc., just like eating. But the
the solid contaminants would. meter screen should
Now these solids and water can get be examined care-
into the fuel any time... while it's in fully right now.
storage... while it's being moved from Take the screen off
one container to another. That's why and clean it if need
aircraft fuel has to be filtered and be...just like it tells
screened and tested every step of the you in Para 20c of
way. TM 10-1113.






KEEP IT READY! TIPS ON GETTING LOADED
Before taking on fuel, though, there're couple other
things you should do to be sure to avoid fire and keep the
fuel pure ... besides making sure the equipment's work-
ing right and keeping your fire extinguisher loaded and
aimed during operations.
Play it safe. Keep your truck at least 25 feet from the nearest other vehicle
waiting to be loaded. Stop the engine and set your brakes while you wait.
When your turn comes, set your brakes after you drive into loading position.
Turn off all other electrical switches. FF OFF oF C oFF
Ground the vehicle and attach the bonding wire like was said back yonder
before opening the first manhole. And open one manhole at a time for loading.
(You only open two if two crew members are each using a loading arm at the
same time.) Don't forget to close 'em as the compartments are filled.
Always lower the downspout of the .
loading arm to the bottom of the [I)wr POUI
tank. This'll keep you from splashing
and stirring up the fuel too much which
creates additional vapor and static elec-

Don't ever leave the loading arm untended while the control valve is open.
The valve's spring-loaded-so never tie it or block it open.
Keep a hawk-eye on the loading markers and top off at a reduced rate to avoid
overfilling. Allow the downspout and loading arm to drain before taking the
downspout from the manhole. If you accidentally spill any gas, halt the opera-
tion immediately. Don't start the truck or let any other equipment nearer than 50
feet till the area's been washed down or pronounced safe by the fire marshal or
his representative. -B ---L' i- ,,
When you load jet fuel, load it at a reduced rate t4 to rated capacity
-till the lower end of the loading arm is covered.



Another thing, don't move the load-
ing arm if there's a fire at a manhole-- L2. i T Vt,, )
you don't want to spread the flames.
Instead, smother the fire with canvas,
burlap or a wet blanket. Incidentally,
if the downspout's not in the tank when
fire breaks out, just close the manhole A f
cover. Don't panic! r-r ,
9 i






By the way, if you're running a pump
and tank unit, always keep the trailer
coupled while loading or discharging.
And always stand by your vehicle so
you can move it in a hurry if you have to.

WHILE YOU'RE LOADING
Here's where your six senses'll do
overtime duty. While your rig's pump-
ing away, keep tuned to how it's doing.
If any part of your equipment looks,
sounds, feels or smells wrong, halt the
operation pronto and find out what's
wrong.



OF 0- 'S

Always remember that mechanical
equipment like the filter/separator,


meter, etc., can fail. So play it safe.
Check the equipment while it's running
and check the fuel after the job's done.


PRESSURE GAGE


fittE PRESSURE
GAGE
Your quickest check on the equip-
ment is to take the pressure differential
readings on both pressure gages-the
one on the walkway by the filter and
the other by the water separator in the
rear compartment. They work in dif-
ferent ways, though, so watch it.


STo get the pressure differential on the filter: To get the pressure differential on the water
separator:
Push the shutoff valve serator
lever to the right (to. Push the shutoff valve
word the rear of truck) -- p -, lever to the left to get
to get a reading on the ( ,.. \\ the pressure on the in-
inloke side of the filter. 'J I let side _-,

Push the lever to the
left (toward the front Push the lever to the
of the vehicle) to gel right to get the read
the reading on the out- ing on the outlet side.
let side of the filler. J

3 Compare the two readings. Normally they'll Compie the two readings. If there's
be 2-3 PSI off, but if there's a -PSI or more 10-PSI difference, it means
more difference between em, you'll know the cartridge is clogged and needs
the filter's not doing its job. Change the replacing. This job's spelled out
filter before the next fueling operation, like Jin Para 19 of the same TM.
it says in Para 21 of TM 10-1113.






On tank and pump units where the filter and separator are
combined in one gadget (filter/separator), you check the
pressure differential just like you'd check it on the water -
separator mentioned a minute ago.
FiLtlR' SEPARATOR
The best way to check the fuel to see the equipment's doing its job is: GAGE
OR...' USE WATE-
TAKE A SAMPLE ACTING
ANO GiVE IT A V/SAL PAST


You can take a sample of the fuel any time after it's passed through the filter/
separator by easing up on the flow and letting some of it into a glass bottle or
jar. Let the sample set for a spell before eyeballing it. -
____, Ii~i


If the gas is OK, it'll be clean and
bright. But if it has water in it, it'll be
cloudy. Of course, you'll be able to tell
if there's rust or dust in the fuel. Figure
1 in TM 10-1107 (Feb 60) will help
you get the right slant.
This test has nothing to do with the
color of the gasoline. The dye put in the
gas except JP-4, which is clear or
straw-colored-is just to identify the
type and grade of fuel. (You'll find a
handy color chart on fuels in Figure 5
of this same TM.)
Use the water-finding paste after
your tanker's been loaded and has been
standing a while. Smear some paste
lightly on the bottom couple inches of
the gage stick and shove the stick gently
to the bottom of the tank. The paste'll
change color wherever it hits water, so
you'll be able to measure just how
much water's in the fuel.
The big thing in both these tests is
to spot fouled up fuel. If it looks at
all suspicious, tell your QM lab men
1


to double-check it. Don't fool around
with it. Spread the word pronto.
And, of course, these tests'll tell you
how good a job your filter and screen
equipment's doing. Do what's needed
to fix them.
















A FINAL THOUGHT
Just remember, it took Nature (with
a final assist from Man) a couple mil-
lion years to produce that fuel. Please
don't foul it up in the last few minutes.








Iae Radj


%eeA 'em a4 i&


No doubt by this time you know two
different types of instrument eyeshields
are showing up in some of your tanks.
Right?
One's a white latex job and the
other's made of black rubber.. and
friend, each stays as it is-puhleeze.
Only three things Uncle Sam is loaded
with go on the eyeshields-soap, water
and elbow grease.
This three-horse parlay has been
kicking around for a long time.. but
nothing beats it for giving out with the
tender loving care that'll keep your eye-
shields in the running all the way.
How-so-ever, if some hot-shot gun-
ners have jumped the gun and painted
the new black shields white to match
the older ones, here's the solution-after


you've read the riot act.
Get your supply man to pick up some
Acetone, Technical (FSN 6810-281-
1861, 1 gal CHEM) through regular
channels.
Acetone will remove the paint from
the black shields without chewing up
the rubber-then you can finish up the
job with the soap and water routine.
But don't, like never that is, use
Acetone on the white latex shields. It'll
turn them into a gummy, sticky mess.
So much so, you'll think you're pull-
ing salt water taffy at the seashore on
a hot, humid day.
A light touch with some fine sand-
paper, followed by soap and water will
take care of any paint problems on the
white shields.


7I8EEN MAKING
WIMh TH'ACETONEV
4GAIN-~.EH, BOYS?







Ad4et te adjauet ment


Valve tappets for both intake and ex-
haust valves on your G741-series 3%-ton
truck engines should be set at 0.014 to
0.016 inches.


engines' tappet covers say ... tappet ad-
So, make sure you note this when ad- justment should give a clearance of
justing valves like it says in para 113h .015, plus-or-minus .001.
of TM 9-8030 (2 May 55). This is the And the same info applies to the
latest poop for old and new T-245 en- M601 1-ton special power wagon,
gines... just like the decals on the new covered by TM 9-8854 (18 Oct 57).

o& oiice madcae4
HEYf



'1 JUL sb)

You say you need publications for office machines and can't get 'em locally?
Here's the latest dope:
Wind up a DD Form 1149-4 (1 Jul 56) -Requisition and Invoice/Shipping
Document-and chute it through regular supply channels to the QM Equipment
and Parts Commodity Center, Miscellaneous Equipment Parts & Supplies Divi-
sion, Columbus General Depot, Columbus 15, Ohio. Be sure you give all the
poop on your equipment... its manufacturer, model, serial number, etc.
Of course, if you're overseas, your "regular channels" would be through the
Overseas Supply Agency, right?






'Scope do4e
Ask the man who has one. He'll tell you the Ml 00
panoramic telescope is used on his tracked vehicle to la-
the main armament for indirect fire.
He'll also tell you that the 'scope can take just so much
of a beating-then it's going to yell, "Uncle."
That means like leaving the M100 in its mount hen
you're finished with it. Comes a low-hanging branch as
you're cruising along.., and the 'scope gets clobbered.
Or maybe it gets good and wet from rain. The water
works its way down into the base of the 'scope... and
plays hob with the gears.
In other words.., it's worth taking the time to gei
that M100 off its mount and into its box. And don't forget
to put the travel insert in the place of the 'scope-to keep
the gimbal assembly in the M99-series mount from ta king
a beating when your vehicle's on the move.


CRL~I
1'*~l


SEa onw tCe dea
Sure ... you handle the M100 panoramic tele-
scope inside your tracked vehicle as careful as
you'd tote a tray of 3-point-2 across a crowded
dance floor.
And the seal covering the azimuth assembly
on the telescope mount is a nice soft spot to rest
the 'scope before you put it in the mount.
Trouble is ... it's also a good way to put a hole
in the seal.
When that happens, you're fouling up the A
whole idea of the seal-to keep dust, water and
what have you out of the azimuth assembly.
So... please to be careful with the seal.
14


"' '~$~-







7?4e 6eed


Most generator regulators on your
tactical wheeled vehicles have a warn-
ing stamped on 'em that reads some-
thing like this-"disconnect leads at
battery before servicing unit". If not,
it should be there-or in your vehicle
TM.
Always remove the battery ground
cable any time you connect or discon-
nect the regulator cables. If you don't
the regulator's contacts could close and
burn up some parts of the electrical
system.
F'rinstance, a mechanic left the bat-
tery hooked up in his M151, -ton
truck and took a hammer and screw-
driver to tighten the waterproof
connector (instead of the spanner
wrench in his #1 and #2 common tool


kit). Burned out the generator, regu-
lator, and cables when the contacts
closed.
A sudden impact on any regulator
can close the relay contacts in it. So get
the cotton pickers busy, and remove the
ground cable first.


Did you know? gun. That also means you want to mark
The M41 90-mm gun on your M48- down the kind of ammo you use 'cause
series tank is good for seven re-tube the life of the tube depends on the kind
jobs. It's a fact, sure enough. of stuff that goes through it on the way
So it's important to keep track of the to the target.
tubes in your Weapon Record Book to And don't let the book get away
make sure you get the most out of your from its weapon.







IS THIS YOUR LINE... ?
RADIOACTIVE TEST SAMPLES... ,NPWnDrDFS 'B GA/Mirm
For the vital ABC know-how you must have if you're going to be anywhere
near radioactive test samples, you'd best get right chummy with these new
Chemical Corps radioactive test sample TB's.
You'll find them sharp and to the point. They tell you how you can identify,
care, use, store, and even how to get rid of radioactive test samples. You'll also
find safety cautions spelled out for handling the stuff. They're all dated October 1960.


URANIUM OXIDE
1I TB CML 53
Uranium Oxide,
Alpha, M3.
COATED (ACTIVE) SIDE UNCOATED SIDE (EARLY MODELS)





Radium 226, Gamma, MX-083B/PDR-27.


J COATED (ACTIVE) SID
3.TB CML 62 Uranium


*mmtnwi mf uimaim MiA.0
IoqooazfI2 CPW:MAH
Ma Isra R
IPF n4"iWnPVWMar wnimi

UN(OAIID INACTIVE ilDi
4. TB (ML 63 Uranium Oxide, Alpha, M7.


(INACTIVE SIDE GIVES
CALIBRATION INFORMATION)


6. TB CML 65 Lead 210, Gamma, M2.


LUfast 2TE~epiMCD!p



UNCOATED SIDE (LATE MODELS)




URANIUM OXIDE



E UNCOATED SIDE
Oxide, Alpha, MS.


COATED (ACTIVE) SIDE UNCOATED SIDE
5. TB CML 64 Uranium Oxide, Alpha, M4.




RADIOACTIVE
Co sO.Cp.
SELNQ


ACTIVE SIDE INACTIVE SIDE
7 TB CML 66 Cobalt 60, Gamma, M1.






GRENADE SAFETY CHECK
All M25A1 hand grenades (hand, riot, CN-1), FSN 1330-219-8578, from
Lot No. SF-229-2049, must be checked quick-like to see if they're equipped
with safety balls.
The check's easy to make-just take a careful look into the fuze collar.
You can see the safety balls through the openings along the inside of the
fuze collar. There should be two safety balls-one on each side of the collar.

Safety balls, as you know, provide an
added safety device. After you pull the
safety pin the balls will keep the gre-
nade from arming... as long as you



If you see two tiny, shiny, "ball-
bearing" type balls, the grenade's OK.
But, if you don't find any balls, the
grenade's risky and has to be destroyed. hold the arming sleeve down with
So, don't let anybody put their cotton- your thumb, that is. So check this lot
pickin' fingers on the safety pin.., of M25A1's extra close ... and make
quick-like yell for your safety officer, it strict SOP to always look for the
or your ammo support people... safety balls in any M25A1 hand gre-
they'll know what to do. nade-before you pull the safety pin.
TRIM THE PIN


Best see that this cutting chore is
tended to soon.
Take the pressure cylinder testing
gage in the M2A1 portable flame
thrower service kit (FSN 1040-095-
0063), and get its pressure-release pin
shortened just awee bit.
The pin needs filing down about32-
in-just so's its point is exactly flush
with the top of the adapter.
Make sure, tho, that an expert with
a light touch does the job. He can pull
the pin out of the gage and trim off %2-
in with a fine emery wheel, and then
smooth off the point with a fine file.
If he can use a fine file very, very
lightly, and gently-without pushing


FILE );" OFF-
FUSH WITH
TOP.
too hard, he won't have to remove the
pin to do the job. And he can use light
air pressure to blow out any filings.
When the pin is shortened it'll be
easier to seat the gage right without
any pressure being lost and the pin'll
last longer 'cause it'll not get its nose
rammed every time the gage is attached
to the flame thrower's pressure tank.






ANI AWAY SHE GOES
That may be the story at your mis- -'
sile site.
It's not the missile taking off-it
could be your cylinders on your M15 -
compressed air breathing apparatus.
Some outfits have their cases fastened
on the wall so they'll have their masks
handy. If that's where yours is located,
there's something to keep in mind.
If you aren't careful when you open
the lid you're liable to have everything
come toppling out of the case.
The mask could fall out and be dam-
aged which would put it out of com-
mission when you need it. But you
could run into real trouble if the cyl-
inders fall out and the compressed air
launches them like a misguided missile.
So remember easy does it when you 4
reach for your M15.
8A4's OUT
The latest word on BAL ointment
(in the M5A1 protection and treatment
i-trup! kit, FSN 6505-368-6152), is to toss it
SBURN T uP!'
r" SURP IT DEEPf out.
Some of you may've already gotten
rid of leaky BAL tubes 'cause they were
messing up your kit. Well, don't bother
-, replacing 'em... as of now, all BAL,
leaky or not... gets dumped. The eye
'*,,l,1 ointment no longer belongs in your
M5A1 protection and treatment kit.
You can get rid of the ointment by
burning it (which is the preferred way)
on an open fire, or if a fire's not practi-
cal, you can bury it. If BAL has to be
buried, its resting place should be in a
deep hole in a restricted area.
If in doubt as to which one applies to
your situation, see your safety officer.
18



















Dear Half-Mast, I
We figure you're the one to settle the dust of an argument we've been kickin'
up for quite a few moons. It's all about the installation instructions used in
mounting our radios in V4-ton's, APC's, and so forth.
Here's the deal: Some of us say these installation instructions are really guides
to follow and are not necessarily directive. Others insist the communication
equipment must be installed according to the installation instructions-with no
messin' around.
Maybe the answer lies somewhere in the middle, Sarge. How about a helping


word or two?
Dear SFC M. I. C.,
Good question. Tough question.
And, like you suspect, the answer lies
somewhere in the middle.
Bear in mind, Sarge, that any set of
instructions for installing communica-
tions equipment in a vehicle is a com-
promise. A compromise involving size,
weight, space and use.
For example, if a set needs to be
driver-operated, it should be bolted into
place where a driver can reach it with-
out turning himself into a pretzel. But
you and I know that these sets are
heavy, and the demands of weight dis-
tribution-in the space available-may
mean it has to be installed in a less
handy location.
And you know, the experts'have
figured out these compromises to a


SFC M.L C.


pretty fine degree. I figure a man would
have to be mighty, mighty shrewd to
improve on 'em all around. So, you
might say the instructions are "unoffi-
cially" directive since there's just about
no room for variation.
But looking' at it another way, Sarge,
the special situation facin' your CO may
push him into having to approve some
installation changes. This may require
re-positioning of equipment in a vehicle
to meet special requirements. Your CO
can have it anyway he sees it-in order
to get the best results.
Sarge, I'd say stick to the instructions
unless-unless your CO approves other-
wise.












e ON'T GoAEAR
I;) I THAT WORM, JU/'OR--
--'"< \ Z> I C4/ HEAR A,,

Dear Half-Mast, W ',.
Our outfit has been gigged for using the wrong oil on our RL-39 reels. We've
tried to find an LO telling us what to use, but there doesn't seem to be any.
Can you tell us the right lubrication? Sgt B. R J
Dear Sgt. B. R. J., 0OI
A squeaky reel has double impor- HFRE
tance. Besides the maintenance angle, WITl
there's always the danger of it becom- OE 30 IL
ing the final reel for the operator. HERE
TB SIG 314 (7 Oct 57) on Reel WITH
Equipment CE-11 tells you not only 0O 30
what you should use on Reel RL-39- (*)
but where to use it. And, whenever you take the reel
In short, it's OE 30. apart to clean the bearing bushing, re-
Drip a few drops each month into the member to put a few drops in each oil
small oil fittings in each bearing assem- cup after you've got her reassembled.
bly and into the oil hole of the crank At.,
handle. 01at


~FS lO GG


One thing a fuse doesn't want to do
is hold out. The thing to do is blow out
-as soon as the load climbs above safe
limits. GET ME

O ALL 71AE
INSU/LA7/ION
ON MY WIRING
WIL E GON6E.

So the word's out that F601 fuse in
your transmitter T-195/GRC-19 fila-
ment circuit is holding out longer than


it should. Seems she fails to blow dur-
ing brief overloads, resulting in over-
heating and breakdown of wiring
insulation.
The solution is simple. Just replace
the slow-blow 15 amp fuse (FUSE,
CARTRIDGE FSN 5920-281-0813)
with an instant-blow version (FSN
5920-012-0151).
Y'might make that switch soon...
so's to eliminate any possible confusion
on fusing.











Vital but fragile.
That's the soft rubber boots covering
the push-to-talk and ringing switches of
your telephone set TA-i/PT.
These boots live a short life even in gi:)|
normal use. But they can die a quick
death if operators spend the time be-
tween messages digging their finger- / i
nails into them.
It doesn't take long for the nail marks -
to grow into large cracks which expose PAM
the set's interior to dust, dirt and mois- ) I 'O' viNYL
ture .and deadlines it to boot. TAPE
A little PM can also go a long way during normal operation since the rubber
boots rub against the switches. While this lets you ring or talk, it also works up
friction.
You can cut down on this by putting a thin plastic "spaghetti" strip over the
switch levers. Or, if you're fresh out of spaghetti, wrap some vinyl electrical tape
around them.

-L-PARFTHOEG CASK ETS^-


Next time you spot paint your switch-
boards, SB-22/PT, SB-22A/PT, or SB-
86/P, spare those little rubber gaskets
covering the slots where wires go inside
the sets.








ON THESE
GASKETS


On the SB-86/P you'll find the gas-
kets around the field wire entries of the
jack field section and around the power
cord entries of the keyshelf.
They're on the sides of the SB-22/PT
and SB-22A/PT.
Keeping paint away from the gaskets
may take a bit longer to complete the
job but it'll save somebody the job of
replacing them later.
The reason is simple... paint has a
way of breaking down rubber.
And without the gaskets, your switch-
boards have nothing to protect them
from moisture, dust or dirt.
As any good operator knows, the gas-
kets should be cleaned daily to protect
them from dust and dirt.







Those LI and L2 binding posts on your remote control C-433/GRC and local
control C-434/GRC appear to lead sheltered lives.
That's because they seem to be protected by the flanges around the edges of
these controls.


But, the truth is that they sometimes
find themselves in the way of a passing
wrench... or worse.
When that happens, the biggest dam-
age is suffered not by the posts, but by
the molded plastic washers insulating
them. These washers crack often, leav-
ing you with a short circuit and no
local control.


As for the posts, they may bend under
the same blow. Although usually this
can be straightened out with a pair of
pliers.
But the best medicine for the posts
and washers is the brand used by a care-
ful operator. It's called BC or Being
Careful... which means you don't
bang 'em up in the first place.


~FPPI1Gr PaRO~lh N


,
/


--P ,
Have any holes you'd like to give a
rubber lining to? Think maybe your
electronic gear should be protected
against shocks ... electrical or other-
wise?
If so, there's a handy little rubber
strip waiting to take the edge off things.
The strip's got a cross-sectional channel,


or "U" form. It can be snapped quickly
and easily over most of the metal edges
of electronic chassis or panels.
The strip's three feet long, but can
be cut to any length.
You can get your mitts on it by call-
ing for: Cushion, Transmitter Distribu-
tor, FSN 5815-125-4920.













Many a Joe has circles under his eyes, but have you noticed some tankers or
air types with rings around their ears?
Unlike the circles, these don't come from a shortage of sack time. They're
made by the sweat and skin oils that work into the headset cushions. This happens
to the cushions on headset-microphone kit MK-400/G or MK-401/G, both used
in the T-56-6 crewman's helmet; headset H-75 ()/AIC, used in the APH-5 flying
helmet, and headset H-101 () AIC.
Besides running rings around a man, the sweat and oils damage the cushions.
You can prevent this with just three clean cloths and some mild soap.






ONE OF THE WIPE IT SEVERAL TIMES"
RUB A LITTLE SOAP WITH ANOTHER CLOTH THEN, DRY IT GOOD
OVER THE CUSHION. RINSED IN CLEAR WATER. WITH THE THIRD CLOTH.

Just to play it safe, you might let the cushions stand in a shady spot for a while.
When you do this, you've got to keep the soap and water from getting into
the receivers.
And, don't try any shortcuts with strong soaps, such as yellow issue soap, or
cleaning fluids. These'll do more harm than good in the long run.
When your cushions begin to show that dying look, replace them with new
ones. .



That's right! echelon maintenance has been pulled on
Lots of communication equipment your Signal equipment before sending
has been behaving like a boomerang it up to field maintenance.
lately. It gets tossed up to field mainte- It figures. Because you want to keep
nance for repair-and bounces right your equipment within your unit when-
back at its unit without so much as a ever and wherever possible.
particle of dust switched around. After all, it's tough enough to lose
So the rules of the game are simple: the gear for legitimate repair needs-let
Make triple sure that all first and second alone for unnecessary ones.
23






SISELTEREI


No matter how you figure-or configure-them, your S-141/G electrical equip-
ment shelters pack the kind of protection your field communication equipment
needs to handle the message and get it through.
She's light enough for air lift... sturdy enough for cross-country humping
in a deuce-and-a-half... and roomy enough to house the electronic brains vital
to modern battlefield communications.
Still, she needs a constant touch of PM to make sure she comes through-in all
kinds of weather and under all tactical conditions.
A handy check list will help ease that chore-and increase the payoff of your
preventive maintenance.
The items in bold type are real serious and need prompt action.

LOUVRES Bent; loose; ock-
LEoose; frayed; ing screws fail to provide se-
Ccure closing.


\~h


DOORS (POWER, SIGNAL, FIL- DOOR (PERSONNEL) Weath-
TER)- Bent; loose; locking erstripping frayed; latch fails
screws fail to provide secure to secure door.
rising I--


AIK rilL
dirty.


- MisVsing;


CAPS- Bent; missing
not captive.


[ MOREE















Like the signs say, make sure the
VENT COVERS are OPEN for AIR
LIFT. Otherwise, the changes in pres-
sure as the shelter goes up and comes
down will cause big, big trouble.
Keep a weather eye open for small
puddles inside the shelter. Your hut
"breathes" to a certain extent, forming
moisture on the inside as she heats up
and cools off. And when moisture and


electricity get together, they produce
electrocuting results.
After you've slung your hut into its
deuce-and-a-half-and tightened up on
its cables-you might want to add an
extra measure of security. Slide some
two-by-fours onto the bed of the truck,
between the sides of the shelter and the
walls of the vehicle. This'll help elimi-
nate side-sway and take some of the
strain off the cables.
Not only that, but another board at
the front of the shelter-on the floor
of the truck-will make sure those
two towing eyes don't go crunching
through the rear wall of the truck cab
next time the brakes go on.


A little darkness comes in handy sometimes....
Heh. Heh.
And from a strictly communications standpoint, wrapping some darkness
around your SB-993/GT manual switchboard always makes it a lot easier to see
the light. f,~


The light, in this case, comes from
the small glow lamps inside each of
your U-184/GT connectors. They glow
whenever a message comes down their
line.
Trouble is, though, they don't pack
very much candlepower. Just about
1/25-watt. And the clear plastic of the
connector doesn't provide much of a


'reflector, either. So even a sharp oper-
ator might not always see the light-
especially when the sun is high.
Y'might just try a simple reflector,
then. Just dab some black paint on both
sides and rear of the adapter. Or darken
the adapter the same way with a strip
of black tape.
This'll serve to beam the light more
directly out from the front of the
adapter so it'll catch the operator's eye
quicker and easier.






OK-THE-BLOClo


Next time your AN/VRC-8, 9 or 10
is off your M38 or M38A1, run your
eyeballs over the wooden blocks used
to fasten the set's mounting.
If they're badly chipped or cracked,
better chuck 'em for new ones. Don't
be one of those who say, "Well, I don't
need that anyway," and re-mount the
set without them.
The block, or spacer as it's also called,
plays an important part in supporting
your common equipment.
Without it, the mounting, MT-299/
GR, bends where it sticks out beyond
the vehicle's wheel well. And almost
before you know it, your set starts
bouncing up and down because its solid
base is no longer solid. The final stop is
a trip to the shop for the set as well as
the mounting.
Of course, the way to prevent all this
is simple PM for that block from the
time the mounting is pulled from the
vehicle till it's replaced. Put it some
place where you'll be able to lay your
hands on it, comes time to put the set
back on the jeep, and where it won't
fall or get in the way of someone or
something.
But if, no matter how careful you
are, the block does get racked up, no


MT-229/GR
INSERT WOODEN BENDS HERE
BLOCK HERE



JEEP FRAME
sweat. It'll take a little time, but a re-
placement can be made easily. Plans for
the block are shown in your set's in-
stallation instructions.
And while you're putting that 8, 9,
or 10 back on its steed, make sure you
don't leave out the steel reinforcing
strip that goes underneath the wheel
well. That keeps the nuts from pulling
through the thin metal of the wheel
well.





























Just a little word-but without it
your manual telephone switchboards
SB-22/PT and SB-22A/PT can't do
their jobs.
And a little carelessness can cost you
a good contact... if you're lucky. If
you're not, it'll mean a trip shopside for
your board.
Replacing batteries is one of those
little jobs that can grow into bigger
ones. If you handle the battery case
roughly, you might bend the contacts
slightly. Then if you're not careful you
can break them completely when you
try bending them back into place.
UNSCREW END CAPS...



CHANGE BATTERIES
So, to keep your spring contacts and
retaining springs in good shape, do like


it sais in TM 11-5805-262-12 ( 15 Dec
60(1 u hcn Sou hae to chance barreries:
With your index fingers
on the end caps of
the bakery case, pull it out.
/ Simple enough r


Do that and you'll not have your
contacts sprung open. But if you do
come across a sprung spring, bend it
back carefully.









ALFA COMPANY was the hottest
outfit in the Battle Group!
They had a citation for the best
performance during exercise Blue
Cloud at Fort Flagg ...
They were twice commended dur.
ing Division inspections... They
were the only outfit to lead the 4th
of July parade at Shangri-La three
years in a row... Like, they were
Gung Ho!


They were, in fact, the first 'READY' company on the apron on
the day the balloon went up!

SNO.. BUT DON'T
EVER GET WORRY...'LL GET .
S THAT RADIO FIXED IT GOI
CHARLIE? OIN





















... and buttoned dowcn fr the e.ipecied
enemi cuunterattach.


ARE YOU IN CONTACT WITH
BATTLE GROUP YET? WE'VE GOT
TO GET HELP ON THE LEFT FLANK...
S INFANTRY ANP ARMOR ARE
S MOVING IN AROUND
HILL 701. r


ARROW SIX FROM
ALFA FOW-OR...
[WHAT.. SAYAGAIN... /
SHUH1I- SAY AGAIN,
PLEASE...OVER...
? '*@!! OuT/ rm


SIR, THE RADIO'S
ON THE BUM AGAIN.
I'M TRYING TO FIX
IT UP... il


Yle LTE... GET
A RUNNER 7D BATTLE
AUDIO'S STILL ON GROUP..HOT FOOT IT.
THE BLINK, CAP'N,
ER... GOTTA DO
A LITTLE
MAINTENANCE
ON IT.


it ?+*!?! rI
SHOULPA MADE
SURE THIS PARNEP
STHIN6 WORKED WHEN
I HAD THE CHANCE!
30









AND THEY YOU PID THE BEST YOU COULD
NEED HELP PRONTO... BROWN... CAPT PETE-- GET
THERE TANKS AND BRAVO MOVING TO THE "NOTCH"
INFANTRY BACK TO PROTECT ALPHA'S LEFT
OF HILL 301. FLANK
H


MEANWHILE... Back on Rotgut Hill
TIME'S RUNNIN'OU'" PROBABLY COME
THEY'LL COUNTERATfACK THIS AOT-POT O EP
MIS OUT-POST ON
ANY TIME NOW... THE STICK 'N
CHECK "R WEAPONS
NOW!! GOT iT?


AHHH... SHE'S OK... 7TO' TH' HEAP
SPACE OUGHT TO BE ADJUSTED...
WHERE'S THE HEAD SPACE
GAGE .
s. .- _--._. ,aIsa









WHEN THE SITUATION
IS CRITICAL
IT'S TOO LATE FOR

MAENANCEH.
C ;


, \ -


Un umun DULL.IllN BUKUv, urn sblArLts, LIlI II UUI AND rIN II UP.


~~> ^^\ I


I'


IF YOU WANT TO























SHOVE IT A
GET THAT HEAP \ OVER THE
15 minutes later... MOVING...YOU'VE 1 \ + LATE..
S STALLED TE CLIFF, L0" o I
COLUMN! MSHOOLIVITCH!







WHILE ... up on Rotgut, Alfa Company braced for the assault.

GET ON THAT PHONE "1
'N PASS THE WO .








CUN...IT "AMMED
AGAIN!! QUICK!
GIAME E A
HAND.1






/ HEY.! THEY'RE
GETTING' TOO
CLOSE .








Enemy grenadiers scurried past
the smoking outpost, up toward
-- the he.avil, defended hill...
FLAME THRLOWER! -U--
)UICK...THEY'VE TAKEN P GAS PRESSURE'S
THE BUNKER... BEEN LOW... HECK, COME
LET'S IT'LL WOK ON!
0! -OK...


.13
































.So.. at 2.342 hours, hlll 70o "Rotgut", uwa indicated as
forward of ML R ...
WHY DID THIS HAPPEN TO COMPANY'A'??


WHEN THEIR SITUATION GOT CRITICAL...
IT WAS TOO LATE FOR MAINTENANCE!!
36



















OPEN AND SHUT
Dear Sgt Dozer,
Our Nike battery was gigged for "floating" elevator doors. We checked with
our field maintenance people and they said it was OK for the doors to "float"
when they're stopped in a half-open position.
But, since we didn't want to get gigged again, we had the door cylinders re-
placed on the inspector's say-so. At the next inspection, same thing again. The
doors "floated" when stopped half-way-we were gigged for faulty door cylinders.
What's the score? Who's right-our
field maintenance or the inspector? Do
we keep replacing door cylinders until
the doors stop "floating"?
SSgt W. L. W.

o IF BOTH DOORS I
I DRIF DOWN...



.' Dear Sergeant W. L. W.,
IT COUI BE RUPIURED DOOR 'Y(NDiE Whoa, hold on there now. Replacing
(UPS OR LEAKING HYDRAULIC FLUID. door cylinders is a lot more than a 5-
and-10 cent store deal. Besides, your
o0 field maintenance people are right.
SO "Floating" doors are OK-it's covered
S 7 by para 15, TM 5-1450-201-35. When
,/ elevator doors are stopped in a half-
/,I open position, it's normal for the doors
S~' THIS DRIFT I to"float". That is, one door drifts up
1i I IK and the other down.







Your inspector friend overlooks the difference in the door weights. The "float-
ing" occurs because the heavier door overcomes the pressure in the fluid lines
and drifts down. Naturally, the lighter door is forced upward. But-both doors
must move.
Now then, if you stop the doors in a half-open position and both doors drift
down, you know you're losing hydraulic fluid through ruptured or leaking cups,
and you've got troubles.
But, keep your testing to a minimum. There's no reason to stop the doors half-
way. Continually stopping them in this position leads to blown or leaking cups
-and you'll have to replace door cylinders for real. Sr 4D)


LOAD TEST-AND ,RE-TEST





t_ F V s ....d WHEN "

Dear Half-Mast,
How can we be sure when load tests are necessary on our M62 and M246
cranes used to handle missiles?
Inspectors say our tests are invalid because of cable replacements and control
bank repairs.
The question is: What type of repairs or changes make the load tests invalid?
Capt W. K.
Dear Captain W. I., STENCIL THIS
When they're being used to handle l.OAD TESTI!)
missiles and rockets, Sir, the M62 and
M246 cranes and their controls have to DAT1: .,,i
be re-tested after any repairs, replace-
ments or adjustments before they're
returned to use.
So, when you're testing like it says in
TB 9-352 (14 Jul 60), it's almost im-
possible to be too careful. If in doubt,
re-test it, 'cause you've got to be sure.
And re-test once-a-year even if
there've been no repairs, replacements
or adjustments on the crane. __ ,







TORQUE RANGE,

WADDYA MEAIA
THiEW'S NO roR9.1 1'


Dear Half-Mast,
What's the torque rating for the bolts used to attach the front exhaust pipe to
the manifold on G742-series trucks? The TM's don't say.
Getting the right torque when tightening the nuts might stop a lot of flange


breakage.
Dear Specialist D. F. J.,
There're no torque specifications in
your G742-series TM's for those bolts.
But I'll give you a couple hints that
should get the job done.
A general torque rating for 3V-in
bolts is 275 to 325 inch-pounds, or
about 23 to 27 foot-pounds. And that's

WHEN TIGHTENING STAY |
WITHIN TORQUE RANGE
OF 23-29 FOOT-POUNDS


Sp5 D. F. J.

about in line with the 25 to 29 foot-
pounds torque rating listed for G742-
series manifold stud nuts in TB Ord
529 (20 Jul 53).
As long as you stay somewhere in
this range, the torque shouldn't cause
any breakage.
But when you're installing the pipe,
like it saxs in para 180c of TM 9-8022
Sl" Dec 5-i you'll want to check to
see if NMVO Ord G742-W28 (25 Sep
5"- has been applied.
The lM\O's been rescinded, but if
the rear exhaust pipe bracket's still
there and if s our CO gives his OK, you
ma\ wanr to sank this bracket at the
same time and avoid possible vibration
damage.






444pt






BUBBLE TROUBLE
BUBBLE TROUBLE ,
0 ,


Q.








'% ,'


Dear Sgt Dozer, t .dO V OLt.
Do bubbles in an engine coolant system mean trouble? If so, how do you get


rid of 'em?
Dear Sergeant J. H. C.,
Bubbles are fine in a beaker of brew.
But bubbles in your rig's engine cool-
ing system are up to no good.
In the cooling system, bubbles just
hang around-holding heat and slow-
ing down circulation. To make a bad
situation worse, bubbles tend to cluster
in corners of the water jackets where
the engine heat is highest.
Now it's no trick to keep coolant free
from bubbles in most engines. Air bub-
bles get sucked into the system through
open tube ends in the radiator. So, to
prevent this, you refill the radiator
often enough to be sure the tube ends
are covered.
But on rigs that rock and roll on the
job-like tractors, scrapers, and other
offroad equipment-it's not enough to
make sure the tube ends are covered
while the rig stands on level ground.
You want to fill these radiators high
enough to allow for the angle of opera-
tion, as well as for the suction of the
water pump.


Sgt J. H.C.
Then there's another kind of bubble
trouble, sometimes known as "after
Boil." This happens when you cut off
a hot engine without idling it for two
or three minutes-like it says in your
TM.
Without the heat-tapering effect of
this short idling period, engine temper-
ature can flare up as much as 100 de-
grees, causing the coolant to expand in
steam.
This expanding steam lifts the pres-
sure valve in the radiator cap, and lets
coolant escape through the overflow
pipe.
Then, when engine temperature
drops, the coolant condenses and pulls
down the vacuum valve in the radiator
cap-replacing the lost coolant with air
in the radiator.
This "after boil" can spill enough
coolant, and suck in enough air to cause
overheating of your engine, unless you
refill the radiator before the next start.













Dear Sgt Dozer,
Like any other rig, the intake and exhaust valves in our Model PB-44 air
compressors-used on Air Products LON-5 and A2 generating and charging
plants-have to be rebuilt every so often.
What are the minimum thicknesses allowed before the valve seats become
unserviceable? Sp6 F. J. Z.
PB-44 fm s%


Dear Specialist F.J.Z.,
Here's the dope you want-














JOY-FUL Al
There's a spang new capping com-
pressor that's starting to strut its stuff at
missile sites.
It's the electric-driven Model 415-
HEP2 Joy rig that puts out 15 CFM at
3500 PSI, and it shapes up like a big
winner.
This new Joy compressor is a double-
breasted brute with tall wheels and a
long drawbar that give it a smooth ride
to and from the job.
Its long electrical cable reaches back
from the far launcher to the power out-
let. Its wide range of controls and gages
make operation simple as shucking
peas. And there's enough room to
swing a cat in the hull that houses this
100% reciprocating compressor.
You can use the same ORC oil in its
crankcase all year 'round unless winter
brings a stretch of real subzero weather.
Best of all, this new compressor does
-- I WID RANGE OF
r4^WHSBS*-' (CONTROLS AND ,


IRJAMMER
away with a flock of problems that
come with compressors complicated by
a combination of rotary and reciprocat-
ing components.
There's no oil cooler and no separator
with felts that can load up and foul
the operation. So there's nothing to stop
you from using this Joy unit to fill your
M15 air breathing apparatus. Of
course, you'll use the M23 detector
kit and M4 adapter in conjunction with
this compressor while filling the air
breathing apparatus.
And the V-belt drive on this Joy will
do the job with less sweat than the
collet, nut and sleeve combo that comes
with rotary units.
The scoop on this rig is spelled out
in TM 5-4310-231-10, -20, and -20P.
There's one little item you might
add. When you pull the I-bolt lifting
ring to free up the hood panels, better
plug the hole. Otherwise water from
rain or "sahing culd slop up its
innardi.






BE YOUR OWN INSPECTOR ON THE...
ROCKET MOTOR CLUSTER TRUCK

J \^ ^ ^ )


When it comes to luggin' JATO's around your Nike site, you'd be up that creek
without a paddle if you didn't have a M442 rocket motor cluster truck around.
It also comes in mighty handy when a- launching-handling rail's gotta be
moved. And, in a pinch with the help of an adapter, the M442 can also handle
a missile body.
The rocket motor truck's a pretty rugged hunk of iron... but rugged or no,
it still needs its regular dose of PM medicine.
Here's a guided tour of the M442 that's reckoned to keep you one step ahead of
the gig parade.
Items that'll really cause serious damage and pile up gig points fast are
underlined.
First give the truck a general look-see. Check for damaged or missing rivets,
cracked welds and bent frames. Watch for chipped or worn painted surfaces and
make sure there's no sign of fungi, corrosion or rust.
If your truck looks like it could use a bath-break out the hose and wash it
down.
43









TRACK PIN GROUP-Pin FIN STORAGE RACK Knobs
twisted, sheared, missing: bent, missing; rubber bumpers
spring weak, missing; spring worn, n.issing; threads, burred;
pin missing, knob loose; spring pin, bent, twisted; racks bat-
knob pin loose, missing; tie tered, loose, hexagon nuts and
down pins, missing, burred, washers loose, missing; eye bolt,
\ worn, missing, loose.


STOP SUPPORT ASSEM-
BLY Stop bolt missing,
sheared, threads burred,
stripped; knob, loose, miss-
ing: spring pin, missing,
bent, hexagon nut, missing,
loose.


REFLECTORS
-Shattered,
missing, discol-
ored, dirty;
assembly loose,
screws missing,
loose, sheared.


TIRES Dangerously or
unevenly worn; treads cut
deep to the fabric; valve
stems pinched; valve core
leaking, broken; valve caps
missing; nails, glass, stones
imbedded in tires; wrong
pressure 75 PSI is correct).


PINTLE Assembly
loose, missing: screws
loose, missing,
sheared; pintle hook
bartered, twisted out
of shape, binds; latch
broken, will not close,
spring weak, missing.
44


STENCILS-Missing, not
clear, incorrect, wrong
height (!1 inch letters are
right). (Maximum speed 10
MPH on front end of truck,
tire pressure 75 PSI two
places on each side of
truck).


NOW CHECK THESE POINTS.


INTERMEDIATE
LOADING RACK STOP
-Twisted out of shape,
missing, loose; hexa
gon bolt, missing,
loose.


CONTROLS
Here's what to keep a lookout for in the steering and stopping department.
TOW BAR-Bent, twisted, cracked; BRAKES-Assembly bolt loose, bro-
drain hole plugged; ball lock pin, miss- ken, missing; ratchet, loose, worn; gears
ing, bent, sheared; retaining ring broke, stripped; spring worn, weak, missing;
loose, missing;chain, not attached, links pawl worn, battered: lever loose, re-
open, hook open, twisted, missing, leases hard.
t .


STEERING Steering arm twisted,
bent; cotter pins, missing, sheared;
clevis, twisted, bent; tie rods, loose, 7
bent, out of adjustment. UNLOCKED LOCKED

T S W PUBS
coaeorrro SET
\ e n Just as a double check, here's a run-
down of the publications that'll give
r you the scoop you need to know to keep
K e_ the M442 in tip top shape.

TM 9-1450-250-12
TM 9-1450-250-10P
TM 9-1450-250-20P '2
MWO ORD Y87-W2 (August 1959) provides
for replacement of
booster fin holding
channel.
MWO ORD Y87-W6 IDecember 1959) adds
drain holes to towhor
assembly.
LUBE SPOTS
In addition to hitting items likc lock screws, hinges and bolt assemblies with
the oil can on sour monthly lube tour, here're seven spots that need greasing to
keep rolling right. Like LO 1450-250-12A says, lubing should be done monthly
and semi-annuall under normal operations. And remember to relube after wash-
ing or fording.












Pulled a throat check lately at your Nike site?
Nope, nobody's trying to make a pill-pusher out of you-it's throat-check lube
fittings that're being talked about.
Like those you just might have on some of your ground-handling equipment
and launcher.


Might is the word because-as TB 9-1400-604-20, dated August 1960, points
out loud and clear-the old throat-check fittings are unauthorized and are to be
replaced by the surface-check type jobs.
Throat-check, surface-check, mox nix you say-a lube fitting's a lube fitting,
no matter how you slice it.
Not so.
Like golf, pool and a lot of other games-it's the location of the ball that
makes the big difference.
In the throat-check fitting, the steel ball is set On the other side of the fence, the steel ball in
deep inside a channel or throat-like so the surface check type is found at the top of
the channel






In both types of fittings, the steel balls ride on a steel spring, when the spring
is compressed, the balls let the grease get to the area to be lubed.
The throat-check fitting was tossed out of the window because it gave no
protection to the channel opening-allowing dirt, dust and other junk to build
up on the inside walls. So when the lube was pumped in it carried everything
down into the bearings-making for one abrasive mess.
When your lube points are equipped with the surface-check fittings, your
problems are over. The steel ball, riding the spring at the top of the throat keeps
out everything except the lubricant.






Once you've made sure all your fittings are of the surface-check variety-ex-
cept those on the rod bearing end of your acquisition antenna-all you hafta do
is wipe the fittings clean with a rag and follow the word of the equipment's LO
when lubing.
The lube fittings on the rod end bearings in your acq antenna get replaced as
a part of the bearing assembly-and only when the entire assembly shows signs
of wear and tear.
,II. ..I ,





FSN 4730-050-4208 FSN 4730-172-0028 FSN 4730-172-0034

Pull your inspection, order the replacement parts and you'll be in business.
One final tip ... mark your requisition "No Substitute Accepted" to make
sure you don't get back the same type fittings you're trying to replace.

UNTIL THE TILT
When the hydraulic elevator at your Nike missile site shows tilt with one end
settling on the locking bars before the other, then an equalizer cable adjustment
is called for.


FOR TYPE BAND C -- 63"
"I" BEAM FOR TYPE D -- 8/" TO 9"

ROLLER

CABLE INTERSECTING POINT
Now, when the cable is adjusted, it's from where you'll make your measure-
important that the distance between the ment-they should be taken off before
bottom of the chassis I-beam and the in- you make any adjustments.
tersecting.point of the equalizer cable The full scoop on making the adjust-
be measured accurately. For Type B and ment for the Type B and C elevators can
C elevators, the distance should be 6% be found in TM 5-1450-201-20, while
inches. For Type D elevators, 8/2 to adjustments for the Type D elevator are
9 inches, covered in TM 5-1450-200-20.
Since the cable separator rollers are Be sure to reinstall the rollers after
at the point where the cables cross-and you make the final adjustments.
47






















Gasohne burning heaters in the trailer ,ans at sour missile site ma% keep)ou
as warm as Jul\ during the cold, cold months. But leaking fumes from these
heaters could also make your %an a tiring room for a wooden orercoat.
With this in mind, the coming of the brass monkey season means that missile-
men had better make sure their heaters are A-OK. -- ..
A cracked or burned our heat ex-
changer ill let fumes sneak into the
heated area and that means curtains. o
To be sure you're going to be com-
fortable inside the vans this winter
without leaks and fumes, nows the best
time to place it safe and gieve Your heat- -
ers a thorough check-our. ~-- ha f

LOOK 'EM OVER
FIRST OFF, livf ALl IHE .AElTY [iviffi ON YOUP iiATER A Cil'I.I ('VF( j'0P IHE HICHI 1 0i(if
OPERATION AUD AbilrUMirf
- E _
Clean the heal exchanger. Take off the
This is your best healer element or
guarantee that you'll get the head from
top heater output. If the
heater has fins, brush off the heat exchanger.
any crum that has Scrape off any
collected during the time carbon, and give
it has been out of it a real close
operation. If the fins are once-over for
bent or out of shape, any defects, cracks
straighten'em. nr hrepni


PJa~g- MWL\ I -4=
If the heater has a belt-drive, eyeball the belt and make
sure it's in working order and that it's adjusted right.
Never take chances n ith a frayed or glazed belt or one
that has outlived its usefulness.
\\rap up \our maintenance chores by replacing all
parts and components that are not up to snuff.

OPERATING TIPS
Al I ass operate the heater with circulating air blowers going.
If the combustion blower motor is controlled by hand, let it run for about
a half-minute after you've shut off the fuel. This forces the unburned fuel out.
49















On the motor-driven raw water pumps that come with Met-Pro purification
rigs-Model 1500-2600 and 3000-2700-there's a couple of two-bit bugs you
want to kill before they foul the main operation.


Bug number one is Ihe bad angle where the
power cable plugs into the conduit box. Ar
this angle, the cable can drag and kink
So you want to take off the conduit box, and
put it back one quarter turn clockwise io the
right. Now the cable connedor faces the reel,
free and easy on the draw


mt D -4







FILTER SLEEVE JOB


You say you've got a Permutit or Met-Pro water purification unit-the kind
with a plastic sle/ve on each filter element?
Then here's the latest scoop for off-taking and on-putting those sleeves when
you service the filters.
Rolling 'em like socks-either on or off-is out. You lose
too many sleeves that way, even with fresh stock. Rolling rips
s ethe plastic and splits the seams, so you wind up with peekaboo
sleeves.
The new scoop says you want to slide sleeves on, and peel 'em off--somethin'
like a one-way stretch.
TO SLIDE A SLEEVE ONTO THE TUBE




I


I IDraw the ripple down,
IIj I and keep working that
Start it right, so the IStand the tufe on end, way until both sleeve
sleeve seam lines up I Pull the sleeve over land work the sleeve down ends overhang the tube
with the seam of the tube., the tube until it binds. until it builds up a ripple Ia smith of an inch.
TO PEEL A SLEEVE FROM THE TUBE



1. Reverse one sleeve end, then peel it towards 2 Hold the tube with one hand, while the
you until it almost overlaps the other end. other hand slides the sleeve from the tube.
When you peel a sleeve, might as well reverse it all the way for inspection.
Open seams, holes, or other damage tell you the sleeve needs to be replaced.
And whenever the purification unit is shut down for a few days, that's the best
time to hop onto the filter cleaning operation.
For washing you use only drinkable water, then dry 'em down to the bone.
And you don't replace the filter assembly dome until it's time to operate the unit
again.

















So you have one of those Model 3000-
2700, or Model 1500-2600 Met-Pro
water purification units.
And every so often you have to bleed
air from the raw water line. This could
get to be a project-specially after the
square heads on those brass vent plugs
get worn down to a knob-headed
nubbin. ) I


You can keep ahead of the game-
[ scrap those plugs, and replace 'em with
SA a fresh pair of drain cocks on the
pressure unit of the raw water flow
indicator.
It's no sweat. You just requisition
two Cocks, Drain: brass, Vs-in, 27
S 9 NPT, tee handle, straight nose, 125 PSI,
MIL Spec D-1203, Type A. They're
listed in SM 5-1-4800 under FSN 4820-
287-4276 (Eng).

OFF k CENTER PUSH

When you're using a dozer to push a USE OFF (ENTER
wheeled tractor or a scraper, you can POSITION FOR
save a lot of tires on the rig you're help-
ing by moving off center when pushing
around a corner or a curve.
Off center, the edge of the dozer blade ...AVOID
won't be long enough to reach the tire HITTINGV
and slice rubber in a tight turn. ITIRES.










i ,: ,,: ,




TlCH e ICAL MANUALS
TM 3 220 : :
FM 5S 61i 20Y 70P .. i :
j' lege. I '' *
IM 5.36 i .04-10 C: i : l *, ,

IM '..- 10 3 .S -, ll .

IM 5.310-T1 5 C:. :' nil ':

TM -410.202 I2s r:.:, .,.:







IM i. eg" -0.OP C *-e ,;, :.


TM E-A'SO-TTB.TOP i L. -i
T. T.0 ..SP,, LX *m





IM 5 4-,10-21 op1 ; -. :,






555 i'..' m 'e Ai Mt i I
TM o.T52- 256*SP ..o iun', i.


TM 5,11?S-??4.2P .iu' Ce it,- '
TM S3AT0 235T-OT *.-r o' 04
-on..) 5a~i ;s.o & M :: C .







TM 5-41.20-i2G04-1 8 ,. : .









IM AbOS : ". 3 i2 7 s ra

TM 5-138Z O-20 LeA 0 0'' o A'
TM 9-4>S0-4S.2025PP C.' I s


















TM 9-.TA0-2.25 S C.' ''-..'


IM 9.lT0-AO.Tl : ",..



TM TO-2930.TTT20P.P. 3 2:': *oi &
IM I3O.3?0-20-0OP C. O'.i' i.


IM 0-9 6110.71620 0ei C r Ic u
TM 5 6115-79 .13 0 3 T. A















IM 15-0.l9 i-0. 3- -20P C2' i
&AC. r ll T i .'&, C I L 11 T, t,'
IM B.605 7 1 C













IM T1-23S aO e '.-. ,', lr-
*,l 1ai
IM 9-10S51.11-20P C'.' e'odc Tale




IM 9.1 10.i00C 17 e .



IM 10-5930J 02-70P. CJ 0:- -a-I &I
i:-.- i r l;
TM 10-3930-710-20P C2 Oc< *le &


TM 10-3930 21&-10 4,P i I L h ia l

IM 1 -3930.2 -20P :e T...k 1.11
foui *:u5 r.'.e.u-.ii s riei l Lr Lt4


TM 10 3930-223-10. -20P. C2, "c
& --.10 Xt Lt C13 i fl .r n i ll

IM 11-5HOS 216-2iPOCi Cci iie- e

1 I1.5005-217-20PO.mH-s 0 T EI
1l. 7re I;


IM 11-5805-219 10P *:., FT-or .ut
A1, FO 4.1,
TM I l-.570-218.20p C.i i c C.qc
N 11.1 i
fM 11-5820-219-20P C-: iAc.-.:e.
ble. ioL.. ID-CO C -a.. i iA0 C-
TM l i-5B0-292-20 0 r il.O ,sB
AN P1C.l -A4 -9 -5A -lU. -lI0
.'j -'.-a
IM 11-5810-335-10 0- TOrAns.rli.s
Pd.- I 1i9 GC 19 T i54 & i..iS
TM 11-5830 207.20OPetih:.s..ial..
g.-., 0\s S.,
TM 1. 835 .21-.15 Sep :,.i.-i Pi
Ac J 5',aLi..'i' ;e, ;D Ill UN
rm 'I 840-229-20P O,. Pit r., ie


C. -t,' ,i M
TM I .-380.-240.10P Ca laea. f[
TAR: I ': )<
TM Ti .401.258T14 ipCi.A .etroa.
GC. *ri UP 3H
TM lI.O930-20i-liPlei.C I 1 1-5965-263-17P Lep .cae.
S* ,., M :,A'u & M ;;b ,J
TM 11 o115.231-15 T.. Ce .-r PL,.
45" r i, I
TM l .130-225.-12 Ot CA9rger Irr,
rI ... 'I
TM l e625-308-12 G., Vilage fd
e ,i3 N URM M*l
IM 11-6621-396-T0f :L- :
i rli:6 uL.d .o 5 rliS C
TM 11 66.a25-400.20P. -. r. I
iltI. ME U
TM 11.6625-406-12A ." :
1 ; LI
TM iT.A75-415-15 :. MI*'

IM 11-6625-427.12 i :, i,
r,-..ei. AN '-CM. AN Ci i.
Ati CGtu.3] Art'C NC.L i
TM 11-6635.46l-15 : 0 ;.a.l "
Ar uPr I2')
TM 11- 6720-203 20F ",. ':-.'..
I .,'S IA.:2OA
TM l -6740-23020P : .
V- fr :.: i--.r. AN.'ii'OQ
FM 11- 1440-200-I00 C.w-. .ie .e
0.4'iM l 1'.a GCex eal Pu.p.We ni I.t .A I
I I
LUBRICATION ORDERS
LO 5-3895-221-20-1 -2 0. M..i.
Coe..ria CO.e.- Bel3 Ma l nl:.
10 5-3895-.261iS D nI-:e I ,.
-A. B oI.. M.d 't-:. iA
LO 5-4310-229-15 A.4 C.Mp Ecta.'
Dr .. i' CFM, iD-) PSf .-, Moda

LO 1.4320-1222-1 OcT i-p ,po-
caring Rlie 0,.ip a M.u-h Cc Mac 10-.'
LO 5-4320-219-12 Se. FuPr., Co."l
Co.aer M1dr N.t0s
L0 5-4490-200-12 OC0 i'.c; Eq.p
Con Ma.'i. II MIJ. rt l.I- 3 '"nc eri, l
ri Bor Cc MjI EFCM
LO 5-6115-274-20Ca Go. nel 41KA
AC .leain & Sileensr. Mod 52iA

53


LO 9-1055-205-10 Oct Lchr, 762mm RK.
LO 9-2002 Aug Lchr, Rkl, 3.5-in M20A1,
M20A1BI.
LO 9-5048-12 Oct Erector M2 (Corporal)
LO 9-U6 Sep Gun, Mach Col .30.
LO 9-U7 Sep Mach Gun Cal .50 M2.
LO 10-4930-204-10 Aug Pumping Assy
Flammable Liq Bulk Transfer.
LO 55-2220-202-20 Aug Rail, Ambu-
lance Unit 56-1/2-n Gage, (Amer Car &
Fdryl.
MWO'S
.MWO 5-4940-203-35/1 Sep Shop
Equip Elect Repair: Set No. 4.
MWO 5-6115-229-35/2 Oct Gen Set,
5KW, AC, HOL-GAR Mod CE-55-AC/WK6.
MWO 5-9100-2 Oct Gen and Chrg
Plant, Air Prod Mod LON-5.
TECHNICAL BULLETINS
TB 9-1220-227-12 Oct AA Fire Cont
Sys M33A1G.
TB 9-1400-511-12 Oct Contr Envir
Cond Set (Hawk).
TB 9-5013-1/20 Nov Air Cont Cab
N/Herc.
TB 9-2320-211-12/1 Oct Trk, Wrecker,
Medium, 5 Ton 6x6 M543.
TB 55-3 Oct Trans Guid I Trk, Dump,
2-1/2 Ton, M215.
TB 55-4 Nov Transportability Guid Trk,
Water, 2-1/2 Ton, 1000 Gal, M222.
TB 55-5 Nov Transportability Guid Trk,
Tractor 2-1/2 Ton, M221.
TB 55-6 Nov Trk, Cargo, 5-Ton, M41.
TB 55-7 Nov Trk, Wrecker, 2-1/2 Ton,
M60.
TB 55-2200-202-25/1 Oct Loco, Dsl-
Elec, 44 thru 131 Tons, Dom Opr Over
Yard Tracks of Com Carriers in Interstate
Commerce.
TB CML 86 Oct Grenade. Hand, Tear,
CS, M7A2.
TB ORD 1030 Oct Ord Veh; Inst and
Use of Overhaul Instr Plates.
TB ORD 1033 Oct Ord Gas Eng Corr
Compr Pressure Readings.

MISCELLANEOUS
AR 600-58 Nov Personnel-Gen Mech
Equip Oper Selection, Testing, and
Licensing.
DA Form 9-204 Sep Rador Set AN/MPQ-
37 (Howk) Checksheet.
GTA 3-32 Oct M8A2 Gas-Particulote
Filler Unit with Combat Vehicle. Protec-
tive Masks.
GTA 5-35,1961 Bridge Classification Card.
SB 5-111 Nov Extinguisher, Fire, CF3BR.
S5 55-28 Oct TC Regulated Ilems.
SB 55-34 Oct TC Critical Items.
SM 10-1-C6-5-SM, Vol 3, May, Hand
Tools, Nonedged, Nonpowered FSC Class
5120.
SM 10-1-C6-13-M, Vol 1, Oct, Type
Composing Machines.
SM 55-4-4220-102 Oct Life Preserver
Set Vest: Mk II.
SM 55-4-5180-503 Sep Tool Kit, Ma-
chinilss Railway.
TOE 5-1770 Oct Engineer Pipeline Const
Sup Co.






SI COMMECI T EH


LUBE LINGO LINE-UP
Can the guess work. Pin this lube identification chart near your vehicle's
grease rack. You'll ind it helpful when lubing commercial-nrpe vehicles per
instruction, in the manufacturer's manual.


Normally For Lubing


Engine (all), Air Cleaner (oil
bath type), Air Compressor
(If not lubed by engine or
power steering)
Automatic Transmission,
Power Steering Units,
Reduction Units
Front and Rear Axles

Mechanical Transmissions

Transfer Cases

Steering Gear Unit


Winches


Overdrive


Commercial
Lubricants


ML, MS, MM, DG. or
DSSAE 10, 20, 30,
40, 50

Automatic Trans-
mission Oil, Type A


Gear Oil SAE 90
and 140 Hypoid
Gear Oil SAE 140 [P
Gear, SAE 140
Oil SAE 90 and
140MP Gear
Lubricant SAE 90,
and 140 Steering
Gear Lube SCL, EP
Gear Ol SAE 90,
and 140 ES lubri-
caling oil special
H/poid Lubricant.
Straight Mineral
Oil SAE 160 and 251
Straight Mineral
Oil SAE 50


Military
Lubricants


Engine Oil Hvy Duty
(MIL-L-2104A)
MIL-L-10295

Engine Oil, Light
(MIL.L.2104A)
MIL.L.10295
Lube. Oil Geor,Universal
MIL-L-002105 (ORD)
Lube, Oil Gear,Universal
MIL-L-002105 (ORD)


0.


Temperature Range and
Military Lube Symbols
Above +400F to 0to
+32cF -10F -65O
OE 30 OE 10 OES



OE10 OE10 ES


GO 90 GO 90 605

GO 90 GO 90 GOS


Lube, Oil Gear.Universal GO 90 GO 90 GOS
MIl 1-002105 (ORD)
Lube, Oil Gear. Universal GO 90 GO 90 GOS
MIL-L.002105 (ORD)

Lube, Oil Gear,Universal GO 90 GO 90 GOS
MIL-L-002105 (ORD)

Lube, Gear, Universal GO 90 GO 90 GOS


(MIL-L-2105)


Wheel Bearings, Universal Wheel Bearing GAA Am 2 GAA Am 2 GAA Am 2 GAA Am 2
Joints. All gun-type fittings Grease, Chassis GAA Am 3 GAA Am 3 GAA Am 3 GAA Am 3
and allgrease-type lube Grease, Cup Grease GAA Rev A GAA RevA GAA Rev A GAA Rev
points on chassis


Water pumps (as
outlined in SB 725-9150-1
(31 Mar 58)


Water Pump Grease


GAA Am 2
GAA Am 3
GAA Rev A


GAAAm 2 GAAAm2 GAA Am:
GAAAm3 GAAAm3 GAAAm:
GAARevA, GAARev A GAARev,


VEHICLES-


I






Temperature Range and
Normally For Lubing Commercial Military Military Lube Symbols
Lubricants Lubricants Above +40F to 00 to
+320F -100F -650F

Hydrovac units (vacuum Shock Absorber Hydraulic Oil, Preservative OHC, OHC, OHC,
portions-only. Do not put in Fluid, Vacuum (MIL.H-6083A), or or or or
master brake cylinders) Cylinder Oil Hydraulic Oil, Petroleum OHA OHA OHA
Base (MIL-0 56061

Shock Absorber Hydraulic Oil, Preservative OHC, OHA, OHC, OHA, OHC, OHA,
Fluid (MIL-0-6083A) or Hydraulic SAH (for SAH (for SAH (for
Shuck Absorbers Oil Petroleum Base Houdaille Houdaille Houdaille
(MIL 0.5606); Castor Oil, shocks shocks shocks
Technical Heavy, shock only) only) only)
absorber, JAN-F-461 (far
Houdaille shocks only)

Hydraulic Brake Cylinder Heavy Duty Fluid, Fluid, Hydraulic Brake HB HB HBA
SAE 70R1 (VV-F-451A)

Oil can points Engine Oils: Preservative Lubricant PL (med) PL (sp) PL (sp
SSpecial Oils (MIL-L-3150)

Speedometer Cables Grease, Aircraft Aircraft and Instrument GL GL GL
and Instrument Grease (MIL-G-3278)











r.
3~~~~~~. .. ... Whr teprtrsrmiItaya 9 n bv,(ncniulln n ev al
















Lean in close, man, and get the latest info on the MIG (Metal Inert Gas) weld-
ing rig that's just hit the scene.
MIG-welding is the deal you've been waiting on for better welding of alu-
minum.
The new welding set's been in the Army for some time now, and it's being
issued to company welders.
The process calls for argon (inert) gas, generator welding power (300-amp
arc welder with 115-volt, AC or DC auxiliary panel), a beauty of a gun-torch
... and, of course, the steady hand and the keen eye of a good welder.
The welding set's complete calling name and FSN are:
Welding Set, Arc, Inert Gas Shielded, FSN 3431-691-1415.
It breaks down like this:


-T MIG gun (torch) O Welding Contactor
[ Voltage Control Box C (able Assemblies
# Compressed gas regulator (argon) with flowmeter


The set was designed for use with the Arc Welder, FSN 3431-222-1722, or
Arc Welder, FSN 3431-542-1072.
And the set's issued as part of the Automotive Maintenance, Organizational
Tool Set No. 2 (Supplemental), FSN 4940-754-0743.
It's also part of the Field Maintenance Welding Shop Set, FSN 3431-357-7268.
You'll find it listed in SM 9-4-4940-A08, and in SM 9-4-3431-A05. And the set
is an Engineer item.
You might run into MIG sets which differ slightly in looks... a button, or
switch, a fuse or screw in a different spot, different brand name, etc., but regardless
of looks, you'll find they work very much the same.
HOW'S IT WORK...?


The MIG technique in brief: As you
weld with a bare electrode, argon gas
flows steadily to the torch where it
forms a shield over the are to shut out
all chance of the atmosphere contami-
nating the weld. Men who know, call it
welding at its best. There's no flux, no
slag to worry with, and the equipment's
easy to use and maintain. Its special
needs are few and simple, but before
you sidle-up any closer here's something
you have to learn real good:
With MIG-welding the generator
MUST BE SET ON REVERSE PO-
LARITY.
The high heat input of reverse po-
larity provides a cleaning action, and
deeper penetration, on the base weld-
ing plate.


If you should forget and leave the
generator on straight polarity the wire-
feed motor will run in reverse, and the
welding wire will burn-back into the
guide tube.
There are a couple of other special
cautions which we'll talk about later
... but, right now let's look at a close-
up of the MIG gun.


I I


WOL
















WELDING TRIGGER. SPOOL MOUNTING
WIRE GUIDE TYPE SWITCH SHAFT
TUBE (ONfROLS WELDING.WIRE
POWER AND I IN(HING.
ARGON GAS BUTTON


The MIG torch will handle all wire-
feed speeds needed for welding with
Y-4-in aluminum wire (FSN 3439-775-
6476), and it'll weld two different
thicknesses of aluminum in any posi-
tion or joint design.
/ Tf4T M(6' Gor
LQE4T VE RAT/ LIT
8L7 YOU GOT C0 R REO
.-. W4WA Y OEf

1 ,,- aw~o


CAREFUL: The torch has a maxi-
mum current capacity rating of 200-
amps ( continuous duty) -so take care
your welding amperage never exceeds
200 amps... a higher setting on your
generator could damage the torch.
The gun's air-cooled, compact, and
well insulated to protect you from its
electrically hot wires and components.
It's also fairly light-weight (somewhere
around three pounds, minus spool and
cables), and with its neat size and shape
-and its welding wire piggy-back-you
can work easier in hard-to-reach places.


GUN OPERATION
You control the welding power with the gun's trigger-type switch. The
trigger-switch closes the welding contactor, and also starts the argon flow. You
squeeze the trigger to start welding and release the trigger to stop. And, right
here's another important MIG-welding caution:

TO STOP WELDING-ALWAYS RELEASE THE GUN'S TRIGGER-SWITCH FIRST. NEVER PULL THE GUN AWAY
FROM THE WORK TO STOP WELDING.
TRIGGER I.}\ -'- E
RELEASE ,, t






Pulling the gun away from the work while pressing the trigger will throw a
voltage over-load on the small motor in the gun's handle, and it'll likely burn up.
So watch yourself real close here... the price tag on that 24-volt, DC motor,
reads something like 100 bucks.
The motor's job is to deliver the wire from the spool to the work. When you're
welding, the motor gets its power from the field of electrical current which is
generated between the end of the wire and the work plate. The current is picked
up by the voltage pick-up cable, sent back through the voltage-control-box, and
on to the motor.
She'll start feeding wire the instant you make contact with the work ... not
when you pull the trigger.






LOADING THE GUN
1. To load, or thread, the gun, loosen the 4. Mount the spool on its shaft so the wire
pressure-roller thumb-screw on the side feeds from the top, and replace the spool
of the gun, and swing the pressure-roller broke. Screw the brake on tight enough so
assembly away from the housing. the spool won't unwind in its housing.
ROLLER LOOSEN [TTIGHTEN
PRESSURE PRESSURE BRAKE
PRESSURE ROLLER
ASSEMBLY THUMB-SCREW
A DL T-H=, M-B,, E s5. Swing the pressure roller assembly in place.
2. Release the friction disc (spool brake) as-
sembly from the spool mounting shaft, 6. Tighten the pressure-roller thumb-screw,
and swing it up out of the way. and adjustthe spool brake, as needed, until
the rollers push the wire through the noz-
S SWING zle without any slippage.
LOOSEN _AWAY_ _
SCREW AW NOZZLE
3. Straighten out the end of the wire on a
spool (about six inches worth), and push 7. With the inching-button you can run the
the straight end of the wire into the wire wire out past the nozzle to trim or adjust
inlet and outlet bushings. it. Before you start welding (and while
-- NL you're welding) the wire should be no
III~~UIW more than /2 inch beyond the nozzle.






WIRE SPEED RATE
Wire speed is controlled by the set- right you
ting you make on the welding voltage- and the v
rheostat, on the voltage-control-box, of a fines
A long arc speeds up the wire, a short
arc slows it down. If wire speed is too
slow the copper guide-tube will get
burned-back (electrode fuses to the
tube).
One way to avoid burned-back tubes
(when you don't know the best wire
speed setting to start out with) is to
turn the wire speed knob to maximum --
speed, and then adjust the speed grad-
ually as you weld.
When you've adjusted the speed just
VOLTAGE-CONTROL-BOX
The voltage-control-box controls the rent relay
wire feed rate and the argon flow. It feeding p.
gives them to you in the proper order. Chang.
The control also provides the means about all
which let you inch the wire through the you'll hav
gun without welding power when One im
the voltage-control-box switch is ON, using 110
and you press the inching-button, the voltage-cc
DC output voltage from the control's the box ha
rectifier will run through the motor's ing it to t
armature, and she'll feed you wire. that could
Always keep the control box stand- See the
ing up. If it's laid on its back the cur- manual w
FUSES PROTECT info on t
OVERLOAD IN
VOLTAGE
CONTROL
BOX.


'11 have a steady frying sound
ire deposit will be in the form
'pray.
r,

.,.c- ..- ft r


will close and wire will start
rematurely.
ing its fuses, as needed, is
I the maintenance business
'e with the control box.
lore thing... when you're
volts AC, don't ground the
)ntrol-box to the building...
s an internal ground. Ground-
he building will create a short
d seriously damage the box.
operator's and maintenance
rith your rig for any special
his box.

SDIGNO OTROL







WELDING
CONTACTOR
Other than
keeping the
contactor's con-
nectors tight,
keeping the box
clean and dry, and
checking cables
for wear, you'll
have little else
to do for this
switch box.


ARGON CYLINDER
REGULATOR
Connect it,
adjust it, read
it, and keep it
clean. Like with
any other gas
regulator, you
don't monkey
with this one
either.


WARM-UP
Are you ready for a few practice passes?
OK, set the generator on reverse polarity, and check your power and argon
adjustments. Make sure that the voltage-pickup-cable is attached to the generator-
ground-cable, so you'll have the right voltage pickup.


1. With the gun threaded (to feed from the WIRE
lop of the spool) press the inching-button
and run the wiie '. inch past the nonzle
Trim the wire if necessary.

2. Take your stand (get yourself in the most %" 90
comfortable, relaxed position you can _.__ _
find), and hold the gun at a 900 angle to .rp -
your work, and point it about 10 toward the direction of travel. Keep the nozzle about % inch
above your work at all times. (If you hold the gun too far from your work the molten metal
will get contaminated. If you hold it closer, the nozzle will get red-hot).

3. Lower your welding helmet, and squeeze the trigger.

ATTACH VOLTAGE PICKUP-CABLI
TO GENERATOR GROUND CABLF


61 IaM-E
|







4. Scratch the work lightly with the wire to
start the arc. As the wire touches the work
the motor will start, and wire will begin
to feed immediately.
(WATCH IT: Right about here, on their first
few tries, some guys get the urge to pull
the gun back a bit, which messes them up,
but good. Drawing the gun back feeds out
more wire than is needed, and the weld
gets contaminated. So be prepared to keep
the gun down once you get going.)

5. As long as you squeeze the trigger and
maintain the arc you'll go on welding.

6. When you release the trigger everything
(power, gas and wire) stops.


STOP I

-E TatS1 FS


OPERATION NOTES
Never let a fan, or any other strong the control box. Also that the control


draft, blow directly on your work when
you're welding. The breeze'll blow the
argon shield away from the nozzle and
that'll be the end of your MIG-welding.
When your welding job's outdoors, or
in a drafty shop, set up some sort of
wind shield around your work to keep
the argon gas shield undisturbed
around the nozzle.
The welding wire becomes "hot" the
instant you pull the trigger, so to avoid
accidental arcing, hold the torch safely
away from any likely "ground" until
you're ready to start welding.
Never press the trigger-switch when
you're trimming the wire.
Be sure the torch ground-cable is
connected to the ground-terminal on


box and your work are connected to a
good ground, and the same goes for the
115-volt power outlet cord.
The welding cable connects to the lug
on the torch power adapter, after it
passes through the current relay so
when you hook-up the welding cable
be sure the adapter's jam nut is tight,
and that the lug's tight enough so it
won't move and touch the screws on
the control cabinet.

,N'


SAFETY
Safety rules for MIG-welding are similar to safety rules for electric arc weld-
ing. (See TM 9-237, Welding Theory and Application pages 38-41, and page
104.):







SKEEPALL- ELECTRICAL 80XES
DRY ATALL 7/MESf
KEEP ALL4 C4LE CONNECTIONS
T *" T/HT,
HANDLE ALL SWITCHES WITH
I .~- ,GER'S eLV(






Before making any connections he sure the
voltage-control switch on the voltage-control-box.
and the qeneaolor power switch are on OFF.


GUN PM TIPS


Keep gun wiped clean and dry.
Oil the rollers lightly with 10-weight
oil (about twice a year).
Clean nozzle after each operation.
Scrape out spatter from inside the noz-
zle carefully with a scriber, or a file.
And take care the spatter you scrape
off doesn't drop back into the nozzle
holder.
Trim and straighten bugged (burned-
back) copper guide tubes with a file or
reamer. The tubes are -approximately


5 8 inches long when they're new, and
they're still usable after you trim off as
much as /~ inch .. but beware of tubes
under 5 inches long ... they're not long
enough to guide the wire right all the
way out to the work.
Use this easy-to-make, time-saving tube measure
gage.

CAP HEPE NOTCH AT 5
Slice a 5%3-in length of pipe length-
wise so's to drop tube in easy. Cap one
end (so tube won't slip out), notch the
other end where it measures exactly 5
inches from the capped end.
Keep hands off damaged power
cables and argon line assemblies...
report 'em to your supervisor.







TROUBLE-SHOOTING T HE GUN


WHAT'


HOW COME? FIX!


Spatter build-up, or drops of hot metal,
inside of nozzle, or nozzle holder, are
touching the guide tube which transfers
current to the nozzle.


Nozzle gets 1. Wire feed's too slow.
red hot 4J1 e 1 2. Nozzle's being held too close to work.


Weld metal is Weld metal has become oxidized due to
black. or porous,.A loss of argon shield.


Spark has burned a hale in the power
cable shield-grounding the torch-switch
cable to the power cable, causing motor
to run.
1. Wire feed too slow.
2. Wire spool empty.
3. Voltage pickup cable not connected
to generator ground cable.
4. Feed assembly contact shoe becomes
welded to contact ring on feed roll.
5. Spatter on wire roll keeps wire from
feeding.

6. Blown fuse on motor.
7. Wire stops feeding.


Nozzle threads ,- I Nozzle worked loose and allowed spat
chewed up f later to gel lodged in threads.


Remove all spatter & balled metal
from inside nozzle with a file or
scriber.


4


1. Increase wire feed.
2. Keep nozzle ," above work.


1. Check for drops of metal
inside nozle holder.
2. Check argon supply in
cylinder.
3. Check argon hose for holes.
Power shield must be removed,
wires retaped and power shield
replaced.

1. Increase wire speed.
2. Replace spool.
3. Replace cable clamp or
reconnect.
4. Remove name plate on top of
gun& free shoe with screw driver
5. Remove spool, cul off spat-
tered section of wire & re-
install spool.
6. Replace fuse.
7. Check for kinked wire, or worn
rollers. Check roller for worn
grooves, increase pressure on
pressure roller.


Keep nozzle tight at all times.


Motor won't run 1. Blown fuse. 1. Replace fuse.
when inching H 2. Faulty switch. 2. Report faulty switch.
button's pressed '{ 3. Broken wire in inching-button circuit. 3. Report button failure.
Welding contactor 1. Blown fuse. 1. Replace fuse.
does t close when 2. Faulty trigger switch. 2. Report faulty switch.
Irigger is pressed 3. Damaged contactor coil. 3. Report damaged contractor.
Loss of argon gas. I. Holes in argon line. 1. Report damaged hose.
S 2. Faulty argon solenoid valve. 2. Report argon failure.
3. Cylinder empty. 3. Replace argon cylinder.


I






BRIEFS I




M1W25 end eurtaWi
Curtain, vehicular, truck cargo body,
FSN 2540-777-5254, found in TM 9-
2320-206-20P (Apr 61) fits either front
or rear on your M 25 10-ton cargo truck.
So use this number when a replace-
ment's needed for either end.


Still towing a G675 stake and plat-
form 2-wheel semitrailer? TB 9-2300-
219-10 (4 Sep 59) tells you to tow it with
the G742-series truck tractors, M48 or
M275...instead of the one listed in
TM 9-890 (12 Jul 44). Check TB Ord 616
(31 Aug 56) for the adapter needed for
the intervehicular electrical hookup.

exte acemy4
Sometimes you'll need to order the
next higher assembly to get some of
the smaller parts for your Ordnance
automotive equipment. F'rinstance, to
get a bracket, you may need to fabricate
it or order the housing it's attached to.
To get the nail, maybe you'll need to
order the shoe-or even the whole hossl
Costs less to stock one item than 10,
y'know.


Sweat no more when mating Engineer
engines with the equipment on which
they're used. Coming to the rescue is
TB ENG 360 (Aug 61), "Internal Com-
bustion Engine Application." It gives you
the scoop on what Engineer engines are
used with most engineer rigs. Manufac-
turer model numbers, part numbers and
FSN's of the engines and equipment are
included.
- .l t. '' ,,:--.'- ,....
. -''. *"" -.. :, : '^ ? ,- ;.: .


1, "". 4- 1 .--., W'.i

Mud and silt caked in the bilge pumps
of your M113 APC can burn out their
motors. The mud gets in when you slop
through the goop in cross-country oper-
ation. Flushing out the mud before it
dries gives you a paid-up life insurance
policy for your bilge pumps. So, man the
pumps with some clean fresh water be-
fore you put your M113 away for the
night.

wml3 dsain plgs
When you drain water from the final
drive outer housing on your M113 APC
be sure you take out the right plug. There
are two plugs pretty close together-on
each side of the vehicle. The one closest
to the track is removed only if you want
to drain the oil out of the final drive. The
other plug at the very bottom of the
housing is the one you remove to let the
water out.

7urn fow the betterc
TB 9-1430-254-34/1/1 (22 Dec 60) is
the answer to keep from touching those
"hot" terminals on the R2 tach phase adj
potentiometer in your Nike-Hercules ac-
quisition antenna's RF coupler. But-in
case your support unit has gotten around
to turning those terminals up and out of
the way as the TB says ... it's a smart
guy who goes along with what it says on
page 25 in PS 105: Steer clear of the
terminals.