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PS
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00010
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1961
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00010

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20-1
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-3
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44-5
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 5
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62-3
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text









OKAY CHARLIE,
S/, / TOL' HR TO KEEP
THE MOTOR RUNNIN'..
BUT SO IS THE METER..,
AIN'T YOU NF-VER DONE
NO QM ON THAT

I^^^ ^ LilG?


'IJovlP; 0,4A


I\' *,








C Maintenance Is Training...




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traii fo cmbt. rig*C ht, t keep e ajse. n m
..9 *- C C e C *. i *. C


Cike .a w e .. Ca C a *

maintained. C ril .th Ary d mnw t. *u *- c m il b

s C.... The ru. A your

T t w y i i i C and
every day on whatever equipment Tat's hy te CO or CG lfarherup Mov~l' e.^^^w^^^^^^^^^


1 5UP 11 I Iu l b i r e S
PublithEo Dr mhe Depirtrne.il of the Afrny irr the inform-
teon of organlza tolnal miririantire and supplyy personnel DI'.
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,. ,T i i M rl;, ,.-i- A ,l 1r, Ai.e- r I M ui: ,tr,, rjie lerr'

IN THIS ISSUE
ARTICLES Page
Faliures
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fDEPRTMEINTS
lit ic.'larn P th rEqu ub ted n A F m 24
PS wlnli IuUI 'aS jno conlribdlluOI arnl is glja la ansrl
your iU.Stloni NjmPs ana 3dlresses jre kefit in confidence.
lus1 rthlr 1O:







In illardjrnc wilh rrqu,lllnlnI .uhm.ndd on DA IFrm l74





















Dame Nature in a permanent sweat-that's deep-tropic climate Ir.r \ .u
A real fickle dame, too. One minute she's hot and sticky; the next she's raining
cats and dogs; and the next she's foggier'n pea soup.
To top it off, when the rain's at its worst you may get vicious winds that'll
really blast you and rip away everything that's not 100 percent protected.
It stands to reason that PM is the life of the party in a situation like this. And
that goes for ALL equipment-vehicles, weapons, radios, personal gear-just
everything. Not easy when you think how heat and moisture and fungi gang
up on equipment. wU .-.WVI DPIVING
^W RAI &ii
Dr.ing in deep-tropic areas presents //
problems you may not meet any-, hIrL -
else. What roads there are may r..- h t
/' '" in good condition even in the dry sea-
son. And in the wet season, or after a
cloudburst-brother! -
But no matter what you run into,
iy ,L y )'our driver's manuals and equipment P', 7r
S operator's TM's'll probably have the
dlution for you. Eyeball TM 21-305
D ,ec 56) for wheeled vehicles ... md
ST 21-306 (Aug 56) for the tracks. -


One of the toughest problems here is overheating. Any engine that has to work
in low gear in soft ground or up steep slopes in hot weather runs the danger of
overheating.
2


kcp .*n cu .fn .A'Ldr irmpur tirui c .agc ii thc\ tjr[
i A I c dimb in1. clit the danL:r z...n|. si.-p In nijui IcJl 1%. i I.-Au Cijn
R l RuI he cngiint di hiL'h |dlc [r.: klu p [hie Cio lihng I i n i.r ifar
spinning.

If there's a breeze blowing, try to face your wheeled ;__.
vehicle into it-to add the speed of the breeze to the fan
blast. After several minutes of fast idling, shut the engine
off and let it cool naturally. Of course, you'd cool down
your tank engine by running it at 1000-RPM for five -
minutes at least before stopping.


But whatever you do, don't try to
cool off your hot engine by giving it a
drink of cold water. You'll bust the
block sure.
To do a good job your cooling sys-
tem must be in top condition. Check the
water level often-and make sure any
water you put in there is clean. In some
areas where fungi scums up the works,
flush out the radiator and put in a fresh
supply if what's in there looks gooky.
But in other areas-especially vol-
canic areas-the mineral content of the
water will be your biggest hex. These
minerals separate from the water and
coat the innards of the radiator core. In


places like this it's better not to change
the water if you can help it. But still
keep the radiator full.

L OR,






St r,, .. heeled vehicles, check the fan bel
it. i And be wide-awake for leaks P
.... I, ind-radiator, water pump or has,
ti em and fix 'em. Smort operate
t check their hoses, hoas rlamp )iidr fnri
beits at every halt. .. I .. I
against faulty igniti I ,s,,, .I. I
could cause overheatir q
On the tracks, all you can do is keep the cool.
ing fans, oil filter and air cleaner in shape and
clean. Watch especially for insects and lees c
that might clog up the oil cooler cores. t ,our
best bet's to rig up makeshift screens to prorter ,
the cores from bugs. Also check to see t.in. n..
OEM, BIIL, special equipment, cargo or passen.i
gers are blocking the deck grills-either milr, s
or exhaust. ''I-/" "
/- ( -

Fuel System


S__. JLl KKtping ,! ,rnr ur Ouii lul Js man-sized job when
-____th_ rhi .arnm.,phcre s laiadcd. One g.,od defense is to keep
our tucl [rlh k rillkd lbu nor bove the FILL mark).
SAn other is 1,1 i:e.in the swimnldn( howl often-and those
A -.n ..ontltnncr \%Lr, dj.


.IU 9 0. i\ Ti,-.. i HALI Vr 4 APOR -OCK"
T ,,,:,,,5 ,

V -A


One of your biggest headaches under '
these conditions, however, could be fuel
pump failure due to vapor lock. What
happens is that the fuel gets so hot it
changes from liquid to vapor (actually
boils) and the pump can't move it.
(This won't happen on vehicles with
pressurized fuel systems.)







On commercial type vehicles this
could also happen because of a "hump"
in the fuel line leading either from the
tank to the fuel pump or from the
pump to the carburetor.


VPOFnT -rT -5-
I.[I II I H IIi f I .





TWO I.OW POINTS IN FUEL LINE.


Thie're a couple ways you can head off vapor lock One is by doublecheck
ing these fuel lines and straightening cm out to get rid of the humps
Another is by temporarily pressurizing the fuel system yourself by plugging
up the vent hole in the fuel tank cover before going on o long haul Be real
careful, though. Loosen the cap ever so slowly to let the vapor escape or
you II be flooded with gas And be sure to unplug it BEFORE YOU PULl OUI



On a tactical vehicle thai has a vapor lock valve
on its gas cap make sure it's closed-in the ford.
ing and vapor lock position On other vehicles
Ihat don't have these valves, just keep the cop
screwed down tight.


Here's a handy way to handle vapor
lock after it hits you: Wrap the pump
and nearby lines in paper, cloth or bur-
lap that's been soaked in water. In a
real pinch, you could also wrap up cool
wet sand or dirt and use it the same
way. But be sure it's wrapped so's the
stuff don't get loose in your engine.
The cool water or dirt will help bring
the vapor back to a liquid.
PAII
s ? 1. .


,. '-.'---_ I .t Trr E'. ,

i 'iJ Y Iir r I-'SE
t 4 t i-i4 'L7



r -n

The right storage of gasoline is real
important in hot and humid areas.
Make sure fuels and lubes are protected
from the weather. Same with Jerry cans
and drums and dispensing equipment.
TM 10-1101 ( Sep 55 ) on petroleum
handling operations, with its Change 1
(22 Jan 58), is full of dope on this.
I^ MOrES










Water, heat and fungi are sure death
to electrical parts and wiring. Keep an
eye peeled for cracked and frayed insu-
lation. Keep the wiring dry and water-
proof by using electrical compound to
seal up those cracks. Be careful you
don't over-do it, though. -
Check electrical connections often .,n
and head oft an, corrosion chai stars.
I o .ou se. a connection ihar's loose or
bire. riihrcn i1 snug and gice ir a coa
ol Inul inig C(ompound. Fleccrical

One of your biggest problems, though, will be the vehicle's battery


%AI,.HEMG
q J .f-IF DA (BAKING
;0'., 5. .a4 ND WATER
-AND O Y 'EM I
T-='L. UGHLY
BSLUT DON'T LISE
I BAKING SODA IF
Check it daily for leaks and cracks And keep it clean THE SEALING
COMPCVhP 5
especially the posts, brackets and clamps. CRAC ". I

Paras 20 and 29 in TM 9-6140-200-15 (July 58) have the full poop on battery washing.
Para 37 of the same TM will clue you on the right battery care in hot and woozy areas. Keep a sharp
eye on the electrolyte readings. In the subtropics your battery'll need less specific gravity than else-
where ... say a reading of 1.200 to 1.225 at full charge.



But you want to be real careful ab,.our ith T cr -
you use. If you can't get yourp.i-o s on dJ illIcd % %ccr,
give first choice to rain water that hasn't touched _
metal. If you scoop it out of a spring or brook you
might have trouble with the mineral content. But
'' keep in mind that even the wrong water's better 3
r i than not enough water.






Remember, before you put the battery
back, scrape and repaint the boxes and car-
riers. Make sure you seat the battery right. -
Make it snug... not too loose and not too
tight. Coat the battery terminals with a thin
coat of grease.
Never tape around battery boxes and box covers. In most humid areas a box
that has vent holes and is unsealed will stay drier than one that's sealed up.
And don't forget: TB ORD 476 (29 Oct 52) says you never use water-sealing
comp..uinJd *in [.rcerc-' n.i.E fL n fur Jdpt "-.Ji r t. rdin

Lubrication

Natch, it stands to reason your vehicle's gonna need your most careful lubing
under humid conditions. Follow your rig's LO to a "T," and do all the extras ...
leave no doubt.
Your first objective is to keep rust-forming moisture out. Be sure to use the right grade of lube at all the
lube points. Pay special attention to the crankcase, lube fittings, gear boxes and hydraulic systems.

F I 11 I


Clean real good around lube fittings i f, N "5
before giving 'em the grease gun. And HE ARTEST
5 AT WORX
use only a clean rag-to keep from set- -S5 & WOiR
ting up the gook so your gun'll force
it right into the fitting.
Another thing, high humidity causes
rusting of all exposed metal surfaces.
So coat all the machined parts and un-
S,--, -- protected surfaces with oil or grease.
\ EE ~~.EFu P T.I Miss out on this and you'll be hurtin'
0 El r E N Y.-- for certain.
NOT IN LSE ff
\r The best way to protect your equip-
/PEPLE ment when it's not being used is to keep
U it covered with a tarp or home-made
I/ shelter, or park it under a tree. At least
keep the engine, gun mounting and the
like covered. O
^SK7 7 1^o







Here's a tip for guys using trailers.
On the M100 trailer, which is amphib-
ious, keep the drain plug out at all times
-except when fording. But on all other
trailers-to keep water from collecting
-park 'em with the draw-bar end raised
so's the water'll run out of the tailgate.


M.S rJ /ESPEkC1ALLYy
(fi WHEN YOU ,< \ W
yl--a ( (AIN'T OILEDV!_ L
Every man should carry a small con-
tainer of lube oil with him for his indi-
vidual small arm. When the weather's
hot and humid, preservative oil is best.
Use PL-Special general purpose corro-
sion and oxidation resistant lubricating
oil... FSN 9150-273-2389 ... QM...
4 oz can.
When your weapon'll be exposed to
plenty of dunking in salt or fresh water,
spread a light coat of Grease, Rifle, min-
eral oil and calcium soap, 190-degree
melting point. If your small grease con-
tainer is empty, get a new supply from
your armorer. He should have it in a
1-lb can under FSN 9150-754-0063.


In sandy, dusty areas you use as lit-
tle lube as possible. Oil will catch and
hold dust and sand which'll chew your
piece to pieces. /




I




Keep your small arms off the ground
as much as possible to protect 'em from
the damp, crawling dirt. It's a good
idea to make platforms to store them
on so they'll be at least three inches off
the ground. A
0 W-F3 II ,-


Give special attention to the acces-
sories, spare parts and magazines to
keep 'em from rusting.







Communications
Ecoipment
High heat and humidity are extra
tough on all kinds of common equip-
ment-radios, telephones-everything.


You're in a fight to the finish with
mildew all the time. Its special targets
are the canvas carrying straps, wiring
and cables, rubber gaskets and shock
knobs-and especially batteries.
Fungi can reduce insulation resis-
tance in a couple days. It'll form on the
edges of insulators and in the keys and
jacks and will cause short circuits.


Your best weapon against it is keep-
ing your stuff clean and dry. Get the
habit of wiping cables and exposed
parts with a clean rag-but gently-and
make sure your equipment's always
protected from the weather.
Dry cell batteries are a special prob-
lem. They're under attack when they're
being used and when they're stored.
They've gotta be stored in a dry, cool,
clean place.

,Op
0 .... 6


Keep a weather eye peeled on the
metal parts of your equipment, too.
They're supposed to be covered with a
moisture- and fungi-resistant com-
pound. If you see any bare spots, notify
your support people pronto.

Optical Eaouipment







Hot and humid weather can cloud
up the lenses of your optical equipment
(sights, compasses, binoculars, etc.)
and play hob with their metal parts.
Your biggest problem is sweat. Sweat
contains acid .acid means trouble.
It's smart to button up your equip-
ment in bad weather to protect fire con-
trol instruments. Inspect all weather-
tight rubber seals often to see they're
in shape to keep instruments dry. And
keep a sharp eye out for condensation
inside optical instruments.
Never use liquid or paste polishes
on the lenses and be mighty careful
wiping off dust or grit so's you don't
scratch the lenses or damage the coating.
Always wipe the equipment dry after
using it and put a thin film of oil on
unpainted metal surfaces. Keep a sharp
eye on screws and pins. They're first in
line when rust attacks. Oil 'em lightly
once a week to play it safe.

iORE






Their rubber parts need special care,
too. For instance, don't let grease and
oil accumulate on rubber eyeshields and
don't use volatile mineral spirits or dry
cleaning solvent to remove gook from
rubber. Instead, clean 'em with mild,
soapy water. Rinse 'em, then dry and
dust lightly with talc.


( .eathej? coi d]od s

This dry locker'll make it easier to
take care of the leather cases for your
instruments, too, if you make it big
enough. You have to handle all leather
goods with "kid gloves" to prevent
mildew.


Your best bet to help beat rust and
fungi is a dry locker. When you store
equipment in one of these you know it'll
be safe till you need it.


I tjirod 'a'-lrl,


%hA -olh tiqhi I in
huir, IMe ei wii
Td.,,- 16 iu,

,rtiu iirfd%


The deal that turns the cabinet into a
dry locker is a light bulb at the bottom
of the cabinet. Ordinarily a 25-watt
bulb will do, but in the deep tropics the
40-watt size is better. Put a shield, like
aluminum foil, around the bulb as pro-
tection against fire.
Air comes up through the holes in the
bottom of the cabinet and is warmed as
it passes the bulb. Then, as it goes out
the top holes it takes the excess humid-
ity with it.
Don't let the cabinet get too warm,
though, 'cause it might damage the
instruments.


Clean the cales real good on the in
side with a brush. Use a stick of wood-
but not a knife or glass-to get real
heavy mud or gook off the outside. And
only use a stick of wood for scraping-
no jabbing or poking. Wash away the
remaining grime with a sponge and
saddle soap. Then rinse away the soap
with warm water and follow with
another rinsing. Now wipe it with a
clean cloth.


S____4_ I RINSE MND WilPE
Don't dry leather goods in the direct
sun. If you use the dry locker, though,
make sure you don't get it too hot. Use
the right size bulb. After the leather's
dried out, replace the oil that's been







washed away by rubbing it with a cloth
moistened with neat's-foot oil. Then
wipe away the excess oil and rub the
leather to a shine.
Of course, for leather goods that
won't come in contact with your skin,
you can use a dressing like: Leather-
dressing, mildew-preventive, Mil Spec
O-L-164a. FSN 8030-174-3201 (QM)
will fetch a pint can. But be careful ...
don't let it bite you.
The Engineers also have a mildew-
resistant compound, textile, (Mil-C-
13295, Type I) that's good to protect
cotton duck and webbing from water,
weather and mildew. FSN 8030-290-
4382 gcii a ga llon. '



Give your boots the best care you
can. Mildew's their worst enemy. Scrape
off mud, clean inside and out, and apply
a double dose of elbow grease and sad-
dle soap. If they get soaked in salt
water, though, rub a raw potato over
the wet surface. The spud'll soak up the
salt. Then wash lightly and oil.

~a3~~


Be careful how you dry 'em. The
sun's too strong, and so are heaters and
stoves. Hang 'em up in the shade. In
the deep tropics you gotta be mighty
careful about preserving the insides of
footgear. Stuff paper in 'em to absorb


moisture (after brushing the inside out
good, of course).
You also want to keep an eagle eye
open for insects, spiders and other
creepy small stuff that may slip into
your shoes. Scorpions are famous for
hiding out in shoes; their stings are no
joke J LI.L P4 L

anve
MildE, Iungi. I [he o EcnIIy
of canvas-and the only way you can
beat it is by trying your level best to
keep canvas clean and dry. Pretty tough
deal, this, in warm and wet areas, but
a few good habits'll help.
For instance, always flip off the mois-
ture before you roll a tent or tarp. Of
course, if you have time, dry it out real
good first. Always carry it-never drag
it. Watch out for tree branches or
bushes that'll rub away the water-
proofing. Concentrate on keeping the
edges and seams and places around
grommets free of mud and wetness.
That's where 01' Moldy always goes
to work fastest.


Take it especially easy when you're
pitching and striking your tent. FM 20-
15 (Jan 56), on tents and tent pitching,
is the bible on this.
Try never to dry your tent or tarp
in direct sunlight. Rather, hang it in
E||)MORE>







the shade a few feet off the ground.
Check it often for rips, tears, loose or
missing hardware. And fix it pronto,
before little troubles become big ones.






Take the same good care of your
lines. It's important to remember that
you loosen the lines when it's raining
and tighten 'em when it's dry. And
when the high winds come howling,
tighten all lines immediately. Close the
door entrances and flaps and close all
corners.

Poncho-













In many areas your poncho's even
better'n a tent. A poncho can take prac-
tically everything the tropics have to
offer-if you give it decent care. This
adds up to keeping it clean and patching
up small tears as soon as they appear.
Wipe it with a clean cloth and wash
it with mild soap and water, like it says
in FM 21-15 (May 56).
Remember-Inspect, Clean, Patch-
the Big Three of poncho care.


Web Ecnkipment

e-* '. F, iN'T 5 ;I



Web equipment is just as much of a/
sucker for mildew as canvas. So watch
it. The cleaner and drier you keep it
the longer it'll last.
Clean it by dipping it up and down in
a pail of warm soapy water. (Be sure
you don't use chlorine, yellow issue soap
or cleaning fluids.) After washing,
rinse out the soap carefully. If any dirt's
left after that, scrub it with a clean
white or color-fast rag and warm water.
Don't ever use a stiff GI-type brush.
Stretch it back to its original shape
before drying. Be extra careful to get
the seams and edees clean and dry.


Don't put it in the sun to dry, but
hang it in the shade where breezes can
do a job on it. Don't ever try to re-dye
webbing, either.
Your load-carrying harness is made
of webbing, while the pack's made of
canvas. Your best guide for taking care
of both of 'em is FM 21-15, with its
changes.







Clothing

iJLJAU THE r
~ Nr
0MEj r..,'/ j


Clothing needs common-sense care
under hot-wet conditions. Here're a
few good rules to follow:
Wash 'em frequently in warm soapy
water. Dry 'em in the sunlight, if you
can, but don't overdo it. A certain
amount of sunlight is good for pre-
venting mildew, but too much of that
hot sun can ruin fabric and bleach even
the best of dyes. EASY WITH THAT





Common sense'll tell you to leave
your washed duds in the sun just long
enough to dry. After that hang 'em in
the shade for a while. Look out for
mildew, always. Any moisture-and es-
pecially sweat-will bring on a big scale
attack.

cOAR IGE


Repair all tears and holes immedi-
ately, if you can. Plenty of clean socks
is a must. Your feet may be your major
means of transportation.


Mess Eao.ii~ment
Cleanliness is the No. 1 rule here.
Bits of food left in a pan or on a utensil
can sic ol' Ptomaine Joe on you quick
as a wink. Dip your mess, gear in hot
soapy water and use a brush, if you can,
to get rid of food or grease. But use
steel wool or clean sand very gently-
if at all. You don't want to disturb the
coating that protects the metal from p
rust. NAME's JOE..
*p-- .- SEE VOUAINH'T
CLEANED Y'R
MESS GEA9 .



Rinse your gear in clean boiling
water and let it drain and dry. (Some-
times it might be handier to air-dry 'em
by waving 'em back and forth.)


Never give your gear a final wipe
with a damp cloth. You want to be sure
it's completely dry before you stow it
in your pack. And pack it right. This'll
prevent damage that'll encourage rust.
Keep your PM sharp and cool and
you'll weather warm, wet and woozy
conditions with plenty to spare.

.F rM T1-37.;, t r CW:-1Y
ll~. ilE "LLT. CF ('F
=rTHER DOOE 'IN
E-, O)PrEATINt& WHERE IT% I
\ aRM, WET AND WOOZY,

'END






e~awa Rea.


B. & ( 'OT A 1OT NOSJE ) 41.,
ApAD'" r




7Te 4sent of danger

If you're driving a track or wheeled vehicle and you suddenly start smelling
exhaust gas fumes-stop right there, boy. That's the scent of danger.
Personnel heaters are dandy like candy when the white stuff is thick on the
ground. The only thing, some personnel heaters could be like some personnel-
false friends.
Don't trust 'em too far. -

IF YOU GlE A GASSY SMill DON I TAKE A CHANCE FLIP OFF YOUR PERSONNEL HEATER
SWir(H 0 (OURS[ SMELL ISII T OUR ONlY (LUE-SINCE (ARBON MONOXIDE BY ITSELF
IS ODORLESS WAIERY EYES A BURNING FEELING IN YOUR NOSf, DIZZINESS OR DROWSI.
NESS MIGHT TIP YOU OFF


Just to remind everybody that it is
better to be a little bit cold than a little
bit dead, put these words near your
heater.
Type this up on white paper and stick
it to the control panel with Varnish, Oil,
Alkyd resin, FSN 8010-263-3196. A
After it dries put a thin coat of the
same stuff over the top of the paper ...
this way it'll last, and so will you.
O'course the personnel heater is not
the only "gasser." Exhaust gas fumes
from the vehicle engine could work
their way into the personnel compart-
ment or cab.
So-o-o-o, if your sniffer or eyes or
dizzy head tell you you've got an ex-
haust leak, get out and try to find where
it's coming from.
Remember: One sure safe bet during


long sessions in a closed buggy with the
heater going is to let a good breath of
fresh air in about every 15 minutes or
so. It might not be too comfortable, but
neither is the wooden overcoat you
could be heading for.
For more info on this see TB 9-2300-
214-10 (8 Apr 59), "Precautions
Against Exhaust Fumes, Combat Ve-
hicles", and TB 9-359 (10 Oct 60)
"Motor Vehicles, Trailers and Tractors,
Personnel Heater Warning Notice."







Ci^tmlcc tice _
Wearing out your hand banging the -- t.
operating rod on your M1 rifle-rri in a; -
to seat the first round in the chamber'
Gettin' a little gun shy from ducking r'
the clip when it takes off into orbit br. i '
fore the last round is fired?
Don't hit the sick book... just get your support unit to check the timing on
your rifle, 'cause it's showing signs of being off in that all-important department.
Steady use of the Ml leads to wear and tear on the parts that control the timing.
And the timing can't be early or late. It's gotta be right on the button or else
you've got yourself a problem-that's for true.
And don't put the job off 'til mafiana. .'cause if you get into a real shooting'
fracas, you may lose more than time if your timing's off.







MWO ORD G1-W106 was supposed
to cure the lube leaks in the wheel hubs
of tanks in the M48 and M103 families 5
ANP LLSE FiTrll' z-
as well as the M53 SP gun, the M55 0,! P-'N- 3-'4-c-
niNLL .';TP T:; E H6LEu6 I
SP howitzer and the M51 tank recovery LE


thing-instead of using the lube fittings .-
listed in the MWO, ask for Fitting, Lu- .
bricant Pressure Relief, S, Cad-Pltd,
Vs-in NPTF, V2-in LG, 15-25 PSI Re-
lief Pressure (Dry Seal Pipe Thread).
This little jewel comes with the FSN
4730-542-5683. Ask your Ordnance
support for it. They have probably got
the word from the design people in De-
troit that it is OK for issue. With this
fitting the GAA will pop out the top be-
fore your hub seals get hurt.
This fitting is standard issue on the
M60 tank.
15































Kccpf the oil Ipac I in the rs 6an rts. 'crankES:s
ui ,..ur G' ou.,vLri e IIti o lnn r a. the
tull o.'rk -,n i[h d fir ick Th at 11 put
d ubl*c himm- -on Cour .I-,1 orri s
LO ').2 2 1 0.2 '...I, 2S l 4 s l I1
rhc cr.nk,';e rn4ll cip clrr for the
NTI'2 liItbr ,n carg~ rruc:k and the M I ?'
truck.tracur i 1(6 quirrc And chat
ch-,kA .uc i ith Piar. I(ib ,.f TM 9.
_,21.I._ I 21 .1_1 -1 FLb 0 ll hich Iic the
capacity of the oil pan only as 16 quarts.
But remember you've got two filters 01[P oil
with a capacity of two quarts each. So,
when you're changing filters, that adds rUtt L
up to a total refill capacity of 20 quarts. 01 l
So what about para 7a of the TM
that lists the crankcase and filter as 22
quarts? Well, that's a "dry" capacity y
that's used only if you're putting a new .... .
or rebuilt engine into service. Once the Just keep a sharp eye on the dipstick,
engine's well-oiled, some oil stays in the like it says in Note 4 of the LO, and keep
oil passages even when you drain it. the level near the FULL mark.
16







Send tle
Ever been stung by a blast of com-
pressed air?
It's not funny. In fact it can be dan-
gerously unfunny. Specially if the blast
that hits you happens to pop off around i
3000 PSI.


Air pressures run that high, and higher, on equipment like the Chicago Pneu-
matic PB-44 compressors that come with the A2 and LON-5 Air Products gen-
erator plants.
The safety valves on each stage of those PB-44 compressors are sitting right
up there where their pop-off blast could hit you while you're working around
the unit.
So here's what you do to bend that ,L '
blast where it's not likely to smack you -, biLt.
with full force. ',I.' ;, A
r t. 11.1


First you order a set of elbows for the
pop valves. On each PB-44 compressor
you'll need three 1-in size, FSN 4730-
254-2744 (Eng), and one 3-in size,
FSN 4730-253-4415 (Eng).
Then you screw an elbow into the
outlet of each pop valve. Wind 'em up
so the open end of the elbow faces down
and away from where you stand while
working around the unit.


Do it now, huh? Before you get
belted. And check in the TM 5-9100
series or TM 5-9107 series on your
compressor for the full dope on the air
safety angle.

MORE






fe'i4/ S"" / rm/


Your ammo-carrying crane been in
a weight-lifting test lately? Brother,
you'd better be sure! Here's the scoop:
Safety's the big word around Nike
sites. Every QM crane that's used to
tote missiles must be safety inspected
during the regular PM service every two
months or 100 operating hours-which-
ever comes first.
In addition, the crane must be load-
tested-when it goes into service and
every six months or 500 operating hours
after that-as well as every time you re-
place a sheave, hook, wire rope, brake
lining, seal or any other part affecting
the safety of the vehicle.
These inspections and load tests are
made by your maintenance support
people, but you're the guy responsible
for seeing that the jobs're done on
schedule.
SO HERE'S WHAT
YOu bO AT THE BI-MOWTHY
"I" SERVICE.
1. Submit a work request and job
order (DA Form 811) asking your
field maintenance unit to make the
safety check. Stash the receipt (green
sheet) in your vehicle's DA Form 478
after the check's been made.


AT THE SE)61-AAMJAL "-5 INTEPA4)
(on-5X i4OiL1, WWICHEVEG
COMES FIRST).


1. Ask for both the safety check and
load test on your work request. Field
maintenance will make the safety check
before and after making the load test.
2. Line out a space on the flapside of
your 478 where the inspector can put
the date of the load test and his initials.
3. Make sure the 478 is on the equip-
ment when it goes to field maintenance.
S AF TEr YOU GET
TH'T CRANE SACK.






1. Check the 478 and work order re-
ceipt to see that the load test and safety
inspection were made and the date of
the load test stenciled on the crane boom.
2. Make sure the work order receipt
stays in the jacket file.
It goes without saying that any ve-
hicle used for handling ammo has got
to be the strong man among MHE's.
That's why you want to really knuckle
down when it comes to before-, during-,
and after- operation PM.
Round up the TM's and the latest
changes for your MHE for the real dope.

















A TOOL STORY...

BALANCE YOUR SIOUX-FASTER
The balancing act on your Sioux (H-13) can get to be a mighty annoying
routine-what with all the switching back and forth of the spirit level from lateral
to longitudinal position to lateral, etc.
So if somebody comes up with an idea to take level readings in both directions
at once, it's bound to be a time-saving gimmick.
Real simple, too. Just connect two pieces of Y8 -in x 3/-in steel bar stock together
in an "L" that will seat on the three leveling lugs. Then install a spirit level on
each arm of the"L"tool. Now check the tool on a leveled helicopter against the
old single spirit level operation and see what you think.















This "L" tool allows you to concentrate more on the jacking and adjusting end
of the operation, speeding up the whole leveling business. If your outfit has more
than a couple of Sioux around you might be able to persuade your CO that this
tool's worth making.
The dimensions in the picture worked pretty well on the H-13H series Sioux.
You may want to change them for other models.
19








BLOWN GASKETS OR..
-5 IiF4~E

^]U!jP
0"-'j^SB~lr-j


Treating a symptom instead of the disease is one of the most common n trips an
aircraft engine medic can fall into.
It's a real simple treatment-but useless-to keep replacing parts that give out
on you maybe five-six times between normal replacement intervals.
It's like taking APC's to make a headache go away, but you still don't know
why you're getting the headaches.
For example, there's the case of one Bird Dog [ ifrl .
(L-19) mechanic who was constantly having ex-
haust manifold gaskets burn out on him after W
10 hours or so. And that's a long way from the
normal 100-hour check. He even tried soaking
the new gaskets in water before installing them
to get a snug fit.
S" It was all wasted effort, since the real cause
S turned out to be warped exhaust tube flanges. So
no amount of tightening up on the gasket could
FllArt MU;T bt 4I:;. correct burning out of the gaskets.
The cure was found after checking the flat of the flange
against a straight edge. The main reason for the flange i
warpage, which can happen to anybody, is alternate heat- ''
ing and cooling of the manifold along with constant en-
gine vibration during aircraft operation. l,0[

Now this flange warpage is not lim-
ited to L-19's. It happens on other air-
S craft engines, too. The immediate solu-
tion is to use emery cloth, followed up by
Scrocus cloth, to reshape the flange be-
fore installing a new gasket. Just place
20


as important. After you finger tighten
the attaching nuts and washers, you
may have to go to TM 1-1-1A-8 (Dec
55) if your aircraft's maintenance man-
ual doesn't include torque readings for
these nuts. If you carelessly overtorque
the nuts you'll jam the new gasket
against the flange. So the gasket will go
bad that much faster, and you're back
where you started.


flange across the cloth.

PuB -.--






If this doesn't give you a flat flange,
then it's time to replace the exhaust tube.
In the event you can't come up with a
replacement part you might use a torch
to heat the warped tube flange. Then
use vice-grip pliers to bend the edges
straight, protecting the flange from the
plier jaws. Finish up with emery and
crocus cloth. This is strictly an emerg-
ency type fix, though.
Of course each installation calls for
following the info in TM 1-2R-1-511
(23 May 60), which means remember-
ing to coat the cylinder studs with a
mixture of 10 per cent molybdenum di-
sulphate (MIL-L-7866) and 90 per cent
grease (MIL-L-3545). This keeps the
nuts from freezin' on the studs.
And getting the right torque is just


Going back to that same L-19 engine
for an example, Table XXXII in TM 1-
1-1A-8 gives you 100-140 inch-pounds
torque for the a,-24 nuts used on those
flanges. A good way to get the proper
set on the gasket and flange is to stop at
the 100 inch-pounds minimum torque
or slightly above first time around. Then
come back somewhere between one and
five hours later to retorque to a higher
value in the acceptable torque range.
If you find yourself messing around
with exhaust tube and gasket replace-
ments a little too often, you also want
to be thinking about writing out your
trouble on a UR (DD Form 1275).
Could be the engineers might want to
get involved. A good medic always
looks to calling in a specialist when the
patient doesn't seem to be cured perma-
nent like.



1 f MORE






A FLAT STRUT GIVES YOU...


A SAGGIN' BIRD


._ M !O-- S^
4 F-uLT' STRUL

Ever see a saggin' bird that looks like (Ar T,)s
itneeds a crurch to sit upstraighr Could f, J.'
be one of the main landing gear ihixk
struts is ~cak in the knee,.
Normall.. iusi adding' ome hydraulic .
oil and air ill prop 'cr up for a good
while to come On the orhcr hand. if 4 -, .
your aircralfi' maintenance record
shows this lame duck cindricin keeps
coming back a little too often. chances .- ''
are you've got more than a small leak. You've probably got faulty packin' in the
strut, which calls for depot level repair.
After all, packin' doesn't last forever-it's gonna go bad in time. You could
keep servicing a strut with oil and air maybe a dozen or more times, just like you








could keep pumping up a flat tire on MUMBL ... 8
your car without patching a slow leak. .R
But, finally, you'd have to come up with
a permanent fix. i
So... if you've had more than one
flat on the same strut over a short period
of time, ask your support to look at it.
If the trouble is with the packin' you get
a replacement strut.







PICKING OUT THE
SCREWDRIVER IS... A FLUKY BUSINESS


Puttin' the screws to the
is a necessary-and someti]
business.
Being that recessed heac
the preferred items in so
fastening situations, you've
in tool problem ready to re
if you let it.
The problem is that you
major kinds of recessed s
being used on Army aircr;
kinds of screwdrivers in yo
to fit each of 'em. So-o-o
tell the difference between
a Reed and Prince type score
screw?
They're near twins on
That's why you take a sec
you suspect you're not gett
you want.
It's "mixing" the two tyf
on one panel that starts the
the fact of having both sere
in your tool kits.

FIRST...CHECK THE
BOTTOM OF THE
SCREW RECESS.


An R&P comes (
to -point.


The Phillips'
is round.


ol'fly-buggy For example, one of these new
mes tricky- Mohawks (AO-1) started life with a
particular access plate fastened on by
1 screws are somewhere around 200 screws-all
me aircraft R&P. There was no problem until a few
got a built- screws eventually got replaced. Yep!
ar its head- Some replacements were R&P, some
were Phillips ... and the mechanic kept
've got two using his trusty R&P No. 2 every 100
screw heads hours.
aft and two Well, you can get away with that
ur tool kits about two or three times, until the screw
. can you head begins to look like it's time to get
a Phillips or the drill.
driver and The best way is to make sure all the
screws are alike. So, any time you re-
first glance. place recessed heads, change 'em all to
:ond look if Phillipson all Army aircraft. Then you
ing the bite have a replacement SOP.
You might say that butchered-up
es of screws screws are one of the trials in a weary
trouble-not mechanic's life. But with a little atten-
wdriver tips tion and care yoy can keep the operation
from being all fouled up.
SECOND... BOTH SCREWDRIVER TIPS, NATURALLY,
CHECK THE WILL MATCH THE RECESSES, GIVE OR TAKE
SCREW SLOTS. A LITTLE FOR WEAR AND TEAR.

R&P's taper in real
sharp, giving more 450
of a square-cut Rs
appearance at the sur- R&Ps have sharper points with
fate of the screw head. 45-degree angled flukes.


The Phillips has 30'
less taper and rounder
cuts on the surface. The Phillips tips are rounder with
30-degree fluke angles.

CE,-kAI----







AVIATION PUBS... REPUNCH 'EM Y'SELF
-- --- --T-FIT ,--- I L-.LL
I VON T F. r, ,'




In recent months we've been getting TMI I-series aviation publications with
different size holes and center-to-center measurements. The ones with V/-in
holes and centers 4 4 inches apart have to be repunched to fit our "Army Air-
craft Maintenance Publications" binders. This is the 7510-282-4757 binder with
/;,-in holes and the 3-in center-to-center spacing listed in SM'110-1-7500.
What's the latest on this? Mr. R. L. H.
STANDARD SIZE
STANDARD SIZE HOLE HOLE SPACING IF YOUR
S0.... 0 PUBS HAVE
O 4'" '- "6 HOLES
SAND 3'2"
S' HOLE SPACINGS
'--- 33'2 --1 REPUNCH 'EM
YOURSELF
Dear Mr. R. L. H.,
From now on you should be seeing more and more of the smaller hole aviation
pubs with the wider spacing between holes (41-in center-to-center, 4-in hole).
This is the standard size hole and hole spacing for Army pubs and will fit loose
leaf binder 7510-188-6955 (QM), also listed in SM 10-1-7500.
Eventually, the TM's with the larger holes,'which fit binder 7510-282-4757,
will disappear. But if you don't want to play around with two different binders
right now, you can just keep repunching pubs the way you've been doing.

FLYING TOGS

--'- ,- '"s CI:.(EAING TOGS



/
Hung up on what kind of cleaning's required by the different items of your
flying duds? No sweat. The coveralls take scrubbing in hot water with mild
soap. Jackets and trousers take dry cleaning. Use saddle soap on the leather parts.
Wool glove inserts can be dry cleaned or washed in warm or cold (not hot)
water with mild soap. It's all spelled out in TB QM 143 (9 Jan 61).
24 1ND
FRIEND







K LE.T' COMMUNtCLFEI

SCRUME RECEPTION. I
a_ HIP L i.ET riu r t E -S
1 :-^c ,y .r


Changes in temperature... humidity... wear and tear... compression...
or just plain aging. It all adds up to one thing on the gaskets of your TA-43/PT
and TA-312/PT field telephones-shrinkage.






Those two rubber gaskets-one between the top panel and housing assembly
-and the other between the buzzer and housing assembly-shrink slightly under
pressure from the tightening screws. Just the least little bit.

HOUSING k 10f a BUZZER


But that shrinkage is enough to allow
a tiny amount of moisture or water to
seep inside. Bad. Trouble is, there's no
way to tell-by looking-whether those
gaskets have shrunk. The only way to
tell is with a screwdriver, by trying to
take a turn on certain screws.
In the case of the top panel, the
screws are located at each of the four
corners and about midpoint along the
two long edges of the panel. As for the
buzzer, there're four screws to check.


One at each corner of the diaphragm.
If they're loose by only quarter turn,
it could mean that water will find a way
in-or already has.
So, next time you're working around
your TA-43 or TA-312, try a turn on
each of those screws. If they don't
budge, it means your gasket is tight. If
they do, then you've discovered a short-
coming and corrected it at the same
time. But watch the strong arm stuff.
Just snug 'em up.

sM







-HOT-FLASSW


Comes cold weather and you can
listen for an extra sound inside the huts
of your AN/GRC-26's.
It's the CLICK of the heater as it goes
- ... "
A Dicr 1


WHEN 2 t ISN I '
FULL OPERATION
KEEP HEATEP OFF
into action to warm things up and keep
'em that way. Mighty comforting and
comfortable. But-bear one thing in
mind when your finger reaches over to
start up that heater.
LOw LINE
vour~e! M i G.


It draws a healthy 1,500 watts. And
when your "26" is in full operation, an
extra 1,500 watts piles too much of a
drain on the power supply. The Gen-
erator Set PU-294/G (consisting of two
PU-286/G Generators) is rated at 5
KW's.
And that rating sure is exceeded
when the drain of the electric heater is
added to that of all the other equipment
during full operation. Your "Angry
26" will end up with reduced line volt-
age, a weaker signal and loud, fatal-like
gasps from the generator.
As a matter of sound operating rou-
tine, then, run your eyes around the
shelter before snapping on the heater.
If everything else is on the line, leave
'er off.
And, of course, turn the heater off
pronto if it happens to be running when
the rest of the radio set is operating.
"







-GORE-CARE-


Just a reminder to care for your core.
'Cause a lost core-or a loose one-
can cancel out your RT-66/GRC, RT-
67/GRC or RT-68/GRC.
The tiny item under discussion is the
plastic insert that nestles inside the shell
of the antenna connector. Right there
on the upper left portion of the panel
of your receiver-transmitter.
The routine connect-disconnect
action between the antenna cable and
the receptacle connector tends to work
that core loose. Especially if an operator
or repairman is in too much of a hurry
to pull his antenna out.
If the core is lost, of course, the entire
antenna connector is useless. And since
the core is not requisitionable by itself,
the receptacle connector has to be re-
placed.


EXHAUJSTING


When it comes to the danger of
carbon monoxide poisoning there's
nothing like a reminder. Which is the
whole idea behind URGENT MWO
11-5410-207-25/1 (27 Mar 61). It ap-
plies to all units with an AN/GRC-
26( ), AN/GRC-41 or AN/GLQ-2.
The MWO authorizes your unit re-
pairman to install a warning sign over
the shelter door which says, among
other things, ". close front window,
side windows, and all air intake louvers
on the side nearest the engine exhaust
outlet of the cargo truck". .when the
shelter is in transit.


On the other hand, if that disconnect
is performed slowly and with a touch of
care, chances are 1000 per cent greater
that the core will stay in its shell and the
receiver-transmitter will stay on the air.
It's a basic preventive maintenance
routine which, like the TM says, will
"prevent certain troubles from occur-
ring."


-SOL UTIOW18.-






(LOSE FRONT WINDOWS ~
SIDE WiNDOWSW AND ALL
AIR INTAKE LOUVRES ON
THE SIDE NEAREST THE
ENGINE EXHAUST
OUTLET Of THE
CARGO TRUCK




i~RklRhl~,~i~i;` i~aiRE







COVERS- FOR- OMM--MOUNTING S






Dear Editor,
Because our outfit keeps many of its vehicles outside, the weather causes a
lot of damage to the electronic equip- WAThR
ment...especially the radio mountings. DAMAGE TO RADIO
So, we decided to look for an inex- MOlUNTIGS
pensive way to cut down on this
weatherbeating.








We scrounged up some scrap canvas (old shelter halves, discarded tarpaulins).
We cut and sewed them to fit the mountings snugly. The snug fit removes the
need for tie-downs or buckles.
Thanks to the covers, the mountings
now stay drier and need less mainte-
4" fnance. The radios, of course, come along
with their own covers.
3" We thought this fix might help some
S20 others in maintaining their equipment.
The Gang
Fort Ord, Calif.







(ED NOTE-Sounds like a good idea, especially for vehicles like jeeps that don't
provide much shelter for comm equipment.)
28END
















Little did the world know, when
Lloyd Sunstroke, the intrepid
explorer died... that he left behind
hin a son on that lonely tropic
isle a stout li'l tyke.

























OK,.YXIPE ON 6 A,~l
PIC OF _, E...YO~U CONTAPL
T1I41 O(TFrrV F11ENPJM ... WANT MY DEAR
11,5~0. W12rITE-UP-1W SIR~, TW15S
SPEAK TOr IM. WOMirPAPE1f IS MY HOME!
1 WANr ...CAN
GO.' AID IN YOUR
COLMLdNITY' ~.7X DI LEMMA'


DI ".4M61
RELA~TCic's .~









WWILE T14E ROADS A.e
ADMnTTEVDW POuG- THE AAA1e
MANNEU IN WH4ICHk'OUR SOYS M/
LOAD IS %OIWO
TP"Cft E OK-9
TWEQ HO T EVZF rLL SRJOYE
THOSE CHASSIS IN TME IT
RAcY. OF T4E FO II,
TRUC5 ?










































A COUPLE OF TI4ICXNEVES OF PLANK&T YEAHf
ON THE TRUCK &ED is A NICE CUSH ION FOR AND
ROXES% TWIE UET CON-TAINER YOU CAN THEY'RE
USE FORZ' ELECTRONIC ESOIPMENT IS A EA9Y To
WOODEN SOX WHICU, IF NOT 'PILEO TOO LASH
HIGH, WILL 1IDE OUTr UMPY RIVES POWN,
WITHOUT TOPPLING... UNLESC YOU'RE R11GUT
rP(UC91NO SOMETHING LI1E A MAGNErnoN
.THEN -YOU USE THE METAL CONmrAINEX
TUfE MAGGIE CAME IN.
4, ~per





Treat electronic gear with great care.
'Whether shipping by land. sea or air.
Make the packing just right:
Keep it padded and tight.
And you'll save "wear and tear"
that's not "fair."

--
a l


ir TUU WAN I U UDISLAAY THIS CENTERPIECE ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD, OPEN STAPLES, LIFT IT OUT AND PIN IT UP.





W, ---







AND KEEPING DELICATE
INSTRUMENTS ON TWE FRONT
SEAT IS ANOTHER WAy OF
RUINING THEM; A SUDDEN
STOP ANL>... ALSO, REMIND
THIE MEN WHO ARE TRANS-
PORTING THE GEAR
THAT'S TO BE REPAIRED,
NOT TO FIpDLE WrTH 177


guT JAZANI, WUI.ATN
-rfE POINT OF TAWIN0
ALL TI-E1 PPECAUTION9
WITHl -TUFF THAT5
GoIN' 6ACI4 FOR
aC PAIR,


SIMPLE,.. WHAT
sTAR-rG OUT Tr 1E
A NORMAL 52EPPAIXR
OR REPLACEMENT..


S,, C.OU l ARRIVE
AS A COMPLETE
SREEUILPf





















,CN THAT LINE &Y, /I
AND TELL VOuJ APES/
TO STOP FICPLING WI-H j i/
-T-AT ELECTN2NIC STUFF, .
THEY'RE AS PA A,1'S .SOME
_F THE BOY-iN VENTS ).
WVE GOT DCOWVN IN
r-H MOT FfR-P0 r






.
LUCK
OLACk






....4 nd when operation Fungus departed,
they. took with them a new recruit,
young Lloyd Sunstroke II, restored to
his rightful inheritance...a 3 year
enlistment...as prescribed in his late
father's will. (If you haven't read
"Bride of Jazzan," or "Jas.an of the
Grapes," be sure and do so soon.)






















THE RIGHT ELEMENT
Dear Sgt Dozer,
What's the story on the fluid pressure filter element replacements for the diesel
engine on our Super C Tournadozers? .We requisition elements under FSN 2910-
287-5473 like it says in TM 5-2420-207-12P, but the element we receive is about
4-in too long and won't fit into the filter case.
What happened?
SFC E. M.








TOO BIG JUST RIGHT
Dear SFC E. M.,
Got our signals crossed somewhere. If you have any oversize Cyclone
Both the TM and the FSN you used are P-278 elements on hand, don't try to
right. But, as you found out, the Cyclone jam them into the filter. Turn them in
filter elements P-278 that've been to your support unit and requisition
stocked under FSN 2910-287-5473 are new ones. You should get the right ones
too large for the filter in your engine, now. f
However, all depot stocks of these filters
have been turned back to the company
and you'll be getting the right replace- *
ment from now on.
37 MRE













Dear Half-Mast,
WVith winter coming on, how about some word on the out-of-round holes wear-
ing in the valve dial plates on our big tent heaters.
CWO C. IF. F.


Dear Mr. C. W. F.,
Your hard-working 250,000-BTU
tent heater's probably sooner or later
gonna develop gaposis of the fuel meter-
ing and shutoff valve dials. When this
happens, replace 'em.
It's a smart idea to replace one dial
at a time. This way you can't get 'em
mixed up and, since both assemblies are

Here's the way to do it-one dial at a


about the same, you can double-check
yourself when you're putting them back
t.'Uchr (IT'S ALSO SMART TO
( \ HANDLEE THESE PARTS -
S GENTLY.. DOESN'T TAKE
TIME, IT 5AVES. IT r/












BETTER -iNC-E
'EM ONE AT A :-'.a Q

You can get a new set of dials from
your support people. The fuel line shut-
off valve takes FSN 4520-J11-0001, and
the fuel metering valve takes FSN 4520-
J11-0002. Both come with self-tighten-
ing drive rivets.


5. Fasten the dial plate with two rivets
and secure the pointer in the OFF
position by tightening the two nuts
i against the pointer and lockwasher.


If your support unit doesn't have the
dials, they can get 'em from the QM
Equipment and Parts Commodity
Center, Columbus General Depot,
Columbus 15, Ohio. -


STORAGE PORRIDGE
Dear Sgt Dozer,
Some supply shack lawyers in this Engineer outfit claim there's a difference
between "shelf life" and "storage life" on perishable supplies and parts.
Alox nix to me what they call it, as long as none of those items go bad before
we get to use them. What do you say?
Sgt D. C. S.


Dear Sgt D. C. S.,
I'd say you've got the main message,
Sarge. Let your lawyers beat their gums
while you mind the store.
On items that spoil fast, you draw
only enough stock to stay in business.
Then you back up that working stock
with requisitions timed to arrive when
you need replacements.
You stack replacements behind the
old stuff, rotating stock so supplies get
used before they spoil on the shelf.
And for official scoop on general En-
gineer items and repair parts, you can
run it down by FSN in SB 5-60.
SB 5-60 informs you, f'rinstance, that
FSN 5420-588-4897, Vulcanizing
Fluid, can spoil in six months or less.
Sooner than that, if you fail to follow
Note 16 about keeping the cover tight.


So you play perishables close to the
vest.
This way you're not so likely to get
caught trying' to patch a float with fluid
that won't flow-specially when the
CMI team comes rumbling up your
road.











d& W

Sj &tN


I"














Dear Half-Mast, i"
Can you give us the latest dope on frame welding? AR 750-2300-7 says you
can't weld vehicle frames between spring brackets, but there are MWO's that
call for welding brackets to the frames.
Is there a difference between welding a frame and welding to a frame?
Dear Sergeant C. C. M., Sgt C. C. M.
There sure is. in them. The welding methods called
The idea back of AR 750-2300-7 is for by the MWO's have been carefully
that a frame so far gone that it needs worked out so there is a minimum dan-
welding is already so beat up that 'taint ger of damaging the frame.
worth saving. The Army used to weld Even so, this is strictly a 4th echelon
frames but in many cases new cracks deal because it depends on so many
showed up soon after the vehicles were things. F'rinstance, if the frame was
put back in service, heat treated during manufacture, all
The AR was issued to prevent weld- bets are off. It is not to be welded at all,
ing between spring hangers because it even for brackets.
was found that in man), cases this repair The slide rule boys have done a lot
was a waste of time and money. of work on frame welding and they are
On 'tuther hand, welding to a frame handing out a new TB which lists some
is a horse from an entirely different exceptions to the general rule in the AR.
horse race. The MWO's are applied on In these cases, and in these cases only,
vehicles that still have a lot of service welding of the frame is OK!

ru -.. C'c' .i !r Y E





If you need a frame welded, contact your field maintenance support and they
will get it done for you if it falls under the rules of the TB.
As far as first, second and third echelons are concerned, AR 750-2300-7 which
says not to weld between spring hangers, is still the law.
TB 9-2300-247-40 (22 Jun 61) gives your support the authority to make certain
specific welding repairs on M-series wheeled vehicles from V4-ton up to and in-
cluding the 5-ton.







A LEAKY MICKO-BRAKE LOCK SPELLS.


4Pift


- It


You betcha it does, and a couple sad
faced drivers can vouch for the fact.
They found out-too late-what a leak
in the lock unit FSN 2530-040-2228 can
do to an M62 or M246, 5-ton wrecker.
Yep, you guessed it, they wrecked an
M62 so badly it couldn't be used no
more.
Reports tell of the aluminum tube
(Mfrs. Part No. MAN-BC10) in the
lock breaking or cracking ... probably
due to metal fatigue from overtighten-
ing of line connectors when the lock got
installed, or vibration due to a loose
mounting clamp. Natch, the hydraulic
fluid is set up for an easy exit out the
cracked tube-and you've got no more
brakes.
Sooo, to protect you and your truck
(until a better lock comes along) check
the unit out before each operation.
Look and feel for signs of leaky fluid
on the lock and line connectors. You
can spot the unit by lifting the master
cylinder access cover on the cab floor...
right along the left frame member.
While you're at it, make sure the
holding clamp is centered and secured
good'n solid.


Signs of leaks?? Don't, do not, try to
tighten the line connector nuts or fittings
(sleeve nuts) on either end of the lock.
Play it safe and put a new lock on.


Anytime you're connecting the brake
lines to the lock, use two wrenches. Hold
the end fitting (sleeve nut) with one
wrench so it won't turn .. then tighten
the line connecting nut with the other
wrench. If you don't hold and brace the
sleeve nut, the stress put on the tube will
weaken or cause it to crack and leak.
Like it says in para 36 of TM 9-8028
(June 55): The electric brake lock is
only used to lock the service brakes in
a "hold" position, when using the crane
or rear winch. The data plate warns you
that you don't use it for a prolonged
parking brake.
-


_7







RIGHT DIPSTICK

r-


/ SL'^ L T ^>-A SEE SARuE, 7T r----
GETS DOWNRIGHT EMBARRASSING
Dear Half-Mast,
We are having trouble with our M51 tank recovery vehicles. So much oil gets
transferred from the transmission to the engine that we have to deadline the
vehicle.
Can you tell us how we can stop this?
Dear MSgt D. M.,
The fault is most likely in the dip- The best thing you can do is first be


stick.
During
gram the
7709124,
replaced 1
9635 (Or
hasn't bee
oil in your
will flow i
breather ti


D


sure you have the right-dipstick and
the M51 modification pro- then keep the transmission oil level on
early dipsticks, Ord Part No. the "hungry" side ... at or only slightly
were supposed to have been above the ADD OIL mark.
by dipsticks FSN 2520-513- That way there won't be extra oil
d Part No. 8348405). If this that can be drawn through the breather
n done you'll have too much tube into the engine.
transmission. This excess oil Your Transmission
nto the engine by way of the Oil Level Dipstick should look like this:
ube. M51 VTR
OrdPt. No 8348405 FSN 2520-513-9635
Check Oil Level 3-5 Minutes Maximum D1 Not Fill
After Engine Shut Down Exasi bve This Line
----.76 --
-----------17.76---------


PS MAGAZINE IS FOR YOU
Your unit can get enough copies of PS Magazine for you and all the other guys
who need it. You have to make sure that your local Publications Section knows
how many your unit needs. Then your Pubs Section orders enough copies for
everybody on DA Form 12-4 from the publications depot.
42








A selected lis of recent publicot,.-i ,
interest to 7 I ., 5 ', : V
Personnel. -pirJ r -
recent Adjutant Generols Distris I
Center Bulletins.


TECHNICAL MANUAIS

IU 3.4700.-701.1 J i 1.



TM 3.I l 0lO.2i i ,e ,"



IM 5I "al 200. oP J,. ii.



TM 5-3740-201-25P lCl Ir--*
Curtis Auto Devices' ; ,, ''

1M S.3620-05. 10 21 :-



TM .3 B95. 00-. 5 i hwa. .


IM 5.3691.I.-2190P .


TM 5.38 5.2* 36 .0F .. -.:


rM S.3894.24.270P i.,- e
*.: *m:. I. j AI a l

IM 5.J9102020. S i B.,.


IM 5.4120-770-75P I.. : .
,I-- u.s a :e.cis' la')r Ri.. '


'M 5.4J10 7?2120P C:-. i:*

GER-125.

TM 5-4310-231-2OP Jun Comp -
i. i .... it:. Mod A15HEP2.

TM 5-4320-220-15 Jul Pump, *
Borne Mod 10-MG.

IM S .5.20.200T 12 i.t i *. ,i

so4: u.t ea.or

IM 5.6115B.56-1 B :* ... -
'.' I; : .': ... .


IM 5.61 15-740 1 1i. rr:: *


IM S-6115 770-70P I, e .. :
55 AC I.t". n:it'.jt -ite '. :


1M i 61 15-291-20P I. :- r' ,
5c.r i MuJd .u'
IM i-6115-.02 10 H1.O C- pC. tw
.i.A *.i" :, -O ir, :, ,ss i.a

IM 9.1410 7O-570P/7 J.-

IM 9 14 0. 50 20P .OP' 4 i.-


'M ,1440- 7120SOP I Jun Here.


TM 9.1450 1 50.20 t .

TM 9 1330.707.1 i.. -- : I- i'

sr ,,Ir, it.- u a ,,,::t ,o,,'


IM .1230.-2161 I .- :



TM 10,3l 30- 18. i : ..'


TM I0.3 O] 0.O- T.IO : i



rM 1.1- 300 16.1 .- .i .


I .BO%.. : t 5 ti -
.u 1 11. 2 0 i 1 i &. 1





IM I l. ,302 10.21. P 2 ,I -e .- -..
i- s'r. 1 .' 'L 1.








IM I ,l 1 0 3 I?P F -' ,1:1,


IM 11, 61F .-20 i, ,I I ., F. .,
"ir ei &;e
IM II .i rJ .2O 6.1 i i .



FM IoIS .~1u0~: ,,

.. -1. 111.
.M l 11 s. .1r ,,.: .,"s :











fM 1 966S.2 01 ?P ,. i i








t1 I l.e1u,.lOB.P 1 i


iM I1 .61.JO 0 P :.* -


TM I 86214-43 I n .


IM IF .,Lbt 65707.0I r i i,.-' .ri


its -o?.. 0-7IQ I. i .r' i:: '.





T. S.-663S.7 .0 i ,, ,: .' .
IM lII61 100 I06 1 .:. 1








FuBRlCOAIhON OCDEP.

O1 i 613 205 20 I i 1 7 '1 3







10 i .B 5 3-. 20 2 .4 i -


LO 5-3895-218-20-1, -2, -3, Jun Pav-
ing Machine, Bit Mot. Barber-Greene Mod
979-8.
LO 5-3895-224-15 Jun Spreader, Ag.
gregate- Gar Wood Mod MS58 Ft
LO 5-6115-303-15 Jun Generator, Die
el. 150 KW, Waukesho Mod 6 NKOBS-E
Ul.
LO 9-1055-212-12 Jun Launcher, 318-
MM Rocketl. XM34.


FORMS

AF Form 50-D Sep Reparable Tog.
DA Form 9-27 jul Here Daily Check
Sheet-Acq Rador.
DA Form 9-28 Jul Herc Weekly Check
Sheet-Acq Radar.
DA Form 9-29 Jul Here Monthly Check
Acq Rodor
DA Form 9-35 Jul Here Weekly Check
Sheet. Msi & Tar Tr Rador.
DA Form 9-36 Jul Here Monthly Check
Sheet, MIl & Tar Tr Rador.
DA Form 9-82 Jul Alax Assy Area Check
Sheet.
DA Form 9-83 Jul Alax Assy Area Check
Sheet, lnltal Operations
DA Form 9-84, -85 Jul Alex Lounching
Area Check Sheet, Daily Checks,
DA Form 9-95 May Here Daily Check
Sheet; Ml- & Tor Tr Radar.
DA Form 9-96 May Here Weekly Check
Sheet; Mil & To T Ta Radar.
DA Form 9-192 Jun Check Procedure-
HAWK.


MISCELLANEOUS

DA Cir 750-2 Jul Repl of Eng Port, Be-
cause of Mg Defeclt.
MWO 5-4310-214-35/1 Jun.Comp Air.
Rol, ReClp, 15 HP, 15 CFM, 3500 PS.,
Dovey Mod RPC-15.
MWO 5-6115-229-35/1 Jul Generator,
Gasoline. 5KW, HOLGAR Mod CE-55-
AC/WK6.
MWO 5-6115-230-35/3 Jul Gen Set,
Diesel, 60 KW, HOL-GAR Mod CE-600-
AC/EG.
MWO 9-1410-250-20/2 Aug Replace.
ment Here GM, XM6E4, Thermal Batlery
Lanyard Asiy.
MWO ORD Y3-W29 Jul Corp II M2 &
M2A): Waterproofing GM Electro-Pneu-
matc Servocylinders 8145238 & 8145255.
SB 38-100 Jul Pres Pkg, Mat, SOP. Used
8y Army.
SM 10-1-C6-5-SL, Vol 2, Jun Hand
Tools. Nonedged. Nonpowered.
TB 9-296/57 Aug Calibration Procedure.
Relils Decode Box TS-679/U.
TB 9-2320-218-20/1 Jun Truck, /-Ton,
M151; Fording & Wmlerzatron Kits.
TB 385-2 Jul Nuclear Weapon Fire.
Fighting Procedures.
TB AVN 7 Jul Painting & Morking A/C.


















In PS 107 we gave you some dope on getting along with your Lucky Lady
M113 APC under ordinary conditions. Now we're following through with info
on taking care of the Lucky Lady under special conditions, and maintaining
her so she'll purr like a pussy cat.



I. Position another M113 or any other vehi-
cle with 24-volt current supply near the M113
to be slaved. Turn master switches in both vehi-
cles OFF.
Connect a slave cable to the auxiliary power
receptacle. Be sure you put the right prong in XiTU --
the right hole, the + prong in the + hole and IPOrtr
the prong in the hole. .F(tl L 'W

7 <2. Turn ON the master
-S' N switch in the LIVE vehicle and
S'with the range selector switch
/45. n1 neutral and the brakes on,
(. (:, .- rL% the engine to about 1500


In the DEAD Lady, start the engine in
the usual way, except you leave the master
switch OFF. After the engine starts, quickly
pull the slave cable and flip ON the master
switch.
Pull the cable in the slaving Lady and ,.',.
run the engine in the slaved Ml 13 APC at f
about 1500 RPM for five minutes or so to
charge your batteries before moving out. Of ON
44


Never do this except in an extreme emergency. Use the
tow hooks to connect two crossed tow cables or a tow bar
between the two vehicles. On the vehicle you're trying to
start, put the shift lever in NEUTRAL, open the fuel shutoff
cock and turn the vehicle master switch ON.

a W Awl, 1r& 7 77 _..M


| ORE






4. WHEN THE 5. TURN THE 6. WHEN THE ENGINE
TOWED VEHICLE IGNITION STARTS, SHIFT TO
ft l fE, ( SWITCH ON NEUTRAL...
th' AND SHIFT W, -IGNA
10-15 'PH 3-6 .ll .. 'oTHe

0 ON ro S-ro

0




WATCH THIS: 4
If you're going to tow
the vehicle more than
200 feet...
SFirst disconnect the uni-
versal joint between the
transmission and differen-
hial. RIGHT
Don't exceed a vehicle I
speed of 20 MPH or a DISCONNECT
distance of 50 miles with HERE.
the transmission dis-
connected.
0 If you want to go further or faster, disconnect the left and right universal joints between the
differential and final drives.


The winterization kit for the Ml13 (FSN 2540-674-6094) has a heater,
heater fuel pump, an engine primer pump, and hot air ducts to the power train
compartment, personnel compartment, and battery box. Don't let the batteries
overheat.


















I ENGINE AND HEA
The hand operated priming pump is
on the front wall of the driver's com-
partment. It pumps gasoline into the
engine intake manifolds. Normally you
won't need it because the engine will
start without it in temperatures down
to -250F. Don't overprime-Prime only
when engine is turning over to prevent
hydrostatic lock.
HEATER

The heater is in the personnel com-
partment on the power plant compart-
ment wall. You use it to warm the
power plant and batteries before start-
ing in extreme cold. It is also a person-
nel heater. You control the heater
output to the battery box with a valve
in the duct of the box. You can switch
the main output of the heater to the per-
sonnel area or the power plant com-
partment.
Make sure the power plant compart-
ment heater intake is CLOSED when
the engine is running with the heater
OFF. If the intake is open, engine fumes
could get into the personnel area.
To start the heater, flip the three-way
control switch to ON-LO. The indicator
should light up and the blower motor
should start. The blower motor will


WATER FUEL PUMPS .|
speed up after the heater ignites and
then you can switch to ON-HI.


If the heater doesn't ignite within
three minutes, switch it off. Press on the
indicator light. If it glows, you are get-
ting current, so you can try to start the
heater again. Wait five minutes for the
igniter to cool. Otherwise, you might
burn out the starting coil.
If the heater won't start in three tries,
don't try again until you find out what's
wrong.
When you turn the heater OFF, the
blower will go on running for a couple
minutes to purge the burner. Don't
turn the vehicle master switch OFF
until the heater has purged itself and
stopped running, except in an extreme
emergency.
There is no chance of the engine ex-
haust gas backing up through the heater
line because the heater has its own sep-
arate exhaust through an outlet on the
top deck.

MORE






Engir di,,-nn r-'',u cin dj.in ,.n
nect the engine tr,.n. [he rcMc 4,i the ErlGINt DIVONIl|T HElir lf
power tr.in t,,r l:.li.'-cei hLr ,iaritiln
by pushing IN. ion rht reninL dil-..nnccE
handle. IYu II find iht i. tIhe rilhc it the
driver in th- rnzinc :'nar.t r ntr Sr,.p
the engine al'cr -,.U ~r It ilp it r :l I npr.
ing temp-rricur pull )1I_,T ,-n dan.
nect hand nm rLst -ir nciri NEVER
TRY T0'i M-i\'VE THIb HANDLE
WHILE E THE ENGINF i7 RI.uNNING


BILGE PUMPS-ODain the b plg compilel Pi to keep iRFUHtlNG -Refuel^ .mm
ice from fcrm.ng and possible domaginq the bilge dately so Cut do*n on
pumps. (lEar Ib drain hIole, so 'ou get complete s fondinso0 1 io n im rh fuel
hull drainage ell At every 0 Nprive
drain off any *teri Ihoc
has O(Eumulaied in thi
nlut el t l .



eng e.L IER Dron
e, ry duv









ARMAMENT-Cover weapons when not in use. Breech and firing mechanisms should be lightly lubed. Use
your rifle bore cleaner straight. Don't dilute it or add an antifreeze.


SNOW AND I(E-On ice, skidding is the problem. Pick the highest ,THAT IF I CAN '
range thal will move the vehicle steadily without straining the "&, T INT,: T;r T I
engine. I


Under these conditions you'll get better traction if you take off _
your track pads. First you have to get your CO's permission- I. .
notch.






VEHICLE STORAGE-If you have to store your vehicle under extreme cold weather con-
ditions, completely drain the engine cooling system.


DON'T MISS ANY OF THE FOUR DRAIN POINTS:

1. ;he rnqinr ne l vnoler I Hhre iK a droin
rr-i and h.i ) --.iI


BATTERIES-Check battery level EVERY DAY in hot zones. Use distilled water
whenever available. If you can't get distilled water, use rain or drinking water.
Batteries must have a weaker electrolyte in hot climates, so have your support
unit dilute the issued sulphuric acid (specific gravity 1.280) to a specific gravity
that'll meet your climatic conditions.
You can get all the dope on this in TM 9-6140-200-15 (July 58) which also
gives you a corrected hydrometer chart.
Batteries self-discharge fast at high temperatures, so if you gotta park for a
couple days, take out the batteries and store 'em in a cool place.

COOLING SYSTEM-Needs extra attention in hot weather.
Check level frequently. Use corrosion inhibitor and
refill with soft water if possible. Flush radiator when
you need to, but if it has to be cleaned let your sup-
port unit do the work. There are some aluminum
parts in the coolant system that can't take ordinary
cleaner but your Ordnance Support has the right
stuff to use. E W6TW- ,

SUPPORT FIRST 49

49"" gLr






ARMAMENT-In dry, dusty or sandy areas, leave exposed surfaces such as the recoil
slides dry instead of oiled because sand and lube make a grinding paste that does
more harm than dry operation.

ENGINE-Under normal operating condi-
tions, if your engine temperature rises
above 2000F pretty often, you've prob-
ably got sand, dust or insects in the
radiator fins.
Blow 'em out with compressed air. Also check belt
adjustment of the cooling fan and make sure it's
operating right.

OIL FILTERS-Check often in hot weather. CHECK...











--F D"I [E; i'[1 1 1 'L W IER




Service daily when operating in dust
and sand. Directions are on the cleaner
can.
You never use gasoline or other sol-
vents to clean the cartridge, but you can
use almost anything else.
Best bet is blowing it out with com-
pressed air at or not over 10 PSI. You
can wash it with soap and water. Rinse ,
in clear water and be sure it's thor- ,
oughly dry before you put it back.
In an emergency you can clean it by gently tapping the fins with your hand.
Don't tap the ends of the cartridge to clean it because that could really damage
the element.









FOR 110-VOLT CURRENT-
A male inlet receptacle is
installed in the back of th"
vehicle near the right tail
light. It leads to a female&
outlet inside the vehicle


FOR 24-VOLT CURRENT-There are three receptacles: 0
1. Trailer lighting receplacle near rear lowing pnlle Supplies erirltcal power to run Ihe lights of a
hailer or lowed vehicle ..


*1
Thc.rcL r'c lur r -nlip. *n ch. iniide rear
- r~~~.~'/rit~hr q~ Al n, ir 1IL [?-ri blL '1rc excin-
L!ui h lr. In .hL-. rc 1,it bhie-w the
~i~cq I I turrr,[r IcrL p[LI-. hk-.h inside and

Th. irc ior inmrrnfl (.-. c-crf~l cle-
pl-ic-n V h\\ l hu. rn nc-i being
m.].t. tl*.c ucrnid u.li L .f Eh'c icicposts are
I%1c- .(hcr-1h1C1lJi ,ich a rulibr 0I'lcr.


You may get any one of several types c:
of radio sets. A mounting rack for the
radios is on the left wall of the per-
sonnel compartment.
51


tMORE







Some radio combinations will require ( DO wE USE
an additional rack for. the right side of f O 4' -S 2.
the vehicle. This rack will be supplied
by the Signal Corps with the radios.
Power for the equipment comes from two radio receptacles built into the
mounting rack. Cap the receptacles when not in use.
Lugs are welded to wall and ceiling on the RIGHT side, for another radio rack
if needed.

INTERCOM BOX-A bracket for mounting an ANIENNA MOUNTS There are four. two on
inletcom box is welded 1o the air vent duct each side of the top deck. When not in use
at the front of the personnel compartment they re covered wilh bolted coverplates An
tenno guards welded near each mount protect
... the antennas The forward right mount is for
," .,i..,rk '.... M *" the rodlnc unil a


I 1 Li n '


IFTllINGEYrE

The M113 has four lifting eyes, one near each corner of the vehicle. Use them
for lifting and for tying air drop parachutes. The two eyes welded along the edges
of the vehicle below the front headlights are shipping tiedowns. Don't try lifting
the vehicle wirlh hernm bki..c au. hC o 'in take it f I


. u










Pintle mounted .50 caliber M2 machine gun. Shoots in any direction. Half of
the authorized 2,000 rounds of ammo is carried under personnel seats. The rest
is stowed wherever the crew wants it.
Spare barrel is stowed on the left sponson beside the driver.
Gun parts and tools are in a roll attached to right wall of the personnel com-
partment.
Two M14 rifles are stowed on the sponson with 360 rounds of 7.62-mm ammo.

FIREXINGUlISHtllE:RS 1


One fixed five-pound cylinder is on
the left wall near the driver's seat. It
discharges CO- into the power plant
compartment. Pull either the actuating
handle at the cylinder itself, or the
handle outside the vehicle, near the
driver's hatch. Remove and weigh every
Q maintenance or any time you find the
seals broken. Always enter the date of
last filling on the green tag.


One portable five-pound cylinder is
in the right, rear, corner of the per-
sonnel compartment. Check green tag
for filling date.


STPLGHTWSHR


If your vehicle is serial number F483 or above, you can skip this. On vehicles
F482 and below, the stop light switch actuator washers may work loose and
interfere with the steering and braking control rods.
It's a good idea to draw the lock nuts up tight and weld them to the washers.
On vehicles F483 and above, your control rod and actuator washer are all in one
piece.
53 OR-
Wt2LIV









Your front shroud covers can get bent on small trees
in wooded areas. When they get bent they crack around
the attaching bolts. Maybe something will be worked out
on this, but for now, take it easy in the woods.


The oil drain plugs sometimes freeze
in place. Work a light coat of GAA into
the threads.


If the commander has his head out-
side the hatch in a cross wind he may
get a lungful of exhaust gas from time
to time ... so be watchful in cross
winds. Some units have been turning
the exhaust around to face the front.
They claim that keeps some of the


In loading the Ml13 on a plane or
railway flat car, you may have trouble
with the front of your vehicle rubbing
against the entry ramp. If you do, block
it up.


smoke out of the commander's face. It
all depends on where the wind's coming
from.

)~i2011 11


Don't take off the manhole cover unless the
fuel cell is empty. Otherwise you'll puncture the
cell or break the manhole cover latches.
\ The fuel cell drain plug is an alloy job and
some outfits have been breaking them. If your
Ordnance officer gives you the nod you can re,
-_ .- place them with V2-in brass plugs.



In the LO it says when
you change the transmis-
sion oil it takes 19 quarts.
The transmission's actual
capacity is 9V2 quarts.


EXHAUST I









Your engine oil quick disconnect lines can cause you trouble unless you engage
them completely. Could happen that you'll get what looks like a tight connec-
tion without it being completely engaged. When this happens the oil line is
blocked and the oil can't flow through the coolers. So, when hooking up the
quick disconnect line-see that the connection is complete, not just halfway.



You gotta be a mite careful to get the adjusting nut right on your road wheel
and idler arm hubs. On account of the seal is spring loaded, you gotta have the
nut just so to keep oil from leaking at the seal. Always follow the method given
on page 107 of TM 2300-204-20 (Mar 60).

If you see the road and idler wheels' rubber coming loose, or the rubber chunking off-do this:
1. Keep the right track tension at all times. ,-E
2. Avoid high speed turns. -
3. Interchange road wheels and/or idler wheels to get equalized wear.
4. If wheels look too bad let your 3rd echelon support people know about it.


Do this daily check right and you can stop a
lot of trouble before it happens. Make your
own list, but it should include..."
WHEELS AND DRIVES Cautiously hand-feel road wheel and idler wheel hubs and
final drives. If one is a lot hotter than the others, the hot one's not working right.
Check oil levels at the sight indicators.
F8


55
IPMORE>
,, ---- yt









Try to check with vehicle on a level, smooth, surface. Don't apply brakes.
Shift into neutral and let the vehicle roll to a stop. You don't have to take off the
shrouds to check. If track tension is right, the bottom edge of the lowest track
block will be within K6 to 1-in off the top of the center road wheel.
If you want to get the most life out of your track and idler wheels you must
keep the track tension right. If it's too loose you could lose a track; if it's too tight
you'll soak up power and do other damage.
Your lucky lady is equipped with a grease pressure adjuster. Be sure you have
the right kind of a grease gun for this adjuster. It should be Part MS-35141-1,
a high pressure lever operated 15-oz gun and it should be in the tool bag of your
OEM. The gun is FSN 4930-223-3391.
You need this high pressure type to adjust your track tension. Keep it full of
grease so you can make this adjustment out in the field.


I'rW-1111. MW .


To tighten up the track, use your high
pressure gun to force more grease in.
If grease squirts out the pinhole-size
outlet port on your adjuster, it is a sign
that the piston has traveled too far in
the housing and that you have too much
slack in the track. Take out a block and
you'll have it made in the shade. That
will let the piston go all the way for-
ward again and you will get the right
track tension.




'J


Remember, when the grease squirts
out that hole it is time to drop a block.
The lube fitting for adjusting track
tension does not have a cover, so be sure
you don't use a grease gun on it when
doing lube service. There should be a
warning to lay off this fitting at lube
services.
The elbow-type safety-lock grease
fitting is a special item but you can get
it from supply. Ask for Fitting Lubri-
cation Vs NPTF, FSN 4730-679-9279.
In an emergency a regular grease fitting
will work. Keep in mind-a new track
will stretch during break-in, and it may
be necessary to remove one track block
for the right adjustment.









TB 9-2300-240-10 (Dec 60) gave
the word to stencil this warning above
the engine rear bulkhead access cover
and engine compartment cover:


Be sure the trim vane is locked before
you try using it as a hand hold for
climbing up. Otherwise, you're pretty
sure to fall on your face and you might
get hurt bad.
When you lower the trim vane for
any maintenance, the rubber bumpers


It should take a 5 to 10-lb pull to get
the steering levers from full forward to
the first notch in the steering lever
quadrant. In this position the brake
bands should be just starting to tighten
on the brake drums.
To adjust, park vehicle on level
ground, chock front and rear on both
tracks and release both steering levers,
Unscrew your brake adjustment ac-
cess plugs from the differential housing.
To tighten the band, turn adjusting
nut clockwise.
Check the steering level pull after
each half turn. Tighten 'till it takes 5


DANGER MONOXIDE GAS
SSECURE ENGINE ACCESS
PANELS BEFORE STARTING
ENGINE
S----------- iS-in letters


I L 1 IL .( .. .

stick out and are easily damaged if
stepped on or hit against anything. To
keep from losing or doing any damage
to the bumpers-be watchful around
them.


to 10-lb pull for the first notch of the
quadrant. Do not overtighten.

F -) 7'

01\


JI

Always adjust brakes when the dif-
ferential is cold. If you adjust with the
differential hot after operation, your
results will be off.

&:M:OR E


I BRAKE BANDS1 1


I TRIM VANE I







STEEIN GLINK A G


All the torsion bars on the left side of the vehicle (as viewed from the ramp
end facing toward the front of the vehicle) have an arrow pointing in a counter-
clockwise direction stamped on the roadwheel end of the bar. You order them
as FSN 2530-679-7965.

FSN 2530-679-7966
2530-679-7965 -679-7966
LEFT SIDE RIGHT SIDE
LEFT SIDE

The torsion bars for the right side of the vehicle have a clockwise arrow on the
roadwheel end and are stocked as FSN 2530-679-7966.
The two kinds of torsion bars are not interchangeable, so be sure you get the
right kind.



lIr,7 \PVCUR GEA ri
LOOIKS IMPRESSIvE.
SSIBUT LEALE THE WELDING ,
TO THE BOYS %%NO
S ~IIE THE SHIELDED







The Ml13 hull is made with a couple different kinds of aluminum alloy and
you can't weld it without using the shielded gas method. Leave it to the outfit
that has the tools, equipment and a trained welder.
58










AN EASIER

This is handy to know in case you lock yourself out of your MI I1. This can
happen very easy if you do the wrong thing. Like you are the driver and you have
your hatch locked from the inside.
You are the last one out and you come out through the commander's hatch
which locks automatically when it closes behind you.
This is how you burgle your way in You CON'T LL VOU
..first take off the four %6-in cap OR A iLEDF PECF
screws which hold the left antenna base. CRIZO B SA OF Ci'RE
This antenna is to the left rear of the !
driver's hatch.
Then take out the antenna and use %
your burglar tool-a stiff wire with a
loop at one end. (You can make it from
a wire coat hanger.) Catch the driver's
hatch lock handle in the loop and un-
lock the hatch.


GENERA IPS I


Here are some tips for the second echelons
mechanic.... When you turn your ignition
switch to ON, the fuel pump shouldn't operate
-aside from a couple of clicks, that is. The fuel
pump shouldn't operate until the starter is en-
gaged.
59


M[ORE
Ir l .- r






If the fuel pump gets ahead of itself and
starts to work as soon as the ignition switch
is turned on, the fault is in the interlock
switch which you'll have to replace. Ask
for Switch, Pressure: fuel interlock
(10874979') FSN 5930-771-8119.

FAN DRIVE GEAR BOX-The filler plug in your fan drive gear box, at least on the early
production models, is a soft alloy aluminum job and it gets frozen to the mag-
nesium housing.


Some outfits are relating it iS aEA F-REPLACED I
with o borss filler plug which S '4 RASS ONE.
is ordered out as Plug pipe,
brass '. NPTIB outside hex.
hd NPF, FSN 4730.011 5711.


TIMING MARKS-TM 9 2300.22-1?0 IMor 60) gives to differerr
i[gurl.- Ior the (orreci ngine timing mark On page 2 iT *ays 16 dg
BID( but page 69 iays to line up your vibraolon domper with the
10 dtcjrr mark on the timing plot
Go by the dope on paoq 69 b-ecause the 10 degree mark is best for
your engine


(LAMP (USHIONS-Some outfits report they are having
trouble with the Clamp loop: 5, fuel resistant cushion,
FSN 5440 200-8027 There are about 5 dozen of these
Little jewels in the M113. If you find the rubber crocks
-and falls out, send in a UER.

TRANSFER CASE-The late production models will have
Sa dipstick on the transfer case. At hall-full or above
you are OK. Don't let it foll below the half mark



RECTIFIER-Your batteries have got ro be installed right
If you get the wrong polarity it II burn out your rectifier
With no rectifier your vehicle son t go any place except
on the deadline. So watch it.







FUEL PUMP RUSIr-lfh is someth.nq oasy to rheck and real
important If you have rusl on your fuel pump coal I.
wth any good rust preventive If you have the healer LIt.
o course you II hove two fuel pumps.-o coat em both



ENGINE AIR C(EANER-ll your engine backfirrs
frequently the four engine arr cleaner pan
latches get loosened ro keep your engine from
backfiring. lel it idle until it warms up or pull
out the choke half ay. To clean the cleaner in
the field. read the directions. reaol it gently.



S STEERING SHAFT-There have been some reports that the
BRASS differential steering shaft binds because the self-
.- FI tlR aligning plain bearing in the bearing bracket is not
PkLG lubed. If you have this trouble, get permission from
your support officer to drill and tap for a lube fitting.
After lubing, replace the fitting with a brass filler
plug, the same kind used as a replacement in the fan
drive gear box.




MWO 9-2300-224-20/1 (May 61) is to be applied on vehicles serial numbers
through 931. Your organizational mechanic will replace the accelerator pedal
shaft with a hard coated shaft. This should take care of the corrosion and bind-
ing problem on this part. WHEN YOu GE"T YO '
NEW A1113, CHEIC FOr
SALL THE Pug5 DUE 'it





When you get your Lucky Lady, have a look-see through the pamphlet bag
that comes with it. This should contain a copy of FM 23-65 (5 Dec 55) with
Changes 1 and 2-on the .50 HB machine gun; a DA Form 478; the latest TM
9-2300-224-10 and LO 9-2300-224-10 and TM for the specific radio in your
vehicle, also a Strapping Diagram Stowage OEM.








MULTIPLE-LINE ITEM
SUPPLY FORM...


Could be you haven't yet met up
with DD Form 1150-1, "Request For
Issue Or Turn-In." The multiple-line
item supply form's been around for a
good spell, and some people like it real
well for different supply errands.
Use of DD Form 1150-1 (and its
continuation sheet DD Form 1150-c)
was OK'd by AR 711-16 (25 May 60)
"Installation Stock Control and Sup-
ply Procedures." And, you old-timers
will find this form a lot like the old 446
and 447-multiple-line item issue and
turn-in forms-which did your bidding
before DA Form 1546 (the single-line
item issue or turn-in form) hit the
scene.

OKAy.
BY REPLACING
LAS T,
YEARS
--
A,



t,e -, ,/ i


D


I I/
Here it is. DD Form 1150 1. This multiple-line
item form land its continuation sheet DD Form
1150 d can request or turn-in anywhere from
one to hundreds of authorized stockage list
items INOTE- Excepi item on which demand
info's needed you have to use a 1546 for
those items, because the tech service supply
people need Ihe requisition s No 5 copy.)


I The form's OK, for example, for
issue of expendable housekeeping items,
stationery, office supplies (where there's
no self-service center), for individual
--- I and organizational clothing and equip-
ment, for TOE and TA equipment for
a new unit, and for medical supplies
(within a medical facility).
THE 1150-1 CAN ALSO BE USED FOR:
HO W 'S IT USED...? 1. Issuing small expendable. inexpensive
non critical items (except reparable an
When it's possible and easier for all items) needed regularly at a shop or moin-
concerned, and the items involved can lenonce operation
be handled better with a multiple-line 2. A hand leceipi for tools and other items
item form, the 1150-1 can take over. issued to individuals for temporary use
Of course, it'll be up to the local 3. Turning in stuf to property disposal
command to OK use of the DD 1150-1 i i
in place of the 1546. And, natch, the Turing in eess serviceable items.
multiple-line item form's supposed to.
be used only for items on authorized.
stockage lists
The form's easy to fill out, too. Info and identification
blocks on top of the form ask for the usual supply .
transaction info, and the same goes for the alpha- '
betical columns across the form.
Blocks No. 1 and No. 2, for example, '
get the same info you put in blocks 1 -
and 2 of a 1546. The "From" (No. 1)
block takes the name of your supply 5. A shop rlocolpurchase Shopping-listlorder
outfit, and the "To" (No. 2) block gets ing and picking-up irtms Ircm local corr
the name of your unit or shop. meal once ns) It he lofrm s used Ithe
The supply transaction info is continued on the top way one copy (an hb Prmorarked to pro.
of the continuation sheet, and each sheet is num- vide demand' into for Ihe ,iem. if pur
bered consecutively. Each item gets a line number. chased
A line of slashes, or x's, and the words (last item)
are used after the last item listed. -

OR.. AS A LOCAL-PURCI-ASE
.*. \SHOPPING LIST WHEN AN
OUTFITS GOT A CHARGE-
-.ACCOUNT WITHIN A
I L'-"- L LOCAL CONCERNj

63 IORE
63 ^ ---y






ITIU
DD Form 1150-1 can also be used to turn-in a unit's "Inventory Temporarily
In Use" items. (ITIU items-non-expendable equipment which a unit gets for a
special time or reason. The equipment-not on TOE or TA-remains the prop-
erty of the installation, or depot, supply, and is not recorded in the unit's
property book).
WHEN 1150-1 IS TABOO
You'll not be allowed to use DD Form 1150-1 when the tech service supply
people want demand data on a specific item they're giving you. For that kind
of record keeping business your supply support needs the demand data page,
and the handy processing given on the 1546. Ditto for fringe items (as required
items) you'll have to continue using the 1546.
Also when supply owes you a due-out on a 1150-1 order, they'll
extract the due-out on a 1546 and send the No. 3, Due-Out copy to you
alongwith your 1150-1 order. All further action on the b2
DO item will be done on the
1546 which supply -
initiated. I.


The form's available at your post
publications section, or your self-serv-
ice supply center. And, if it's OK'd for
use in your area, supply'Tl usually want
an original and three copies of the
form on each transaction. You'll need
64


one copy for your unit suspense file, so
an original and four copies should see
you through nicely on an 1150-1 trans-
action.
And you shouldn't have any sweat
working in your 1150-1 transactions
with your other supply records... the
form's easy to fill out and it fits com-
fortably into a manila folder.













7hse Ord UtS's
If you've got a DA Form 468 (UER) all
filled out and ready to send in on Ord-
nance equipment, be sure you use the
right address from Change 6 to AR 700-
38. You can also read all about it in PS
Magazine 106. You don't send UER's in
to the Chief of Ordnance now.

Wf60 mfoatee' cam4
Your M60's M13A1D ballistics com-
puter should have an ammo tab and
cam for each type of ammo aboard.
You'll need 'em to get the right reading
like TM 9-2350-215-10 (14 Jun 60) tells
you in step 1 of Fig. 63. Some early
M60's had only one cam installed, so
the selector handle was blocked off so
wouldn'tt work. But when you've got
more'n one cam, the selector handle is
mounted on the computer and should
be used like the TM says.


~a~r~i ~ad r


tA,42 iftes atsa
You combat vehicle crewmen best check your M8A2 filter unit (FSN 4240-691 -
1505). Especially, if you just got a new uni'.Some M8A2's in a recent shipment
(lot numbers EA 12-214-01-1, -2, -3, -4) got away with faulty valves in their hose
couplings. The units aren't to be used even in an emergency, 'cause the valves
won't let thru enough air to do you any good.
Your Chemical officer's already put a hold on the M8A2's involved. And they're
to be deadline until he can give 'em new hose assemblies. The replacement hoses
each unit'll need are: FSN 4240-300-6464, hose assembly M6 (1 each); FSN 4240-
300-6465, hose assembly M7 (2 each).
And they're available thru regular Chemical Corps supply channels.


V HD 1149 T'


Army aircraft outfits needing Air
Force publications or blank forms that
are not listed in Army indexes can now
order 'em. Just ask your local publica-
tions section to make out two copies of
DD Form 1149 for your unit and label
the form "Air Force Publications Require-
ment." But AF Forms listed in the Army
index are still ordered on DA Form 17,
like always.
Keep t acMu
Making too much time in Gigsville
cause the respirator on your 105-mm
howitzer shakes loose-no matter how
often it's tightened? Start building
Brownie points the easy way. Drop a
hint to your support people tell 'em
maybe a new washer, FSN 1015-501-
7584, might do the trick. It's made of
soft copper and, when tightened, both
seals and locks the respirator as snug as
a sweater on a pinup queen.




*PM
IS FOR
STHE




PRI RTIVE
I HAllTEHMCE