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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00009
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1960
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00009

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22-23
        Page 24-25
        Page 26-27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50-51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text

Issue


TH E


SSeri
0 Seri


~L~C,---~5
c


7:7 -








'"Aar i4 lf-Mast,
L. ks like we're off to a rat race again, and I'm
w.:..i-ring where we stand on MWO's that've now been re-

.:.me of our vehicles stood in storage quite a while,
anr,.d TR MIO's said not to move vehicles from storage to
.1.-. rrl- work. Now that we're putting them in service, the
r':..' have been tossed out the window.
now I'd like to know:
[.. we still have to make these modifications?
so, are the parts still being stocked? -
Sthe MWO's are not to be applied now, will we get
iI.;.-. when inspectors find they're missing?
I' a vehicle or equipment gets damaged because a 3rd
.: r hi:-gr echelon MWO wasn't applied, who's responsible
-. a statement of charges hits the fan?

Sgt G. H. L.


CASE CLOSED

n_- a, r t ,[. H. L.,
i sa .!e t'.:. take 10 for a breath of air, Sarge, 'cause those rescind-
j 'rr,' r- sre :r,-r-. They're not to be applied.
I ni':, h -,t' v- Been rescinded--by the numbers--are considered non-essen-
tL'l. nr,i thr,r I an Army way of saying they're not needed any more--period.
7:, if "-.:. i- r! 'r.:u.oles cruising around with equipment that didn't get one
.:.! ri-:.- r-e- i..j.. rlWO's applied, the troubles won't be gigs from the in-

"'.:, 're t.: 1-t nygones be bygones, too, even if you know where there's
. s-t.-.' _rri ,nd kits that were meant to be used to install these re-
. r.~~I.j '*..'. l.isng this "salvage" to install a modification that's now
?.:.n- l- ri.. rn.:...----:r tial is against DA policy.
.i;r- a m'.1.i r'iation wasn't made while the 1WO was in effect, it's as-
sime ,<,r r ..- w..rr. wasn't done because the CO--where the equipment was at
r,.i ir .i-r s .it up because he couldn't or didn't get parts or didn't
'.. rt- tr.:. sai..' the 'WO, or he got an item by transfer recently.
'.,t.-1- i r: pinned with a statement of charges unless there're facts
t.-. -, rFr .:...7- ...-dy didn't follow the CO's rules in doing the work he was

.. :r' r ,:*. assuming that all of the old MWO's are being mustered out.
.:,-e r~-r'v -r-.ij more'n a two-year hitch are still rated essential to re-
I.:1 a.'.leas.'- -, a.'oid serious damage, or remove safety hazards. Check DA
Fa 1 ;.1 : r l hat MWO's your equipment needs. Install 'em pronto, or--
' ..;' r- !-.r r.ii -,er echelons--notify your tech service support.

,-^ ^__72/_-^ 1-


{7 rs



[po


IT


Issue No. 89 1960 Series
Published by the Department of the Army for the
Information of organizational maintenance and sup
ply personnel. Dilsrbulion is mjde through normal
publication channels. Within limits of availability,
older .iurs; may be obtained direct from PS Maga-
zine, Raritan Arsenal, Metuchen, New Jersey.
IN THIS ISSUE
ARTICLES
Deep Water Fording: A General Rundown........... 2
Electrical Accessories: OFF When Power Is Turned ON 11
Scorpion 90-MM Gun: Exerc;:- 11 M-,hi ,i lll 12
M50 SP Rifle: Roadwheel ([ i- Alrcr F.:,roi,n, 14
Rai.J;, Si MKr.,i;ng Cajr- nrd ii, i ,ni 16
RL 3! fil U"I: A. ,I ;r,n P, E i.t ,,a 17
S e m H h ? P l : hi: Thl c r ,, '-, ,.:: ( 3 hh S l.h L ,b 1 9
Aul:m,,Tjhi : Ar -iltr,: I1.: i .. i v:. -rr ..r 20
l ,:l r ,ll.: M.',h.:r: Op, ll,.:.' A nl i.,[r 22
Ml.;la'es In Manujil. .juun d Off W .h [IA rrm )028 24
Anlifrepz"e Emply II O'. rn iri ('ir 2 26
1.0; FlIE E lrie iir.h r" i, lrili, L T: I [Ever' 5 ire ir: 3"
Mi3uij.iu.ijr Fii' rjurmb,: H T.. Fird li 3?
li'. MM H,:. .r: M1 H- I,:, i. .:ii li ,- 1 'i1 :" 39
Collapsible Fuel Tanks: Get This Repair Kit........ 40
f.16 TF Tubie: Dr,'i T:il.a W;ilh..ui This Check.... 43
Mi l rp['r l E lr',.)r .'.[ l, Ti, .r ............... 44
ra .. ur,,,rl-' i :, .'1. HA T,:, Ch,..I li 45
f ,l- .I I: ir,.ri H jl..rr lr ,:31ii I.il Lj- I Fni.: rIuC 46
Mi, I M,. :,ii ( ,.v -r Ni'r fr .r i ,r :r,., 48
ill,;i. ri.. A]J,., I,: t[ I t wV ,, Trh,, .'- Fuelei.1 49
[lji fi' I'. A,. L:..Tpr.:.... r e.ra..:.. Ar] FM 50
Flying: Don't Lose Ynor Grip 58
Missile Universal [:uii.,. 6,,1. ir,,.. hll 63
DEPARTMENTS
Connie Rodd .................................. 10
1,- C,,1 ,,: i ....., : A Filip Ar,vininr, Can Happen..... 29
j j.Tv,i jnd rn. ei ...... .t...... 37
S... : .. ......... 6 1
Connie Rodd's Briefs................ Inside Back Cover
PS wants your ideas and contributions, and is glad
to answer your questions. Names and addresses
are kept in confidence. Just write to:
sgt .4alli-Mad,
PS Mwfa}aae,

Metuchefa, NwA 3ei 9 e.
DISTRIBUTION:
In accordance with requirements submitted on DA Form 12.

1















-w




So you know you're gonna take your buggy swimming. Here are a few points
that might help you make your water fording a success and keep you out of
trouble.
-- RREE!- u--
BUDDY, NOT FOR
'ME...I CAN'T SWIM t
A STROKE. w k.. .


BASIC CHORES:
First thing you wanna do is pick a
driver who can swim. It's not likely
you'll ford in depths over 6 feet, which
isn't too deep for non-swimmers but a
qualified swimmer is less easily shook-
up in case of the unexpected.
Next dig out your vehicle's TM and
go over all the info on fording. The


info's usually found under the "Fording
Operation" or "Unusual Operating
Conditions" sections. Use that info plus
the quarterly service in TM 9-2810 to
thoroughly inspect and tune-up your
vehicle. However, there is no point in
pulling the wheels, because you're going
to have to do that chore after you come
out of the water.


PUBLICATIONS:
Next, don't overlook any fording your advanced designed waterproofed
TB's or SB's that may apply to your fleet.
equipment. If you don't have or know Here's a few other pubs that have
of any, check the latest publications fording dope and data: FM 31-60 (Mar
index (DA Pamphlet 310-4 w/changes) 1955), TM 21-305 (Dec 1956), TM
anyway and be on the safe side. 21-306 (Aug 1956) and the TB 9-
Deep water fording could be covered 2853-series.
under various headings so scan the index And if you have the time and facili-
careful-like. Another pub that has good ties, there's a good training film, TF
dope is TM 9-2853 (7 July 1945) and 9-2541, "Preparation of Vehicles for
Change 1 (7 June 1948). It's a little old Deep Water Fording." Run it through
but the general basic info still applies to a couple of times for your men.



FORDING KITS: LISTE, DAD..
What fording kit your truck or tank gets is f TWIi MY DEEP
outlined in SB 9-155 (23 Oct 57).- sT..
These kits are special. They're made to fit spe-' )
cific vehicles. Most of these kits are designed
according to the type of truck and its serial num- '
ber (not USA or registration number). So before
you're issued a fording kit make sure you're
getting the right one. For example, a G742-series
deuce-and-a-half can take either of two different
kits.
Eyeball SB 9-155 before you order. Since
there're not too many of these SB's around and
the kit FSN is not in your SNL, some CO's have






told their drivers to mark the FSN for
that specific vehicle kit on the vehicle
itself, in a place it's easily found and not
bring a squawk from the inspector.
The mounting instructions that come
in the kit are important-don't lose 'em
or toss 'em away. Some people keep 'em
with their vehicle's TM just in case they
may get a kit without a set of instruc-
tions later on.

LITTLE EXTRAS:
There's some things that you won't
find in your vehicle publications that
you've got to do before fording. These
are the little "extras" that could mean
the difference between a ride or a swim.
So, taking a Jeep for example, here're
those little extras you wanna do. (If
your vehicle is of another G-series, these
still go.)


1. On your distributor, be very sure that the
positive vent line s in position. It's easy for
people to forget thal or let ir go IIt down
underneath the disltrbuloi on the Jevp and it's
a little hard to get at.)


2. Next. you wonno go ovei all the Ihnes on
your engine-the fuel lines. the vacuum lines.
the ventilation lines. Check each one to be
sure it s snug and also to be sure that it is in
properly and not (ross threaded You better









slack each lilting oil ist a hair and then bring
*i op rice and snug Don I witl m foH If any.
body has fouled one up, cross threaded or
ripped it or leh it loose, be sure to get it fixed

3. Now take a look at both your fording
valves and be sure they re installed correctly
on the vehicle. (On the Jkep, both levers should
be lorwvard for the highway and back for
lording Be sure these valves are not turned
around.)


.. .




B k^9





4. Then start in on your induction system.
Check the air cleanei from the snorkel right
through to the carburelor Examine your air
hose and if there're any frayed spots or holes


in it be sure and tape 'em up with non-hygro-
scopic tape (FSN 8135-266-5016 for 2-in roll,
FSN 8135-269-8123 for 4-in roll) or replace
the hose.


I


.7)


7. Crankcase, differential and transfer case-
Any signs of leaking?














8. Give the vehicle a full grease job other
than pulling the wheels.


5. Generator cables, generator regulator,
starter-Cracks or loose covers. Cables snug
and tight?


6. These paris require ventilation: Brake
mosler cylinder, fuel tank distributor housing
In air broke equipped trucks, of course. the
air compressor has a vent line The different
trals on the G479-series trucks have vent lines.
others have vent valves Check all these vent
lines again and be sure they're tight and not
rross-threaded


~~~-s


V L-J~L





9. Exhaust extension-Snug and secure?


10. Snorkel-Any leaks? Secure the little
round top which you remove from the air
cleaner to put the snorkel hose on, to the top
of the snorkel hose (14-ton's only).


11. Now drop your top and windshield so
you can get away from the vehicle if you
should drop into an undiscovered hole or have
other similar troubles.
laEV 'i f I(^ -*


12. Check your fuel tank filler cap II you have
tfe n.w type with the hnnd-opelated air venl
valve, set it in ihe fording position The cap
without the valve musl be seated lighl. Go
over the cap's gasket for possible air leaks


13. Put the flywheel-housing drain plug in
place-this goes for all vehicles.
I ni-' WW", -- ii


14. Now take out the manuals and forms
and anything else that's soakable. This box
could be sealed bul II won t stand deep watle
fording



15. Open all your body drain holes so the
water can run out after you're across.

16. Just before you enter the water, loosen
your fan belt. Except the G-742 series 2'/?
tonners. .heir fans are designed to lurn
under water, too.





M /


































TRAILERS:
The amphibian-type trailer is a snap. These
you can unhitch and float across. And they're the
babies you can use for cargos that must stay dry.
Heavy loaded trailers can be winched across once
your truck gets on the other side. Or a wrecker
on the other side can help you across while you're
towing a trailer.
SLT'S GO CWICK T TOLP VA' IT WASN'T
EA % EE' DEEP. '-


- M-100 TRAILER (IT FLOATS) -

-- ,-


~F-


--~-i--.
~ '-- r--
-~ -'






DEPTH AND BOTTOM: --
The M-series vehicles are all designed (B CME IPT O
to ford water about six feet deep, but .,a*, .
don't push your luck. If you can find a _" o
shallower crossing, use it. C
And remember that if you're fording
at close to maximum depth, there's that
much more chance for a wave to slop
over the top of your snorkel. Every-
body's gotta take it real easy. While the .
condition of the bottom tells you how -
much of a load you can expect to carry -
across, naturally a hard, smooth gravel : -
bottom will carry a full combat load,
but a sticky mud bottom may not even
carry the empty truck-you gotta use
your head.
Some soft-bottomed creeks have been crossed by rigging a snatch block to a
tree on the far side and pulling vehicles across with the winch on a wrecker. The
towed vehicle was running, of course, and helping all it could.
The specific fording depth of your vehicle is found in most of your TM's.
Don't go any deeper than that depth.
So have somebody go carefully over the bottom of the creek in which you
propose to ford and check for depth and soundness of bottom.



CROSSING
F ,I Itrt. cthe .[.r and, r I .il i r u re io r l rl g
d. n.. us.- ,.jur luri, it ) -,u -in h lp It. Th SAID
bKcau L it in., %,a(r ic int, i....ir c:luiit:h hi u. ASE IT INT
ERASHE WATER
ing .'u put the pluic In. of :...ur t cli uJ Tu.i -W T
mll prubabl) hold all right to get o uu across the. :.,-
creek and out if you don't keep breaking it loose. 4; f O0b
If you release it several times it may get water on Oo'.o
.0,9ool
the surfaces and may very well leave you sitting oo
there slipping. & _
Set your idle moderately high; your vehicle A -"
in front drive, low range, and ease it into the l '/'
water. Let t proceed steadily through to the
other side at this high idle speed.
C)B ^ ^''1'







Just as the vehicle breaks up out of the water, I~T TOMORROW.
as the water line recedes to your body bed, it is j '
wise to pause for a moment and let the water
pour out of the body through the various drain i
holes. Otherwise, if you cannot do this, just as
the body breaks water remember that all of a
sudden you are lifting several hundred pounds
of water on this uphill grade. You wanna add
an extra burst of throttle so you will not stall
just as your hull breaks water.




OH

ON THE OTHER SIDE:

I KHEW THAT '.) 1/
OL'UTI CO. r ) -L ,'S
C TULC'T FPUSH Y' '.i (HINCEPIN '
"US THAT FAST.I .iZS .I, ,TC,


After you're out of the water, first
thing to do is ride your brakes a little
way to dry the linings. Then remove the
flywheel-housing drain plug. On the
G749-series trucks, drain the flywheel-
housing and put the plug back in.
Tighten your fan belt.
At your earliest chance, do the after
fording operations as spelled out in
your vehicle's TM.
In combat, of course, you can do
without this for as long as you have to,
but the longer you wait, the harder on
the vehicle.


Remember-attend to your wheel
bearings,transmission, transfer case and
differentials just as soon as you possibly
can. They're most important.

And you may have to pull after-ford-
ing service on your cargo, too. It stands
to reason that a howitzer that has been
pulled through a creek is going to need
some attention before it can be used
again.

When fording, let common sense be
one of your guides.









I. "a


Seems there's still some M123 and
M125 10-ton trucks running around
with nothing on 'em to warn operators
they should use a soft touch when
they've got their hands on the winch's
safety-brake adjusting bolt.
Winches that got passed up when
these cautioners were handed out are on
10-tonners turned out before April
1958. So just those put out before that
date need a look-see.
Troubles you'll see if you screw the
bolt in too tight could be a sheared pin
or broken brake bands-or, worse yet,


if you've got the wrong shear pin, the
power take-off or the winch worm shaft
worm gear-or maybe both-will get
chewed up.
The TM for the trucks tells you to go
easy with this adjustment. See para 257
in TM 9-8002. But if your CO feels
the operators need a reminder, here's
the way to do it: Just paint or stencil
the warning on the brake housing cover,
right by the bolt so it can't be overlooked.
MWO Ord G1-W93 (11 Dec 56)
told you what to do about this kinda
problem on 21/2- and 5-tonners.






0#-fffea Clot


Switch off.
That's the way it has to be for the
electrical accessories powered by your
vehicle... or your generator. You want
all your accessories turned off when you
turn the power source on. It's easier on
your batteries and your accessories.
Whether you're operating a radio in
your truck ... using a circular saw on a
shop truck or some electronic equipment
at a missile site .the equipment
switches have got to be off when you
turn on the power. If the equipment
doesn't have an ON-OFF switch, then
you want to pull the plug before you
start up the power source.


On aircraft especially, you run the
risk of damaging accessories two ways
-through surges and through operation
on low voltages. Most aircraft acces-

Veuce-and-a

Some of you ma-, b ha' ing rrotubi
trying to decide which rcnch ,oI 1
should use on the air compressor pul-
ley of your 21/-ton G742-series trucks.
If so, here's what you should ask for:
Wrench, flange, /2-in sq-drive, 1 in thk,
7 in dia (air compressor pulley), FSN
5120-795-0404. And here's what it
looks like:


series won't have plugs to pull, so make
sure the switches are OFF. Check the -1
flight handbook procedure for your
particular bird.
W -17
AVs _;


When starting up, a surge in current
can burn out or damage your equipment
-especially on vehicle-mounted rigs.
Same goes when a guy with a heavy
foot stomps on the gas pedal or gooses
it unnecessarily-comes a surge, and if
things are not right in your vehicle's
circuits, the surge could slip through.
Either way, the result's the same:
equipment no workee.





5~oeeraa ea ale ude


Sure! You know that most anytime
you want to give a gun's recoil mech-
anism a little exercise you can do it hy-
draulically like it says in TB Ord 303
(27 Apr 5 5) -except when you're work-
ing with the M56 90-mm Scorpion.


On this self-propelled gun's recoil
mechanism you never-no never-use
any hydraulic exercising method. The
only time you use the vehicle's hand
pump on this M88 gun mount is to get
the right hydraulic oil pressure in the
recoil mechanism.

-i kce a si


%\ hon %*,.u r.e cr.ppini .i,,, hill "%%ih
a hca \ [r-u.k or [ru k .:>inbl .,[ii,'n,
hiitr [r. z,.;jr IuM Lnu' Lh t,. (he gc.jr
inrj [hli- nULlb'inL' Llic[ i, the break ii11
hIJld [he cLnLine RPM hl -''i. iit r.iiou
L'.'L\ -rnd spicd
Otherwise, it's possible your flywheel
and clutch may rev up so high they'll
disintegrate like a grenade burst. And
that may get you knocked off like a sit-
ting duck.
To be sure of your own safety and
to prevent serious damage to equip-
ment, stick to the operating instructions


You're just asking for trouble if you
exercise the SPAT'S recoil mechanism
any other way. Use the mechanical
method shown in TB Ord 303 or that
outlined on page 249 of TM 9-2350-
213-20 (Jun 58).


.ttig t duck

,.. ,_









you've got in your vehicle's TM. For the
M123, f'rinstance, that's TM 9-8002 (1
Nov 55) which gives its governed full
load engine RPM as 2600 in para 100b.
Also pay sharp heed to road speeds
on the instruction plate like you see pic-
tured in Fig 5 of the TM for the M123
for example.


HMD ?4 ONL
TO W TE RIGK





"s.,...." -As -in g "

It happened the other
day. Two M42 twin 40's ", DON'T LET
facing each other in the ANYONE TOUCH
shop bay were having their \THE RANGE
SELECTOR
transmissions checked. OS OL LEVER
CONTROL LEVER
One vehicle's engine WHILE ANOTHER
was running at 1200 RPM PERSON IS
in NEUTRAL. The me- NEAR THE
chanic walked 'round to VEHICLE
the front of the vehicle,
reached in and put the range selector control lever in LOW RANGE. The next
thing that happened was the vehicle leaped forward and one human being went
to meet his ancestors.
So anyone with any sense a'tall:

WILL .Not a'
SIGHT THERE
SDON- E.





1. Always have another person working with him 2. Use a ground guide in close quarters like a
and in the driver's seat if the engine is going to be shop or storage area.
turned on or the brakes taken off.

WONL ...T '
ili).A&H"MA. U .IN BOY






1. Let anyone play around with the range selector 2. Make a move until he makes his intentions
while there's another person near the vehicle, known loud and clear to anyone else in the area.

'Cause in a situation like this-no matter what end you wind up on-it's gonna
cost you.


rL


=--






Z.e4d c. Uv.e


After every fording operation there's
many a job needs to be done before
restin' those weary bones. Here's one
on your M50 SP Rifle that you can
knock off the list.
On Page 129,par 109 b (3), andpage
523, par 330 d, of TM 9-7222 you're
reminded to "remove the roadwheels
and clean and lube the bearings, after
each submersion."
In the 50's the wheel hub assembly
contains a seal that'll remain waterproof
for a lifetime and a bearing with a posi-
tive preloaded adjustment. There won't
be any leakin' into those hubs unless the
seals, hubs, or bearings have been dam-
aged through careless handling or
combat.


If your CO still feels the wheels
should get a going over, he can make
the following checks which have been
developed:
1. A look-see if the lube level has risen in the hubs
after each fording.
2. If the level has appeared to rise, pull the hub
cap and check for the presence of water.
3. If water has snuck into the hub, then disassem-
ble the bearings, clean and lube them.
If the water's been in the hubs for
any length of time, it takes on a grey-
sorta sheen and tends to thicken up.
This would indicate the hubs, seals or
bearings had been bad before fording
was made.
For more info on fording, TM 9-2853
will come in real handy. Check through
it next time your vehicle takes a swim.


26' .. .
~'- ,


If your job is trying to keep a Hydra-
Matic happy in a G749-series 21/2-ton
truck, you've got to gage 'er right, hot
or cold. Give 'er the oil she needs, but
enough's enough.
Extra oil will cause the spinning
drums to foam the oil. And so much air
may get mixed in that the oil will heat
up and foam like the head on a brew.
Then, pretty soon you'll get uneven
operation of the automatic shift and
oil leakage.


So, lay a sharp eye on para 194 of TM
9-8024 (3 Oct 55), especially Fig. 187.
Read on, though, 'cause latest instruc-
tions on checking and filling are in Note
6 to LO 9-2320-210-10 (19 Jan 59).
With handbrake set, transmission in
NEUTRAL, and engine idling (375
RPM) for three to five minutes, the oil
lidl should be COLD FULL betre



^---------~---
operation or HOT FULL when the en-
gine has been running and is at operat-
ing temperature (after operation).







You M42 dri c r, h, hv.
been finding y u r par kint: if,,' H iat
,' l, fi u C SP ,1Ff IN ll'uti 1 it IP[L -.
brake control rud in :, hind as I H.A8t BLlN
can find relief bh turninrL
it end-for-end. 7
It seems tha as oriLi.
nally installed the for r ard
intermediate br a kc ir.d PA an,
bind on the parking brakie 'pri--- t
bellcrank, anc also a' ~ *:_ itl( Ani
hit the personnel bhcucr
duct.
But if you take it out and reverse it, so that the fixed clevis is installed on
the parking brake bellcrank, while the adjustable clevis goes up to the brake
relay bellcrank, you'll find it clears everything OK.
The first thing youwant II, ," PHrAIl 5
to do in making this C(v .
change is to line up the
little index holes in the
parking brake base and
bellcrank and those in the
relay base and relay bell- M "" .
crank and shove Vs-in l 'Ni: eat
drill rod index pins into /,- BE LlaN f'1 N
'em to keep the bellcranks .n/ l. ,:j.Iia"it
in proper position. (In a ,1 .L'' oll
pinch, a seven-penny nail -- uINT
-.112-in dia. will do.)
Now you remove the cotter pin and washer from the parking brake side of
the parking brake bellcrank pin and take the pin out. You've got to take it out
on the side away from the parking brake housing. It won't go the other way.
Next, take out the cotter pin and the clevis pin from the brake relay bellcrank.
Then turn the rod around and install the fixed clevis end at the parking brake,
replacing the clevis pin, the washer and the cotter pin.
If this rod was adjusted right before, you won't have to change it. If not, you
adjust it so that the adjustable clevis pin'll slip into the brake relay bellcrank with-
out forcing.
Replace the clevis pin, washer and cotter pin in this end, and lock the clevis ad-
justing jam nut if you had to loosen it.
Take out your index pins and try your brakes. You're back in business.








-ANY^rMVO4*J G-I^- P RD &llE P5?

TI TIME YOU NEE7 A
S"- LITTLE HELP,,~~.~..' E)
-*" ^^ ....I' -. LE,%ME KMIOW/ ) ,. /


Just about every time your radio set is lifted off its mounting and sent in for
repair-or whatever-is a good time to check its mounting.
Actually, you only have to check one or two movable parts. The locking
handles there in the front of the mounting that hold the transmitters, amplifiers,
receivers, etc., in place. Also the locking strip and its spring.
Located where it is, the mounting can't help but act as a catch basin for all the
dirt, moisture, dust, and all the rest, that collects from many miles and many
hours of operation.
Too often an operator has to pull, bang, pry, sweat and grunt to loosen the
locking handles that have rusted shut or gotten so clogged they couldn't be
released.
So next time your mounting is free of its load, check the moving parts.


0 Clean out the rack.


to see what condition r hey 're in.
to see what condition they're in.


O Drop a drop or two of oil on the
I,.,I,,,, h ,I 1 1'""y


a few times to work the oil in.


Handles that lock and unlock with an easy touch means that you can slip your
set out pronto-and lock it back into position firmly and without sweat.






MEiF&rREELF





Talk all iou .nr c bu arlomik C r-".' .
po-er and uch. Thcre re no push but. Ii
mons around to help druie chuse RL. 1
scrnsi i rel units Norhin' but min-
p," cr and s car. A h.n the ,imc co.menL M:

Ithe Lu% ich thie strong rm "hlo h u g

Nicc thing about hc.se- RL -31
hoiuh. i the fact that there are 'nl I '
.:i min point, of fri[ction \hh "i h
meianN, ro ke lubrication points to,
kecp an e:,i on. Bur ih~i -3rc criti il.
Because if the 1e shiat bcarin ri arce
rusts, grinm% or gencralli ftulcd up
iv h dirt. \ou' I ha'e reel croublk. -


Snap open Ihe beating (ops every Eighl hours-which ~. i
Sjusit about rveiy day-and rub iome GAA giease on the
boring surloaes Generously plenty of il then snap the
a (ups shut and *ipe off whatever ozies out Always ihe
Ilik of extia grease finding its way into the brake
----'-- --iO'UR iMAINTEN t Ia NC ----
Once a week (or every 40 hours as the TM says) slip the whole axle off and give it a bath in some
cleaning compound. And while you're making with the lubrication, why not walk around the reel
unit with an oil can and drop some oil on such spots as the frame hinges, pin catches, the bearing
latch hinges, the bearing cap hinges and the crank handle catch.




,,-

A little grease and a little oil at the right time and place will keep your unit
ready to pay out or reel in when there's time for just one thing: Action!















Up to now, the J-101 and J-102 Con-
nectors on your TS-117/GP Wavemeter
Test Sets were sharing the same Federal
Stock Number: FSN 6625-330-9680.
Like shown in SIG 7 & 8 TS-117/GP,
dated 26 April 57.
Cozy, maybe, but confusing.
Comes now the separation:


e 4


i Been some brand new TA-312 field
i if .'" telephones coming to their units with-
,.. Ti J. out a nameplate. Sure, they'll get a
', message through just fine without a
nameplate, but complications can set in
later on.
"!-N F'rinstance, the nameplate gives you
the serial number of the phone-which
is vital comes time for turn-in for repair.
l H t,. That serial number also is the only offi-
-R.i cial way of telling one TA-312 from
another. And that plate's not a SIG 7 & 8
item of supply.
". So when you pull a new phone out of
its box, include the nameplate on your
check list. If it's missing, check with
'. higher headquarters before accepting
responsibility.
18









i LET 'WAE riJE
r' VER LIP

eu~c: ( A


No need for any operator to take any lip from them.
From the semi-flexible plastic cases used with some of the TA-1/PT field
telephones.


FR[IAOtV Pral F:PLA(I
iHOUC (APEFULLY
r41 Lit iSWPAGiIE


T'seems they've been giving some lip
to the gents who use the telephone and
its case. The trouble rests with that lip
around the upper rim of the case-where
the hinged cover closes down to make a
waterproof seal.

This lip is little more than a thin strip
of plastic stuck down over the top rim
of the case.

And it seems to be cracking and
breaking loose from routine opening
and closing of the case. Just removing


and replacing the phone is enough to
loosen the lip.
Until a newer, rigid, stronger case
comes down the line, sort of pay some
lip service to the one now in use. Slide
the TA-1 in and out extra carefully.
And if the lip does start to pout, the case
still has many moons of use still left in
it. Unless, of course, you plan to do some
underwater swimming with it or get
caught in a nineteen-hour downpour.
Still, if the case gives you all of its lip,
turn it in for a new one.






~O~BITE~


When a wet tarp and a wet antenna
get together, they'll put the bite on you
just about as fast as electricity can travel.
Real rapid.
And it's a bite that hurts, injures, and
has been known to swing the pearly
gates.
So bear one or three things in mind
whenever you're in the vicinity of auto-
matic antenna loading equipment...
like the AN/GRC-19 mounted in a %-
ton truck. F'rinstance:
When the time comes to pull off the
road, a good driver will take some extra
seconds to look around for a level spot
to park. Because if the truck is parked
on some bumpy, uneven ground, a full
15-foot antenna with all mast sections
in place could easily droop all the way
down to the wet top of the tarp. Or may-
be touch a wet tree limb. Or anything
wet.


And that's when the sparks start to
fly. Because a wet tarp or limb, or what
have you, becomes an electrical con-
ductor and can give a nasty "bite" to
anybody who touches either tarp or
vehicle.


More problems, too, 'cause all this
hurts the radio set as well. The antenna
section of the transmitter will cut the
transmitter right off the air while it tries
to compensate for the extra "electrical
length" the wet tarp or tree put into the
circuit.
That kind of automatic tuning equip-
ment can do almost anything by itself-
except carry an extra load and still put
out. As a matter of fact, sets without
automatic tuning are in trouble, too.
They'll keep trying to put out, but
without much luck. They just can't load
up an antenna plus a wet tarp or tree.
And a set will chug away long and hard
-yet next to nothing will get out into
the air.
Sort of keep an eye peeled, then, for
wet things and droopy antennas-and
in that way keep them from bitin'.




















This is a timely tale about a tail that
makes a big difference by being at the
right place at the right time.
Like if you're up forward spotting
for some artillery or mortar fire. You
hustle up there with your TA-l/PT
field phone and a spool of WD-1 wire
... make a quick hookup .. and stick
around only long enough to pull the
mission.
So seconds count. And precious sec-
onds will slip away if you try to hook
that TA-1/PT to the connector of the
DR-8 Spool without making a slight but
important adjustment ahead of time.
Because even though the phone and
spool are used together, trouble crackles
when you try to get 'em together. The
binding posts on the telephone just
won't connect with the posts on the
M-221 connector.
The connector was made for alli-
gator-type clamps. But the phone's
binding posts don't bind that way. They
can't bite on the connector, but instead
need a stripped wire to bite.
Sooooo, make one small adjustment
on the connector before heading out.
Instead of terminating the WD-1 wire
directly at the two posts of the M-221


connector, wrap it around the posts once
and then leave about a 2-inch "tail"
on it.
And that tail will be just right for the
binding post to bite on!
Before heading out, then, strip back
the wire about three inches ... wrap
each strand once around its post... and


then tuck the two tails under the lead-in
wire twixtt the spool and connector.
That'll keep your tail in line until the
time comes to tap in, and spare you the
sweat of stripping wire and messing
around with pliers at a time when time
means lives.
1
















One look at the Army's Iciom-,rii ~a crcraft .i r.
craft, some special rolling stock and mjteri.l h:,ndlinl
equipment, etc., will show y.iu that the modern Arnm i
lives just as electrically as the mnodrn hou-c% Ijt Our
good friend, the kilowatt, is c.irine t..i.oiuc, thcsc d.,.s l .
-and in a big way. i
It's sure nice to have all these, clctric motor doing thi
muscle work for you-but it's up to you to give these
motors every chance to do their job.
Which, of course, means that you
A ) make sure they are kept clean and dry,
| being sure nothing is dripping on 'em,
-v dirt isn't piling up, and particularly
that nothing louses up the ventilation
around 'em. And it's only common sense
to be sure that no tools or other objects
have a chance to get into the moving
l c parts and jam things up.




.. ....







Check your LO for the proper lubrication of your motors, and remember that
overlubrication can be just as bad as underlubrication, particularly if you get oil
or grease on a commutator or the brushes.
Also, you're the one who has to know what load your power tool is intended
to handle and see that it isn't overloaded.


Now, there is a fact about clci:ri:
motors that not everybody really .iarc.
ciates. When a motor's spinning, tie
armature is carrying its coils dhr':.lgh
the magnetic flux of the field coils, just
like the armature of a generator. And
there is actually a voltage generated in
this armature. This voltage is bucking
the driving current, and the faster the
motor turns, the more bucking voltage
you have. This is called "counter-elec-
tromotive-force" or just "CEMF."
So here's the pitch: When a motor is
designed, this CEMF is figured in, and
the size and number of coils in the arma-
ture is determined by allowing for it,
as well as by calculating the resistance
of the coils themselves. OK, the only
place this concerns you is that when the
motor is turning slower than its in-
tended speed, there is less counter EMF,
and the armature draws more current.

I NEED IES,..


'And that's why motors draw extra
current when they start up, and why
they get too hot if you start 'em under
load too often. So you've got to either
let 'em run a while or rest 'em a while
between starts, so they can cool off.
And for exactly the same reason-lack
of speed and lack of CEMF-if your
leads are loose, or your connections are
dirty, or if for any other reason your line
voltage is low, your motor is likely to
overheat.
So, naturally, if a motor is running
too hot, one of the first things you do is
check the line voltage at the motor ter-
minals, and then check back for loose
or dirty connections.
But remember that lots of motors
are designed to run with a 20 Centi-
grade rise in temperature, equal to a
360 Fahrenheit rise which is often too
hot for your hand. (If you had a 800F
day, your motor would run at 1160F
and be right on the designed tempera-
ture.) So be sure it really is overheating
before you get all shook up about it.
So, that's it-you work for your
motors and your motors' electric mus-
cles will work for you.







SOUND OFF 08 DA 2028


Since Connie spelled out the spiel on
multi-part manual numbers in PS 71,
hundreds of those new manuals have
been rolling off the presses.
Now the people who work up your
manuals aim to make 'em perfect for
your purposes. But nobody hits a home
run every time at bat.
This is why they put their mailing ad-
dress in every manual under the heading
"Errors, Comments, Suggestions."
They invite all you operators, me-
chanics and supervisors to sound off
every time you see something in your
manuals that needs to be corrected,
changed or improved.
So don't just sit there growling into


RECOMMENDED CHANGES TO DA TECHNICAL I
OR SUPPLY MANUAL 7, 8,
(Fowd in dFpllcat. 0 addre. i .
TO.
Commanding General
US Army Transportation Materiel Command
PO Box 209
St. Louis 66, Missouri
AT'N: 'CMIC--!
1. COMPLETE TM OR SM NUMBER AND DATE 2. PAGE NO

7M 1-IL-19A-2 1U Feb 57 156
4. FUNCTIONAL GROUP (Enter goup, nmber(, o).r Ut(.), under
whch Ilw appu-)

Engine Ignition System

5. ACTION REC
CHECK ONE STOCK NO. ALLO WA
FACTO;
A FROM IROM
TO TO
6. IDENTIFICATION
* STOCK NO. (FSCTc o ACh.ll S. tc(IR a.L( ble; b BRIEF DC
OTHERInsE LTT T MFCR'W NAME AL PA1RT NCUMTE



7. DEMANDS FOR ITEM (Exact q,.ftty of dmids orT JOm In each
0pc0f0c block for otA ,KIr olI daye Indflcltd)


A. R DAYS | I. ODAYS


9. JUSTIFICATION. REMARKS OR OTHER RECOMMENDATIONS (B-el
I d.to non t -cov c .O o Illustations, -c4I.. .. -
Ior chsneKK to ma'niftRcA JlocetIon chars)


Section V, paragraph 105-m specifies

Suggest it be corrected


MANUAL PARTS LISTS '"'
In m Jan W
FROM ...... .'.. .
9'T.h Ac'it'rt'n 'to
Avon '"- t~Re Tea
APL0

3. ._-uME T

L 19A and E Aircraft
b. BRIE DESCRIPTION


Breaker Point Gap Setting, Magneto

:OMMENDED
E SOURCE. MAINTENANCE, AND RECOVERABILITY CODE
CE (Whore appflfcbl. )

TO
OF REPAIR PART
:5CRIPTION



8. TOTAL NUMBER OF MAJOR ITEMS SUPPORTED TO WHICH ITEM



Incennc opoarlon cvOr AIn fRchnlcAl m -aual nd -oomnddt.onU



a breaker gap setting of .0015 inch.

to read .015 inch.


;,.-ur gr.-,g v h r.i );,.u ind a fu,.l.p mI
your manual.
To make things easier there's a ready-
made form for reporting your problem.
It's DA Form 2028 (1 Sep 57), author-
ized for distribution to all units by DA
Circular 310-16 (2 Oct 57).
And don't let the DA 2028 heading
throw you-reports on operation and
service manuals can be covered in Block
9, like it explains in fine print.
All you have to do is write up your
DA 2028 in duplicate, filling all the
blocks and furnishing all the numbers
you need to describe your problem-and
the answer, if you have it.
Then send it to the men who make up
your manuals, and remember they asked
for your comment-let 'em have it!


TYPED NAME. GRADE OR TITL E
F. LIGHT, CAPT., Maint. Off.

'ConpleeIlt Sb 6,d c, 6. .8, & 9.
cw l.l, It.ms 6. i.a 9.
3 Complete Ite, S b4 or c, as applcable. and 6. 7, 8. & 9.

DA, FORM 0
.EP....2028


SIGNATURE





U. 1-- --- --


. SO DAYS








M7 po,"EE UR.
~r-v-


DON'T KEEP ANTIFREEZE IN YOUR VEHICLES,
ENGINEER RIGS AND QUARTERMASTER STUFF
DURING THE WARM WEATHER SEASON. .11 .. 1 J

As the first step in this new scheme...
get yourself a pencil with a big, black
point and scratch this sentence from
your vehicle's antifreeze radiator tag,
which is on or near the filler neck: Remember, this only applies to oper-
"Drain and save old solution after one ating vehicles. It does not apply to veh-
winter's use." Just not so anymore. icles in storage.


r -a, X


/


wW I' LiSTEN MV"O.D." L-
'OVEREiD LIlTLE FRIEND,
.cI T NrK ',O' GET3OULD
GiTt CHECK iTiA T14E
IrlF,). BELOW..,
GE TT.- 1 -14 4 A- ---


When the temperature starts up and it's time to slither out of those longjohns,
start thinking about getting rid of your antifreeze. Here's what you might do:


1. Drain the antifreeze from Ihe cooling sys
lem by opening the radialor drain corks and
engine-block drains. (Remember now, you
don't do this on "combat ready" vehicles un-
less you have a fresh supply of antifreeze
on hand )


PPV


2. II isn't a smart idea to use a hose to flush
out the radiator-whether or not the engine is
running. Cold water closes the thermostat and
stop the water fom circulating. To do a real
job, close the radiator's drain cock and fill 'er
with clean, fresh water. Cap it, Ihen run the
engine at fast idle for at least five minutes.
Okay, now drain. If the water s dirty-repeat
this over and over again until the water comes
out clean. Then, close the drain plug.


i2E







3. Refill radiator with fresh, clean water and
add corrosion inhibitor, FSN 6850.281-1989
S ISpec 0-1490). Put in live ounces of inhibitor
for each 10 quarts of water. The inhibitor
S should be dissolved in warm water and poured
S ~ ^ into the radiator while the engine is idling.


Then you're all set.. till next winter when you put in fresh antifreeze.
HELPFUL HINTS

sr crm cleaning compound ( Mil-C-
10597B) FSN 6850-.22--952- ais rou-
tine maincenancc t rvicenhen the anri-
freeze is drairicd in the spring or added
in the fall. These cleaning compounds
a re to bt used only when you've got to
work on clogged radiators or rus[c '
cooling systems. 'Cause the cleaning
compound makes it easier for rust to
form on metal surfaces.

Also, you best order your antifreeze now and not wait for the fall when it gets
cold-or you may be left out in the cold. It's nice to know you've got the stuff
around.
Here's the poop to order the kind of antifreeze you need:



[Ihylenr glycol antilreeze (Sper 0-A-548a, type I. formerly 0-E 771a, type I)-
FSN 6850 243-1992 = 1-gallon can, domestic packed.
FSN 6850-243-1993 = 1-gallon con, export packed.
FSN 6850 224-8730 = 5-gallon container.
FSN 6850-243-1990 = 55 gallon drum.
Arcticgqiode antifreeze MIL-C-11755 iORDI-
FSN 6850-174-1806 = 55-gallon drum.


For the complete scoop on this phase of using antifreeze, take a look-see at
TB ORD 651 (9 Oct 59).






















The installation lay shimmering under the hot sun .. like
a tiger poised and waiting at a lonely wadi.


In its motor park-vehicles are
tuned, serviced, ready to roll...

%%, ONL


S... Service equipment ready to
I move at the signal...


EXCEdPT




















I BEEN CHECKING' A
IT AND THE CONTROL A ... DON
HANDLES BIND, /LET IT WORI
AMONG OTHER 2 YU.
THINGS. ;h


THAT CHOPPER'S BEEN
SITTIM' THERE FOR MONTHS
...THERE'G JUST NO CALL
FOR IT... GOSH, WHAT'S THE
FLAP? BE COOL, MAN//


WE INTERRUPT THIS
BROADCAST FORA
BULLLE TIN. THE DAM
ATAPEXV/LLE MAS BURS.T,..
T EN/RE VALLEY /S
B E/NG FLOOPEO...ALL GIUARP
A BENEG ALERNTE


30


. rglo







Within the hour the installaiton springs to life .
rolls to the touch ol a biti


. ,. 1,Mnths of PreLefli,'e .1lajire-
njnce pay ofl at las t...
w'*i~~~~: 3Q


NOW, LET'S
C'MON, JOE!GET SEE...TWFLIGHT
THAT CHOPPER CONTROLS DON'T
OUT ON THE FLIGHT RESPOND TO THE
LINE, THEY'RE COCKPIT CON IS
CALLING' FOR IT/ ..AOS SNAFUED
H RAULIC SERVES
HAVE NO POSITIVE
OPERAr.oL..






:'sS? .-i 4 51. -
~t~st~ 4V~L;h
~.


You will be up the creek,
Without anq paddle to clutch.

'j-


, / .'


-t -


IL 71


'LIC
~
li~~-"0


''r
;i r,






FLASkH AUTHA./TIES ARE HELLO..YES, SIRl/I HEARD THE
CALLING R A A #ELICOPTER ( RADIO,..NO, OUR 'COPTER IS NOT
70 RESCUE BAB.. OPERATIONAL...I'LL HAVE
TO CALL CAMP ZIG ZAG
TO REPLACE US!











HELLO, CAMP ZIG ZAG,THIS IS SGT.
BAKER. CAN YOU GET A'COPTER DOWN
TO THE FLOOD AREA...THERE'S
A BABY TRAPPED ON A
ROOFT.. AND.. YES...GOOD
... THANKS.' THIS IS
L.T BROWZE
WA~ 47T7HE FLOOD
ANAR M 0REPART-'







IM /OVERIA/16 AT pAMM..
300FEET..S-SLL #0 LESSEE NOW ... WAlr..TERE'S A
SAW OF A 5SY.. ...WOTS HOJSE...SOMEOAE'SWA V/MG
OE ARE iA THESE CONTROL ...I THINK THIS IS/5
SUooSES AE FLOAT- PEDALS ROIND... .YES. IT IS
POWDt- MUST BE THIS "6RUNT'
STREAM... LINKAGE THAT THAT INCO0EC
GOES BACK MOVEMENT IN TE
DOWN TWRU FLI&IT CONTROLS
HERE, AND MIT ORIGINATE J
ITS... UP HERE...









34





*fI M7ERIN6 APMDt.7..
.1O1LYCW(' NEVER
EXPECTEP 1 TI/SI'
Le. 6A5:P!:C0CI. _


MY RADIO GAVE OUT... GOOD
ERIEF.. HE'S IN TROUBLE S50B'
WHAT HAVE I DONE...WHAT
HAVE I DONE,.. WHAT HAVE
I DONE?


I'M RESPONSIBLE... IF I HAD
KEPT MY CI4HOPPER IN SHAPE
I'D BE OUT THERE INSTEAD
OF POOR BROWZE.'


I'M A MURPERER...MURDERER!
THERE'S NOTHING LOWER
THAN A GOOF-OFF
WHO ENDANGERS HIS
BUDDIES/


M4HHOW CAN I
EVER WIPE OrT Vi15s
IL BLOODY STAIN...,


I ~ I





OH SOB' HOW CAN I EVER FACE
mMY BUDDIES... SOB... 1


AIEM...I'M LIEUT. BROWZE OF CAM
ZIG ZAG... JUST THOUGHT I'D PROP
BY TO MEET YOU NOW THAT OPERATION
RESCUE IS A SUCCESS.!! BO .
SUBOWZE... '
THANK HEAVEN
YOU'RE
ALL RIGHT!








-01H, SHE'S FINE...,YAN IMAGINE MY I'M SURE
SURPRISE WHEN I DISCOVERED THAT UNABLE TO
SHE WAS NOTA CHILP-BUT BABY SEEING AS
LAVERNE, THE FAMOUS INGTHE SW!
DANSEUSE... WORLD...WH






36AKIN






36


TELL ME...PLEASE...
TELL ME DID YOU
RESCUE THE BABY?
THE OABY,. MAN,
SPEAK UP.'


GRATEFUL THAT YOU WERE
GET YOUR 'COPTER UP//
HOW IT LED TO MY MEET-
EETEST GIRL IN ALL THE
O, BY THE WAY, I AM
'ME TO INTRODUCE TO
MOTHER/
S1 ----





01JES no, T


AND- --;I
ANSWER
T411"'4Nvi 'rnIEWr


EXTINGUISHING
TROUBLE


Dear Half-Mast,
A question has been b o, ,'t' a .,., ., I"': ''.' ',' ua O P .
fixed C02 bottles on all ;r,- t.., i,, I..
The vehicle TM calls Jr i, h. i -. oi :1 o, .. .-e',
to be weighed and refill 1. ,'' ,1 i, q.i. 1, -' ,..i. ..,. ,
system makes it quarter) .., i' ./,: B. p'li, .
that the fire chief, who no, ..ll i i .' 'i.': .. .i. '. ..I ..u' I
fill them after they're fit I..i, rlJ .',,ar; .i ,:J .!.o oa; ,
test is made. This post is ,:0i i',i..'f'/' i'. .t.I~ 'i r e r
Most of the vehicles he~, .i,, ..,> .o l,. r'a .- i,..i., ./.. It ,
can't work out some wa i' .t 'ri..i.';g /,it. ic i J.h i,
will be a lot of deadline asijla. blJot loag.
J. W. McK.
Dear Mr. J. W. McK.,
There's not too much you can do about this now 'cause you have no choice but
to turn in those fire extinguishers every five years for a test. That's what it says on
page 9 of TM 5-687 "Fire Protection Equipment and Appliances" (20 Dec 57).
The TM also tells who's qualified to make these tests.
This means if you have a fire extinguisher on an Ordnance truck, or a Quarter-
master laundry unit, or an Engineer generator, it still comes under the provisions
of TM 5-687 and must have a test.
Because of this many posts have set up a system where they won't get caught
with their extinguishers down.
They do this by always making sure there are fire extinguishers in stock and
when the extinguishers are due for the five-year inspection they're turned in
with a DA Form 1546 and a replacement issued. Or they get it on direct exchange.
These posts space the turn-ins to make sure they're staggered. That way all
the extinguishers wouldn't be due for a check at the same time. This keeps an
extra load off the supply system every five years. l /,
W'r-





NEGLECTED PLUGS
Dear Half-Mast,
I've noticed two plugs on the bottom of the M59 APC ramp. I've looked in
the -12 manual and I can't find any reference to it. Why are they there and do
they have any purpose?

Dear Sergeant W. R. McC., M/Sgt W. M. McC.
They're drain plugs. Or to give 'em
their official name: PLUG, PIPE: auto-
motive, sq-hd, S, cd- or zn-pltd, 3/8-
NPTF (ramp drain) (444583)-2 ea.
They're listed on page 71 of TM 9-2300-
203-20P.
These plugs must be removed at every
quarterly service to allow any water, .
which might have leaked in through the
welds, to drain out.

STAKE A NUMBER







Dear Half-Mast,
This Federal Supply Code for manufacturers puzzles a lot of guys like me,
especially when the SM 5-3 series or SB 701-501 shows a manufacturer has sev-
eral factories, divisions, or sub-divisions-and each has a different 5-digit number
assigned to it.
We need this number for our DA Forms 5-73 and 5-73a. What happens if we
use the wrong number? Is there any set rule you can follow to be sure you have
the right code?
SgtL.G.
Dear Sgt L. G.,
Know just what you mean. This 5-digit code can set you guessing. But, take a
gander at the introduction in any ENG 7 & 8. It lists the manufacturer and the
number to use. Same goes for your multi-part manuals. You'll find the code to use
in the introduction in some TM's and in the appendixes in others.
If you don't have these pubs, check the 5-digit code listed in SB 701-501 for
the manufacturer's name shown on the ID plate on your rig. If there are several
numbers for the same company, about the only thing you can do is pick the





number you figure is the right one. The Engineer Equipment Inventory Control
Point at the Enginer Maintenance Center will give your forms a double-check and
see that they have the right code.
HOW FOR YOUR HOWITZER


,,I



D0 gl HalV-1
In the bore evacuator assembly of the 105mm Howitzer M49 there are valve
gates, six of one type have two beveled edges on one side, eighteen of another
type are flat on both sides.
The TM 9-7204 calls these items valve gates, but our Ordnance support unit says
they're called leaf springs like their Ord 8 SNL C-86 says. Who's right?
Also, paragraph 268 of the TM doesn't state how the valve gate or leaf spring
FSN 1015-219-8141 should be installed. The question is this: Should the beveled
edge be installed first with the beveled edge against the tube, or should it be the
last one installed with the beveled edge facing away from the tube?
SgtE. C. L.





_- -/ Dear Sergeant E. C. L.,
The answer to your first question is-
rth TM is right in saying valve gates.
Three flat leaves and one beveled leaf
mn.ke up a valve gate.
You install FSN 1015-219-8141 last
and with the beveled edge facing away
f rom thetube. 4/wd















Dear Halt-M..Lt.
TM 10-1130 (Dec 51) mentions a kit for repairing 900 and 3000-gal collaps-
ible fuel tanks. But the TM doesn't give any nomenclature or stock number. So
tell me, hey, how can we requisition that kit or any of its components that we
need? C


Dear SFC P.R.C.,
Sarge, your woes are about over. The
kit you want is "Repair Kit, For Repair
of 900 and 3000-gal Collapsible Tanks,
"FSN 5430-542-2216. You can get it
from QM Equipment and Parts Com-
modity Center, Columbus General De-
pot, Columbus 15, Ohio.
The kit is not a stockage item and has
to be purchased on an "as required basis.
(It costs $17.50.) You gotta allow
about 150 days for delivery from the
time you submit the requisition.
Also, the components are not sup-
plied as separate items. FSN 5430-542-
2216 brings you the kit and kaboodle,
including three 2-oz bottles of activator
(methyl ethyl ketone); two 3-oz bottles
of cement, self-curing; two 12x24-in
patches, coated fabric; and three 4x6-in
sheets of No. 1 fine sandpaper.


40






A selected list of .Ii :* .:1 s.. : .


TECHNICAL MANUALS
TM 1-IH-21C-1020 Jan
TM 1-1H-37A-1034 Dec Inspect Alig
Toil Rotor Drive Shaft, Pulley and BroSk
Assembly, to the Main Gear Box Take o
Flange
TM 1-1L-19A-1021 Dec L-19A Bas
Tiner to L-19A
TM 1-BE2-5-7-4 Nov I PPorts Breakdow
Mogneto Mods SF2RW-I, FS2RW-2
TM 3-500 Nov Chem Equip Data Shee.
TM 3-1040-206-20 Nov Tank Flow
TIhrower
TM 5-2410-204-20P Dec Tractor Cote
pillar Model 0.8
TM 5-3810-207-10 Nov Crane-Shov
20-T 3/ Cu Yd Quickway Mod M200
TM 5-3810-210-12P Dec Crone Shove'
Truck Md, 3-T Cap Schield Bantam Mc
AEM-53
TM 5-3825-201-20P Dec Snow Removc
Unit, Rotary Sicard Model Bl-10
TM 5-3825-208-12P Dec Sweeper, R,.
tory 8 Ft. Spencer Modl MS-1
TM 5-3895-203-15P Dec Spreader, A.,
gregate: Towed 4dWh Pneu Tires, 8 Ft
TM 5-3895-208-10 Nov Mixer, Bitun
nous Materiol Barber-Green Mod 848
TM 5-3895-209-12P Dec Roller, Mole
ized 9-T Galion Mod 3T-9G
TM 5-4310-200-15P Dec Compressc
Reciprocating 15 CFM, 175 PSI
TM 5-4320-207-35P Dec Pump, Ce
trifugal Base 25 Ft Hd, 115 GPM, 2
Carter Mod 7M and 7MCW-2
TM 5-4610-202-20 Nov Water Purif Ur
Elec 115 V 60 Cy 600 GPH
TM 5-4940-203-12 Nov Shop Equ,
Elec Repair, Set No. 4
TM 5-6115-255-10 Dec Gen Set 3 K'
TM 9-1055-204-20P Nov Launcher, 76
MM Rocket XM 33 and Rlt, 762-MM M3,
series
TM 9-1410-250-20P/2 Dec Guide
Missile M6, Simulator, Guided MissiF-
Flight OA-1643/M (Nike.Hercules)
TM 9-1410-251-12/2 Dec Nike-Hercul .
Assembly Area Checks
TM 9-1430-250-20P/3 Dec Rod:
Course Directing Central Ant-R ccTra
Grp, Msl Tracking, OA-14B5/MPA
TM 9-1430-250-20P/5 Dec Launch
Control Grou Fid Nike-Hercules
TM 9-2330-232-25P Dec Trailer, Lo-
Bed, 3-Ton 4 Wheel, XM114EI and 5-TI
4-Wheel XM455
TM 11-530 Dec Instal Practices: Aircrc-
Elecltronic Wiring
TM 11-1550-200-12 Dec Surveilln
Drone OA-2343/USD-
TM 11-3655-200-12P Nov Hydrogen S
AN/TMQ-3
TM 11-5805-215-20P Nov Parl Toc,
for control monitor C-1151/TC
TM 11-5805-216-15P Nov Ports Toei-
for remote switching control C-1509/ -
TM 11-5805-268-12P, Nov Power Su.
ply PP-850/FCA
TM 11-5815-202-12P Nov Printer-Pr:
lector. Teletype TT-71/UG
TM 11-5820-226-15P Nov Cabinet El.
Equip CY-938/VRC, CY-938A/VRC, RaI
Elec Equip MT-1236/VRC
TM 11-5820-239-10P Nov Radio Fr .,
Transmission Line Assy CG-1013/U
TM 11-5820-341-12P Nov Radio .
AN/URC-4
TM 11-5820-357-10P Nov Receivt
Radio R-390/URR


TM FT- h&Td .2 T7P i i. -7
FM I l 8720B-3.7.2DP iI. I .-.

TM I '.* ? ri i c .
TI l. 8 T 212 70P o t ,

TM. ..47H .. I; I.....

TM I .2O- :
IM 1, ,i ; ? ,: : ,' *;1 [':. r :




TM i S.. O i 1. l



IM I 1.506 j41-.121PN. .,T : '..
10. ic: ".
TM 1;S. O2 5 20 P r, 1:,, '.:c
TM :i j -;i .

IM 62.j0 :I r : .: I: .

TM i 1-661b 29 u

!M II..fab7i. .1 F r L-,

TM 51~ 0JOTS '046

IEClHNICAL TUILEI lf
TB 9.AMM ? (i..
IB AVTI 10 L- T' li-e A 1
TB AVN 23-..12 tc. 't;i G .' i
TB CMI C'.. F a. .2 k,-,.

IB ENG 47 Lb- 7-1..,e, :" i i
...: F -,F i..-
IB 9.7200.225 .0 1.-:. i ,r ..uL
r6 I.i o I .1 ? ,: ,-,,' i r-t o,.

F1 I.
LUBPlICAlIOr ODDEPi

LO 5.10SJ I .7 .1 jd.. ,




1O 1 0 0I 0 ii :.-.



u; .11|5i~ (1 L ~ l rlif"' ":' ? .: ;l



LO S.4F10-4 ?0.0 -1 ,- C .. '. ,





1O 5-5170 lsl.

LO 9.F $50.70 I.10 + T. ,,- l jllF
10 5.10 1 T Ole '.c F >loc
LO .-FTFO :7 7T t'. f. 'F- t..









LO IO Fo-.1013 0 -1 : l i .




LO 410, 730,0 .2 0 -e F;eL I I0 ,


FO1AM5
DA CIr 310T-91 D-: rT ... .b. .1 :.
OD Form 9.11 Ore: D:.: .r., 'L4




41


DA Fu. I C i. :i .

CA m 12"' ; ""
DA .. r ,..



[.A Fr- 9. :


C ,l -, F, 1 F h I



,A ", -|, .... ,..







. : i o.,i i.?




CA L .a. IJ
0A Ft. I p








.M 2li :-




;M 5.T.;0" : j ., 4. : i



M .- 1 .:0 : i :
.M ',.F.. C O. l _- r F. .'':, ,

!.M '-.J.', 0; -Ni.; Ir ; il F I .::







im J F I .., 1'*i ': .
.M F. :,.A-I : '.,* l :-
iM .3; l Til'.A F :, i i i
i : F .


iM -i ,i ..B i. F' '
lM bAA '50-? ?






.M a.I.i 6o By ? I :. i::i ,

.. 0 B;? 1 C. Crl







:L h,
.M '...TF1 160. 1

Mn.) 0.4 145.15FF L' F








DATE DATA
0)ATE W.C'T
1r7E.. 'LL BE



IE-K TH OATE
THAT A,:.IE
WILLA? -







Sure would be a good deal if you could keep track of the time those expensive
electron tubes are used in your guided missile systems-especially since Ordnance'd
like to get its hand on that scoop. Well ... you can.
Yes sir, with the help of a grease pencil, you can tell how long your modu-
lator tubes, hydrogen thyratron tubes and magnetrons work before they fail.
All you have to do is mark down the
day, month and year when you install
the tube. The best place for info on the
maggie is right on the magnet. The best
bet with the other tubes is to put the
scoop somewhere near them. A good
spot on the Nike track radars is on the J
cover. Just write the name of the tube-
like the modulator-and the date it was
installed.
It doesn't pay to mark the glass part
of the tube-the heat might melt the
info away. And don't use the grease in
a place where there's a chance dust could
gather on the mark and lead to arcing.
Speaking about arcing ... it can also I l
happen if stray electricity follows the
path of a carbon or lead pencil mark. So
don't use pencils like that for writing
down installation dates.






NOT YOUR JOB
Hold up there.
vYOU GOT
You Nike guys can save wear and AN*.~fT-IriG BETTER
tear on some equipment and leave your- TO 00, SOLDIER.
self some time for other work if you re-
member one thing.
Don't, but don't, fool around with
the zero set switches in your computer i
- except to clean and lube 'em accord- '
ing to LO 9-5018. The switches are
Ordnance's babies-when it comes to
repairing.



NEW LEASE ON LIFE


There're people who make moun-
tains out of molehills and now they're
building 'em out of discarded 6164 TR
tubes-the ones used in Nike missile and
target track radars.


,tjt .


9i


Trouble is... a lot of the tubes are
still good. Some outfits toss 'em on the
salvage pile because they get low volt- r
age readings on the keep-alive cap-
through the 3 Megohm resistor. But
that kind of check is dead wrong.
The deal is that the reading is nor- 1
mally in the 220-250 volt range-par- _
ticularly when Sylvania tubes are used. But Microwave Associates will read
around 190 volts, which is OK for them.
So ... if your crystal diode life and transmitter recovery time are normal, it's
a safe bet that the TR tube is working right.
43













_C) "I ''* I !
S l You oughta see the way
r [hi re repairing ceilings l4
hack a. depot-what with
[the uys going through
them after they get a Nike-
Ajax missile with corro-
-ti sion around the "B" nuts.
The way it looks, some support unit guys pressure-tested the propulsion sys-
tem for leaks with GI soap and water. That's a real bad deal 'cause the soap con-
tains lye ... and lye means corrosion.
You tell the man he wants to use wetting agent for those checks. He can get a
quart from Ordnance with FSN 6850-433-4042.
And make sure he wipes dry everything after he's done testing.


DON'T SPARE THE SPARE

voI C-j 11.,IT










Then there was this here Corporal how to tell that the tires on the erector
outfit. .. and it had a sharp looking M2 were showing signs of wear.
erector. And you should seen the spare So keep checking those tires ... and
tire-it looked as new as the day it was take the time now and again to rotate
first mounted, the tires--at 2,000 miles if they're wear-
And why not? The spare had never ing unevenly, or at 6,000 miles regard-
been used. If the crew had looked less. Rotation can add 20 percent to the
through TM 9-1870-1, they'd known life of your tires.















They're not in your Nike-Ajax
battery TOE, but it might pay to keep
some gloves handy in the launching
area.


ti

m
th


That way... when the man comes sa
around to check the clearance between 7l
the tunnels and skin surface of your mis-
siles, you can hand him the gloves and to
tell him first to put 'em on before he th
checks the tunnels. The gloves'll keep at
him from making a fingernail inspec- tu
tion which is about as accurate as telling at

Body to Tunnels
Approximately station 75.7 Attachment bolt well area .094
Maximum tolerance allowed for lengthwise distance of 1.125-in
n Body to Tunnels / Forward .020
ation6 Maximum Tolerance\ Aft .030
Tunnel to tunnel I
Station 76.437 ) Longitudinal Gap .0312
[Maximum Tolerance //


Station 108.687 \Body to Tunnels
to /Maximum Toler
Station 114.687
Station 114.687 Body to Tunnels
to /Maximum Toler
Station 135.750
Body to Tunnels
Maximum Tolerance
Station 135.750 and aft .030 gap
allowed twice for each side
of any one tunnel


/
once\

/once
nnce\


me on a clock without hands.
Once his hands are covered, give the
an a thickness gage and remind him
sat you're allowed .020 (20-thou-
ndths) clearance forward of station
6.
There're some other things you ought
know. There are some exceptions to
e rules about the body to tunnel clear-
nces. And there are some tunnel-to-
innel tolerances that you have to think
bout. Here's how they shape up.


Station 76 toaximum Mis mtch .040
Maximu m nMismatch .04 0

Station 108.687 \Tunnel to Tunnel Maximum/
/Longitudinal Gp .093
L\ Tunnel to Tunnel
Station 108.687 JMaximum Mismatch .050
(Tunnel "3 Only
STunnel to Tunnel
Station 108.687 Maoximum tMismoatch .040
(Tunnels'~1, 2, 4

Station 198.593 Tunnel to Tunnel Maximum/
Longitudinal Gap \.125
Station 198.593 \ Tunnel to Tunnel
Station 198.593 it imum n isnmotc i .040






THIRD PLUG NEEDED


OK ... so you've got two plugs on the middle joint shaft housing on your
M280-series Corporal servicing platform. One's for filling the housing with oil
... the other's for draining it.
What you need is a third plug-so's you can check the oil level.
It's easy enough to put a check plug in the housing.


SFirst... into your No. 2 Common Tool Set and come up with a "i drill and a
i'-in NPT top.




Then... measure S. inches fror .
center of the drain plug up the front I.:
housing. Do this wih the platform in C e
position.


Y Mark the point that's 5S' inches frtc, .'
droin plug and run the drill th...
the housing at that point. Then make yc ..
some threads in the hole with the tap. 5




0 The deail'l he all wrapped up when you stick a -in socket head pipe plug in the hole.
You can get the plug from Ordnance under FSN 4730-044-4688.


Don't worry about chips dropping down into the housing while you're drill-
ing. Most of 'em will come out when you drain the oil. Those that're left in the
housing won't hurt anything.
You check the oil by loosening the plug. If any runs out, you're OK. If not,
fill it to the level of the plug. It's best to check monthly.






OH, MAN...THAT ONAN





Say, hey... are the guys in y our Honest John uutlit
sweating bullets 'cause they get sparking and arcing
around the rocket during AC and DC cabling?
Maybe you've got the idea that a governor foulup
will cause the Onan generator to let go with enough
current to damage your test equipment.
There's no sense to frettin' about a small-scale fire-
works or the possibility of wrecking some equipment i-..
-not when you can call a halt to that stuff by keeping -,.,-. -.--
your eyeballs peeled and making an adjustment if it's- '.
needed.


It's this easy. Before AC or DC cabl-
ing, start the generator and keep an eye
on the starting and continuing voltage
output to see if it flicks quick to more
than 40 volts before returning to 30
volts 2 volts. In case it goes beyond
the 40 volts, you want to adjust the
governor-the way it says in TB 9-
3066-1 before you use the generator.
You also want to look at the polarity
to make sure it's right before you use
the generator. When the voltmeter
needle swings to the left instead of into


'I If FLICKS PAST 40 VOLTS BEFORE
:'!JRNING TO 30 VOLTS 2 VOLTS..






/ ,

ADJUST GOVERNOR LIKE IT SAYS IN
i '?-3066-1 BEFORE USING THE GENERATOR

the meter range scale, you've got reverse
polarity. And that can be rough on your
equipment.
When you have the right voltage out-
put and polarity, stop the generator.
Connect the AC or DC cables you
need.
Start the generator.
No more sparking or arcing, right?
After your support unit applies
MWO 9-1055-209-30/2 (21 May 59),
the reverse polarity problem will be
solved for you.






YOUR M351 CORPORAL
" MISSILE CONTAINER


Then there was this here Corporal outfit that was running tests on the missile.
Things weren't working right. The crew did some checking. It turned out there
was corrosion here and there-enough to foul up things.
The crew could've let go with a swift boot in the southeast quadrant of the
missile-but they would've been dead wrong blaming the two-striper.
The real villain in this story was the WATCH HUMIDITY INDICATORS
M351 missile container. A short time '
after the outfit got the missile in its con-
tainer the humidity indicators on each
end began changing from blue to pink.
And that meant the air was getting
damp in the container. And the desic-
cant couldn't handle the moisture. That
was the time to call in the support unit.
No dice, tho. Things went on that way CO( IlANlrf
until one day the missile was taken out \AP L\01I
of the container. The test was made and
the corrosion discovered. "
S\ IIGHIfIJ
Moist air is kept out of the container /.\,, (
by air pressure that's supposed to be in nrF [
the container. The right amount of air BO's.
is 6 1 PSI. That's right-not 8 1/2
as you might've heard.
If the container refuses to hold the pressure, the container is either a bad one
or it's not sealed right. You can check the seal angle by tightening the container
cap and access doors and replacing the valve cores. If that doesn't help, you've
got a bad container. That's when you read TB 9-5038-2/3 (20 Apr 58) for the
word on spotting leaks and what to do about 'em. If you don't have the tools
and equipment to make the repairs, send the missile back to your support unit.
Something else to think about with this business of moisture whenever
you latch onto a new batch of desiccant, don't keep it if it comes your way in a
cardboard or wooden container. The stuff's gotta be protected from the air until
you use it so it ought to be sent in your direction in a sealed, metal container.





FUELISH BUSINESS


The medics had a tough one the other
day-repairing the Southern end of this
Nike-Ajax guy who'd been chewed out
by his CO.
Seems the man decided to gamble in
removing a tunnel screw whose head
had busted off when he tried to get it
out with a screwdriver. It was so tight
the head twisted right off.
Anyway ... the missile was in the
assembly building. He figured it was a


five-minute job to drill out the screw.
There was no use in moving the missile
to the fueling-defueling area and then
defueling it... that would take too
much time.
So he starts drilling. All of a sudden
-ps-s-s-t-the drill went through the
acid line. He was lucky, tho. Except for
the chewing, he's almost the same guy.
The big difference is that he'll never
again use a drill around a fueled missile.


REMEMBER:
1. Missiles containing fuel or oxidizer aren't supposed to be in the assembly and test area.
2. Drilling, cutting, soldering or any other operation that produces heat is strictly verboten
on missiles that are fueled or have explosives in 'em.



PS IS FOR Io READERS-

PASS IT ALOWIt




Meet a Newcomer
To Your Missile Sile...
f


THE DAVEY


Shake hands with the latest addition to the family of Engineer missile support
equipment-the Davey RPC-15 Rotary-Reciprocating Air Compressor. It's a
lightweight, mobile, four-stage rig that'll give you 15 CFM at 3500 PSI.
It brings along with it a couple of firsts. Unlike the other high pressure air
compressors now in use at Nike-Ajax and Hercules sites, the Davey is electrically
driven. It's rigged so it can be used on either 440- or 220-volt, 3-phase, 60-cycle
current, both of which are used at Nike sites.
50


RPC-15


The Davey RPC-15 uses a rotary is also oil-cooled and uses its own air
sliding vane for the first and second pressure to pressurize the oil for lubrica-
stages of compression which operates tion and cooling.
independent of the common recipro- Your Davey's got the important job
rating third and fourth stages. The of putting the air charge in your missile.
rotary section is real compact and main- You can do your part by taking care of
tenance on your Davey has been cut it and seeing that it's in tip-top shape to
down by eliminating valves, pistons, give out with the air.
rings, and connecting rods. This section
BEFORE OPERATION


Park the Davey on level
S ground and give it the
once-over to be sure it's
ready to run. Give the
parking brake a tug to
double-check that it's set
and it won't go rolling.
Now open all the pan-
Sels. This'll give your rig
plenty of breathing space.
Then, you open all three oil drain valves and
drain off the condensation. The two rotary
compressor drain cocks are in the back of the
compressor on the bottom of the rig under the
control panel. The reciprocating compressor
drain cock is on the left hand side of the machine
directly behind the front wheel.
You keep 'em open until all the water runs
out. When oil starts to show, close 'em.
51


,, 'r"







r






Check the oil level in both the rotary
section and the reciprocating sections.
The oil should be at overflow at the filler
plug in the rotary section and at the full
mark on the dipstick in the reciprocat-
ing section.
Now check the cooling fins on the
compressor cylinder and crankcase.
Keep 'em free of dirt and crum.
Give the cooler assemblies the eye to
make sure they're mounted real tight
and that the fins aren't bent or clogged.






-I



Under normal operating conditions
10 hours.


R./ i -


Eyeball the hourmeter and the record
of the last dehydrator cartridge change
that's listed on the instruction plate on
the control panel lid. Change the car-
tridge if the next period of operation
will go over the remaining useful life
of the cartridge.
you want to change the cartridge every


To change the cartridges, you throw away tile Then, you transfer the cartridge from
cnrtrdge in the No I (inner) holder the No. 2 (outer) holder to the No. 1 holder

Give the "0" rings a gander when you're replacing a cartridge. If they're worn
or need replacing, replace 'em along with the cartridge.
Give the entire unit the once-over for oil leaks, broken instrument glass, loose
or cracked housing, frame, axle, damaged wheels, or drawbars.
Now, connect the power cable to your power source and you're ready to put
your Davey into action.
FIRST, MAKE SURE THAT THE MOTOR IS WIRED FOR PROPER VOLTAGE AND HAS THE RIGHT ROTATION.

You can check the rotation by tapping the starter button. The rotary section
should turn counter-clockwise-like the arrows on the housing show.





STARTING




Now, yyou opee n the e

fr,. p o 11 up. -. i



S,'. Be s'







!No* you riun the Dovey 1 '?
for three to five minules to
i]ot 'er worm up.




DURING OPERATION

When your rig is running under normal operating pressures the air gages
should give you readings, like so:

07j



SECOND STAGE THIRD STAGE AIR RECEIVER (FOURTH STAGE)
185 TO 215 PSI 850 TO 915 PSI 3500 PSI

You want to check the operation of Blowdown the compressor by open-
the oil return valve to make sure that ing the drain valves one at a time. You
you have an oil and air mixture delivery do this real often-at least every half-
at all times, hour-depending on the area you're in.
Check for any unusual noises or The more humid the area the more
operation, often you have to drain.





When the pressure in the air receiver builds up to about 3000 PSI, you're
ready to take the hose out of its rack, sandbag it on the ground, open the hose
valve, and crack the service line valve. You sandbag it to make sure the end of
the hose is secure and it doesn't whip-not only does a thrashing hose pack a lot
of wallop and could cause serious injury, but it could also damage the hose valve.

SNow, let your Davey run for at least
an hour with the air draining out the
ON. E service line. It'll take that long for the
I HOair to get down to the right dew-point.
PAL You want the missile to take dry air
only. If you cap it before running the
air through the compressor for an hour,
I you'll have too much moisture in the air
-and that's bad for the missiles.


When you've run 'er for the hour or so, you open the hose bleed valve and
close the service line valve.


CHARGING THE MISSILE


To charge the missile, you connect
the hose to the missile, close the hose
bleed valve. and open the sericc \1ile
and the hose alic. m

After it's been (
charged, ou re-
verse the stc p'. You ,f
close the --rr ice
line valve on the
control panel nd
the hose valve. Then, you open the hose
bleed valve. When the hose has drained,
you disconnect the hose from the missile.

STOPPING

You blowdown the compressor by
opening and closing each drain valve in-
dividually to get rid of the condensation.


Now, you open
the fourth stage
drain valve.
Then, let the
compressor run for
three to five minutes
to cool down before
you push the stop
button. _
When the second ~
and third stage
pressure gages read
zero, you close the
fourth stage drain
valve.
If it's necessary or you want to drain
the air receiver, open the receiver drain
valve. You close it after all pressure has
been released. Go easy when you open
the receiver drain valve or the line will
freeze.






AFTER OPERATION
After you shut 'er down, disconnect the cable from the power source. Then
check the cooling fins on the compressor and cooler assemblies. See that they're
clean and free of dirt and scum.
Give the hourmeter and the dehydrator cartridge change record another look
see. Change the cartridges if it's necessary.
You also give the oil level in both sections of the compressor another check and
bring 'em up to the proper level. T ------






Before you close up shop for the day, take another look around the compressor
for oil leaks, loose, broken, or missing parts.
Now, you can close all panels and store 'er in a protected area.
LUBRICATION
Here's a rundown on the lubes your Davey takes:
TEMPERATURE RANGE
HOURS LUBRICANTS COMPONENT REMARKS
ABOVE320F 320FTO-100F 00FTO-650F
10 Rotary Comp. Fill to Overflowing
10 Reciprocating Fill to full mark
Compressor on dipstick
50 Shell Shell Shell Latches and Lightly
Tellus 72 Tellus 41 Aeroshell IAC Hinges
100 Rotary *Drain and refill.
Compressor Check level after
running five minutes.
It'll take 21/2 quarts.
100 Reciprocating *Drain and refill.
Compressor It'll take 21/2 quarts.
250 Stabilizing Plate Sparingly
250 Trunnion Sparingly
250 GAA GAA GAA Tie Rod Yoke (2) Sparingly
250 King Pin (2) Sparingly
250 Center Steering Sparingly
Arm
1000 Wheel Bearing Remove wheel, clean.
Inspect, lubricate
Of course you'll want to dig up LO 5-4310-214-20 (7 Dec 59). bearings; reassemble.
*These take 7 pints each, whenever the machine's been disassembled and all the oil's been drained
off. You'll need only 21/2 quarts for a normal oil change.






When you change oil in the rotary oil chamber, you refill it to plug level,
install the filler plug, and run your rig for about five minutes. Then you drain
the air receiver, remove the oil filler plug and add oil to the plug level.
When you change or add oil to the reciprocating crankcase, you fill it to the
dip stick level mark. DON'T OVERFILL IT.

ELECTRIC MOTOR

The Dyna-line electric motor has sealed bearings and doesn't need any lubrica-
tion-except when it's being overhauled. If you've got a rig that doesn't have a
motor with sealed bearings, then you're going to have to lube it regularly.

KEEP 'EM CLEAN

Here's the general time that your filtering and cleaning units should be changed.
Your climate and temperature may vary a little, so you'll make your changes
according.

Dehydrator: When the temperature is: Change every:
-650 Fto +700F. .............................20 hours
+ 700 F to + 1000 F............................10 hours
+1000 F to +1250 F........................... 5 hours
Mechanical Filter: Clean element in dry cleaning fluid every 50 hours. Don't use an Oil-
Base Solvent.

.cI

















CONDENSATE TRAP: Clean screen every 50 hours with a non-flammable solvent.
You also clean the screen on the filler base of oil return valve every 500 hours. It's on the top of the oil
separator.
rr~r*
*Th::"
*n~












separator.





MAINTENANCE AND SAFETY TIPS

You always open all valves and drain all the air from the compressor before you disassemble any
part of it.
You don't ever adjust the pressure switch so that the automatic unloading pressure setting is more
than 3700 PSI.
Never paint or cover the vent hole on the priority valve.
Always use a non-oil base cleaning solvent for the mechanical filter.
Always inspect the "0" rings when you replace a dehydrator cartridge or filter.
Be sure that the vent on the side of the unloader valve is always open.
When you clean the mechanical filter-every 50 hours-soak it in on approved dry cleaning fluid
for about 45 minutes, then blow it dry with compressed air.
Always allow the compressor to warm up and cool off for three minutes when starting and stopping.
When draining the air receiver, you open the drain valve slowly to prevent the drain line from
freezing up.







You may hear a noise like coffee percolating at the oil return valve on the oil
separator for several minutes after you shut down. That's OK.
Always unload the compressor during the initial pressure build up to blow
out any moisture and oil from the condensate chambers. You only want to open
one drain valve at a time because they're all connected to a common manifold.
Always, but always, release the pressure from the service line before discon-
necting it from the missile.

You don t use a wrench or tool to tighten the retaining screw on the dehydrators.
Hand tight is good enough.
Never paint the fins on the cooler assembly. It's the same as putting a coat on
em and it'll overheat in no time at all.

Another thing-pin this with para. 39a, TM
5-4310-214-10: Caution: Do not attempt to re-I
start the compressor when the air receiver gage
exceeds 3000 PSI. You release the pressure by
39--
opening the fourth-stage trap drain valve before: .
restarting. I s
Your Davey's found a home at your missile site. Treat 'er right and she'll
treat you right.
57






DON'T LOSE YOUR GRIP


Couple of boys are walking around
in the borrowed time class but good.
They survived the total destruction of
their Sioux helicopter, and when total
is said, total is meant because the wreck-
age was complete.
Comes how this busted bird? Well,
the man was doing autorotations -
power recovery autorotations. Natu-
rally, after he split his needles, he held
down hard on the collective stick to keep
up his RPM.
But unfortunately he was flying bare-
hand, and it was a hot day, so naturally
his hand was damp with perspiration.
When he started to apply power for the
recovery his hand slipped off the col-
lective stick and throttle. It only took
him a fraction of a second to regain his
grip, but that was too long-scratch
one whirly-bird.
OK, too bad, and fortunately the pilot
and the IP are all right, even if the bird
will never be the same again. Now, the
question is: What can you do to be sure


UP
this never happens to you?
Most important, perhaps, is just to
know and remember that it has hap-
pened, which proves it can happen.
Which thought should remind every-
body to be sure of his hold whenever
he's moving into close quarters, whether
with the ground, obstructions or even
other aircraft. The same goes for any of
you mechanics authorized to run up this
chopper. Be sure of your hold on that
throttle-and check to see that the pitch
stick's tied down securely.
There's a lot to be said for wearing
light leather gloves, even in warm
weather-perhaps particularly in warm
weather, when hand sweat is probable.
That's light gloves, remember. Heavy
gloves are out-you can't get the proper
feel wiil \rn.
Jus: in pm~iing. )3u 'll be hippy to
kno th.1 [her rc'thininkin abiut put-
ling idcepLr grol;ces inio rbhi[ control
h.indle ,coo.


- 4

nc-















You'd think everybody would know caught by one of the low flying main
by now that an H-13 rotor blade can rotor blades while leaving the chopper
swing low enough to strike a man walk- after shutting down. Fortunately the
ing under it. blades were turning slowly, so the one
But there's a man in hospital right that caught him didn't kill him. But it
now who was scalped by the Sioux as gave him an awful belt that really
neatly as his Granpappy got it with peeled his knob.
Custer. He forgot to duck and got Leave us keep our heads down, what?

STICK WITH IT

/Many a half-tightened nut didn't
-,-" stick around long in flight when the me-
chanic didn't stick with the job on the
'.. \ground. Switching mechanics in the
middle of a job is one of the best ways
I to set up an aircraft for an accident.
The mechanic taking over may start
his maintenance where he thinks you
left off. He might never see that half-
S tightened bolt, the missing safety wire
or the adjustment you didn't have time
to finish. When you are called off the
job you're doing, at least try to com-
S plete the particular phase of the work
iyou started.
/ -Happens you're the man doing the
S. taking over, wouldn't be a bad idea to
call over an aircraft inspector before the
/ first mechanic leaves the job. That way
there's less chance of missing something.
Of course, whenever possible, it's always a good idea to plan and schedule
your work so you won't have to switch mechanics in the middle of a job.





Webster Has a
Word for it...

CONFIGURATION

It means "... relative disposition of parts..."
And the word is well used when talking about the disposition of Signal equip-
ments in Army aircraft.
That's exactly what TB SIG 239-40 (12 Mar 59) manages to do in less than a
dozen pages, too. It lays out various configurations of Signal equipment installed
or scheduled for installation in Army aircraft now in use. No small task in itself.
Does it by type and geographical location. Not to mention the tools, test equip-
ments and Department of the Army technical literature needed to maintain the
equipment.



SI KNOW,

IT'S AMH...
SIGNAL
EQUIPMENT .











Although avionics requirements sometimes shift and configurations change,
the maintenance literature references in this TM stand pat except for the supply
manual descriptions.
Your Sig 7&8 is now "Repair Parts and Special Tools List" (RP and STL) and
carries TM numbers. For example: The AN/ARA-31. The first and second echelon
RP and STL for this equipment is TM 11-6625-221-12P and the third, fourth and
fifth echelon RP and STL for the same equipment is TM 11-6625-221-35P.
If you're an avionics maintenance man, TB SIG 239-40 is one of the most useful
guides you can get.







(OnTRIBUTIOnSAPU TUG


Dear Editor. -- .
You kno" h,,o it i, o iii the APLF' s .." .
-seen.is like ihie'rc eich.r in us... ni /
across the held or iou c.an r ;farrt m or
they're outil g.-il % is su, mcching.
To Iclk thi. handicap put a sp.ial
generating rigt on our aircrA.tc [ug
(Trairtor. v .rchouos. .! hieli \\ e goc I
a regular issue 2--volt gcntrawtr, regu-
lator and battery and mounted 'em on
the left fender of the tug. We drive the 24-volt generator by taking the double
groove pulley off it and putting it on the 6-volt generator of the tug. Then we
take the single groove pulley from the tug generator and put it on the 24-volt
generator. A short commercial fan belt runs from the spare groove on the tug
generator to the other one and powers it.


The rtegla.icr and battery are hooked
LIp n1or n .11 Th n v, ehook our aircraft
p excternal powercablce othebattery.
Now an% time n'e use the tug to haul
aCn aircraft ouit r the line, we have a
builc-in APLi to sra:rt it. Works good.
Shop Crew, 25th TAAM Co.


Fort Bragg





(Ed Note-A simple solution-but be sure you have the Old Man's permission.
Thanks for sending along the snapshots.)


. **?***
? -^ '






A FIRM STAND


Dear Editor,
Most times when you want to fly flags on tanks
you attach or tie them to the radio mast or to the
commander's cupola. This usually means loss of flags,
a haphazard way of flying the flags and obstructs the
visibility of the tank commander besides being hard
on the radio mast.
A homemade holder for the M238 flag set would
eliminate all these negative factors... for a cost of
less than a dollar and an hour's labor. Here's all
that's needed: -

B -


This flag stand is assembled and attached as shown. With this arrangement
the flag-holder can be taken out of the loops and stowed away when not needed.
SP 5 James E. Fox
Fort Knox, Ky.
(Ed Note-It's a real sharp idea-inexpensive, easy to make and adds to the safety
factor and the military appearance of the vehicle. It'll be up to local commanders,
though, to adopt it as SOP in their outfits.)


7.11






"" SNUG SHELTER






Dear Editor,
Why not cut down maintenance time
on the universal dolly at missile sites by
building a shelter over it?
Instead of storing the dolly in the
trailer, where it's hard to get at for
maintenance servicing, here's an easier
way:

S I Place the dolly on the authorized
Storage rack in the fueling area. Then
build a frame around it, using 2 x 4 and
1 x 6 scrap lumber, cover it with canvas
and paint it. Paint will draw the canvas
Sight and give you a neat protective
cover.
,.- SFC William L. Funk
Ti Bristol, Pa.


(Ed Note-It's a neat idea that would appeal to a lot of missilemen, Sarge. Hitch
is that you want to be sure you make it out of non-flammable material for use in
the fueling area. Organic materials like wood and canvas are strictly no-go. They
ignite too easy.)






FOREARM YOUR FOREFINGER


Dear Editor, k 0"-
Sounds silly, but one of the handiest maintenance items I own is an old beat-up
sewing thimble.
That thimble not only saves my fingernails and knuckles-it actually helps me
handle some real pokey service jobs.
Say you have to pull a cotter pin that's buried in a hard-to-reach spot. With a
thimble on your forefinger, you can poke in there and bend the ends so's the pin
pulls easily with your pliers. It helps put cotter pins back, too.
Gets so you reach for the thimble to poke anything too hot for the bare finger,
or to handle a touchy job like guiding cable through sheaves.
SFC J. P. Rogers
Fort Bliss, Texas
(Ed Note-Darned if you haven't got a good thing threaded up there, Sarge.
Hope your outfit doesn't needle you about it.)

SO? SO SEW IT!
Guys who use mucilage or liquid ce- -
ment to attach organizational or grade-
insignia to overcoats, field jackets, etc., .
give Uncle a big pain in the clothing *.
budget. Ruins garments. Comes now ) -'
DA Cir 670-39 (27 Aug 59) tosaythis /
type of insignia will only be attached
by sewing.

.p ss .-w= .j...


SORRY, WRONG NUMBER

S a e another gander at TM 5-4310-
207-12P on Carter centrifugal pumps,
Eli-.'\ T models 7M, 7MCW, and 7MCW-2 with
/ Carter engine, model ABN. The num-
S ber on the cover is wrong-read it TM
S 5-4320-207-12P.







BRIEFS t
BRIE F S


-- -





T7iter tow-hold
A heavy load behind that M125
10-ton truck calls for tight connections
between the truck and the tow. Any
looseness in that heavy duty pintle hook
may let the load break away. The lock-
washer and jam nut that hold the pintle
hook and rear adapter to the front
adapter have been known to work
loose. So give 'er a once-over now and
then and tighten as needed. If the pintle
lockwasher's defective, replace it.

aeuty, W frng pfits
Hold it! Your M-1 rifle could have a
faulty firing pin that'll break off at the
tip.
Which means it could get wedged in
the bok or jam up between the bolt and
the cartridge, giving you a fixed firing
pin action. Mighty dangerous.
These faulty pins have tool marks
around the tip, causing them to break.
The marks are so small it'll take a mag-
nifying glass or expert eye to spot
them-your armorer may have to get
help from your support unit tmspot them.


Nteed laucher ewashrW
It's the latest. You need those felt filters
on the main bearing of the Nike-Hercules
launcher. Launchers serial numbered
from 3685 will have them permanently
fastened to the bearing spacer. If you
have an earlier model, see your sup-
port people about getting permanent
washers for your launcher. They're FSN
5330-622-1764.
0# to the 'rigt sta t
You M48A2 medium tankers and M51
TRV drivers want to be sure you haven't
got your hand throttle more than one-
quarter open and that your engine
speed doesn't go over 2000 RPMs ...
when first starting. This heavy hand or
foot method can ruin your fan rotors.
TB 9-259 (4 Sept 59) gives the poop
on this.

iew cold weat6eA fet
Remember that those old, reliable,
publications on cold weather care of
vehicles, TM 9-2855 (Jan 51) with
changes, and TB Ord 193 have been
superseded by a later pub. It's TM 9-207
(Sept 59) and goes under the handle of
"Operation and Maintenance of Ord-
nance Materiel in Extreme Cold Weather
00 to -650 F." It's a mighty good thing
to have in the brass monkey tempera-
ture zone.





In PM -Its the little
things that count!



.''


MEAN

IT'S ONLY

A LI'L OL'


- lt


f~i~ii4b~*~C~
~i~-~~
.


I/ ~C-
I-
I