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PS
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076787/00007
 Material Information
Title: PS
Series Title: <Mar. 1987-> TB
Uniform Title: PS (United States. Dept. of the Army)
Alternate title: Preventive maintenance monthly
Alternate Title: PS, the preventive maintenance monthly
Caption title: PS magazine
Abbreviated Title: PS (Wash. D. C.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Eisner, Will
United States -- Dept. of the Army
Penny and Sol Davidson Collection
Publisher: Dept. of the Army
Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor
Place of Publication: Lexington Ky
Washington D.C
Creation Date: 1960
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Military supplies -- Maintenance and repair -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: The Preventive Maintenance Monthly is an official publication of the Army, providing information for all soldiers assigned to combat and combat duties. The magazine covers issues concerning maintenance, maintenance procedures and supply problems.
Summary: From 1951 until 1971, Will Eisner illustrated and co-wrote PS. Self-descriptive in purpose, featured a mix of illustrated articles, diagrams, and comics.
Additional Physical Form: Vols. for Dec. 1990-1991 distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: No. 61-<74> are photocopies (positive) copyrighted by Will Eisner Productions.
General Note: Imprint varies: Lexington, Ky., <Aug. 1978>-19 ; Redstone Arsenal, AL, <Sept. 1997->
General Note: Not distributed to depository libraries in a physical form, Dec. 2000-
General Note: Description based on: Issue 309 (Aug. 1978); title from cover.
General Note: Sol Davidson Collection holds issues 36, 40, 44, 49, 85-6, 89, 108, 112, 142, 148-57, 164-71, 173-4, 177, 182-4, 186-96, 198-209.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001362266
oclc - 04507968
notis - AGM3698
lccn - 61040228
issn - 0475-2953
System ID: UF00076787:00007

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2-3
        Page 4-5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10-11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20-21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58-59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Back Cover
        Page 66
Full Text


























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'i"'; \I






Got Maintenance Problems?


(TELL THE MA


You've got equipment to maintain and you've got problems ... right?
You're short on time, help, tools, parts, publications?
It looks like everything gets in the way of keeping your equipment maintained
and ready for combat?
You've tried to solve your problems, but just can't seem to make any headway?
Then, there's one man you've got to give the word to or you're not with it. Tell
him-your immediate superior, whether he's your squad, section or platoon leader,
or maybe he's your Commanding Officer.
That's right. He's the man who'll listen closest when you're stumped on getting
maintenance done.
Why? Because without good maintenance, it's his outfit and his equipment
that won't fight comes the showdown.
Also, AR 750-5 lays it right on the line ... says he's responsible for keeping his
unit's equipment combat-ready.
So, tell The Man your problems.


He con make sure you hoae enough
help (in fact, he can arrange for training
men as drivers, mechanics, armorers,
operators, parts specialists and the like.)
He can make sure that enough time is :
allowed on your unit's training schedule
or operations plan so that maintenance
can be done.
He can give that extra push when
there's a snag in getting tools, parts and
pubs.
So, there's no point in butting your
head against the wall when you're
stumped in maintenance.
Tell The Man. He'll go to bat for you
100 per cent.
1 1









SOME LIKE 'EM HOT
I7,, .A .. y
t. N khNLTE'
"LLErZ! ,

-L.-












Be it ever so humble there's no place cozier'n a home on the range... or moun- Set It Up-Next, follow your stove's TM step by step to assemble i
taintop... or snowfield, when the mercury's scraping bottom IF your tent stove's the stove sets so that it looks level to the eye.
giving out like it should. And like it will if you follow a few tried and true rules. Try It Out-Finally, give your stove a run-in test-following the
Doesn't matter what kind of stove you've got, an M1950 Yukon or an M1941 Use just enough fuel to warm it up good. After you've checked it
Tent Stove or a Herman-Nelson 250,000-BTU job or the like for big deals-or in and clean it up...so it's ready when the real time comes.
a real pinch even an M1950 cooking stove or an Immersion heater. Every last one __ _________________
of 'em needs everloving care to keep purring. KIN C
SSTOVE 1v, L'%E G< AND TOE EISI

First thing you do when you get that new or used stove is to see that all the
parts, tools and accessories are there... and in working order. In other words:
Inspect It-Check your TM's and SM"SEE N II
for the parts, tools and accessories "o ur Ag E TWE E RE %. ?
stove should have. If you find any minor 4 -
deficiencies that you can fix yourself or
have fixed in your own outfit, hop to r.
If you can't fix 'em, report 'em right l
away.


t. And be sure

TM, of course.
out, shut it off






WHEN BURNING LIQUID FUELS


1. Make sure all stovepipe...
connections are tight and
that necessary tent shields
are adjusted right.
--------- ------ -----




2. Keep the stove on the level so's the burner
assembly will spread an even flame within
the stove.



3. Protect the fuel hose so it won't be pulled
loose by accident. If need be, dig a trench
across the tent floor to hold it.

4. Turn the drip valve
lever carefully so's not
to damage the threads
when you adjust the
fuel flow. A


DO'S
1. Feed fuel in small amounts till the bed is
burning brightly.






2. Remove clinkers to prevent the grate from
being blocked.


5. Check the fuel rate
regularly. Adjust as
needed to keep a
sleady flame.


6. If the flame acciden-
ltlly goes out, close the
drip valve pronto When
the stove's cooled off,
wipe up any excess fuel
inside the stove. Then
wait 2.3 minutes before
relighting it.
---- -- - - -
7. Keep all fuel supplies outside the tent
Fuels used in combat areas will probably be
the low-temperature type that'll flow easy


WHEN BURNING SOLID


3. When you add coal, push the live coals
to the rear and put the fresh coals at the
front. This way the gases from the fresh coals'll
be burned off as they pass over the live coals.
4. Be sure to install the
spark arrester on your
M1941 when using solid
fuels This'll cut down
on stack drafts and keep
burning embers from get-
ting sucked out by the
wind.


(LIKE KEROSENE, GASOLINE, AND FUEL OIL)
DON'T'S




Let the fuel hose to ov
h. iep your mug near the door when
lighting up.


S3. Leave the stove untendedrl l I
level goes dowr! i iled '
just n e l Ir 6

hi





7.
4. Store spare cons of gasoline or other fuel li
inside the tent. ar

FUELS (COAL OR WOOD)
DON'T'S


,Olt

J'061vs






COLD WEATHER CUES
%%WEN THE %\INVC 1
1. LIKE MUP'EC ANC1 TiE
TENIPETL'OP2! CLCLEPN **OIJ
CLIPLE fl-INi %J) 5N,1












Ventilation-No matter how cold it gets outside, always be sure some fresh air
can circulate in your tent. Poisonous gases from partly-burned fuel have a nasty
habit of massing for attack on humans.
Overheating-And no matter how cold it gets, never let your
stove run full blast. Very important. Could overheat the stove-
pipe and set the tent on fire, or might warp the stove body.
Support And Protection-When the wind's a gale, you've got
to see that the draft diverter on top of the stack is well anchored.
You'll need three guy lines to do it right.


Some stoves need special care...like the M1950 one-burner,
for instance. Never fill the tank of these one-burner's more'n
3 full 'cause excess fuel under pressure will make the flame flare
up when lighted.
Another thing, in extremely cold weather y'might have to pre-
heat the one-burner twice in quick order to get it started right.
It may also be necessary to pump a few extra strokes off and on
to maintain operating pressure in the tank.
But in the mountains it'll be just the opposite. Gasoline va-
porizes faster at higher altitudes and if you pump more pressure
than's needed you might flood the burner or make the flame too
high. Could be bad all around.
You've got to shield the cooking stove from strong winds, too,
'cause high winds could put out the flame or keep it from doing
a good job.






If you're the keeper of a Herman-Nelson 250,000-BTU
tent heater, you'd best be on the lookout for a couple things
in extra-cold weather. Like for instance, ice forming in the
exhaust stack.
What happens is this: Engine exhaust gases escaping
through the economizer header, columns and collector con-
tain some moisture which tends to collect and freeze in the
stack. Also, always put a cap on top of the exhaust stack to
keep ice and snow from collecting on the arrester screen
nhen the heater is shut down.


I EE 'R APYAN SEU7


Once a week, whether you think she needs it or not, give her a real top-to-
bottom going-over.
Fix any defects you find right off-or have somebody else fix 'em. Apply medium
oil to the stove body and to all parts showing signs of rust-'specially the spark
arrester and/or the draft diverter. ., i''/il/t / \ /,
Remove the stovepipe. Take the sec- / /y, .-- -
tions apart, clean 'em good and then
put 'em together again. Make sure all/
the sections are tight. Replace any that /// /
are damaged.
With the liquid burner: Operate the
adjustment and shutoff knobs to see
that they turn properly. Inspect the float
valve to see that it's securely mounted
and properly connected and that the
controls are not damaged.
In some ways a tent stove's like a gal. Treat 'er right and she'll do right by you.
Neglect 'er and watch out.


1_


~I






Check the fuel container and fuel lines for leaks. Keep
the small holes in the burner pot free from carbon, soot
and rust by cleaning 'em with a matchstick or wooden peg.
But be careful not to enlarge the holes.
The bottom of the pot should be kept reasonably clean, "i
but don't scrape it. A thin layer of carbon protects the metal
and aids in starting a fire.
The float valve strainer-the whole valve, in fact-should
be removed from the stove and cleaned with gasoline
OUTSIDE the tent. Here's the way to do it: Disconnect
the valve from the burner and connect it to the fuel tank. '
Then lift the flow adjustment knob and let the gas flow
through the valve body. After it's all nice and clean, refill
the fuel container with clean fuel.
Here's the way to clean the burner assembly on your
Yukon stove: Close the drip valve and allow the burner
to cool. Then lift the wire loop and the retaining arms to
the side so that the burner assembly may be removed from
the stove. Next, take out one of the cotter pins holding the
burner body to the burner cap and allow the burner body
to swing down. The second cotter pin'll act as a hinge in
this deal.
Then with a knife or screwdriver scrape the carbon
deposits from the burner body and cap. And when both .-
surfaces are clean, reassemble the burner and replace it in
the stove body.

ONE LAST wVOaD OF WISDOM: A MISTAKE WITH A
LGASOLINE LE'3 LOIL FIRE ST,%'VE C-'N BE FCETTY
SSEPI2OLIS. 50 E S-.'IE TL RE-ECAD AND CIEMEMIBEO
THE SAFETY' PRECAUTIONS IN 'OUIR MANUAL
PEFOR3E TRYING TO C-ET '.)L)U STOVE CGOIN2.
THESE ARE THE PLUS TO GOT FAMILIAR
WT;:-







LIMBER 'Em UP


'2 <


One of the first things you do when you wake up is stretch, right? Gets your
blood circulating, puts you on the ball....
Same thing should be true for all kinds of vehicles and equi ment that have
hydraulic systems. Hydraulic muscles
need flexing too before going to work. '
This goes double for equipment
that's exposed to freezing weather. ,
Cold weather makes the oil sluggish,
ices up condensation in the oil lines, etc.
-all of which add up to a charley horse _
that needs loosening up before work begins. -'
Same's true for vehicles that don't get full-range exercise of their hydraulic
muscles during a regular day's work. You know, lifting just so high, booming
just so wide or tilting just so far-as a particular job calls for. And, of course, any
equipment that's been idle for a spell needs a little warm-up exercise.
No matter what kind of work your equipment's doing, make it a habit to give
it a brief workout-some setting up exercises-first time out each day.
Swing that boom, lift that fork, or tilt that mast a couple times as far as they'll
go. This'll do the trick.
And do it before you start out-not after the equipment been moved out ten
miles to the job.




























To get your diploma from the School of Sleuthhounds with a degree as specialist
in Slaving Secrets, Polarized Poop or Summa Cum Cable all you gotta do is read
and heed this primer. Credit from this school will come in handy on freezing
mornings when your vehicle's batteries are too low to turn over the engine.
Before you even get to the kee-rect method for slaving, you ought check your
vehicle's slave receptacle and the slave cable you're going to use. Here're the
A-B-C-'s on how it's done:


VS r RECEPTACLE
A few vehicles have been found with their slave receptacles wired wrong-that
is the negative wire hooked up to the positive hole in the receptacle and vice-versa.
That can lead to a wicked charge... of murder for your vehicle's electrical system.
A quick way to check out your receptacle is to use
a test lamp. With the master relay switch ON, and the
engine and Li'l Joe OFF, hook up one wire to the recep-
tacle's positive hole and ground the other wire to the
vehicle. If it lights your lamp, then you know the posi-
tive (+) hole is hot like it should be. If it doesn't light
your test lamp, the receptacle is installed wrong. To
check out the receptacle further, try the negative socket
to the ground. If this lights your lamp, that confirms .
that the receptacle is hooked up wrong.


To right the wrong:
1. Make sure the master relay switch is OFF.
2. Take out the attaching cap screws.
3. Tear down the receptacle. mn
4. Switch the leads so that the hot wire will be in the positive hole, the one
marked +.
Remember, when you do this keep the master relay switch OFF, or you'll be
working with a hot wire. A 24-volt arc can give a nasty burn.


SSLA VE CABLE o,


Before .ou leIr hat slIa'e cable from
the [ie isla'ingi ichicle snake sour
Ua) make sure the "rresi n"ihin chat
cable are not crossed. If the ires ha\e
been assembled to the arong terminal
pins %ou'll get reversed polarir -and a
deadening shock for the dead vehicle's
electrical system.


HOLE 5 HOLE


--- --- ---- ---- ---------






If it's a new cable or if you're not sure it's OK, check it out: Again, using a
test lamp, plug one end of your slave cable in the live receptacle. On the other end
of the cable, put one wire from the test lamp to the pin that will mate with the






slave receptacle's positive ( +) hole and ground the other wire to the live vehicle.
Turn the master relay switch ON. If it lights your lamp, you're set. If it doesn't
register, the lines are crossed. To get 'em straight:
1. Remove the screws in the slave cable head.
2. Disassemble the terminal and change the pins
or wires so the hot pin is positioned to mate with the UNS(REW
hot (+) receptacle hole. TWO SCREWS

PREPARATION FOR SLAVE STARTING
Now that you've checked out the slave cable and the slave receptacle you're
ready to revive your dead vehicle with a live tank.


/ I,'' ''" -



1. See that the water level in the batteries of the dead vehicle is above
the places.



That the battery cables and terminals are clean and tight.


BATTERY
On dead vehicles that have an auxiliary generator, you should always hand
start Li'l Joe and use it to charge the batteries or start the engine. When starting
the main engine with Li'l Joe, keep the master switch OFF until the engine's run-
ning. This'll keep the low batteries from putting an extra load on Li'l Joe.

There'll come a day when you may want to use a slave cable to charge the
batteries in a dead vehicle instead of starting an engine. If this be so, with both
the master relay switches OFF, get the slave cable connected. Then, start your live
12







LIVE VEHICLE SLAVE STARTING DEAD VEHICLE
R O'course the first thing you want lo do is get your vehicle close enough for the slave -
table to reach both the live and dead vehicles.

OF Turn OFF Ihe master relay switch in BOTH vehicles. Remember, in both vehicles the OF
switch must be OFF, OFF and more OFF This'll stop any arcing when you conned the
slave cable
OFF
SAfter plugging in the cable into both vehicles, turn Oh the master relay switch in
I the LIVE (slaving) vehicle and start its engine-sel il for about 1400 RPM and bring
the engine up to normal operating temperature. OFF
In the dead (slave) vehicle keep the master relay switch OFF and start the engine
in the normal way...
except the M42 Twin 40'5 In the M42 s the slave receptacle
is installed so that on outside current cannot get to Ihe starter unless the starter ON
switch is closed .. so when slaving this vehicle turn ON the master relay switch. )ON
But turn it OFF much pronto as soon as the engine starts and keep il off until the
cable is disconnected.
OFF

Why be so careful? You don't want any current flowing through your cables
when you're making or breaking connections-otherwise you'll damage the con-
nections by arcing. And to avoid any danger of fouling up the two vehicles' elec-
trical circuits by having two generators charging without any paralleling circuit.


So, when you have your slave tank running, turn off the engine and master relay
switch in the slaving vehicle. Then, remove the slave cable from both tanks as
quickly as possible.

Now at long lost you can turn on the master relay switch in the slaved vehicle so' ,.
the generator can start charging the batteries and bring 'em up to par. O

CHARGING
vehicle and turn the master relay switch ON in the dead vehicle. This'll put the
low batteries into your live vehicles charging circuit.
If you don't have another vehicle of the same size-let's say all that's available
is a Jeep to start a tank-don't try to start the big tank engine with a cable from
the Jeep. You can see why-the Jeep doesn't have the battery capacity for the
work. But you can charge the tank's batteries by hooking in the Jeep and running
it at a fast idle for some 60 minutes. Natch, this is only used when tactical situa-
tion calls for emergency measures.






MOREM POWER TO YOU
There's one more situation where you might want to use a slave cable. This
is to supply current to run the electrical accessories in a vehicle which has no
battery. There's no point here in turning on the master relay switch-except in
the M42-'cause with no battery in the vehicle the positive cable may be lying in
such a position that it can cause a flashing short.

MASS P,'RNODPUCTION SLAVING





In places where vehicles are stored and batteryless-like National Guard or
Reserve units-it's easier to start up engines and exercise them by using the
slave cable from another truck or from an extra set of batteries transported on
a cart or truck. This eliminates the extra work of installing the vehicle's own
batteries. Here again, always use a set of batteries that are at least similar to
the batteries in the vehicle you're going to start.
When using the batteries from a slaving vehicle don't forget to shut OFF the
live truck's engine when the dead vehicle is able to run on its own-that is, if
you keep the slave cable hooked up. You don't want two generating systems
trying to charge the same batteries without a paralleling circuit.


IN ALL- CASE FOLLOW TO THE
LE.-rE r WHAT IT SAYS 15 Jg

TB O/07n

4 O,:,l. ..un-" "-20OSEPT' 56


COLD WEATHER SLAVE KIT
For you men stationed in long underwear country there s o cold-starting
aid kit (slave kit) M40, FSN 2540-570-1354, to help you out with your
starting problems.
This slave kit is a magic box thai has an auxiliary source of electrical energy
to start engines in temperatures as low as -70' F. In an emergency. the
slave kit can be used to charge a vehicle's batteries with or without the
slave receptacle. For the full dope you ought look up IB Ord 390 118 lul
52) including changee 1 (20 Jan 54). To find out if your outfit rates on M40
slave kit, take a gander ot SB 9-16 (21 Oct 54).







Soanie Rodd'
"SHORT 'N SWEET DEPT"


Here's a rope trick that helps beat the fire hazard of having left-over gasoline in
the tanks of engines, stoves, lanterns and the like that're in storage in your unit.
Take a piece of clean V2-in cotton rope (never hemp or material like that) and
drop it into the tank so that it reaches bottom and contacts the remaining fuel.
Make a knot in the rope at the filler neck (or other opening) to anchor it so it'll
stick out.
The rope'll make like a wick and help the fuel out of the tank into the open
where it'll evaporate fast. Be sure you have plenty ventilation.
It's a good way to get rid of the problems of fumes and flames, which could be
real dangerous. And it sure throws the scent off the inspectors too.



Still straining oil in your Jeep engines
with the Cuno-type filter? They're the
ones that came with your M38's and
early M38Al's.
If your quarter-ton's still wearing
this original equipment, you need to
twist her top several times for each day's
operation to keep that glop outa the oil.
Four or five complete turns a day... not jui one like a lot a people ha' e been doing.
You'll find the poop on this in Change 3 (18 Jun 58) to TM 9-8012 for the
M38. If you don't see it in TM 9-8014 for the M38A1, it's because most of the
M38Al's have another type of filter ... the military cartridge. It's got no handle
at the top to be twisted.
The military cartridge is the preferred item for filtering oil, but as long as
Cunos are serviceable, they're to be used until the stock's depleted.
15















"MMaW On the other hand, the military cartridge type
If your Cuno's nm cleaning the oil, it may need can be renewed just by slipping in a new filter
a new head. element.

Lay a sharp eye on the FSN's in the Ord 7, though, when you're ordering new
parts for these filters. Don't let the word "cartridge" throw you.
With Filter, oil, assy (Cuno) -FSN 2940-737-5060-your filtering unit is Head,
w/cartridge, assy-FSN 2940-737-5058.
With Filter, oil, assy (cartridge type) -FSN 2940-202-96 5 3-your filteringunit
is Element, oil filter, w/gasket-FSN 2940-141-9025.
Like oil and water, these units don't mix. And if you change over to the military
cartridge type filter, you'll need to take it up with your Ordnance support, 'cause
you're gonna need different brackets to hold this new-type filter.

Spfead 'em out
Some M55 SPH outfits been having trouble with ammo hoist hooks that won't
fit around the projectiles. If you're in this spot, don't pull out your hair-grab
your Jeep's hand jack for a spreader. .


But crank that jack handle slow and easy. Your hooks are made of low grade
carbon steel that won't take kindly to any welds made necessary by careless hands.
Besides, most of the hooks giving you this trouble probably won't have to be spread
more than 1/6 inch. You can leave the hooks right in place for this job.
16















Seems like the rear hull platform of the M44 SP howitzer and the ramps of the
M59 APC and M84 SP mortar can get mighty slippery at times. Especially when
the regular coat of non-skid paint gets worn and then is coated with mud, water
or gook.
Here's something that'll solve this safety problem right quick. It's called Enamel
walkway compound, non-slip, rough O.D., MIL-F-18176A. FSN 5610-171-4055
gets you a 1-gal can from the Engineers.
This paint will take about four hours to dry tack-free and should reach its full
hardness in about 24 hours at a temperature of 700 F. You can spray, brush or
trowel it on.


Aid 'eM 40a












Whenever it comes to parking your M131A2, 5000-gal semi-trailer gas tankers,
there's something you should do before you drop it from your tractor.
The two pads that go under your landing legs should be taken out of their
stalls and placed under those legs. This is so the legs'll rest on a good solid base-
'specially on soft or uneven ground.
There's another job, not so easily noticed, that those pads do for you when you
place 'em under the legs. Water can collect on the top of your tankers, along the
catwalk dam wall-the pads'll help raise the front end of the tanker and let a lot
of the water run out the drain hole at the rear.
You want to get in the habit of using the pads and they'll be a big help keeping'
that tanker in shape.







ouAt tlAChere?


Maintenance allocation charts are now coming out almost as fast as sausages
out of a meatgrinder. This is something you want to be on the lookout for-
'cause these charts give you something to sink your teeth in as to what you're
responsible for on your vehicle... and who does the other maintenance jobs.
So take a gander and see if these additions apply to you:

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION CHARTS
M52 105-mm
SP howitzer TM 9-7204 'Change 1 (29 Dec 58)
M53 155 mm
SP gun TM 9-7212,'Change 2 (29 Dec 58)
M42 twin 40s TM 9-7218, Change 1 (l Jan 59)
M44 155-mm
S SP howitzer M 9-7004 'Change 1 (29 Dec 58)
------------------------------------------


Before yanking that top-deck cover offa your M48-series medium tank with the
M62 wrecker's crane ... better make sure you take out all the hold-down bolts.
Some of your buddies are forgettin' to pull out the four front bolts at the turret
line-two on the left and two on the right. They're easy to forget... 'cause you
can'tsee these bolts without looking for them. If these bolts aren't out, they'll shear
when the cover's lifted.






You ought add a special check on the
M48A2's ... because some vehicles in
this series have Li'l Joe mufflers attached
to the underside of the top deck. It's just -
as much a goof move lifting the top-deck LOOSEN CLAMPS, AND REMOVE
cover without loosening the auxiliary MUFFLER BEFORE LIFTING DECK.
muffler clamps. The result is a messed-up muffler. But if your vehicle's got its
auxiliary engine muffler attached to the fender you've got nothing to worry about
on this score.


W7enM i4CeW pao d Ue

That's the time to get rid of them. Yessir! If your track tension idler wheel
assembly kaputs on any of your M48-series tanks-check MWO 9-2300-202-20
(5 dec 58).








It tells you to remove the assembly and close up the openings with two covers
... FSN 2530-039-9534. But if you have trouble getting the covers-or run into
a lot of tanks with idler trouble-here's a fix you might want to try between now
and rebuild time:
1. Cover the area around the idler assembly with asbestos.
2. Cut the idler arm off with your acetylene torch, leaving the arm support in
place.
3. Grind down the sharp edge left by the torch, then paint over.

EPEMEMOERIE TLO RIME -AN PNNT ,T AFTEC2 N.IN-.







Comes rebuild time, those people can remove the remainder of the arm and its
support-then close up the openings with those covers.
19





















Your crane-shovel units-crawler or truck-mounted-can be pretty handy rigs
for any outfit to have around. With a wide assortment of attachments, they're
the answer to a lot of your construction problems.
Regardless of the make or model, all your crane units have a lot in common.
Given the right PM, they'll help you handle most of your earthmoving projects
with no sweat.
CAB-Loose, missing assembly ;
nuts or bolts. (This could be major.) .'.. G ENEF
Bent, cracked frame members. If ...
higher echelon has deferred main
tenance and said it's safe to oper- ( .'-
ate, then it's not a deficiency
Windows broken, missing. Doors .
or panels missing; don't open, .
close or fasten. _. .I


-----^- W^i-i

You can keep your rigs in top shape and, at the same time, make 'em gigproof
if you take care of each deficiency as it crops up.
Take your Garwood as a f'rinstance-here's what you want to look for on your
M20A(F) or your M20B. Generally you can use this guide for any crane-shovel
for that matter.
Your major deficiencies are in heavy type. They're the ones that could make
your unit unsafe to operate...cause extra ~car or lead to a breakdown n.


MACHINERY DECK-Oily, excess
dirt, Cluttered with containers,


LEAKS-look for source of grease,

I *ery deck.

Ao o o


LIGHTS (Floodlights, Marker Lights,
Dome Lights)-Lenses dirty, bro-
ken, missing. Reflectors discolored.

Wires-broken, loose, badly
frayed. Lamps loose, burnt out.
Mounting loose.


SEAT-Mount cracked,
Bolt missing.


FRAME, GUARD, OUTRIGGERS-
Bent, cracked, broken. Outrigger
pedestals mounted loosely. Screw
jack not protected, bent, damaged
muddy, dirty, rusty. Pin missing
from jack screw cover.


ID, INSTRUCTION PLATES-Miss-
ing, not readable, loose WU ,






TOOL BOX-Rusty. Lid doesn'
close, fasten or open.

TOOLS, EQUIPMENT-Unservice
able, missing. Nol properly stowed
Here're the tools you rate for thi
M20A(F) or M20B:


FSN


5120-224-1372
5120-224-1390

4930-260-2801
5120-243-2963
5120-293-0887

4930-169-8275
5120-293-1408
5120-223-7397
5120-277-9491
5120-293-1322
5120-264-3796
5120-317-8178


COMMON TOOL!
TECH SERVICE


I I


QM
QM

QM
QM
QM

QM
QM
QM
QM
QM
QM
QM


CASE, OPERATIONS & MAINTE-
NANCE PUBS-Missing. Ripped.



S
NOMENCLATURE


Bar, Pinch: 26-in
Crow bar: 59-61-in
(Effective 1 Oct 59)
Grease Gun, Hand
Hammer, Hand, Mach, Ball Peen
Hammer, Hand Blacksmith, Sledge
(Effective 1 Oct 59)
Oiler, Hand
Punch, Drive Pin
Pliers, Slip Joint
Screwdriver, Flat Tip
Wrench, Box
Wrench, Open End, Adjustable
Wrench Set, Socket Head


SPECIAL TOOLS
FSN TECH SERVICE NOMENCLATURE
5120-595-9001 QM Wrench, Open End, Fixed,
1/4-in Opng
5120-293-1352 QM Wrench, Open End, Fixed,
7/-in Opng
FSN Not Assigned Eng Wrench, Open End, Fixed,
Req Under 80226-11919 212-in Opng
FSN Not Assigned Eng Wrench, Open End, Fixed,
Req Under 80226-11918 3 /32-in Opng

PUBLICATIONS-Missing, unserviceable. Here's what you should have:
I- --------------- L---- --
TM 5-3810-203-10 Operator's Manual
MODIFICATION, GARWOOD M20 TM 5-3810-203-20 Orgonizational Maintenance Manual
CRANE- MWO 5-3810-203-35'1 TM 5-3810-203-20P Organizational Repair Parts
(1 Oct 58). MWO 5-9488-5, 27 LO 5-3810-203-20-1
Aug57.MW05.9488-6.10Nov58. 5-3810-203-20-2 DA Lubcatin Order
LO 5-3810-203-20-3
I LO 5-3810-203-20-4
i ,







INSTRUMENT PANEL


TEMPERATURE GAGE-Glass bro-
ken, missing. Needle broken,
missing. Registers low or fails to
register. Registers above 200'f.
(Operating temperature should be
.. between 160F and 1900F.)

INSTRUMENT PANEL LIGHTS-
Reflectors missing. Bulbs burnt out,
missing. Wires broken, loose,
frayed.

HOURMETER-Glass broken, miss-
ing. Needle broken, missing. Fails
to register minutes and hours when ,
engine is operating.

STARTER BUTTON-Broken, -
loose connections, mounting. .
IGNITION SWITCH-Loose connec-
tions. Broken.

TACHOMETER-Glass broken, "i'. J
missing. Needle broken, missing.
Fails to operate when engine is
running. (Should show 1,725 RPM
with no load; and 1,600 RPM with
full load )


OIL PRESSURE GAGE-Glass bro-
ken, missing. Needle broken,
missing. Fails to register. Reg-
sters below normal high. (Should
read about 40 PSI operating speeds
-can be as low as 15 PSI at idle.),

AMMETER-Glass broken, missing.
Needle broken, missing. Fails
S Ato register. Needle shows dis-
S -Scharge when engine operating.
(Ammeter should show 2-3 amp
charge with engine running. Can
how high charge temporarily right
after starting.)


LIGHT SWITCHES-Broken, loose.
SConnections loose.


TROUBLE LIGHT OUTLET-Connec
S tions loose. Cover missing, dirty.



HORN BUTTON-Broken, loose.
Connections loose.

ROLS \ I /
LEVERS, PEDALS, LINKAGE-
Loosely mounted. Not lubed. Pins,
bushings, bearings worn; out of
adjustment. Locks fail to hold.
Linkage excessively bent.
Keepers, cotter pins, bolts,
loose or missing.
HAND THROTTLE-Bent linkage.
Loose, missing nuts and bolts.
S Fails to stay in pre-set position.
VING LOCK-Pins, springs, link-
e worn. Excessive play.
23


i
J







CHOKE-Fails to stay in pre-set
position. Connections loose, bent


45,g


PRIMER-Foils to operate. Loosely
mounted.


DRIVE SYSTEM
I' MASTER CLUTCH-Grabs, chat-
S ters while being engaged. Slips
l/J when fully engaged. Hard to
engage, disengage. Drags when
V/ being disengaged.


OPERATING CLUTCHES-(Swing,
Crowd, Hoist)-Oil, grease on BEA
lining. Bands, lining worn. Ful- caps
crum arms, pins, links, anchors loos
worn, out of alinement. agei


JAW-PIN CLUTCH-Exc
worn, not properly adji
not engage, disengage.


RINGS, SHAFTS-Bearing
, retainer bolts missing or
e. Excessively worn, dam-
d bearings. Shafts out of


Sline,

essively / OPERATING BRAKES-Lining ex-
usted, will f cessively worn. (Rivets contact
Sdrums.) Lining oil-soaked. Springs,
bolts, pins, locks loose, worn or
missing.


GEARS, PINIONS-Worn, dam-
aged. Unusual gear noises dur-
ing operation.
DRUMS, SHEAVES-Excessively
worn. Not lubed. Cracks, breaks.
Broken flanges. Loose, missing
bolts.


f







fraying, excessive wear. Not
lubed. Crossed on operating drums.


GEAR HOUSING CASES-Seals,
r' I ) ,' bearings, gaskets worn, leak.
Loose assembly bolls.


RIGHT ANGLE DRIVE, GEAR
HOUSING Leaks. Breather
clogged. Case, seals leak Lubri-
cant below level. Mounted
loosely.
DRIVESHAFT,UNIVERSALJOINTS
-Damaged propeller shaft. Shaft
out of line. Missing, loose bolts.
Worn bearings.
L- -----------------.------------------


.FUEL TANK GAGE-Glass missing
ibroken.Needle missing, broken
ils .o register.

'FkEL TANK--eaks. Filler cap
oi se, dirty. Plugged vent. Dirt,
crum around filler hole. Tank
mounting bobls loose or miss-
ing. Drain plug seized.


FUEL TANK








i FUEL LINE-Leaks. Connec
i loose. Lines clogged.


tions


ELECTRICAL ITEMS
BATTERIES Cracked, leaky HORN SIREN Loose mounting,
cases. loose. corroded posts, connections. Cracked, bent, rusty.
straps, holddowns Dirt. corrosion
on top of battery Loose, corroded,
damaged terminals, cables. lec-
trolyte level low. (Should be '14-in
above plates.) Specific gravity low.
(Should be 1.225 temperature cor -
rected.l Filler caps loose, miss-
ing. Vent holes clogged







ENGINE (Left Side)-I


HOSES, CLAMPS-Leak. Spongy, MA(
swelled (when engine is running). dirty
Clamps missing, broken. Brec
wror
FAN-Guard, shroud loose, bent. to 0.
Mounting bolts missing, loose. remc
Blades bent. bind
RADIATOR-Leaks. Air passages
clogged. Loose mounting bolts.
Coolant below proper level.
(Should be al, or near, overflow
with engine at operating temper-
ature.) Coolant dirty, rusty, oily.
Not enough anti-freeze (if re-
quired). Drain plug seized. Guard
missing, loose. Coolant forced out
overflow pipe (By leaking head
gasket.)

THERMOSTAT-Defecive. Oper-
iting temperature too low, too
high. See Remarks.

GENERATOR REGULATOR-
Start mounting loose. Wire con-
nections loose.

GENERATOR-Loose mounting.
Commutators, brushes worn, loose,
dirty, oily.
FAN BELTS, PULLEYS- Belts ex-
cessively worn, cracked, frayed,
glazed. Fan belts too loose, too
tight. (Belts should have a dellec-
tion of one-inch from normal posi-
tion at a point midway between the
pulleys.) Pulleys cracked, chipped;
out of alinement; loosely mounted.

BREATHERS-Leaks. Rusty, dirty.
Missing.
WATER PUI
tions leak. L


GNETO-Rotor cap, distributor
, corroded. Air vents clogged.
iker points pitted, gapped
g. (Point gap should be 0.014
018 in oa full separation. (See
rks). Brush damaged, worn,

CRANKCASE-Leaks: if '
low. (Level should be at full mark' '"
on dipstick.) Oil dirty, contam- -
inated. ia
m OIL FILTERS, OIL COOLERS, LINES I
Leaks. Loose connections.
Dirty, clogged.


/ OIL PUMP, PRESSURE RELIEF
VALVE, LINES-Screen clogged.
MP-Pump, connec- Loose mounting, connections.
.oose mounting. Leaks.





r -ENGI-NE R-ht -Sie) --
ENGINE (Right Side) i


GOVERNOR, LINKAGE-Engine
surges at top speed without
loading. Mounting bolts loose,
missing. Linkage not lubed, bent,
binds.
\


AIR CLEANER-Loose, leaks. Dirty.
Oil level low. (Should be at apex
of disk.) Screen clogged. Gaskets.
seals worn.


CARBURETOR, LINKAGE-Mount-
ing, assembly bolts, screws miss
ing, loose. Linkage bent, worn.
Leaks. Connections loose.


SPARK PLUGS Dirty, loose,
crocked. Pitted contacts. Wrong
gap. (Should be 0.025 to 0.030-in).

S MUFFLER, TAIL PIPE-Loose, worn,
cracked, holes. Screen loose or
Missing.


FUEL PUMP, HOUSING-Leaks. .'
Mounting assembly screws, loose,
missing. Water, dirt in sediment
bowl. Screen dirty. Gasket worn,
cracked.





FUEL FILTERS-Leaks. Dirt, sludge, -
water in sediment bowl. Screen : i .
dirty. Gasket worn, cracked. -
Chipped, cracked glass.







STARTING MOTOR -Loose VALVES-Excessive chatter. Loss
mounting bolts, Wiring loose, of power. Valve cover gasket CYLINDER HEAD, MANIFOLDS,
excessively frayed. Commuta- cracked worn. Cover fits loosely GASKETS-Leaks. Loose, missing
tors, brushes dirty, worn, loose. Locknuts missing, loose. Vent tubes mounting bolts, nuts. Gasket worn,
dosed, cracked.






ATTACHMENTS
BOOM ASSEMBLIES (SHOVEL,CRANE, BACKHOE) Cracks,
Breaks,lust. Loose, missing bolts, rivets. Sheaves worn, broken
flange. Bent members. Bushings, pins loose, missing. Foot pins ex-
cessively worn. Damaged bumper blocks.
DIPPER, DRAGLINE, BACKHOE, -Excessivewe
CLAMSHELL BUCKETS Crocks,Dipper stick bin
breaks. Sheaves worn, broken Dir sk
flanges. Loose,missing bolts,lock. i- ets worn, loos
Excessively worn dipper door /- STICKS AND Rr
latch, hinge, pins, bushings, re- AND BAHOE
trainers, bearings, and dragline son dipper han
bucket chains. stop PE
DRUMS, SHEAVES, CABLES lively worn, br
Bearings, bushings excessively Unevenly born
worn. Shafts worn, bent. Cables keep inse rt
worn, kinked, rusted, nol lubed,
strands broken. Loose, missing S FAIRLEAD-Lo
drum logging mounting bolts. ing bolts. E
Broken flanges on sheaves. ;M/ sheaves, roll


TAGLINE-Reel not lubed. Loosely
,,W ~ounled. Worn seal. Leaks, oil low
in tubes. Foirlead sheaves bent,
frozen so that they don't turn.

CROWD ASSEMBLY -
Crowd chains, sprockets
excessively worn. Chain
too loose,too tight Crowd
cables, worn, flat spots,
kinks, frayed, broken
i strands.


guide plates.


,SADDLE BLOCKS
aron wear plates.
Is. Gears, sprock-
e.
BACKING (SHOVEL
)- Cracks, breaks
dle.Worn, broken

, BUCKET)-Exces-
oken, loose teeth
teeth. Worn lorth-

lose, missing mount-
xcessively worn
ers, pins, bushings,


GANTRY-.Cracks,breaks. Loose,
worn mounting bolts. Worn
sheaves, cables, pins, locks.
PILE DRIVER HAMMER, LEADS,
GUIDES-Loose, missing mounting
and assembly bolts and nuts.
Guides bent, loosely mounted.
Worn, bent leads. Cracks in
weld.


SWING ASSEMBLY-Jaw
clutches, rollers, bear-
ings worn. Loose, miss-
ing mounting bolls on
roller. Rollerpath dirty,
not lubed. Swing gear,
pinion excessively
worn, damaged.


MACHINERY
FRAME, BASE -
Cracks, breaks,
loose mounting
and assembly
bolts, pins, locks.


CENTER PIN (GUDGEON) Excessively worn.
Bushing adjustment nut and lock loosely mounted.
















nce upon a htne, on a post way back in il'e booiJlock, ibire i.,, a Sergeant
named Ebenezer Scrooge (man, dig iali ca:-) ianIll ."J~V' ilis square, a
real L-,was so beat he did not dig no maintenance jazz, especially around
Christmas when this thing takes place.

LET'S NOT SLUFF OFF yS ND KEEP AWAY
RATCHIET...Y'GOT 28 SECONDS FROM THAT STOVE
BEFORE Y'R 3 DAY PASS BECOME GOT INSPECTION
EFFECTIVE... I WANT THEM AY AFTER TOMORROW
EYEWASH CHARTS AND DON'T WANT
FINIISHED. 8 ANY ASHES MESSING'


AND FORET THOSE)BUT SA E, IFBWE AM, I'M NOT TERRY CHSTM
NEW DOZERS... I ONLY HAD SOME SPENDING
WANT THE BUTT TIME FOR MAN HOURS SAR6E...
CANS REPAINTED. MAINTENANCEWE R SUC DANG BA,
GET THOSE DOZERS F SUCH DM16 BAHD
E D OZERS FRIVOLITIES
OFF DEADLINE. OKAY, YANM
KNOCK OFF
NOW!'


~~Bur






B iii >id so .R.iclbt .os to li,: ho.i on it le po'-i u ihere It, unle .aid Ihuhl loy
'JTm Ji ii f wbIo bl .ied bis Ita ii a fL r til fl.ic aaliil u'.wr io Iar, a l.te





Inu l at1 Ebenezer Scrooge loolAe back io Iii pai d Ii le barrack I ei'in ihoiijl.
b he had an invite from his nephew, tobo is a l',lrraiI OfJi':.
S/~IWE GOT THE CLEANEST COMPANY AREA
CHRISTMAS, AH!, IN THE WHOLE DANG CORPS. I AIN'T WASTING
UlR,,a ,. -ITT L NO TIME ON THAT MAINTENANCE KICK...
rHUMA uO.. LOOKIT WHY BUY PARTS WHEN I CAN GET PAINT?
T-hE.M MAN. EATIN ...LEMME SEE NOW, MAYBE I CAN
OZERS. I~~FIGURE HOW TO GET THEM CATS ROLLING...


THE OL' MAN HOLLERED ABOUT THESE M-A-I-N-T-E-N-A-N-C-E
DEADLINE REPORTS. BUT IT'S SPIT 'N' INDEED..(HIEH, HEH) I'VE
POLISH THAT COUNTS. LET'S SEE... GOT THE BIGGEST HOARD
I'LL PUT THE MOTOR SERGEANT IN OF OD PAINT IN THE ARMY.
CHARGE OF THIS PARADE GROUND HI-EH, HEH.
SWEEPING DETAIL.



yj E


riier d d fl Iof f ie riiini' Iahl&I vir hli4 dcsk atid 4,ick d in 51?iir1ii
Fr.,lionillI oi cr fIIe iiZr J ol 1I1- Coiimpaa Atalif ,11 ''i 1,:iii H lobb-, p pora
n..ppmon ai-c






yva qIdI oI wind
IT'S ME, EBENEZER,
ME-OL' JAKE MARLEY
YOUR OL' BUDDY...
REMEMBER WE JOINED


WHO e S awakene b

WHO'S TIATIS


5,

3


BUT WE WERE IN NO
SHAPE TO MOVE 'CAUSE,
- THEM DOZER1 WERE
SDEADLNED...


..


AND DO YOU KNOW WHY...BECAUSE W KNOW THE REST!
WEEKS BEFORE YOU GIVE US A ~...THE REDS BRACKETED
"WRITE-MORE-LETTERS-HOME" THE AREA AND WE WA
LECTURE WHEN WE WANTED TO CREAMED... MAN, SURE
PULL MArfNTENANCE.BUT YOU WOLILDA LIKED NUTHItJ'
SAID IT WAS JUST A WASTE O' BETTER THAN WORKING
TIME. IF WE COULD HAD REAL DOZERS FOR A
MAINTENANCE 'STEAD OF SPIT CI-IISTMAS
'N' WIRE ... THEY'D HAVE PRESENT! .
BEEN IN SHAPE TO PLOW .-A L k &al


1


UPW IN E WASOIL FUP IN
OF TEXAS AND ROSE IN NL
THE RANKS...UNTIL,
"MOAN KOREA..',



CLANK LUN .

...BUT THEN TI4E
YES SOB REMERE RED ATILLERY
HOW WE WAS UP IN WHOMPED AN
THEM MOUNTAINS WHEN AVALANCHE DOWN
THE OUTFIT WUS TOLD ON THE ONLY PASS
TO SADDLE ULIP AND PULI DOWN THE MOUNTAIN
SBACKT...THE ENEMY WUS SIDE...THEYCALLED
BREAKING' THRU LIKE MY DOZER TEAM IN.
GREASE IN A WET
PAPER RAG..










With just twentq-four hours each day,

You've got to make PM time pay,

Tho' that eqe-wash is fine,

It won't help on the line

If yLour maintenance is frittered awaq!





With


kI TWINK A
WEVLL CLEAN
I-r l iD9 7
,i== nocrT


'.7,

i.


.1 V.r


t~ li R
.,-

*;*~'
;"'










AM THE GHOST
OF CHRISTMAS PAST.
?EMEMBEI THE NEW TYPE
ENERATORS YOU DREW
.AST YEAR. ALL THEY
NEEDED WAS SOME
,- SPECIAL OIL.


E..YWANT ME TO TOC A BUT, SARGE.
SPECIAL OIL?. BAH! A FRIVOLITY... ALL WE GOTTA DO NUM U
WHY, I BEEN IN THE SERVICE FOR IS GET A 154G BACK ITAIN'T NECESSARY
'V.TWENTY-FIVE YEARS...AIN'T NO TO SUPPORT...TI-EY'LL AND THAT'S THAT!
PIECE OF EQUIPMENT IS MADE GET THE OIL FOR US...
THAT DELICATE!








REMEMBER??
REPAIRS BAN RE m6AE? I AM THE GHOST
BUT SARGE WE'LL WORYO CH T
HO ABOUT ABOUT THAT PESET
REPAIRS? WHEN" WE
COME 70 IT.P!





T...WAIT A MINUTES.'/
Y'CAN'T REAM ME ON
TITHOSE GENERATORS
'CAUSE I ALREADY
GOT THE OIL NOW...
AFTER TWO OF
'EM AHEMM) BURNED'
UP. HEH, HEW.


WITHOUT SCHEDULED TIME
FOR IT YOU'LL HAVE NO
WAY OF PERFORMING
PROPER MAINTENJANCE...


LOOK, SCROOGE, THERE'S A
BIG FLAP.. THE COMMERCIAL
POWER HAS BEEN KNOCKED
OUT... THEY'RE CALLING FOR
YOUR GENERATORS...
WHERE'S
wiiMY CREW...


OUJT.. WHAT ARE
YOU GOING TO DO
WITH THAT OIL,
L DAD.


I'LL SHOW YOU... I
AM THE GHOST
OF CHRISTMAS
FUTURE... COME
ITH ME AND SEE YOUR-
ELF AS YO WiLL .


THEY'RE BUSY TRYING TO MAKE
REPAIRS THEY SHOULD'VE BEEN
1 MAKING WHILE YOU HAP THEM
HOSING 'EM DOWN.


- r ~ cf


1 7






TACTICAL CAPABILITY TAKES
GOOD MAINTENANCE, SCROOGE.
SEYEWASH JUST WON'T
CUT IT..


i es -A k- .a.r6 r

Ratchet's pad.



On the way be leans out and hollers to a motor park guard (who is just being
relieved) to run down to the motor sergeant and get the biggest 7M he.can find.









S hen 01 Scrooge calls for order (this shakes Ratchet a hi on account the Sarge
really raised his voice) and says, like we mean,

AS A NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTION, AND LOOK, 8BOB, ...BLESS
RATCHET, I'M ORDERING ALL DEAR, UNDER US ALL,
THE PARTS AND PUBS YOU THE TREE...A CAN EVERY
NEED..; AND EFFECTIVE OF(CHOKE)GAA AND ONE...
0800 TOMORROW WE'LL AN ORDER FOR NEW
START MAINTAINING FOR TOOLS.
REAL... NO MORE KIDDING'
OURSELVES... AND OTHERS. S
^_, .--- ^ a^ ^_3.B


)L -- I '--l -
4M%(
















FELT FILLERS FALLING?
Dear Half-Mast,
You know those felt fillers on the main bearing of the Nike-Hercules launcher?
Well after launchers were out in the weather for awhile, the fillers rotted away
and dropped out. How do we get new ones?
Sgt R.O.R.
Dear Sergeant R.O.R.,
You don't.
Those fillers were put on the bearings by the manufacturer for shipping pur-
poses. Makes no never-mind whether they fall out or you take 'em off.



TUBE TEARS


N-- P TL'-E-



Dear Half-Mast,
Para 64 of TM 9-1870-1 says all inner tubes with injuries longer than % inch
must be sent to higher echelon for repair. But our unit's been told to salvage all
inner tubes costing $10 or less.
Why scrap tubes that only have nail holes .. just because the unit can't get
hot patches or because the hot-patching tool is broke?
SFC J. C. W.
Dear SFC J. C. W.,
That $10 rule must've come from a local SOP, Sarge. There's no.Army author-
ity for salvaging inner tubes just because you're short of repair parts or tools.
TM 9-1870-1 (18 Feb 55) doesn't give the full story on tube repairs. Para 3e






(14) of TB 9-1870-V2 (27 Feb 57) says tubes smaller than size 9.00 that're dam-
aged enough to need depot repair are not economically repairable.
But even these small tubes may be economically repairable at 3rd or 4th echelon
if they only have nail holes. And tubes that are size 9.00 and up may be economi-
cally repairable even if they have to go back to depot for repair.
So ... regardless of size or cost... let your Ordnance support decide whether
those damaged tubes are economically repairable or should be scrapped.




CHAIN CHANGES







Dear Half-Mast,
How can I get new chains to use in towing commercial vehicles with the M62
Wrecker? They're always breaking, and I'm told the only way to get new chains
is to order the whole towbar assembly.
Can you help me?
SP4 J. R. M.
Dear Specialist J. R. M.,
That's the way it's been on those tow-
bars. Bar, towing, "V", universal type,
has included chains which were to be
had only when you ordered the unit.
Also, this assembly now has a new FSN that's different from the one in ORD
7 SNL G744 (24 Apr 56). It's now FSN
4910-735-6056.
But things'll be different from now
on with the Clamp, assembly... includ-
ing the chain that goes through the
t clamp and hooks onto the towbar. This
assembly now can be ordered as a separate item. It's tagged with FSN 2590-679-
9648 (G-744).
That'll cut down a bit on the excess parts you have to get to replace those
broken chains-then you only need to turn in the clamps.


38






WHERE TO GO
Dear Half-Mast,
I understand there's been a changeover on which technical service is responsi-
ble for supplying the fixed fire extinguishers for the M48-series medium tanks.
What's the poop? ., ? "
3 ----- G. H. E.
C-J






Dear SFC G. H. E.,
You understand right. The Engineers took over control from the Ordnance
Corps on the fixed fire extinguishers that go in tracked vehicles.
The stock number was changed from FSN 2520-771-4476 to FSN 4210-202-
6465 for all tracked vehicles-except the M74 tank recovery vehicle which gets a
cylinder under FSN 8120-286-5579.
But don't forget-Ordnance is still responsible for the lines, fittings and the way
these fire extinguishers are fitted in the tanks. So, if you have any installation diffi-
culties, get in touch with your Ord support unit.



ICE-PACKED GEARS
Dear Half-Mast, GIVE BOOM A FEW TURNS
Last winter when the boom was traversed on BEFORE WEEKLY LUBING
our wrecker, it gave out with a chattering noise
like the gears were chewing up rocks.., and
no wonder. The pivot post gear housing was iced
up solid. It melted down to more'n a gallon o
water.

How about leaving the drain plug out of the underside of the pivot post base
plate on wreckers in winter to avoid this freeze-up?
Sgt A. R.
Dear Sgt A. R.,
Some water may collect in that pivot post housing 'cause it's not completely
waterproof. That's why there's a drain plug underneath.







If you take out the drain plug and
give the boom a couple of turns before
each weekly lubing... like the direc-
tions in Note 15 of LO 9-8028 (15 Aug
57) say.., it should take care of accu-
mulated water. Also make sure you hit
all four points with GAA like it's shown
in Fig 112 of TM 9-8028 (13 Jun 55).
This should get the water out-that is if it hasn't turned to ice. O'course if the
water's frozen at the time... as it's likely to be if the vehicle's parked outside in
winter.., you may need to move the vehicle into a heated building to thaw the
ice so it'll flow. And if you keep the pivot post ring gear housing full of grease like
the LO says, there'll be no room for water to enter the housing.
Best take a look at para 70 of the TM, too, for info on sub-zero operations.



EDP FOR FIRE
EXTINGUISHER?







N? OI

Dear Half-Mast,
Is an aircraft properly EDP if the fire extinguisher is not in it? I can't find any
regulation that calls it out positively.
SFC M. R. H.
Dear SFC M. R. H.,
No, you won't EDP the aircraft for a missing fire extinguisher. Red diagonal
the ship and make doggone sure that anyone releasing it for flight, and everybody
riding in it, knows that extinguisher is missing.
Then, start up a hotshot requisition for your extinguisher like it says in par 96,
AR 711-16 (18 Apr 56). Which really means that you get the same treatment as
if the aircraft were EDP, but you don't call it EDP because it is still possible-if
not very smart-to fly it without the extinguisher. a ./Pi

40









:' TT'--< ES S C^ *C0G'P C7s


,, iA,,, :, ,: .. P .tl,:.





LUlI(CATION OfDE 0.
10 -.1 01 0 .12 '..1 *. : .

10 ol l 1 .24-20 '.i .


. : c l' H: :tI F 5 l : ,,,
10 .t i.241.-l0 0 ,
above but JETA r l: I: l :

LO 10 i.203.15 J.i n: : '

LO 4.J41'.164 .' ':" a




MWO
MWO 5-1053-1 -


MWO i.10.4 1 -.: :.. :-
Washing Unit, 5: : I'
MWO 5-2329-1 :.-'
400C Cummins :
(MWO 5-6100-. : ':
Stewt-Stevenso- : ,. : s .-
28100).
MWO 9-2320-209 70 1 .

M 0 DORED IT.w3 I
-- 3 : : '
MWO OiD V83.-W12 V6 If6, J.9
oad 7)3 2.W?23j r l: -, ii.
MWO 10 165J1A -. 1 :
.. ...

MWO 16,1694A3 ,,', ,.,",'o




TECHNICAL BlLIETlLN

Th 9-1410-251-12 3 a.L H
Warhead torque
TB 9-1430-251 ,20 2 -.., :

i8 .2730.-10LI I -I : I '
trucks M44 che It nl r:'
oxle shaft flang: I : :
TB 9-2320-212 10 1 :. ; '
trucb 11:" -I 'P 1 1 :
TB 9.2370 211 .' 1 -. .- j
Mule: Storting.
TBO M 96 .j r. L ,r
TB QM 9E 8 i.-" l .lr.
wear.


MAINIENANLCE FORMS
DA Forms 9-49 9-100 9.101. 9-102

DA Fr,ms 9.31 IAuq1t .--IS IJn. *-
91 ,Jc h, : IL .At : %:
DD loren 1275 'U 'JO.:i.j.rCA L



M'iCFLLANEOUS
TRAINING Circular 17-6 J1. rar1-i

FM 23-43 Jul *.1 : ;': '. ., .


TKHNICAL MANUALS
IM T-IH-19-571 -.57, .1011 O -.
TM I-1H 34-1003 A',, ;l00" lb Cawl 0
HCc.
FM 1-IH-34A.4. -541 .546 .552
Ch I. -4.20P. JLI a.-d A .3
rM 1-.IH ]A.I, .1044. -4-20P 'ul

rM 3-1040-208-15P "u., O.-h Irr.l
, .a.k M 13 h II.e.,
TM 5-3810-206-.0 A0., 40 twn Cr.ne
hsc.el o riIj-ci t hi; :0 5 C,
IM -36B25.206-12P 1J. 1 'Jl" gal
I I,'.. .l ri-t kiu. 16urler c.icd da Il
IM 5.362. 707.12P A-.g i':0 gI:l
lJA ".- rl?'-Lbli.cr (I:..;e Mod-l MOlI
IM -.4170-?01.12 u i1Ot00JO iU
I pr Eu.... .1... .F 3 BH HA:3 E &I.

IM 5-4120-207-1 P Jul 23.1i:( 61l
i :r.d.r :.,e i ii Id, Pc.-e' Mct P

IM 5-4210 210-12P ., .'16':' GPM.i
'.Olo jl )A. grnnO ifgln r,
EM 5-4310.207-1D P -u3 IH i Cr'

TM 514310-216-15 ;,q I Ci1 1':
P, I R.IFp Csr.p-eiso. ecI e.. isd
IC' da.-pion
TM 5-4320. 04-12P O.A 100 CAir
rnd .l r-r.1 \ ,,,.-. A
IM S-4930-20?-12P Jul Fu.' eI
.\..,l.'-c3 l.b.. k...U:. A. fle >: MAI K
'5 01
TM S-6i1 5-00720P -'.. -ru.r ,,:,
,)l Ko0. 4iOJU In Oic.1 ?O At


i')A .l. Ia IM..l .l' M.d CE 5, M

IM 5-6115T-.2 12P JUL C-Arlr w C- L
ao SW OC 40' IC iur.rr.rs -aui j1Y.
601 .-15
IM 5-2815-202-12 A't Diesrl Er,-r.-r
'o:.a Mad D 539, .eplii.tiorn.
TM 5-B10-201.12P Jul Le SIcCaie
t.uns Ta.,er i C '100 I1rb l ip'r,s:
I'artlitg; Mrfl ial.1ibi
TM 9 1005223-12P JuJ rA14 P.lIr

IM 9.1430 503-70P Au. HO...L ,cq

TM 9 1450 509-10 aL,. Huk soad,.
TM 9.5076 10 ul Co.o oa Brner-,

IM 9-66'0-201-12 Jul Cb..r.it. "

IM 9.9507-4 irl 6 .<> A,,, e.ij.ri

TM 9-9502-7B AJ r.le A,.- oal.r

TM 9.9502-13 A. N.Le Ar LesA

IM 10-390-204-10 A6..O Ft.k Lit,
irar.llO', f .t ilcoO.'
TM 10.3030-205-10, -?0 Aug Fo.k
Lih il IO.3S 'i.d. .il I,]'051
IM 10-4940.201-9OP A.. Cant/Dri.eo

TM 10 500-37 Jul ,i.-d..p ,i/J tr,
I...p A1
TM 10-7360-701.20P ui M1bile. 6s
lhr, M 1 i
TM 11.-110-20J-12P Jul LD2A H.r
roht oleCenTi. pqulp
TM 114B895-202-12P iug Reel Ur.i
QI3II. I3iB C, D E
M 11-5805 200-12P J.l Telephor,
tE E. A B, C. D E.
TM 11-5905-207-I's Atg ieleprAr.A
.*r-L l ar5I ,MIC i


TM 11 .5601 i 17 loP 1..l
IM 11.560.1246 12P j.I Terminal
7-1 1 rl t IH :: 1.
IM 1 '805.-72510p -?DP Jul Code

IM li.;l 'l. isl -M ielegraph/

iM 11 idi'. 206 IF .1I i-letype Set

TM I .i.81 i. i :. '. :gnal Data
IM 11 581 .2 l lIP IJl T letype Set


TM 11 2050-719.10i .2OP .' i l

iM I I. 3670. Oi ?P J11 .. '.

FM 1.56i20 376?TP Jul Radio Fre-
|i 1, -:-. 1.:0J.1?P 1 1 ..' .:. r n
EM lt l8' lJO3.I3 i.l -L r, eiv.
-l l ..- :
IM Iiil l1.03I-1 'GI f i.ins-

IM 11 i6?1.20.12P Jul Radio Set

Am Il6i 2l07.10P, -20P Jul Hos-
A 'j ... L .- t Sys.
TM 1S-56 30.14,.1 P Aug Vibrator
F: i F1 SI/TIQ, PP-31A/

i; II lid1.2o0910P, -212-10P,
.213 i.1 .714 10P Aug Radio Freq
S Tr -I 13 (180, 181,

IM i11641.710.lOP Jul Mixer Am-
iM 1 ,- ,:i 7 a .10P l l :
ITM 11T.0,1231.IOP .,L :

IM 11-5895 7.1:, GP -,. i .

IM 11-58 5 .23 10 237. 10P.
238-IOP 10P -. .: Fi- .


IM 11 .5B5 .?li 10P ,: .e, 5.
;.,: A IL P; !;L 011i
IM 115965 7j37.1 -.; C .-. I

TM I a1o5 205 1P 11-2
TM 11. ol2 ;20 1 2P J, '''.:. i ,'

r: L ': FT "
IM 1 .0S 5.2 1.r10 .20P .I i .
I, ,1 i, 1 i; ; /U, B/U, C/U,

IM i 1667il697.IP -20P Jul Radar-

IM II.ob62 1O?- 2P Jul Test Set TS-

TM 11-6625 30i 12P Jul Crystal Rec-
i I.- i a'r: i :: ,A B C. E/U.
TM 11.662l 1 29.12P Jul Frequency

IM 11 .660-2i03.70P -, Wind
-. ArsiM a 21, -IS.
IM 11.6740.711 20 Jun Photo Print

IM 11.6'40-l1. 1O Aug Photo Print

TM 11 b67T) 216. 1P, -20P Jul Photo-


M : : l .1- 0 1 .I : I:
IM .120. 2 12P 5 T M- I-:


TM 39-T4I0081.1 :.- a.li.:.
IM j9-14076-2.12P "-,9 i:. rrl n.,
- --3 -.,m I Jy:' I
M 6i 7210-213-10 ",A. *l' :rld
,I I I:. :, 1 .. -I ----l ll :C I:- I.T e



















BE SPECIFIC
Just a reminder that sometimes a statement can be too general, even though
it's perfectly true as far as it goes.
Like when you fill out block 27 (Corrective Action) on your DD Form 781-2
after repairing an aircraft deficiency on your ship.










It was a defect, and you corrected it, yes? Yes, but NO you can't put "Cor-
rected" in that block 27. The Man says "The word 'Corrected' can mean almost
anything, and will not be used." (TB AVN 5, 11 Feb 55).
So you tell how you corrected it: "Replaced," "Repaired" or "Adjusted" as
the case may be. And a brief description of the repair or adjustment. This gets
you off the hook, and makes it easier ,'T C.T NIE NF. E D
for the next guy to tell just what the F'ND THE EN'GNE
ArORE LE
trouble was, and exactly what you did TEPLAEC IT'
about it. OK now?
And let's not set up the old classic .
where Block 26 said "Engine missing,"
and block 27 said "Engine found and
replaced." No wisecracks, please.


_




'r rl)~
1?1
~-L~ ~i*
~I~g~be~


--?Ui3
;-iia~-~----f

i~$E~I~i~g$r







:SPRING SPRUNG
ATS WHAT I
-OTTA USE FIvUPED !ATSf
You Bird-Dog handlers know that UP TH E OLD WHAT FiP-U.REp,)
the tailwheel springs of your L-19A's --e FI -.
can't always stand the gaff made by a
hard landing.
OK, so the supply people know about
this, and a better spring is coming into
the system. However, there are lots of
the old springs, FSN 1620-186-0645, still in supply. And since it can't be said to
be a safety of flight problem, these springs will have to be issued and used up.
So all you can do is draw another spring from supply and install it, hoping
for nice gentle landings.


MOJAVE TAIL SHAFT GREASE LOCK

You heard about the danger of over-greasing the tail rotor drive shaft coupl-
ings on your little Sioux helicopters. Well, it turns out that Big Brother suffers
from the same ailment.









If you pump excess grease into the tail rotor drive shaft splined coupling right
next to station 462, you can set up any one of three conditions, and none of 'em
are good.
Pumping the splines too full will force the shaft aft, which puts undesirable
and possibly destructive strain on the bearing supports. Or compresses the rub-
ber coupling at the after end of the shaft, or both. And the other possibility is that
you may burst the cap in the forward end of the shaft, and let grease into the hollow
shaft. This will throw it out of balance, and probably give you a high-freq
vibration.
OK, so they're working out a pressure relief type grease fitting for this coupling
-but until it gets here, your best bet is to back off the knurled cap before greas-
ing, then pump grease into the fitting until it comes out around the spline. Then
you remove the surplus grease, replace and tighten the knurled cap. Wipe up and
the job's done.






BEAVER BRAKES



VN OUT YOU







Far too many Beaver (L-20) brake parts are being requisitioned.
Either someone's squirreling away a stock of brake parts "just in case" or else
the brakes are not giving adequate service.
If the brakes are failing, you can help the design people out by turning in
UER's (DA Form 468's) on any Beaver brake failure you encounter. And they'd
like to hear about any linings you have that don't last at least 150 hours, discs
that go out with less than 400 hours, and any complete assemblies that fail for
any reason.
With the dope from the UER's they can study the problem and come up with
better brakes.
And y' might pass the word that the tech inspectors will be most unpleasant
if they find a bushel of brake linings in some stock room. Get any surplus back
into supply channels fast.




ORM CHANGE FOR SCAMP







OK, so you've been sending your aircraft to SCAMP facilities and getting 'em
receipted for on DA Form 811. Just like it says in TCSMC-FAD letter of 12 Feb
59 and the new TB AVN 23-8 (14 July 59).
As you know, the 811 takes the place of the DA Form 477 called for by the
old TB AVN 23-8 (22 Aug 57), so you'll use the DA Form 811 on all aircraft
you send to SCAMP.
















""-'" i't t' i.-a
| 'L -ll 1;:, i 1 .J :Bd \l-:.,
H:.'1L:'I ,:LI :ER E'S.:


1. ..--- ------

= 4- K-: EXAMPLE


hT ,. r Ca-r. t blr
F .. l ltI rb im- *U1 a I..D I t -anri.iet tr, -in .1 ,.4| ----

S I r t-
L ah -s 1.. rIr rh .







-1.i IN I l






Y'see that you'll just leave blank spaces in the blocks thatdon't apply to SCAMP
type maintenance.
(show where your aircraft is) and you mail page three to:


.r..nr.rsus *,*sl.r .g ,a


US Army Transportation Supply
and Maintenance Command
PO Box 209, Main Office
St Louis 66, Mo.
ATTN: rTSMIC-FA


Then when the job is done the accepting pilot will show on pages one and two
any shortages of equipment or any special work not done. Page two is then given
to the contractor as his receipt for the aircraft, and page one comes home with the
bird.











There have been some sheared magneto drive shafts reported on Lycoming
powered aircraft (H-13-H's).
The engineers feel this might have been due to the engine backfiring while
starting. (Specifically to a spark occurring before top center on an engine that was
cranking or running so slowly that the
resulting explosion of the fuel charge
caused it to kick violently backward to
the prejudice of good order and disci-
pline among the magneto drive shafts.)
Now, the -1 will tell you that your
starboard magneto has the impulse
coupling. A magneto impulse coupling
SNc.. Bl'r ITS does two things at the same time. As
T L Z your engine is turned over, a dog stops
.. ; ''E. C' the magneto, and a spring begins to
THAT" ALL l- wind up. The engine continues to turn
I. gT3NsL. T until the dog releases the magneto arma-
ture, and at that time the spring snaps
the armature over, fast. This gives you
a hotter spark than you'd ever get from
the magneto at cranking speeds.
At the same time, due to the period of engine rotation during which the mag-
neto was held, and the spring was winding, this fast flip and hot spark take place
at a later part of the revolution of the engine. That is to say that the spark is
retarded. T SEEN
Which is just what you want here, C-IN' l4i
some way to retard your spark so that it f
will not come soon enough to kick a
slowly cranking engine backward. ,
The old -1 (Sect 11, page 2-3 of Ch
2, 9 Feb 59) told you to turn your mag-
neto switch to BOTH when starting the '
engine. This works just fine 99 times out of a hundred because the slow turning
left mag does not fire the engine, and the impulse-coupled right mag comes in
with its hot, retarded spark to kick your engine off forward. Then as the speed
comes up, your left mag cuts in, and the impulse coupling stops holding the right
mag, you're off and running with both mags correctly timed.
46







But once in a rare while ever rhin g N
...sEE ElEe rIME
is ideal for the explosion in your c lin. I s\.E FEEBLE '<
der, and the left mag gives its feeble CM 'Pup :
spark. This'll fire the charge, and kick EHNC' .NC
the engine backward. Possibly shea vrin : v '3iM
a mag drive, and surely not good tor it. -.." "'-


She'll start just as promptly, and you've eliminated the slight possibility of
a bad kick. You'll find these instructions in para 4-109 on page 4-33 of TM 1-1H-
13H-2 (March 58).
The -1 has been changed, and TMSC EH-13 (9 Feb 59) gives you the word.





Take a quick look at the pump-to-
filter hose on your main rotor primary
hydraulic system. (Item -38, Fig 4, Page
20, TM 1-1H-34A-4, Change 2, 13
Aug 58).
Couple of 'em have carried away
about an inch and a half from the pump
fitting-possibly from bein' pulled too
hard when they were put in.
Anyway, the manufacturer is working on a longer hose for use here, and it
would be smart to look at yours every so often until the new one comes along.






SANDY HOOK?

Not the seaward end of New Jersey
-the cargo hooks on your Choctaws
(H-34's). E L ,,X. SE:
Seems some of the boys have been see WrEM ,
havin' trouble with sand in the hooks YJe ruiE A.CA M
jammin' the micro-switches. So, if rough
air gives a momentary no-load condi-
tion, the load leaves you. They tell me Z ... (
the boys don't like to take delivery on .
their jeeps fifty feet in the air. .
So why not give your hooks a real careful checkout and cleaning-then do
everything you can to prevent draggin' 'em through sandy ground.

BETTER BEAVER BRAKE VALVE
Friends, Romans and Beaver trappers, lend me your ears:
It seems a small goof has resulted in Scott parking brake valves in the 4200-
series getting back into supply channels in an unmodified condition. Which

DIDN'T PE-ET








means they could be on your Beaver (L-20) now, or could be issued to you for a
replacement.
OK, this valve does work. But the trouble is, when it's in park position (closed)
you can't increase brake pressure, no matter how hard you kick the brake pedals.
So, first of all, check and see if your aircraft has these 4200-series valves in her.
If so, best you requisition the new valves, FSN 1560-629-4536 (P/N 4500 SA1)
and install 'em.
And in the meantime spread the word around so that you and your pilots and
anybody else authorized to start or taxi Beavers get in the habit of always releas-
ing and re-setting the brakes before starting the engine.
None of which relieves you of the obligation to have chocks under your wheels
any time the aircraft's engine is running except when you actually intend to
move it.







DON'T LET YOUR GUARD DOWN

It n as mo-t embarassing: Real pro- SEEM T,
ficicni pilot, faithh over 8 landings a I
week for the last seen ceeks. all earnr
ing passengers in the Beaier 50 he ges
a solu light. bounccs into his tried and i
true old "ork horse and "ild-blue.
yonders her.
He had a whole 100 feet of altitude when the engine quit. Bent his bird all up
on the landing.
So now he's trying to explain why he didn't check the gasoline before he took
off, and the boss man isn't smiling.
No matter how much time you have, and no matter how dependable your air-
craft is, you never never never reach the point where you can afford to kick the
tire and light the fire, even once.


ONE DID, ONE DIDN'T-

ONE IS, ONE ISN'T

Shoulder harnesses for the birds? Perhaps so, and for the birdmen too! Be-
lieve it.
Two recent accidents are the case in point. In one of them an L-19 had an
engine failure at too low an altitude for safe jumping. It was flown into some
50-ft trees and totally destroyed. The pilot and his passenger were properly
belted and harnessed in place, and were only scratched.











While in the other case a man was found dead in a crashed helicopter-and his
shoulder harness was not in use. There was every indication that had it been, he
L-TTLEC L LrTL:
-I EN I rSuN I%9NT4 Z

IT %%0L1Lr /






While in the other case a man was found dead in a crashed helicopter-and his
shoulder harness was not in use. There was every indication that had it been, he
could have walked away from the wreck.
Simple, isn't it: Them what used the harness lived-him what didn't use it died.
49












NATUP2ALLY YOU CAN'T
HEAn'L NCTIN'... "YC0U AIN'T













You've all heard the old routine about position being everything in life.
Maybe the man who made up that little saying didn't quite realize it, but
his words of wisdom were maybe more true about plugs than about people.
Because a plug that isn't positioned
right when it's time to shove it in sure
is going to leave an operator with a bent
pin-or more. And if he hasn't got a pin .
straightener handy-well, that's the end
of things as far as that plug and recep-
tacle are concerned.
As a matter of fact, even though a pin straightener is brought to bear, there's
a chance something will go wrong. Figure it this way: the pins on an 18- or 24-pin
connector are not the strongest things in the world.
As a matter of fact, once they're bent there's a good chance that they'll break
as soon as somebody starts straightening or messing around with them in any way.
They just aren't made to flex and bend.
So position properly. When it's time
to stick a plug into a receptacle, check
where the ridge is on the plug-and then
line it up with the matching slot in the
receptacle.
That way all the pins on the plug will slide smoothly into all the holes in the
receptacle. Any other way and you run a dangerous risk of knocking out a plug
-which could mean knocking out the whole electronic rig.








14OLD






Naturally you're in a hurry to wrap things up ... get the bench cleared ... and
head for the gate. Fine. Who doesn't. But why not make two last checks on that
AN/PRM-15 Multimeter. Takes only seconds, but it could make the big differ-
ence next time you open up the case and want to make with the tests.
When you turn off the ZERO AD- j ,- OFF
JUST knob, be sure it is OFF. Best way
to do that is to turn 'er all the way- /
clockwise-'till you feel and hear a soft
click. Then it's OFF. Besides, it's im-
possible to put the cover in place unless
that knob is in the OFF position. ERO ADJUST
FUNC"I And comes time to slip the cover on,
SBA-30 y'might bear one small but kind of im-
I/ portant item in mind. Drop your eye-
A41balls toward the lower left corner of the
front panel. The setting of that FUNC-
TION KNOB should not be at R.'Any
other one. But not R. H'yars why:
There's a good chance that when the test leads are wrapped up and tucked into
place-and the cover clamped on-one of the prongs might touch the metal cover.
Pretty hard to avoid, as a matter of fact. And it's OK as long as the FUNCTION
switch is not on R.
But if so-if that switch is on R-and if a prong touches the metal cover-then
a circuit is completed. Ouch! And that will drain the life out of the batteries faster
than anybody wants to think about.






This kind of PM ill mean a lot to your multimeter, and pay dividends for
everybody right on down the line.














So that's what's been happening, eh!
The printer in your Teletypewriter Set has been jumpin' a little. Maybe not
spacing right. A little whip-lash effect. Some lines look sort of ragged, with too
much space between some characters and and others squeezed together.
Happens on the AN/FGC-20 and AN/FGC-25 Teletypewriter Sets-on their
Teleprinters TT-98/FG, TT-99/FG, TT-100/FG, TT-117/FG and TT-119/FG.
To mention a few.
It's all in how the driving worm gear makes with the mesh on the carriage feed
driven gear. You see the two of them at the rear of the printer.
Unless those two gears are lined up
dead center with each other, you're
going to end up with unmeshed gears
... rapid wear ... and visible evidence
on the paper of what happens when
those gears don't get together right.
All a repairman needs is maybe a couple of hands and 12 or 15 seconds to line
'em up.

FORWARD REAR
POSITION (0 ) ProsON




LOOSEN

S(RW
Loosen the set screws in the shaft collar. Then There's a little play" in there. Somewhere
use a push-pull routine on the carriage feed around Ia-in. The idea is to center the carriage
driven gear. First push it forward until it's feed driven gear at midpoint between the for-
tight. Then pull it to the rear until it s tight, word position and the rear position.
Things get a little eye-straining about now, so sort of remember that the dis-
tance between the back face of the carriage feed driven gear and the machined
surface of the base casting is about 1 Vs inch. But that distance will vary maybe
three or four cat hairs from one printer to another.







Line the gears up-and when they're TIGHTEN
looking' each other square in the eye- SET
hold the carriage feed driven gear in SCREWS
place and slide the shaft collar against
it. And tighten the collar set screws.
Wrap things up by checking two re- SlIDf SHAFT
lated adjustments-like mentioned in COLLAR
the TM. One on the carriage feed shaft ratchet wheel and the other on the carriage
feed shaft drive shaft collar.
And your spacing problems are squared away.




Even though a good repairman handles his communications equipment with a
firm, gentle touch, there's always a chance of a slip or a jolt that might lead to
trouble.













Like when you slide out the Junction Panel of the Amplifier-Pilot Regulator
AM-707/TCC-7 on your AN/TCC-7. Sliding it out is no sweat, but setting' it down
on the bench or floor is when you might run into some trouble.
So happens that the E-105 insulator
on the bottom of the Junction Panel (
sticks down a trifle too far for comfort
-or safety. It extends just about as far
as the supporting pins. And that means
it's not protected when the panel is laid
down on a flat surface.
A little care, then, when handling the
panel; Either prop it up so the insulator
clears the bench, or lean it firmly against
a support to keep the insulator in shape.
53











,'Where?"
Yep '.i group panel of the AM-
-- .... ............ 707/"TCC-7.
A switches off" ---------- ----------

T Yep e WHERE? l
S '.Awright, where the 'Like I said In its cradle
TS 9-5 Handset'' on the group panel "
"Huh ".
-- ------------------------....... --- . .- -7 .,7 .T

i I' said where's the TS *You think t'll stay in its
9-5 Handset?" T. cradle even though we've
Oh. In its cradle." 9 got rough country to cover
between here and there?"
SYep" ,*.
"Well, that ties it. HUSTLE INTO THAT HUT AND TAKE THE ,
TS-9-5 OUT OF ITS CRADLE. AND THEN PUT IT WHERE IT S '
SUPPOSED TO BE DURING TRAVEL-IN THE BRACKET ON THE "
TOP OF THE CHASSIS OF THE ORDER WIRE RT 280 TCC-7

BECAUSE IF NOT THE UANCSDET WILL
POP CT'r 'F ITS C3ADL-E ON THE FISPST
I ^A MP Ti-E E-II.CLE IUITS...AND SPEND
S THE RES-T lF THE T3IP' SAN&ING
s IT! HEAD AC.I VIND ON THE FLOk.1Q -
i o o WIi.C MA0BEE vO.ULCNT BE To ,
I .-.
G r~o10


























All simple enough.
I2EAt'IH I .EEN THINKIN'
ONCE IN T,5. r L A
AERL'T SNAP EA 5IEIZ %-YTO









So how complicated can a snap catch get?
The kind used on all those different cases used in packing up Signal equipment.
They're either snapped shut when the cases are closed-or they're snapped open
when the electronic gear is taken out and put to work.
All simple enough. 9'
But here's the catch. Those cases close up tighter than a clam. And the pressure
on the snap catches to keep the cases closed tight is pretty fierce. Which makes life
rough enough on them.
And their life can be chopped short
if they're handled like somebody's mad
at them. The idea being, of course, to fit
together the two sides of the case as care-
fully as possible (get all the cables, etc.,
tucked in) and then close up the snap
catch firm and fairly fast.
Comes now a special kindof thing to watch.
And that is: there are two kinds of snap catches. One kind that can be fixed by
your own outfit if it breaks or pulls loose. And another kind that can be replaced
only by sending the case outside the unit. All the way back to the shop.
It's all in how those snap catches are attached to the side of the cases-either by a
screw (easy to fix) or a couple of rivets (not so easy to fix).
For example: the snap catches on the Transmitter Case CY-1341/TRC are
screwed into place. Easy enough to tighten up or even replace that screw if the
snap catch starts to show signs of shifting.
But the snap catches on the Antenna Reflector Case CY-1385/TRC are riveted
in place. And if they work loose or break off-the case has to go out into the organi-
zation and back to the shop for a new snap catch-or catches. Not good.
So you might heck your cases. See what kind of snap catches they have. And
treat them all with care.










See that there handwheel retaining screw?
The one that holds the handwheel on the TA-43 and TA-312/PT telephones?
It needs a little screwing.
How many messages is the man up
forward-or up anywhere-going to be
able to send if he can't crank his phone?
Mighty embarrassing when he goes to
ring up somebody and CLUNK... the
whole assembly flops into his sweaty
mitt.
All because the retaining screw didn't rte rain
It's one of those things a man can't tell just b) looking :a it-like )ou can tell a
cracked case, corroded battery or frayed cord by a quick visual check.
SBefore heading for the field, then, do
i yourself and your outfit a good turn by
taking a few turns with a screwdriver
on that retaining screw. A few seconds
eof screwing will pay off later in hours
*o / / of good ringing operations.


Yep, Yep. It's tricky, crowded, cramped and generally a curse-inspirin' kettle
of complications.
And any Sig repairman who has ever had to shake loose the vibrators (El, E2,
E3) in a PP-109/GR or PP-112/GR Power Supply sometimes gets the twitch just
thinking' about the task.
One thing's for sure. There's just not enough finger space inside the chassis of
those power supplies to do a neat pluck job, especially because you need a good
upward lift.
So the shrewd bench jockeys slip a .screwdriver-very careful like-twixt vibra-
tor and socket. And a gentle pry is all it
will need to free the vibrator from its
socket.
When it's free enough for freedom,
just tilt it toward the side of the unit
and lift 'er free.



















Sometimes the old work bench can be sort of hard when a repairman sets
down a radio chassis or a few tubes or almost any electronic gear. Hard enough,
s 'matter of fact, to damage some of the more delicate equipment.
Some simple scrounging should set a repairman up with a good sized piece of
felt to put right there on his work bench. That felt will smooth the job ... make
things a bit quieter ... and even look a shade better.


It's awful easy to get an ankle or foot
or something snarled in the cord of that
handy Handset H-33/PT.
It hangs down and curls around and
generally gets in the way-unless you
back off a full five feet from your radio
gear. Not likely.
Now y'might say there're two ways
out of the dilemma. For one thing, try
looping the cord over any nearby hook
better still, (if your handset is ready for
new type now in supply.


or support to keep it off the ground. Or,
replacement) send out a signal for the


/ W r .' NEO 1. E .TF New type cord did the man say? What
THE 03'' T else! A handy, practical, curled kind.
The kind that stretches out as far as you

S-so's to stay out of the way when the
phone talk is finished.
The same kind you find on most
civilian-type telephones.
But make sure you requisition the "F" model of the H-33. It's the only one with
the retractable cord. And they're available in supply now, too.
57


<
\


~FWAIT








BIG CHARGE


To correct your reading, the rule is: Subtract 4 points for every
100 below 800 F, and add 4 for every 10" above. That's because
your hydrometer is built to give you a true specific gravity
reading at 800 F only.


You can do everything just right with your tracked or wheeled vehicle-lube it,
operate it just so, fill out all the forms and keep it as clean as a baby that's just been
powdered. But, brother, you go no place unless the battery-the source of all your
vehicle's electrical power-is in good shape.

Battery Check
One of the best checks to see if your battery is working is with a hydrometer.
The hydrometer measures the state of charge your battery is in by giving the
electrolyte's specific gravity reading.
When doing this, you're comparing the weight of an exact volume of your
electrolyte with the weight of an equal volume of water. Like water, when your
electrolyte cools down it contracts and becomes dense. So a cold solution will give
a higher reading than a warm one even though the actual percentage of acid
remains the same.
You see, 8.336 pounds of water equal one gallon at 620 F. If you cool off that
jug of water down to almost freezing, it'll still weigh 8.336. But the water con-
tracts with the cold and it'll no longer be exactly one gallon. Same way if you
heat it up to just below the boiling point. You'll still have 8.336 pounds, but it'll
have expanded until you have a little more than a gallon. Or in the same words,
water becomes denser as it cools-thinner when it is warmed up.
Your hydrometer uses a float to measure the density of the battery solution.
The float is weighted to hold it vertical and calibrated to show how far it has set-
tled into the liquid you're testing. Natch, the float will sink deeper into a light
liquid and rides higher out of a dense liquid. But this float will only measure
the actual density of the solution without taking into account the temperature
variations that make the electrolyte contract or expand.


What Specific
1.265-1.290 = fully charged battery
1.235-1.260 = three-fourths charged
1.205-1.230 = one-half charged


Gravity Means
1.170-1.200 = one-fourth charged
1.140-1.165 = barely operational
1.110-1.135 = completely discharged


Voltmeter Check
There's nothing like being sure-especially when your low voltage circuit tester is
handy. This'll not only check out your batteries but your vehicle's charging system
as well. To check out the batteries use your low voltage circuit tester set at 50 volts.
Hook its positive leod. to the positive post of the battery that has the starter cable
attached to it. Then, hook the negative lead of the tester to the negative post of the
battery that has the ground wire attached. That way you're sure to get the kee-rect
measurement. 'Cause if the negative lead was grounded to the frame, a possible
voltage drop could give you the wrong reading.
Leave your ignition switch OFF, and crank your engine with the starter. If you
have at least 18 volts while the starter is cranking, your batteries are in good
shape. __A


Batteries


x WILL pE
IF A sE.
li ,


Try to match batteries in pairs so that they are as nearly equal in voltage as
possible-depending on the amount of batteries you have on hand. The closer the
voltages are... the more evenly matched the batteries will be.


IrE SPAE
-1 um






Test each battery with your low voltage circuit lester. Hook up the teste
so you'll draw current from the battery through the load bank. Draw half
the rated capacity of the battery-50 amps for the 6TN's and 22','2 for ... J
the 2HN's-for about 30 seconds. This II allow for any small differences
and let the battery output be even. I
- ---- -----,--------- ..................
Then read the voltage-which'll be lower than the batteries no-load voltage.
For example, supposing you check out four batteries and the scoreboard reads:
NO. 1-11.27 VOLTS NO. 3-11.80 VOLTS
NO. 2-11 VOLTS NO. 4-A LITTLE OVER 11 VOLTS

If it's your idea to match No. 1 and No. 3 and your second choice is No. 2 and
No. 4-you win the big, black cigar. Pair 'em off this way and you're almost
sure to get more life out of your batteries.



Let's Keep It Clean h
Things start happening with the battery if it isn't kept clean. Here are some
signs of a dirty battery and what to do about it:
1. Electrolyte salts-this results from acid fumes given off through the vents or
from spilled or overflowed battery acid.
When any acid liquid is left to dry or wiped off it leaves these electrolyte salts.
These salts in turn will pick up moisture and in this combination they drain
current like a sneak thief in a deserted bank.
It doesn't take too much to stop this. First, when you wash your vehicle, hose
the batteries and carriers with lots of clean water. Never, but never, use a steam
cleaner.
If your carriers and battery are dirty, get 'em out, make sure the battery caps
are tight and give everything a good scrub down with a scrub brush and a solu-
tion of baking soda and water-one pound of soda in two gallons of water is
plenty for a half-dozen vehicles. (FSN 6810-264-6618, Soda Bicarbonate, Tech-
nical: will get you a 1-lb carton.) Let the soda solution sit on the battery until all
the foaming stops, rinse it off with clean water and try again. When there's no
more foaming you've neutralized all
the acid on the battery and the carriers.
Rinse once more with fresh water and
let dry. GROAWtmN
Remember, if the caps aren't tight- Too-MI .01
the soda can get into the battery and
neutralize acid just as fast inside the
battery as well as outside.





2. Cable terminals-As long as you've got the soda handy, clean the cable ter-
minals and dunk them, too. Then rinse in fresh water. If you haven't any soda at
the moment, you can get by using lots of fresh water.

'3. Paint the carriers-Any type of paint is better than leaving the bare metal
of the carrier exposed, but acid-resistant paint is better than any other paint.
FSN 8030-290-5141, Compound, bituminous, solvent type is available from
the Engineers.
W ----------------------------------j
4. Check the case-While you got it out, eyeball for leaks, cracks, signs of
chafing and anything else that look suspicious.

5. Grease em-Remember to put a light coat of grease on the battery posts
and the cable terminals after they've connected. Now don t think that if a light
coal is good a heavy coal of grease is even better. Not so-just use a sm-e-ear.

6. Make sure the terminals are tightly fastened. Metal handles should be fas-
tened tight to the case, clean and slicked down with GAA.


Words of Caution4
Here's what to be on the lookout for and what not to do if you're working
around batteries:

1. Check your battery cable insulation-is it frayed or worn? A bare cable n
cause a short circuit or a fire.

-2. Tighten just right-The connection at the battery post, that is. But be careful
Sin the other direction, too. You don't want to overtighten 'em either 'cause this
will crack the lugs.

3. Starting a fire-And that's exactly what you can do when you light a match
or flash a spark near a battery. Here's why: Hydrogen gas (which is high
flammable) is given off by the battery when it's being charged or discharged.
And you got some gas floating around all the time even when the battery's
not working.
....................-----------------.....................................
.5u 4. Avoid "bulgitis"-A battery can develop this disease if the voltage regulator
is set too high. 'Cause as the generator keeps putting out, the batteries over-
lo charge and heat up. So check your TM for your vehicle's correct regulator setting.
Another thing that'll put a drape shape on your battery is running the battery
when its electrolyte level is below the top of the plates. The plates will corrode
and swell-and buckle. Then, letting the specific gravity run down in freezing






temperature can also distort the case. Clogged up vents in the battery caps will
cause pressure to build up inside and sooner or later the battery gives up the ghost.
5. Never keep a battery that reads more than 25 points between cells.
Operational Tips



1. Removal-To take out your battery, first turn off all circuits and then dis-
connect the ground cable. If you're not sure all circuits are off, ventilate the
battery area and disconnect the ground cable at the frame. If a
spark does occur it'll be at least a cable length away from the
battery. Now, if you should happen to touch the vehicle with your
wrench when you unhook the positive cable you won't get a short
circuit and the possibility of a burn.

2. Installing-When you set the battery into the vehicle, position it so the nega-
Iive post lines should line up with the negative cable If you're in doubt, as to
what leads to what, check your vehicle's TM for the right hook-up.

Then, tighten the hold-down bolts. Make darn sure that
these bolts are just right. Not too tight so you strip the threads
but tight enough so's the battery is held firm. If you tighten
the hold-down bolts too much you can also cause a cracked
or distorted battery. This'll cause leaks where the sealing is
broken.
Okay, so now the first cable you hook up is your positive cable-and then your
negative cable.


3. Adding water-By using the syringe you'll he able to judge just how much water
to odd-not too much and not too little-just enough to come up to the design (broken
line) in the battery well in all military batteries. If there's no indicalor in the i
cell, fill to 'a inch over the plates.



SBe Careful
If you get acid on your clothes-you can't do much except
change 'em and dunk 'em in some soda solution to stop the acid
action. If you get any acid on your body-wash yourself with
much water and report to a doctor. Your shop probably has an






eye-washing fountain or a jug of soda solution. Learn their location i
in case you have to help yourself or a buddy. BATTtRY WOREP S
When working around batteries it's always a good idea to wear APRON
SfW 84115 9'!53
rubber gloves and battery aprons. FN
Don't mess around ... if your battery is leaking, get a new one. A
RUBBER GLOVEt
Cold Weather Whammies rts 84i.;a,.870o

.,e ,. '- k -I-- 6 i

The greatest enemy to your battery is cold weather... so you got to be extra
careful when the frigid season hits.
O'course, the best way to protect your battery from freezing is to make sure
it's fully charged. And you want to do that by checking it as many times as you
get a chance without interfering with your mission.
Supposin' you can't start your vehicle or can't get a long, long ride after a cold
start. Take your batteries into a warm joint or put 'em on charge. Otherwise,
they'll freeze up on you.
Also, the colder the battery gets, the less charge you can get out of it. So there's
another reason you might want to get the battery out of the vehicle on a cold,
cold night. A warm battery has a much better chance of starting. If this can't be
done: Try warming the battery before starting your vehicle. But never do this
near an open flame or never get it hotter than you can put your hand to it. TB
ORD 390 (18 Jul 52), including Change 1 (20 Jan 54), tells you how to use the
M40 slave kit to heat your batteries.
But all this business doesn't have to be done unless the outside temperature is
going to be well below zero. A battery that has been taken care of will start a
well-tuned vehicle down to 100 below zero without special treatment.
rHF PEEZMI FONT OF EL!ECTROIYT
AT VARIOUS SPECIFIC OPRAvmITIE
WIJIL. SHOW YOU WHY:
BATTERY ELECTROLYTE n
SPECIFIC GRAVITY WILL FREEZE AT
(AS CORRECTED TO 800 F.) THESE TEMPERATURES
1.000 (water) +32
1.130 +100
1.160 + 10
1.220 -310
1.250 -620
1.275-1.300 -850to -950






As you can see the temperature would have to go so low that a brass monkey
would be in severe pain before your battery would freeze when it's fully charged.
Don't go adding water to the battery in cold weather unless you're going for
a long run 'cause the water will freeze in the battery.
But that doesn't mean old Jack Frost doesn't take his due. Even with a fully
charged battery at zero degrees you only get about 40 per cent of the cranking
power you'd get from the same battery at 80 F. The battery current, as you
know, comes from a chemical reaction and the cold slows down that reaction-
and there isn't a dadblasted thing you can do about it.






The same barrier that makes it harder to get power out of the battery makes it
just as hard to get a charge into the battery-so take the battery to a warm shop for
this kind of operation.


BLOOMIN' MASK











Has your protective mask turned "blushing" pink? Well... this pink or
"bloom" is caused by an age resister put in the rubber compound when the mask's
made and'll cause no harm. A pink mask is OK unless it's sticky or has cracks,
and leaks. This pink condition isn't considered to be a defect under Change 1
(2 May 57) to SB 3-30-10.
While you're reading that Change 1, it might be a good idea to take a look at
the small print there. It says that if your mask is exposed to direct sunlight it'll
have a tendency to discolor. The amount that it changes color depends upon how
long it's in the sun and how hot the sun is. It'll get a light green or light brown in
color. So-keep those masks out of the sun.
Another thing to steer clear of is using carbon tet to clean your mask. It may
removethe dirt all right, but what it'll do to that mask shouldn't happen.
64






6aonie Rodd'a
BRIEFS


N"<7 7


Not attactie e oftta nMyon rtaneoa7?


Any time you have to clean the mag-
netron in your radar set, steer clear of
steel wool. The magnet part of the
maggie will draw the slivers of steel
wool...and when they stick to the insu-
lating parts, you just won't have any in-
sulation. Use crocus cloth instead. And
if cleansing powder will work, you can
use that.

7e voCt's the thing
Caution... watch it... think. You've
read where you can stick a higher-rated
fuse in the place of a lower-rated one
as long as the amperage is the some.
That's right. But don't put a lower-rated
voltage fuse where a higher-rated one
belongs-even though the amperage is
the same. Fire is catching.


Sor, aerng wnmder
If your M56 SP 90-mm Scorpion me-
chanics are about to order the Nozzle,
Fuel Injector, assembly listed on page
17 of TM 9-2350-213-20P...use FSN
2910-571-6769.


Hey, there! You with the new nylon
taupe 179 raincoat! That coat wasn't de-
signed for fatigue or field duty, so you ve
gotta be mighty careful with it. You wear
it with your Class A uniform or appropri-
ate civies only. Carrying it around under
your belt, for example, can punch holes
in it. You'll use either the synthetic rub-
ber, shade 107 raincoat, or a poncho in
the field. DA Circular 670-37 (7 July 591
gives you the real lowdown.

Keef tde sptin
The magazine spring which is a part
of the ten-round magazine used on the
M40A1 Recoilless Spotting Rifle M8 is in
short supply. So when you have an un-
serviceable magazine assembly better
hang on to the spring FSN 5340-726-
6418, so you can repair other maga-
zines.
It's in the T7
What every good Nike outfit ought
to have: a copy of TB-9-1400-601-20(24
Oct 58). The TB gives a rundown on
maintenance of interconnecting cables.


SYourS SLife onS
Would S SYSo "S




ROLL OUT THE RED CARPET
FOR A
V, I, P.%jk


*VERY IMPORTANT PUBLICATION
IT'S HOT OFF THE PRESS


S-t- Q