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 Poems of Nature
 Poems of Love
 Miscellaneous Poems
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EIGHTSANDDEPTHS JlY UNA M. MAUSONWITHANINTRODCCTIONBY SIllWILLTA3IUORIUSON. KT.

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HEIGHTSANDDEPTHSPOEMS WITH AN INTRODUCTION BYSIRWII... LIAM MORRISON,PRINTED BY THE GLEANER CO.,LTD.,KINGSTON, JAMAICA, B.W.1.

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tf/.9:" ,91'137 'HL/1131BytM...."'.AIIt,u,.ij)'rl1pirItftltritll

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TOTHE MEMORY OF MY BELOVED MOTHER AND FATHER, AND TO ALL THOSE WHO LOVE BEAUTY AND WHO LOVE LOVE, IDEDICATETHESEPOEMS.

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"As high 3S we have mounted in delight In ourdejection dowesinkaslow." Word8wol'th.

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INTRODUCTIONBYSIR WILLIAM MORRISON,KT.TheTitleofthisexcellent BookofPoems isstrongly indicativeofthe poetie temperament ofitsAuthoras,withvaryingdegreesoflightandshade.shetakesyouuptodazzling heights,andthen brings you down withstartlingrapiditytothelowestdepthsofdejectionanddespair.Butthereis astrongnoterunningthroughoutwhichbreathesaspiritofhopeandconfidence, and sotheultimateeffect istoleavetheReader in agladframeofmind refreshed andinvigorated bytheinspirationhehasreceived.I likethesimplicityoflanguageinwhichallthese verses are couched, theliltand tone which runso smoothly, andtheabsenceofany artificial strivingafter effect, allofwhich produce a fine harmoniouswhole.Thepoemsarein three groups, and deal withNature,Love,the passing of time and the peculiar beauties and joys of our Island Home. I like well the character sketch of "The Peanut Boy," the beauty

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and pathos of "Heights and Depths,"(from which the volume is named), and the refreshing touchof"The Nameless Flowers."Butthey are all good and full of interest, and my hearty congratulations and warmest thanksaretendered to Miss Marson forthedelightful entertainment she has givenmeand the privilege which I have been afforded in writingthis Introduction.

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UNAM.MARSON. AUTHOR'S FOREWORD.The warm reception accorded my first book of poems hus encouraged me to prescot to the public a secondvolume.I wishtotbank all thosewho so generooslyexpressed theirappreciationofmy efforts inthis direction, andtrustthattheywillfind further pleasure in "Heights andDepths";and p;ll'ticulal'lyMl'. J.E.CIa,"c lieF.tr lane, Secretary ofthePoetry Leaguefol'Jamaica, who has always advised andencouraged me.Iamdeeply indebtedto Mr.AsUey Clerk and Mr. W.J.Mastertonwithout whose l"cry practical assistance itwould have been ioJpossible for me tocarrythrough both publications. Kingston,Jamaica,B.W.I. September,1931.

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CONTENTS.POEMS OFNATURE:'TisJuneDiscord .. Sunshine andRainThe Speedwell. ..The ComingoftheRaindrops :Nature's Heart.ConfidencesTheRivals.The Approach ...The Meeting oftheClouds.Gold oftheCassia The Nameless FlowersJamaica ..A Moonlight Rc\'crie POEMS OFLOVE:The CllptiyC AGreat Lore The CallI CareNot.DreamingCommunionWould You? A Complaint Unawares Heightsand DepthsThe Letter. Greed. Tile Heart'sCI'IlClty A Dream Resignation Ethereal. Ecstasy Forgetfulness SomeDayTheIngrateLove's EclipsePleading To---Poverty5 G71012 ,. 15I.17"2027303132 333435 3.373839 40414243<4454.474849 505152

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CONTENT8-(Oontinued) MISCELLANEOUS POEMS: My Hope Respite ...The Passing oftheYear AMother's Cry .ToMollyFriends..Henry'sAmbition Invocation .Waiting.. TheBreathofMorn.Fostered..JoyCometh...SadSongs. Thanksgiving ThePeanutBoy. Tl>-ToPoesie.. Another Mould ALittlePrayer.To Mothers Conflict TheLittle Guest. InJamaica.Refuge Rea80ning TheSnare. ToMySister Time.MyHeart is Sad. Songs ofJamaicaPerhapsTheTidalWave.. ThereWillComeaTime PACr. 55 .. 575860O.63 .. 0500 076871 73 7.75707778 7.80 81 82 83 8485 80 87 888 0 n'5

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POEMSOFNATURE.

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'TIS]UNE.omy henrtbegladandSillg,For 'tisJUDe!Listthe music song-birds bring, Allintune;Seethe roses richandrare,Smellthe fragrance everywhere,owllnt joys beyond compareCome inJune!

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DISCORD.How can yebemerry. ye songbirds, And sing sucb glad songsallthe day,When my heurt is a-weary,a-weary, And cannot respond to your lay? How can yebemerry ye blossoms And sweet fragrance breathe onthe air, When your perfume can only remindmeOfthingsthatawakendespair?How canyebemcrry, ye wild winds?Ibearyourbrightlaughterandshout,When all my sad heartis a-wailing, Withgriefanduorest tossed about!How can yebe merry, ye sunbeams, Anu. pl-oudI.y diSphtJ' y01l1'white crest, When billows and tempests withinmeForbidaDyfriendlierguest?How can yebefilled with gaylaughter,Ye days of sunshineandgood cheer, When there is no gladness withinme,And gloom dwells withmeeverywhere.0,break throughthedarkness within me,Fondlove ofmy heart with a smile,Forthe birds and tile flowersarecalling,AndI :lID so wearymeanwhile. Theywillnotbesadorbe dreary, They are callingCormetocomchome,But 110w canI go, mybelo,'ed,ohowcnnIgrectthem alone?YoU!' smile their splendour enhanccs, YourlOve keeps myheartall in tune,0,come,CorFair.Natnre ie oLo,'e,I amhere and 'tieJone!

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SUNSHINE AND RAIN.How lovely thesun shines forthAfterrain;Howfairarethe joysthat come Afterpain.Bowsweetarethe flowers thatbloom Afterrain;How tendertheheartdoth growAfterpain.BowQl1icklythefruitgrows ripeAfterrain;How swiftlythesoul finds gainAfterpain. How richisthetasteof thefruitAfterraiD; How largeistheheartof God's child After paiD.

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THESPEEDWELL.I lovethe littlespeedwell flowers Thatgrow beside mydoor,They close their eyes and go to sleep Justasthe clockstrikesfour.But at the songbird's waking cry.They open their blue eyes, Eyes bluerthanthe ocean's breast,Andfairerthantheskies.One daythe busy honeybee Cnme justatbreak of day, Tbe speedwells bad scarce ope'd their eyes Ere he WlIS on the way. "Awake, awake, my loves," hesaidAnd gently kissed each,"Ilove your eyes ofdaintyblue, You rob myheartof speech." Then, with a promise toreturn,Heon hiserrandswent, The speed wells laughed and whispered low."Thishas been some event.""Hehasnot been tous for weeks He has 80 many Buthowcanwe resist his charms. Though ortenfarhe roves '!"And then they laughedand danced aboutTbe while I loved them more, I hopethatI shall always seeFair speedwells at my door.

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THECOMING OFTHERAINDROPS.Formonths my poor flowers were drooping, All brown with the !lent of the day, They lh'cd for the soft dews ofnighttime, To soothe the bright sun'sscorching ray. I lovingly cool'd thematevening, When I had a few drops to spare,Butoften they sighed fortheraindropsThatunto their heartswere 80dear. One eve, as I wandered among them, They seemed in a mood of delight, ''Lift upyOllrfair heads," saidtheLily."The raindropsare coming tonight." And soon the news spread thro'the garden, The wee violetpoppedouther head, "Are the raindrops coming to greet us? Oh Iam 80 happy," 8he said. I lookedatthe sL.-y, itwas clondl{'flS, A crescentmoon shone from above,The flowers nIl very happy, And sangofbrightlaughterandlo\"c.Iwasgladthatthey all were 60 happy, And I kissed them a tender goodnight, A..8 Icametothe Lily she whispered, "Madam, have you seen the fair sight!" "Lookupatthe llOrns of thecrescent, Whatdo you seesparkling there? Why, theraindropsall glisten already, They will come before morn, so prepare!"Irejoiced witht.hemallaswe parted; AndIprayedthattheir vision was true,ButI slept with my windows all open, I fearednottberainnorthedew.Iwokeatthe callofaweevoice Which whispered, "My lady, beware, The cool crystal raindrops would kiss yon, Sodrawclose yourcurtains,-takecare."

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Before Ihadopened my eyelids, I felt some cold drops on my face, And I heardthewild roseatmywindow As she sighedattheir loving embrace, And now since His Rain cametocheer them, There's never a sighora tear, Every flower is happy and cheerful, And no one has e\'er a care. They danCi:!every dayin the sunlight, And talk ofthat wonderful time When the raindrops returned to caress them, And gave themthatglorions sign. And the raindrops have promised the floweJ's Nevertolinger so long,Buttowoothemandlove them more often, And cheer their fondheartswith aBong.

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NATURE'S HEART.Give me a life of indolenceand ease Close 'to the hcu tof Nature. When I please, Letme revisitman'srclentles8martAnd feel the pulac of her swift throbbing heart.Letmebe free towanderby yon stream, And sit beneath the trees anddreamand dream With song of birds to soothe myheart'sduH pain,Andjointherushingriver's sweet refrain.Andletmelistenwhilethedainty Bowers Whisperandlaughawaythegolden hOUrs, Andlearnfrom them how they such fragrance give Although80brief a timeODearththey Ii"c.Letme adorethebeanty of atreeSo gracefuland80full of majesty,Andlearnthe BecretthattobirdsbelongHowImayliftlife's burdenwitha song.Obgive meheaven's bloe above my head,Andfragrantwild flowers on a mossybed; Andwhen I seek againlife's busymart, llayNature's peace sustain my fevered heart.

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CONFIDENCES.Itwas a perfect dayinpertectJuneWhen evening shadows come, nlas, too soon; I had been waud'ring in the wooda allday,Andnow upon a mossy bankI lay,When,10!two birds upon n flowering tree, Who soughtitsshade, no doubt, (or privacy, Conversed in tbis wise, thoughit was quite clear They had no wishthatI should overbear. SaidtheOld Squire, "Look there, my love, look there," The dame l'cplied, ''Look where, mylo,'c, look where'!" "There on the grass beneath us," be replied, And most suspiciously my form he eyed.Thendrawinguphimself to his full height,Quite satisfied thathe had seen aright,Hedrew alittle closer to his wife, And thus he mused upon this human life. ''Do you remember, love, thatdusty town Where creatures of this kind rush upaoddown,Withfaces worDandsad and weary eyes Thatfind no joyandcomfoltin the skies? "How grieVed we were for them!It seems tomeThatthis faircreature, longingto be(ree, Soughtour fairwoods, but she is dead, is dead, Indeed sheismy love; lookatherhead!'"She is not dead,but sleeps," tbe dame replied, "Poor, toilworn creature/' and she deeply sighed, And brushed away a tearfrom herbrightfaceThatof sad tears had ne\-er worn a trace. "Cheer lip, dear heart, cheer up," the Old Squire said,"Andsince she sleeps and is not really dead,Let'ssing a roundelaytofill her dreams Of thesefair glades and yonder merry streams." And thenthey ministered tomein song, Such cadences as unto them belong; Sweet melodiesstraight from theheartof God,Sentdowntocheer us as thro' lifeweplod.10

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()h,Icould thus have lain a thousand years, And eased my brokenheartwith joyous tears, Could thesefairminstrels sing their plaintive songTome, whose soul had hungered for so long. How quickly deepest joys forevercnd!How soon we losc the comfort of a friend! A thoughtless move, and10, Uds kindlypairInbuta flash had vanishedin tbe air.ItwastheirwishthatIshould never knowFromwhence the music to myheartdid ftow, ThatIshould wake with music in my soul Andyetnotknowthe source from whichitstole .ojgentle Minstrels, your sweet pluinti\'eIny Hassoothed my heartache, bornemy cnres away,For tbis sweet peace which never shnll depart, Accept my love and deeply thankful heart.11

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THERIVALS.The sea andIarelovers, All through these changeful years,In times of merry laughter,In days ofbittertears. We have long talkstogether, We sing full many a song,But,ob, sometimeswe quarw, Altho'weknow 'tis wrong.LasteveIwalked beside him, He was inmerry mood;In sweet('St tones be wooedme, Andall the world seemedgOOd.Butas the hour grew later,Myfootsteps I retraced; Whatwasitcaught my vision,Andallbeside effaced?Asunsetsuchas never Hadcaughtmy eyes before, I longed for powertoholditInvicw forevermore.I walkedonas a dreamerWhotreadsenchanted ground, Orasa child enrapturedWithtoysbutnewly found. The glory ofthatvision! It thrilled me thro' and!bre,'WouldthatI had the power To itintoview.Butob,the sea grew jealous.Andmurmured all the way Beeauee be thongh t the sunsetMight lItealmyheartaway. 12

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I told himthatthe Bunset Would never come again;Hegrumbledthathis beauty, 'Wouldinmyheartremain.Isaiditwould,butwhispered, f'You know my love istrue:What,iffairsunsetsthrillme? My love, I've chosen you1"13

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THEAPPROACH.The flowers have heardThatJuneis near, ThelittlebirdWithplumagefairBastold the flowers To beware ADddeck their bowers,And prepareForJune draws near. And allaroundThesigos I see,Rich budsabound;The June-rose treeAll inherhasteInflower will be, (WhichisbadtasteYOuwill agree,) EreJune we see. Thebirds (ll'C glad,The flowersaregay, Since they have bad Long hours for play.And 80 amI,ForwitlleachdayThe fields andskyAreshouting "May! 'TisJUDe-Away!"

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THEMEETINGOFTHECLOUDS.One day upon the soft green grass Ilayin idle mood, The sunshine glittered on the leaves, All thingstome seemed good. The sky bore buttwo fleeey clouds, One east, the other west, And each seemed lonely wondering there, And full of vague unrest. And as I watched, these fleecy clouds Towards eachotber drew, Andinwhatseemed a moment's space, How close to each they grew. Then, in one eager breathless rush, They melted intoone;And lingered buta moment there, And wcre forever gone. The sky became a cloudless blue, Iturnedtowardsthesea,Andborewithme atcnderthoughtOfyou,dearheart, andme.E'en sooursouls would fainuniteInODelong, fond embrace,Andslipfrom olI tIliswearyearthTo some ethereal place.Butnowourbodies intervene,Yettherewillcome a time When,3Sthe clouds became butone, Your soul will join with mine;In some fond where spiritsmeet,Weshall know endless joy, Noweariness ofearthand lIeah Shall tben ourpeace annoy.15

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GOLD OFTHECASSIA.Come, feast withthine eyes,aDdstore in thyheart Treasures thatfadeyetne\'er depart, Gold fromtbeheartof Godstraigbtinto thine, Goldthatisthineforthetaking, and mine.16

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Miss."THENAMELESS FLOWERS.Flowers!theSUD and Moon and stars ofEarth!I love them dearly, whatever theybenamed,Pansiesand Pinks, Asters, Hollyhock, Rose, ThedaintyBlackeyed Susan usitgrows, Twiningitsslender lltcm about the herbsThatgrow along the wayside and in woods. Tile daintyPeriwinkle, pink or wbite, I love them all, andinthebusymurtI buy me flowers [OrmylittleroOlli. A week ago I bought some blossoms rnre, The loveliest bunchtbnt I had seeD. The stems were long and slender andthefiow'rs Were richingold,and red asdarkaswine; Some petals glowing richerstillingOld,While otherswere more winc with golden fringe.0,they were lovely! As I held tbem close,AndsmIsmiled ''What bethey called?" shefurtherqnestioned mc, "I know not," I replied, and then I lookedIntentlyatthe wrinkled face of her Whose heartwns warmed nod cheeredat such a sight. Shemight have seenfull eighty summers here.:what blossoms andwhat thornshad strewn her path I knew not. Kow she stood instraugedelight.Shedidnot ask for alms asmighthave been Herfirstintent,the flowers lmd blest her heart. I ventured n small gift, she smiled again, And thnnked me in herdeep andmellow tones (Ithinkshe once possessed a.heavenly Then she moved on and I could hear her sigll, ''1Vhat lm'cly roses,"asshe joined the throng. As I stood lost in thought, another came, A solemn faced old man wholost a.leg Infighting for his countryandhis King.Heleaned uponthecrlltch beneath llis arm, And gazed uponmyflowers fOr a while. 11

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And then, as though )'(!calling I was there,Hetouched his hat, and asked mefor 'their Mmc. I told him I knew not, and he mOI'ed on More pleased than when he first cameby that wny.I took thecarfor home, and there I setMy golden flowel's in twodaintyjars.The I>temswcrc aU so long, theyleantand kissed Each other 'croslJ the mirl'or'lJ tell tale face. And so I had thcm witli IIICfOi' six days, A double portion, they and their reflection. Howman;)'heartstheyChCCI'CdbefOl"c they cameIntomy hands, I knowDot,butI know trhat two bad smiledthat might hal'c beenyetsadSavethattheir beauty touched a tender chord Within thosehearts tbathad been pierced by thorns. And as forme,whatneed is tbere to tell? I bnyme flowers for my little "aseInsteadofotherthings I sometimes need. Imust hal'c flowers, any flowers atall, Sothatthey come from God'sartisticHand.18

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JAMAlCA.Josta lovelylittlejewel floating on fair Carib's breast, A II a-glitteringinher \"el-dure 'neatha blazingtropic sI.-y_ Musthave been a part of Eden,it'sso full of peace and ,..,t. Andthe flowers intheirsplendour rn.ake you feelit'sgoodto die Inaspot that's 80nearheal-en where one Dever feel!!depressed,'c ause Dame :Kature makes you lat.y andDameFortune lingers nigh, Andyonfeeljustlike a fledgling inyourmother's cosynest. 19

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A MOONLIGHT REVERIE.Weary of life nnd all my heart's dull pain, Ileftmy lonely rOom and sought to gain Brief respite somewhereoutbeneath God's sky, And urged myhearttheopen roadtotry.Late was the hour, the moon, now growing old,Had long sinceriBell;thestars were none too bold As though, in fond allegiance to their Queen, They wi.shed that nIl bel' glory shouldbe seen; Andsotheyfaintlyglimmered hereaodthereLike scanty D3isies seen in meadows fair, The lovely Queen enjoyed hersbortreign,Proudof the lo\'e of all bel'starrytrain.The tropic sky wore notthe swallest cloud,In voiceless sound her beauty cried aloud."FairmOOD,"thoughtI,"thereonthyglorious throne, Dost thounottire of being all alone?Hereisanother,butshe isDOQueen No throne is hen, andno worlds has she seen, No golden crested ser\'auts on her 'wait, And she has ne\'er slept athetwen's gate;Butlonely is sbe now like unto thee, And 80 to-night she seeks thy company. Queen oftherealms on high,tho'thoudost reign And art contentthus everto remain Inlonelystate with uo King at thy side,Nordostthou weary of thy tedious ride, I knowthatthouart sad, and oftentimes Thou hidest thy pale fnee from earth's sadcrimes; Thou see'st lovers kiss beneath the shade, And.seek fair]0\"00ones over hill andglade;Thou see'st when one wearies: of the 'way, And how these ficklehearts change day by day.Butbenotwcal'y ofme,for tonight I seek thy lore and thy fairguiding light." Methought she nnswered sweet andtenderly:''Isee thyheart is sad,wme thou withme,And this thy heavy load sllnll lighter be.Ifthou be wnsbmt thou sllnlt surely know Great things for thySO\1l'sgoodthalIwillshow;20

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Only bepatient,and forget thy grief,And800nto thee will come a full relief."AndI took courage, opened wide my eyes, "Lookroundabout thee," Queen Moon whispered low,Forclosetothee are things thy heartshould know."Withalmost noiselesstreadI paced the groundForfear of losing Rught by noisySOlmd.Sometalland gl'ace!ul trees cameintoview;To these Iturnedmytiredheartanew,And therebeflide the noisy streettlley slept, Nolittlewind among them rnddy crept. Amid the noise of horns flndpa@sillgfeet, Serene they 8lcl)t, by pale moonbeams,Lostto allsound-a slecp thatknew110dreams. At morn they would awake to fec.11he kiss Of jealous sunbeams, which in p(!rfect bliss Would gambolaUthe dflY, forgetfulstillThatall th(!ir untamed h(!at made leafletsill; And tho' they frolickedand S('Cffied gladat heMt, Theywere notsorrywith stich lovetopart.The lesson came: These trees all bear theheat And borden oftheday,but night is sweet;And always theyaddsplendour10the day. Whatsilent eloquence 1Whatfine display! They soothe 'Withloveliness (!arth's drearyeye, Andgire theirshade to tra.velIcMIpassing by. ''HowweU theydotheirpart,"the Queen Moon said.''How well/, I answered, andI bowed my head.Thelesson conned, Isoughttofindthe next. Nolonger was myheartforlornand vexed. Ihadnotlongtowait,forsoon I so'lw Whattearsof sorrow to my eyes did draw. A woman placed bothhandsupon her bead And wept 8S one who mourned a loved one de3d. Greatchoking sobs now swnyed her slender form As some deep sorrow llDtohl'1'wasborn. Isoughtfor some solution to her pain,Andvery soonthetruthto me was plain. ,While I walked slowly,justbefore me stroll(!d A couple who some secl'et did llnfohl Which waken(!d 3nxiolls thougbts:thisI could see 21

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Fromthe strained \'oicc of onc in agony. Now as I saw this woman weeping there, I called to mind again the unknown pair, And as I movedm,}'e,}'cs from bcr pale face, I saw her 10\'c1' who with quickened pace, Moved on and left hel' desolate and sad As tho' she lIad lost e\'el'ything she had. A tempest roared within her aching breast, A might,}' struggle filled bel'with unrest. Grown weak with grief, llhesat upon the bank, And into further sobbing there shc sank. A moment passed, then up sbcsprangastho' The storm had ceased, and all her woe Hadgone inthatdarkhOIiI'.A flash oflightHadshonc upon herpath:and now sheran As tho' her very life were with the man She sought to overtake. I turned, and10,I saw her hundstealround his form, and so They passed into the night. Then came tomeThoughts, clear and plain us they could be,Of man,thevictor, woman, \'anquished still, Who to his thraldom bends her e\"ery will. Ithoughtof all thetalkaboutthe sexes The women with equality complcxesAnd then I saw before me plain and clear Eternal man-(!ternal'woman fflir. Butstill I soughtthelessontobelearned, And didnotfindand so once more T turned To my wise guide, and thus she madereply:-"Forthy heart's good on these wise wordsrely:Woman is born toeatthe bread of sorrow To weep today,andknow nogladtomorrow.Itis bel' privilege. Dost thou forget That, tbo' the iUother ofourLord,yet :Mul'y's beartwith grief andtearswastornE'en fromthemomentthat her Son wasborn?'What agony like unto hers was there, Who saw her Childstretch'don the cruel cross,Withcrown of thorns, and feet and hands each pierced22

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Withbloody nails,Hisfuce ill suffering \'eiled! How often since have weury mothers wept O'er some belov'd flon, andvigilkeptForprodigals who still no morereturnE'erthedimlampof life has ceased toburn!Howmanywomen atthia very hour Are filled with anxious thoughts,anddeeplyprayThatlover, husband, child may mend his way?Untiltheearth shall cease shall woman layHerallatmanhood's feet and seek in vain Loveconstantfirmandtruefrom him to gain.Itisherlot. Be thoucontent-loveonAnd always welcome him. Whenhe is goneInvanitysome conquest fresh to make, Console thyself, letnotthy loneheart break. KnowthouthatGOd,who fOrmedand fashioned thee, Gave thee aheartto love, a mind to scn-e And ne\'er fromthjsnoble purpose swerve.Forsorrowisthe torchthatlights the was ToGod-andmanwillfollow theeor stfl)' Contentamidthehouses hecan raise, And give himselfall gloryandaU praise. Fearnotto loe: toloveis always rightSothatthyheart bepure. The beaC(lD lightThou see'stcomes from God's own bandto Thee, Andthouwilt see, when sorrow's stormyblast O'erwhelms thytroubled life,if thou hold fast,Thelight shall hrightershinethysoultolead,Anduntothissome wanderer wHl gh'e heed. Womanthouart:rejoice in sorrow'shourThatGodtotheehastgiventhis great powerTo suffer andto lo\'ctho' oft unloved;Togive andseek fornaught;tobe reproved, Andtho'notguilty,stillfor love'sdearsakeAcceptthewrongandalltheburden take. Man maybemasterof thelandand sea, Andevenofthyheartmay keep thekey,Butunto woman comes alone the joy Of shieldinginherform agirlor bOy. A blessing onthyheart:rejoice, be glad,ThankGodforwomanhoodandbenotsad."23

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1 raised my head, andtearswere in my eyesThat cast a dreary shadow o'er the skies.Butnototsorrow werethetearsthatcame,Butjoythattotheworld 1 would proclaim. 1 homeward turned enriched with heavy thought Of allthatnow had come tomeunsought. These lessons 1 would keep withinmybreast, And, henceforth they would briugme peace and rest. Butlo-anotherstill remained. The smell Of jasmine flowers sweet cametoforetellThatnearby grew theplant1 usedto love When long among tbe flowers I would ro,'e. I sawitgrowing nearandscannedtheground FOr some smallflower-butoneatlengt.h I found, Crnshed by a tread. 1 gathered itin haate, And, oh,wbatfragrance!what exquisite waste! Two petals had beenlost;thosethatremainedWith dust andearthand passing feet were stainlld; Butit was sweeter farthanany flowerThatonthattreehad blossomedbutan hour. I mused awhile.MyQueen smiled
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POEMSOFLOVE.25

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THECAPTIVE.Alas, how haplcss was thisfate of mineThustoberuledbylegioos of pale imps \Vho,at theil' King's COllillluud,hadstormedmy liCart, Torndowll my battlements, nud caused me thus To live in bondage like a fettered 8Ia\"c1 Howloyal werethC8e soldiers totheirKing!They cared notifOlechains about mehurt;Inloyaltytohim they pressed me BOre: Butthistheir Killg was kind in \'ol'ytruth.One day I hem'd him st.erllly chide thegual'd: l'Sluvcs al'enotmade of woodandslonc,"hesaid,And,O! his \'oice fellon lll;l' bungl'J' cal'SLikethatof10\"Cruntoonc belO\'ed. My guardthenkinder grew, aDd I CorgotThattherewere chainsaboutmy heart.Thenmycapti\'itygrewVCI'Ysweet,TillI begun to [en!'thatthiskindKing :Might onedaybid his soldiel's setmefree;Aye, feared thatfreedom untome would come;POI', though the;y broke the fetters round myheart,IknewIshould flot flee-whollees from light'!' Flee? when as capti\'e I had stormed the gates Ofheaven,andfelt the kiss of fleecy clouds Upou my lips,anddrank theirhoneyed dews, O! iuthat there was lifefOI'me, And in my freedom death. Fol'oft the King Came dowll to see how well his capti\e fared.Hecame today, aDd though mye;l'eswere brightWithunshed teal's, my face was radiantstillWith happiness thatborenosign of grief. He seellled less ])I'ond todaythan he was wont.Be was perplexed, andso, in gentle toneHesoughtto know the secret of my joy. The eyes ofallhis imps still brighter grew Tohearthegentle sweetness of his \oice. My guardcommanded metoheed theKingAnd answermake;butI was silentstill, FOrintheirpresence wouldInaughtunfold.TheKillg divined my thoughts, and gave commandThatall his imps retreat intotheirtents.27

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And then he knelt, and with his own dearhands Undid the chainsthat bound me, andmyhenrt Almost forgotitsusc when I beheld How soft and gentle his proud face had grown. Then he heldouthis hands to me, his slave, And thus he spoke in accents 80rt andswect: "My lovely slave, how cruel Imust seem Now inthineeyes. Imnst confess ThatI had thought to see thee pine away, Grow paler day by day,andthenatlengthPetitionmetosetthee free.Buthere,In capth'e bonds, thy life seems sweet to thee: Thou Art morefairthan onthat drearJ' day When first I looked upon thy tear-stained face. Tell me wllnt secret spring doth feed tlly8Oul? From whence this bloom of rOsesinflly cheeks, Those smiles t1l1Ut speak tomeof rosy dawns?"Heceased, and lookedatmefull tenderly.1triedtohushthehlmliitinmy breast Thatkeptmy lips from speech, thenmadereply:"Iknow notwhatwasinthatheartof thineThatthoudidst ecck tokeepmehel'e in bonds;Fortllee1have not wronged, exceptitbeThatonce I looked upon thy face too long. H thou hast soughtto feed endless pride, Toreapthefruitsof conqllestbythesightOf my pale face anddarkimploring Thouhastfailedsadly;Corlife unto meHassweeter grown since now thy shl\'e amI.1hadnotliveduntilI saw thy face, Andasthy cnpth'e now Icanbehold Thy formand press mylips unto the groundOnwhich thy feet have trod. Now I can hear Thy voice in golden tones of cold Mark thy proud visage whichmy 100'e tran8forms To Godlike. One fear alone is mine-Thatthouwiltone daysetthis capth'efree. Then 'whither shall I go in allthe worlel Which needsmust darkened beifthy !:lir face Therein I shall not see?" And allthelove Which long had been concealed withinmybreast28

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Burstforth. I claspedmyhands about his feetAndcriedwithall the anguish of mysoul:"0King, thouwiltnot,wiltnotsetmefree?" I ceased. myhearto'erwhelmed with anxious thonght. And, for reply, he raisedmefrom theearth,And kissed my lips with such sweet tendernessThatinhisarmsI swooned. When I awoke, Around me I beheld no longer impsButfairies four who ministered to me, And smiled at me \1(ith largeand wistful eyes. And soon theirKing:l sign made untothem;Then two came forward with a crown of gold Likethat he sometimes wore upon his head And placeditin hishands:he gazed atme,Hiseyes more teuder grown, and plaeed the crown Upon my head. ''My Capti,eQueen," he said, "Onnst thou forgive?"andkissedmeonce again More gently thanbefore. "My King," I sighed, AndnOwI did notsWOOn.29

PAGE 39

A GREAT LOVE.I askedthegodsto send a wondrous love To wake my 80ul andliftmyheartabo\'c; I wusimpatientatthelong delay, And in deepearnestdidmy youngheartpray. This great love came,but brought withit unrest With peace and calmDOlonger W38 Iblest;Withinmyhearta mighty tempest rose,Buton this lovethedoor I could not close. Thentothe gods I prayed and sadly said,"Iasked a wondrous Love, butnow insteadPainandunrest have my fullheartllUdone, Could:ye notgrantmethen this love alone?" The answer came, "Such love wenever give To mOl'tal soulsthaton thisfairearthlive Unless theyask:have therefore thou no fear, Since thou desirest, thouhaststrengthtobear. "The gods have honoured theeingrantingthis;These sorrows are butpartnersin thy hliss, Hadstthou known love alone, thou wertnotfit Amongthe fair immortal souls to sit." I dried mytearsand clasped thefragrantroseWithallitsthorns;then softly I arose, And blessed the gods for such agiftdivine; May lo\'e, with allitspain,be ever mine.30

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THECALt. Friends ha,ebeenheff, ButI'mlonely.Friendswhoare kind, Sweetandtrue;Glad smiling facesSurroundme,ButIjustsitthinkingOfyou.ThinkingjusthowYou are faring, Wondering who sharesYoursmile,Alone,orwithfriendsInthe gloaming, My thoughtstravelMany a mile.O! lo\'cofmysoulThro'the distanceCan'tyou hear myheartCallingthine? Bend me an answer Belm"ed, Whisper to me Love ofmine.

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I CARE NOT.I care not for the sunshineorfor the sih'or rain, I care DotCortheflowersthatstilltomeremain,Icare not forthe moonlightorfortheeveningStar,I care not forthe zephyr that cometh from dur. Icare not for Hfe's wonders unless thou smile onme,Forin thy smile the beauty of alltheworld I sec. 32

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DREAMING. SiUing bymy window Lookingateach flower, Dreaming dreams aboutyouAlltbissunlithour;Birdies come asinging, Bees areon thewing, Sunbeams rounda-playingTemptmyheart to sing. Shallitbea sonnetToyourlovelyeyes?Or a lithesomelyricOtthedeep bloe skies? Or the wondrons beautyOfabuddingrose,Andthetender fragranceThatshe doth disclose?oI'msureI'mpuzzled,Don'tknowwhattodo, Think I'llienvethewritingAndjustdreamof you; Dream I see yourdeareyesIn tile blue above, And Ihearyou callingAsthebirdsmake love. But the streets grow noisy, Folksrush ontowork,BetterquitmydreamingForImustn'tshirk;Butwhendayisover Stars shine throughtheblue,Then I'll sit a-dreaming Lovelydreamsofyou. 33

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COMMUNION.I lOl"e beyond all timesthesilenthoursAt eve, when palestan: glimmerinthe sky, And we two sitamongthefragrant flowers And watch themOODrise calmly upon high.Those golden hours wben you holdmyhandAndourglad hearts are(artoo full for speech, Asourtwin 80uls commune, I understandWhatheights in silencemortalsouls can reach.

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WOULD YOU?Ifyou knewmyheart hungrytorouetenderword from you,Ifyou knew mylipswerethirstyasthe rosesforthe dew,If you knew my eyes wereturningtothecrimsonsunset dky, ADdmy life was passing from me in each deepandbroken sigh, Would you come to me beloved hold my trembling hnnd nnd say,''Littleone,Ilove youtruly,letme cheeryourlonely way," WouldyOIlspeak kind words of comfort, till myheartandbidme live?Would you come to me beloved, even one smile would you give? 35

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A COMPLAINT.I waa contentwithlife until you cameAnd smiled on me,Now life can nevermore be justthe same;Fornow I seeBrightstarsthatI bad never seen before, AndoftI hear Sweet silver-throated mock-birdsatmy door, AndyetI fearMyheartshall neverbecontent againWithlessthanthee;owherefore couldst thou notrefrainFromloving me?36

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UNAWARES.Last night I passed yourwindow As oftI'vedone before, The usuallightwas burningAnd closed was every door. I've never seen your shadow,Noteventhrooghtheglass,I'venever heardyomfootstepsTbo' Isooften pass.ButI find joy, belo,'ed.Inbeingneartoyou And wishing I could linger Toguardyouallnight through.And ere Itornmy footstepsUpon my homeward way, I leave my longingspiritToguardyouuntilday.37

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HEIGHTS AND DEPTHS.We have known the heights together, IhQ,'eknownthedepths alone; We have joinedinmerry laughter,Butthe tears have been mine own. Ah,to reasonthus, how selfish,Hastthou notthyvale of tCllrll Andthyhidden depthsofanguishThro'theever lengthening years?Yetwelinger on the hilltops, And wepartaswe descend Strengthened thus to seek the valley All alone,withouta friend.Ah!tbeheights growstillmOreloftySince we two go hand in hand,Butalonethedepths grow deeper; Yetwe seem tounderstand.Therearewords too sad (orsounding,Therearethonghts too deep for speech, Butno heights too high(orclimbingAndDOdepths too low to reach.

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THE LETTER.I'vewrittenyou a letter, I wroteitdaysago;Butnow Ithinkitbetter The sending to forego.Itlies among mytreasures,I've readit throughagaio; Iwillnot send ittoyou,Becauseitmight gi"fe pain. And SO I sendthispoem,Since wemustbeapart,To tell you I still love you As I did from thestart.These wordsareoften spoken,So youwillbeatrest And never know thetumultThat rages inmybreast.89

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GREED.I have most everything to makemeglad: Acosy littleroom withfairest view, Friends, books, andflowers,yetmyheartisEadBecanseIstill need you.

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THEHEART'S CRUELTY.What &ayest thou myheart?Wiltthounotyield To my control? Orthus rebellious stillWiltthou toss frommy band thisironshield And leave me captive t9 thy fickle will?;What pleasuredost thou find in subtle pain?Whydostthou counseltake of cruel grief? Myfleshis weary,andmy feeblebrainCriesouttothee imploring BOnterelief. Yieldthou for pity'ssake-be Dotunkind,Orwiltthouseektotakemy very breath?IfsoI prithee, (aster measures find, Andletme feel the welcome kiss (Ifdeath:Yield.orthyleave of.meforever take, Forlifeisdeaththewhile I feelthisache.

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A DREAM.
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RESIGNATION.Lastnightwhen you euid youhadtoplay bridge,And asked meifI likedthegame,Fora momentitpained meandsomehow IthonghtThatmydarling was notjustthe same. Playbridge! when each fibre of my aching heartYearnedjnstforthetouch ofyourhand,Whennaughtthattheworld could givetomethenCouldgrantme my 80ul's demand?Whatmadness came o'ermethatmademeforgetThatonlyindreams you aremine-Altho' from the moment when drst wetwo met,Myheart has been sealedas thine.Forgiveme,beloved; whatever you do My fullheartmust praise aDdcondone, Sinceoutof the great world I have chosen youAndsetyou as king onmy throne.

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ETHEREAL. Beeause I lO'feyou more thanitis gi,en To mortal souls tolo.ebeneaththeheaveD.Ineedsmustgo abovewhere lo.e8upre.z:ne Pervadestheheartand is a waking dream. Beeause Ilove you so, thegodsI'llsueThatthis unearthly flame your soul embne Sothat you cannot rest onearth butcome And join me there inthatethereal home

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ECSTASY. Today you smiled onmeand sincethathour Myhearthebeen enriched a thousandfold; Today I beard your voice and every flower Since then mytaleof happiness has told. TodayIsaw your lovely laughing eyes, Since then,naughtbuttheirradiance have I seen; Today you heldmyhands, and from my skies Vanishedthegloomy cloudsthatthere hadbeen.TodayI saw youaftermany days, Saw you towhom my heart's love doth belong,And,O,thejoy I find in life's dull ways As myglad heart keeps singing love's oldBOng.Today I saw you (or alittlewhile And heaven onearthI find within your smile. 45

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FORGETFULNESS. Metbinks thatsomewhere undernealb God's sky Theremustbewaitingstill a little spot, Where Ishalleasetheburden of each sigh And whereallhauntingstrainswillbeforgot. Methinks thatsomewhere theremustbe aheartThat lacks completeness since I am alone; Ahenrtthatmustbe restless thusapartAndalltbiswealthoflove should fully own.Metbinksthatsomewhere theremustbea soulThatwanders on in dreary solitude, Seeking in vain thelovethatcnn console And even now with saddenedheartdoth brood: Methinksthatfate holds wealthtorall in storeButoften she forgets to opethedoor.

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SOMEDAY.Somedayyouwill grow weary of my love,And 80forsake thisconstantheartof mineThatcberishesDOotherthoughtabove This love for you which seems tome divine. Some day,yourface now tender witb IO'i'"e's smile Will sullen grow, dispassionateandCOld,And youwillmurmurinyourheartmeanwhile,"Itweariesmethatsheshould be 80bold."Some day, 0 bitter thonght, you will forgetThatmygreatlove once movedyonrtender heart, Andonce-what bliss, in fond embrace wemetAs thongh the world shouldnot keep usapart:ForCODstancyto manisgra\'e unrest Althoughit uehtles calm in ",'oman's breast.<7

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THEINGRATE. My lifeinlove is rich beyond compare,Farricher thanmy feeble worth doth claim, Since Good DameFortune has not mademefair,NoramI blest with wisdom's noble name.Mylife in love is rich, where'er IgoTruetenderheartshave opened unto me, And made me humble, 8uch foud lo\'e they show To one whose deepest lo\'c they hold infee.MyWein10\'cisrich,andIamblestWithkindnessthatenrichesmorethangOld,And I shouldbemore happythantherestOr else aningrateprove of blackestmouldAndyetmylife inloveispoOrindeedSincefatewithholds from methelove I need. 48

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LOVE'S ECLIPSE.Your love failed from my sl-y 80suddenlyThat darknC8s 8uchascomes before the morn Would seem aslighttothatwhich came tomeWhenthusyou left me lonelyandforlorn.Andlikea child who leaves a lightedrOomForone unlit, finds allatfirst moredarkThen gradually therefadesthe deeper gloomAnd fixtures here and there his eyescanmark;My changed worldthatseemed80 bln.ck atfirst To my accustomed eyes has lighter grown, I donotlearthe dark, noramIcurstSince I can claim foud memory for my own: ogrief!thoughthouhastchangedmy Jlay tonight, Thoustilldoth send thisstartogivemelight. .9

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PLEADING. Unlearn me how to love thee, JO\'Cof mine, Givemeonce mON! the happiness I IroewEre my unknowing eyes gazed intothine ADd tomy soul's IIweet calm I bade adieu. Unlearn me howtolove tbee, setmefree,Easethoutheburden of ill,}'restless heart And give me once again tranquillity;Thedays seem years, the nightsh-esh grief impart. Unlearnme how to love tbee,toforget Thehauntingmelody of lo\'c's refrain And all the worldthat lies in thee, andyetWhenI forget bow shall I live again? Unlearnme how to love thee, though I die, Deathis a welcome kiss to suchas1.50

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TO...I love you for whatI know you CQuldbeI hate you forwhatyou nre, May I hopethatsome beautiful day I shall seeAIy glow-worm transformedtoa stal'.51

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POVERTY.Whatcan I bring to thee-what have Iyet? Yea, answer make-thou whodostcometomeWithlove so deep andstrong, draw nearandlet Me listagainthemusic ofthyplea. How should I answer thee? ForI am poor, The riches ofmylove 'were spentin vain, Thoubringestme thy heart's own wealth instoreShall Ibring tbee the ashes that remain?:And dostthou hopetofind therein asparkRekindled by thytrueandsteadfastlove?Thatwillburstforthandso dispelthedarkAnd dreary damps'midwhich I sadly rOve?Itmaybetbatthou wilt, Icannottell;Forsadandlonelyheartsmakedullthebrain,And since my sorrow dotbnotthee repel. Thoumaysttunemyhearttolove again. Then,itthoumustbe answered, here's my heart, The home of griefand8orrowanddullfear, And since thouartcontentwewillnotpart;Thestrengthof thy great love shall minerepair.52

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MISCELLANEOUSPOEMS. 63

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MY HOPE.I donothopethatsoinedayI shallwriteApoemwhereon all mankindshnlliookAndpauseinwonderasthey <'!osethebook Andmarvelatthegrandeur of the flight; Nordo I hope tobeamongthefew Whose worksare by thegreatand wise, Butdonotbind theheartby simple tics,NOl'simplehumanfaithwithinrenew.Nay,rather,may my hopebesomething more,Some simple songsthatstealupfrom tile heart,Bornofgreatlove,greatlongingandgreatpain,Thathumble souls who havebutlittlelore May feeltherein a comrade'steardropsstart,Andclasp ahandthat presses theirs again.55

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MYHOPE.I donothopethatsome day I shall writeApoemwhereonallmankindshalllookAnd pause in wonderasthey close thebook And marvelattlle grandeur of the flight;Nordo I hopetobe among{lIefewWhose work!! arclaudedby the greatandwise,Butdo not bind the"heartby simple ties,Norsimple humanfaithwithin renew.Nay,rather,maymy hope be something more,Some simple songsthatsteal up fromtheheart, Born of greatlove,greatlonging andgreat pain, Thathumble souls who havebutlittle lore May feel therein a comrade's teardrops start,And clasp a handthatpres8Cstheirs again.55

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RESPITE.ThinkDotmylife is sad Because in minor strain My80ngsmust:flowto thee; Deep peace andjoy remain.WhenthatIam distressed,My harpItakein. hand,Andinthese souUuI songsI reach a happier land. And tllcn IrestmyharpWith all my griefs forgot, Itoiland smile awhile,Whate'ermaybemy lot. And when new griefs appear, And myhearthurts 3gaiD,My faithfulharpandI,We singourplaintivestrain.56

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,THE PASSING OFTHEYEAR.Old Year, thouartdying, Would I weretoo; Soon should I be lying Close beside yon.Old Year,tllOuartdead,Would I were too;Butt11eNew Year bas said There's workyetto do 7

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A MOTHER'S CRY.Andheis dead, my child, my only80n,Aye, indeed, andfor these ten long yearsI hu\'cnotseen his face1101'llcard his voice, Norputmyal'maabout his tender formAnddrawnhim to myhungrylonging breast. Cold in hisearlygraveHelies,mywell belo\'(!d SOD !las goneWhom ten yearssince Ileftatinybabe,Lefthimmydarlingchild with manyteul'S.Oh, he:lrt of mine, howdidst tllou undertakeSoharda taak,tobid farewelltoolleSo tenderandso sweet? Oh, woeful dayWhen IUllclaspedthose tinybabyhandsWhichclungto me, amidsttheblinding tears I couldnotstem;ob did I persist? 'Vhy did Inotgrowweakaodanswer 'No,'Staywitbmyinfantchild,my first bornsonOr bear him with mco'ertbe restlessseas? And nowthon'Ituc\"er know,mydarlingchild,Thatlo\'cfor tllcc (n mockery now it seems), Boreme awny from theeto unkuown lnnds, Wherenightanddaymy thoughtshave been ofthee.The sleepless nightsI passed in wakingdreams WhenoftIfeltyourbaby fingers clingSoeagerlytome! How oft atdawn I seemed tohearyour tender, birdlike coo! Howlong the years ba\'e been, howdark and !irear!Row often have Isatalone in tears, Andwishedandlonged to hold you in my arms,My babe whose infantcry was 8weetest musicTomineear,mineownfair son, whose lifeForoneshortyear, one glorious, lovelyyearWasnourished, cherished, tendedby these hands!Oh God,andthouwilt never know my Ieve, Ne'er pl'O\'e a Mother'sheartor lW.crifice: Forthouartdead, my child, my only son,Whenmy fond dreamshadtofruitioncome,AndI should clasp thee to my bl-east again. A fewshortmonthsandI should sec my babe58

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Tosplendid boyhood grown, him for whomBothdnyandnightI InbOured, prayedand planned, No, nevermore shall I behold his face,Orhear him call me Mother, Oh, my God, My heartcriesoutinanguish unto Thee,Thechild Thou gavestmeThouhastrecalled, Maybe because I failed Thytrusttome,Failed hopelessly whenthusI went awayE'erhe hadlearntto lisp Thy nameinprayer, Tho' fostered still by lo\jng gentle handsWhatheartcanunderstand like Mother's hertl't! Whatotherlovecanfeed aninfant's soul'! I sinned, though goodintentwas thenmyguide, And now my cross is more thau I can bear,My son has gone from me:oOodindeep distress of soul I cry, Cometomineaid;myson,myonly child, Thouhastcalled home to Thee,andmyfaintbeartInanguish soreisaching in my breast.Hewill return DOmore, ah nevermore. Oh, Thou who stood by Lazarus' grave long siuce Come Thoutome, forgive my sinandcalmThistumultinmysoul-helpme, oh God; The waves of sorrow o'ermefiercely roll, GrantThouto me,Thy erring sorrowing child, Beyond this cross to see Thy loving face, TobearThee say, "Sumcient is My Grace!'59

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Come onlittleMolly. Climb upon my knees, Open ;your big grey eyee Sothatyou cansee. Don'tyou knowI loe you, Love you such a lotThatDotfor a moment Are you e'erforgot? Why, you have been sleepingAll thelive longday!'Vake up nowand greet me,Letus have some play. Tell methatyou love me, By your gentle purr, While I hold you closelyStrokingdown your fur. Tell mewhatyou dreamed of,OftI saw youstart;Didyoufind abirdie?Bless yourlittleheart.Didyou see yourbabiesWhile youlay asleep? 1Iolly, I still love you Though I made you weep. How you miss those infants, Call them every night, Makes my own heartache80,Surely'tisnotright. :Holly, theyare safe, love,Safefromevery harm,Hushyour restless crying, Iwillbring you calm.60

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Soonwillcome some others, AndIpromise youThattheselittledarlingsShall remain withyou. And youwillbehappyWiththemalltheday; Cheer up pretty, Molly, Come along and play.61

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FRIENDS.Oh Lord, please sendme somc good friends Whose beartsare true assteel, Whose smiles come fromtheirinmost souls, And tellthelove they feel. Notmany Lord,butjust n few Withunderstandingheart And love tbattakes inallthe world, NorshuDs the bus;r mart.Truefriends whowill notsmile awhile, Then frown behind myback; ButloyalfriendswholllI CUD trustTostandtruetotherack.Lord,makemesuch a friendtoall,Firm,faithful,true and bold;Even through sorrow,Ue it l.ord, Oh makemyhearttrue gold. G2

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HENRY'S AMBITION. (ATrueIncident). LittleHenrywasjusttenandlived beside the seaYou wouldthinkhe was ambitious a sailor manto be, Butno, though hewentfishingandrowing muuy a day. His hopes forfuturehappiness didhardlyliethatway.Tononehetold his secret, thongh oftenODewould ask Ifwhen be grew tomanhood be would like a specialtask;His largebrowne;ycsgrew largerbuthe ne\'crsaidaword,Andhekeptit as a secret,80tllat nobody heard. Butoutitcame onc morningina most mysterious way.Thelittleman 'Went fishing with his Uncle in the Bay.The sea wasveryangryandhuge wa,'es dashed about, To hear eachotherspeakingatlength each hadto shout. A mighty wave abovethem rose, theyhadto sink orswim,PoorHenry sauk beneath the wn.n!S, his e;yeswith fright grew dim.Full twice he rOlSC and sank again whenstrong arms caught his waistAndbore himo'erthewater; thcrew.as no timeto waste. Witheyesshut tight, and sJluttering mouth his Uncle heard him say,"Icannot drh'ca motorcaryctTmllst drownto-<1ay."Andthis was followed by agro.aD and consciousness then "ed. Whennexthe opened his brown ('yes hefound himself in bod. To-dayHenryto manhood grown can drh-e a motorcar,And ne"cr tires or makes a slip a.lthough the way be far. Henow has new ambitions, .and I hope theywillcome ,,"uoAs the chcrishedODeheutteredwlleDhe thought his lifewasthrough. G3

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INVOCATION.Gentle Muses, come and bless mc, Take me to your bower again, I ha"c wandered, loneandweary, 'Midearth'sjoy and 'midearth'spainProdigal,returning homeward, Sickatheartandtossed about, I can onlystillgo forwardIfyOll stay this anxious doubt. Roaming far from thy caresses, Yet some treasure h/H'e I found, Oasesin wildernesses Deep I dug beneatll the gl'otmd. Thesewill scne meif yonI'blessing Falls upon my soul to-night,ForI need your tender guidanceInthis fresh ad\-entUNlUS flight.Gentle Muses, come and bless me, I would soar,but know not how, Sweet inspirers, IamonlyWaitingfor your ,'oices now. 6'

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:WAITING. Here I sit thelong, lone Pen inhandand scroll on knee,Waiting for anin.spiration Forto write somepoetry. Everything seems inmy favour,Allthestringsin perfect tune,Butthemelodystilllingers,OnthislovelynightinJune.Dianawithmagic splendourO'ermecasts lief potent spell,Fragrantrosesroundmy windowStillinsistthat all iswell.YetIcannotwriteasonnetOra lyric clearandsweet,Not n breathofinspirationComes to-night my soul to greet.Now I feel a call from dreamland, I will go, fordoubtlessthereI shall find theinspirationThatIwaitedvainly here.Oll'todreamlandthen 1111 wander, Sleep will soothe my discontent, AndperhapstheMuse willgreet me Whenthe,'eil ofnightisrent.65

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"THEBREATH OF MORN."Oh God, I thank Thee for this beauteous MornThatuntoU8Thy children has been born,Hertender breath blows soft upon my face, Andallthe land is wrappedinher embrace.oGo.d,give all Thy children eyesto see The splendourthatincommon days there he,AndgrantthatI may ever liveThypraiseForThy great gifts in Nature's wondrous ways.

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FOSTERED.I clasp yourhandinmineandsay no word,Trustingthe silence toconvey to you The depth of feelingthathas sealed my lips Now when they most should speak consoling words. The tale youtellgoestomy very aoul-So deep that, eveninthesesilent bouI'S, I longtotakeyoutomy throbbing breast,Andbid you weep againaswhen a child Youmusthavewepttogaina fond caress From her who bore you. Still,youprospered well, And she who gave you all herheartcould give Has lived to see your manhood richandstrong.Yetthathearthunger, yes, I knowitwell, Has only strengthened with the lengthening years. Ifeelyour sorrowandit hurts the more Because I have no powertoheal yonI' wound.Butit may comfort youatleastto know Thatmyheartfeels with you your every hurt,And, when I claspyourhandinsilence still,I pray theyearswillbring yon happiness. 67

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"JOYCOMETH.Ilaid me downwithgrief to pass thenight,And tenrs unbidden flowed tbl'o' weary hours And watered allmycouch;buterethelightOf dawn arose, sleep ledmeto bel' bowers, :Andthen 8Sonher mossy bed Ilay, My 80ul forsook the fever oftheday. And, whileintroubled sleep, one cametomeIn garmentswhite; less white her lovely face, Her eyes were wet, butstill she smiledatme And beckoned metofollow her apace. Iroseandfollowed withDO anxious fear: :Were nother eyelids wet withmany atear?We wanderedthro'thewoods, I grasped bel' hand, ''Haste forthedawnwillsoonbehere," I said, "And nowIknowthatthoudost understand Forinthine eyes some message I ha\'e rend." "The time is long," shesaid; "bepMicnt still;Dawn will notcometillImy task fulfil." And soonwecalllcupon afragrantbower Securely made and with wild flowers o'er-run, Safe from harsh wind and heavy frost nnd shower, With casements forthebright beams ofthesun."Sit here," she said, "andI to thee will tell Why I alone withinthisbower dwell. "Once, like to thee, I hadmy yOlltllful dreams,Greatlongings and desires fordistantthingsjLike tbee I wanderedfarby lonely streams, And sigbedtbatlike the birds I might have wings. I prayed for loveandcomfort, wealth and fame, And feltI'dweepDO more if these butcame. "And love did come,_ht notasI bad dreamt,Witbsweeping fire that dazzled allmy soul And filled my youthful dreams, and80I sent To heaven a cry thatfrom my anguish stoleUptothethroneofGod, 'Send me such loveAspoets dream whilethro'the woods they rove.' G8

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"1 badnotlongto wait, for this love came, A migbty forcethatshookmy vel'y life, And withitall the comfort wealthandfameThat1 had sighedfO!" iumyearly strife; Andallthethings 1 craved wereatmyfeet: Truly, I thought, my life is now complete, 'fVain thought!fOrtbere were longings in mybreastThatwouldnot silent be,and 80 I wept; Butunto none wasthismy grief confessed. 1 'woke andsighed tbe while my 10\'cr slept, 1 coold notpray-howpray when God had givenEachboonfOrwhich my soul had cried to heaven? "My lover asked, 'Why are thine eyelids wet? Hast thou notallthatthis "ain world can give? Thou ever basta smile formeandyetI knowthatdeepinsorrow thou d08t li,'c. Thy grieftofathomoftin,'oin Itry;Come, kissmenowandstillthatweary sigh! "That eve they broughtmylover home to me, A lifeless clay, 'An accident,' theysaid;1 hcard as ina dream-I couldnot see Fortears,butyetI kue\1' thatbe was dead. Then, one by one, fame, wealthandcomforts went, Andallthe joys thatunto me were sent.''Naturewasallthecomfortletttome. I lingered long beside the .selfsamestreamWhere inyearspast1 had so lo\'ed tobe,And where I had full many a glorious dream, Ilaidme down upon her banks and weptUntilmy tearsflowed iu a ri"ldet. "The rh'ersang the selfsame merf')' songThat charmed my soul inhappy da:)'s gone by, Nonote of sorrow couldtoher I.>eloug, Sbe never feltUleburden of asigh;Then myheart smote me, for I surely knewThat crags, and caverns dark obscured her "iew. "The scalesfeUfl'ommyeyes. There cameatlast Inwondrous clearness to mystartled eyes A visiontrueof allmychangefulpast 69

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That filledmenow with wonder and sllrprisejGod had grown weary ofmydiscontent. And 80 Betooktoheavenwhatoncenelent. "And I who hadnot prayed for many a day Lookeduptoheal'en'svaultin deep distressjInagony ofheartI sought topray And asked for mercyinHis tenderness; Hehad been merciful and kind to me,ButI from discontent was ne,'er free, 'Tholl art forgiven,' He &'lid.'hutrise and go Unto a place I hne prepared for thee; Thonshaltmyservantbeand li"e to showUntotheWOrldwhatthouhastlearntof Me, Andto My discontented children teachWhat sages have ill triedinvaintopreach.II 'When thoudostsee a child of Mine in pain And full of discontent, go, give thinehand:Thine eycs forevcrmore shallwCurthestrainOf tears, and this will make them understand,Forsorrow's language is so plain to all,Thatthey will rise andfollowatthy calL'"Andso I came for thce and bronght theeherc;Wecp not, butthinkindeed how blest thouartjGod's love surrounds his childrcn e\'el'ywhel'e, Be thoucontentandtrusttoGod thine hear't; Ifthouwilthumblydrink life's gall und wine,Eternal gladness shall some day be thine. "Nowlearn from one whoiscontent with aught;lancehadallthejoysthatlife enn gh'c. Yetwas Inotcontent-butGod hastaughtThatknowing discontentisnotto live. Socomewhatmay, grief. longing. lossor pain Letsweetcontentwithin thy soul remain." I woke with all the music of her voice Within my heart, andbirds were singing sweet, And sunbeams danced abont. I bad no choiceButto be glad und worship atHisFeet;Insorrow I bad lainmedown to rest; I woke with sweet contentmentinmybreast.70

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SAD SONGS. "Our .u;e6ted,ong.are tM6e thatteU of ,addutthoug'U/'ShtJlley.You ask me why I sit and sing sad songsInsteadof joyful oues.IslifeDotsad?Naturecan sing glad songs, toher belongs The powertosing when we cannotbeglad. Shehathnobeartto feclliCe's bitter pain; Shehathno eyes for tragedies oflife;Shebathnoearsto hear man'ssad refrain, No feet to jostle in tile endless strife. But how cnn I who daily feel life's strain, Whose eyes have witnessed scenes too sad for tears, Whosecarsha'-c heard of sorrow and disdainSingalways joyous aoDgs 'mid hopes and fears? How singgladsongs, wbenoftmy brethren weep, When burdened saintslift Ill' theirhandstoGod, When cares and Deed do rob their cJcs of sleep, And mourners weep for lovedOIles'neath the sod? How sing glad songs, when !late doth yetabound, And man stillliftsa bandagainst a. brother;When selfish deeds and thoughtless words abound, And meo feel notthe woos of oneanother? How sing glad songs, when, in life'sbitterschool, The lessonstaught arelovelyhutsevere; Yet we must learntokeep each well planned rule OnlyfOrlove and notfOr frightfijl fear? Does he who first attempts, sweet musiedrawFromanyinstrument?Nay, hemuststriveFormany a year,(it is of life thelaw),Ereat "his precious hope he dotharrh'e.Kindfriend, forgive me, I am younginyears;,What you have mastered is tome so new; I strive to seek life's meaning e'enthro'tears, And sooftsaddened thus I seem to you,71

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ButI ehall sing glad songs for you somedayWhen life'struemeaning is tomemade clear, When myheart'stumultshall h{l\'e died away, And my pliilosophy candrythetear. Till then, askmeno moretosing glad songs,Fornow I feel that saddest songsare sweet; When I havelearntthe mystery of lire's wrongs, Then I shallcast sweet trophies atyour feet.Tillthen, askmeno morejforin sad bours Theheartdoth calmly sowthegolden grain Thatshallspringup and send forth ]o,'ely flowers, And soabundantfruitshall then remain, Then shall my songs flowalways calm and sweet,Grandmelodies with joy andSOl'rowblent,Withchords majestic and rich tones and deep, As never unto mortal souls were sent.

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;rHANKSGIVING.Ithank Thee, Lord, for all the joysthatcome tomeinlife,ForNature's gentle soothing balmthatcomestoaidourstrife;Forfriends, for health, for books, (or food and everythingbeside,ForThy sweet words of 10\'c and cheerthatinourheartsabide.ButLord, Iwanttogive Thee thanksformyownquiet room,:Withwindows opentothe east androses round inbloom,.With Naturepictures onthewalland booksupon theshelf :where Icanleave the world outside and seek toknow myself. To &Orne it'sbuta trifle, dearLord, iVs allto mo. Forinitscalm andquietI can often speak to Thee, Ican sing my soogs of gladness orfindreliefin tears, AndinThy love find refuge from life's manyillsandfears. matpeace comcstomyhearthere in this qnietlittle Where Isitandwriteat leisure aodwhere con.8ictenters not;Icanreadorwritea poem oralettertoa friend, Ortunemy little phonograph with myownmoodtoblend. And so, Lord, thoughImaynotownahousethat is aUmine; I'm gratefulfor thislittlespot and will no morerepine;Ionly need a resting placethewhileIjourney here,FordailyIamncaring my fair homeland Over Therc. 73

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THE PEM..rDT BOY.Lord, look uponthis pemlllt boy,He's rough and coarse nnd rude;He has been selling all the day, Bis words arc vcry crude.But, Lord, he'sworDand wcary now,See bow he stands asleep;Hishead isl'csting011the post,'l'he basketathis feet.Deal' Lord, he Iwe not sold them all,ButhehasdODellia best:And, while hestandsnnd sleeps awhile, Withsweet dreams make him hlest.And, Lord, when Ishallfall asleep Withmytasksincomplete, Remember I was weary Lord, And give me peattfuIsleep.7<

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TO-He was 80young,sogentleandso sweet, I neededDOt a second glauce to seeThatin hisheartdidtender graces meetAnd from base thoughtsandactious he was free. I lookedathimand loved his yonthful face, I heard him speak and loved his mellow voice, Isawhimsmile,and therein I couldtraceThe lovelinessthatmademysoul rejoice. HistllOUghtswere wondrous deep for oncsoyoung, But, child of Nntmc, he hadlcarnt her ways, And all her bcauteolls secretsyetunsungHe whispered tomeinthose aunny days.I loved himashespake-andlove himstillWith love thatlongs to shield him fromallharm;Oh, God of heaven, mould his gentle will,Andallthe foes that seek hisburtdisarm.75

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TO POESIE. Come, letmeclasp Thee to mybreastagain, Sweet Poesie, ah, whither should IfleeFromearth'sdull thraldom, save alonetoThee And there abideinpainful ecstasy? Come,letme feel thy kiss uponmylips, And quenchmythirstwith thy fresh honeyed dews, Fornaughtunto thy lovewiltthou l'cfuse, Thoughearthlylove away so swiftly slips. I had foresaken Thee, mytruestLove,Butnow I seek Thee with a famished heart, Remembering how thou nourishedmeofyore;Now I relinquishallwith whom I stroveAndturnagain from life's absorbingmart To bless Thee, love Thee, serve Thee evermore.76

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ANOTHER MOULD.You cantalkaboutyour babies Withblue eyesand hair of gold,ButI'll tell you 'bout an angelTllat's castinanothermould. Sheisbrownjustlike a biscuit, Andshe has the blackest eyes Thatdon't(or QDCeremind yOuOf the blue oftropicskies.AndherhairisblackandshinyAndherlittle teetll are pearls, Sbe'sjustayearI'lltell you,Butthebestof baby girls,0,she's sweeterthanthesweetest Ofallbabies'neaththe sun,AndI feel thatICQuldeather,Thinkingshe's asugarbUD.0,thelittle ivory babiesAreassweetasthey canbe,Butgive me my brownskincherubStilla-dangling on my knee. 77

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A LITTLEPRAYER.Lord,letmebecontenttodo Thelittlethingsthatcome my way.E'enwhen my heart is longing forA biggerandabrighterday. Lord,letme love thelittle gifts ThouseDdestto enrichmy heart, The friends.the books, thetender flowers Themerrybirdsthatne'er depart.Lord,help me lovetheuglythingsThattry my patience and my soul. And letme keep aheartthat smiles Tho'trials around me roll.AndLord,whenoftIfeelaloneInthisthy wondrous universe,Come,and thy lovetomereveal And allthe dreary gloom disperse. 78

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TOMOTHERS.Here's a songtothe MothersThe Mothers of every race,Inevery country underthe llunIn every clime andplace. The Mothers whose hearts arehappy, And those whoseheartsaresad, The Mothers whose childrenareangels, And those whose children are bad.0,thCl'C'Snoheartlike a Mother's, There's no such love sublime As fillstheheartofthewomenWho are mothersinevery clime. Then here's a songtothe Mothers,To yours,andyours, and mine, YoungOrold,bethey here orThere,They are withthe apark divine!79

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CONFLICT. My heartissickandsad todaYl To me there comes no joy,Formy soul yearns to soar away, Where cares no more annoy_ My spirit fain wouldgather wingsAnd sour beyondthesky; A longing now withinme springs Fromthis dulleartbtofiy.Butthis frail earthlyframeof mineMy soulinbondage keeps,And seekstorob thesparkdivineWhilemy sadspirit wecpf3. Oh,soul, be patient;soon will comeThe time forthyrelease;Then thoushalt preen thywings for home Where thon shaltbeat peace. 80

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THELITTLEGUEST.There's a baby in the house, So beware, Just be quiet as a mouse, AndtakecareHow youshut tlmt noisy door,Bowyoustrutuponthefloor;Ifyou wake bimI'll besore, Soprepare. Hejustcame two months tlgo,And I'll SIly He'sthe sweetest boy I knowAny dny;Hear his mammy singing sweet, How her becomes complete Ashekicks hislittlefeetInhis phlJ'! See the prideinher fair eyesShining bright, InherfirlllSherbabyliesSoftand lightAs she dreams of future yenrs, Ofthelaughter andthetears,0,the futurethathope rearsIn hel' flight.And proud daddy, be can rave O"er his boy. To bis charms he's now a slaveInhisjoyBaby is n peach for sure, "Listen, dear,don'tbangthatdoor.Didn'tI s..'ly thatbefore! Here's ,your toy." 81

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INJAMAICA.O! theBUDshines warm inJamaica,Fromone year's end to the next, The flowers bloom011illJamaica,AndsongbirdsUl'eUC\'C1'perplexed;It'sa lazy lifethatwe live here, Tho' wecarryafairshareofwork;Andtho'thewarmthmakesUBweary. It's seldom we really do shil'k. O! the darkics smile on inJamaica,And whistleorsingalltheday; There's always a song ringing somewhere, Tothemit i$a1w83'8 bright May.It's littlewe need forou.rcomfort, Wben we live in awee cosy cotIntheheartof the hills wherekind Nature Givesall,andthetoWDS are forgot.O!it'sagloriouslilein Jamaica.Forthe man 'whohaa merely enough,Butit'sadrearylife(orthe beggars, Andthelarge slums areall pretty rough.It'sagaylife too for the children Notpoor,andwhoseskin is light, Butthedarkerset are strivingAnd facing a very stiff fight.0, it's a wonderful life inJamaicaForthetouristswho visit this shore, There's golf, there's dancing, and swimming, And charmsthatthey ne'er saw before. They callita garden of Eden, They Io\'ethefairhills ofSt.Ann, And theysayonthewhite sands of Mo. Bay Theygetsuch a wonderfultnn!0,thel'e's beatlty in most e\'ery country, And scenes that brinrr thrillsof delight,Butthere's no place like sunnyJamaica,And no people whose hearts al'e80light. Should I leave these fail' shores for another,Bethatland Jet the fairest of all, I should pine for tile hills ofJamaica,And basten to answer her call.82

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REFUGE.I sought theearthlycomforts I could findTocalm the tempestsinmy troubled soul,T said a prayerformy peace of mindAnd sought to give the poor some trifling dole.OnODefrail hope Istakedmy happiness,And closedmyeycs to allthatcame between, Toearthlyfriends I went in my distressAndhardon wavering propsI sOllght to lean.Allfailedme;andin agony ofheartIturnedtoHimWho saith, "Come unto Me" And inour80rrows seeks toshareapart,ToHimfor refuge did my sad soul flee: And0,thoughlastofallHislove I How wonderful the peace tome He brought.

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INJAMAICA.o!thesunshines wa.rm inJamaica,Fromoncyear'send to the next, The flowers bloom on inJamaica, And songbirds areDCyerpe1'plexed;It's a lazy lifethatwe livehere, Tho' wecarryafair share ofwork; And tbo'thewarmth makes usweary,It's seldom wereallydoshirk.O!the darkies smile on inJamaica,Andwhistleorsingall the day;There's always a song ringing somewhere,To themitis alwaysbright !la-y.It's littlewe need foronr comfort. 'Vhcn weli\'cin a wee cosy cotIntheheartofthehills where kind NatureGivesall,andthetowns urc forgot.O!it's a glorious lifeinJamaicaFOr the man who has merely enough,Butit'sadrearylifefOl'the beggal's,Andthelargeslumsareallprettyrough.It'sa gay life too for the childrenNotpoor,andwhoseskinis light,ButthedarkersetarcstrivingAnd facing a very stiff fight.0,it'sa wonderful life inJamaica the tOllrists who visitthisshore, There's golf, there'sdancing,andswimming, And charmsthattheyne'ersaw before. They caUit a gardenofEden,They lo\'ethefairhills ofSt.Ann, And they say onthewhite s..'lnds of lIo. BayThey get such a wonderful ron! 0, there's beauty inmoste,-ery country, And scenesthat bring thrillsof delight,Bnttheres no place likesunnyJamaica,Andno people whose hearts areso light. Should I le:nethese fairshores for another, Bethatlandyetthe fairest of 9..l1, I should pine for the hills ofJamaica,And hastentoanswerher call.82

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REFUGE.I 80ught theearthlycomforts I could findTo calm the tempests in my troubled soul, I said II.prayerfor my peace of mindAndsoughtto give the poor some trifling dole. On onefrail 110pe Istakedmy happiness, And closed my eyestoallthatcame between, Toearthlyfriends I wentinmy difltI'css Andhardon wavering props Isoughtto lean.Allfailedme;andinngony ofheartIturnedtoHimWhosaith,"Comeunto Me" Andinoursorrows seekstoshareapart,To Him for refuge didmysad 80111 flee:And 0,thoughlastofallHislove I sought, Howwonderfulthepeace to meHebrought. !IS

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REASONING.oheartof mine, canst thounotbecontentWith all the glories life lays atthy feet, The rosy dawnsthatuntothee areseDt, Thelaughing children withtheir facessweet? The roses bloom for thee on c\'ery band,For thee thebirds are singing in the trees,Fair Nature'sbeautieso\OerspreadthelandAndthine are allthe wonders of the seas. Ohheart,what need istbisthat all earth'sbalmCannotassauge?Whatisthismighty boonThatthou wouldst haxe to bring thee perfect calm?Thou growest weary ofthe years too soon: Takethon life's giftsupon thy bended knee,NaughtforthygoodwillGod withhold from thee. 8.

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THESNARE. Wherefore dojoysthat arefairestandbestFadeasfast 88the frailest of flowers '! :wherefore do hearts that have stoodthe great test Pass awayinthebriefest of hours? Wherefore does fate stir theheartof desire When sbe mennsnotto whisper bel' peace? :wherefore doheartsgrow aweary and tire When there is no timely release? Wherefore doth God send DSsorrowandpain And heartsthat know littleof joy? Wherefore myheartdOBtthou sadly complain?Itis ease thatthy soulwilldestroy.85

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TO MY SISTER.I watched them asthey laid you in theeartb,Notyou,butwhatremained of mortal clay After yoursoulhad leftits feeble berth Forrealms beyond ofeverlasting day. The peace of God was in your calm sweet face,Foryou, beloved, death had lostitssting;Loved ones were waitingyou in somefairplace Where there are neithertearsnor journeying. You bade usnottoweepormourn your loss; Truly, we wouldnotha,'e you Buffer more;But,ab, tean arebut weak when such a cross Weighs on theheart,now you have gone before. Now you ha,'e gone I am indeed alone, Such love3Syours no more onearth is shown.86

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TIME.oTime, thoughallthe world doth singthypraise,YetwillnotI,butcllrsethy vcr;}' name, Andbatethycoming nightsand speeding days Who for my sorrowsarcthemostto blame.oTime, thoustealerof sweet childhood's hours Whotakest all andgivethbuttheearth,WiltthouDotgrantmebut these simple DowersTogivemyleaden soul a littlemirth? My kindred,nearanddearesttomyheart,Thou takest from me, I amleftalone;Andnow again I feel thy wickeddartSpeed outorob me of theallI own. Since thou Jmst taken allthatlife holds dear,Hereismyheart,be swift, I have no fear. 87

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MY HEART IS SAD.Althoughthedayis perfect as c:m be,Asightfitforthe gOO$ andtorhumanityTo wander round inperfect e<::stasy,Myheart is sad. Though (airestroses bloom on every band,And treeswent' golden flowers throughoutthelandAnd sparklingwavesefU'CSS thethrobbing sand, My heartissad. beyond the beauties I behold, I see world sorrowand distress untoldInGod's supreme creationstillunfold, Myheart is sad. Because my restless 80ulisfartoostrongFOrthis enfeebled flesh in which itlongMustlinger,anddisturbmy perteet song, Myheart is sad. Because Imustkeep onthis weary way, And stillbe brft\'c thoughtrialswillhave swayUntilthedawnbringsina.fairerday, My heart is sad. Because those deD.rest totbisheartofmine Are sharingintheglorythatisThine,Andthis poor dross Thou seekcst to refine, Myheart issad. Becauseearth's beauty is so rich and deep, And wecanonly see through eyes thatweep, Because wemustclasp pain from steeptosteep, Myheartissad.88

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SONGSOFJAMAICA."Write n song about1m-ely Jamaica,' You ask with a smileinyour voice; And I wouldbehappy toplease you,Butit seema thatIhaven'ta choice.rthoughtI'dwriteofDunn'sRiver,OroftheWhiteSandsat Mo.Bay, Butthe pen itjust stuck tomy fingers, It seemed Ihadnothingto say. Then I thoughtofthe peak of Blue Mountain By the fair fickle cloudsoftcaressed,OfthesoftRowingriveratBogWalkAndtheliliesthatbloom on her breast.I wanderedinlovely Hope Gardells,Smeltthefragranceof orchids80 !'are, Sntdown'neaththeflowery arbours,Andsawpoetryroundeverywhere.Irecapturethese scenesasI'm writing, AndI'mmoved by their churm rich and deep,Butfor fine words to paint afairpicture, To the musesstillvainly I weep. 0,Jamaica,the Muse willnotgrantmeThe powertopraise theein song, FOr where in God'searthis such beauty Or where doth such splendour belong?ItmaybethatIamnotworthy,Butstill forthisblessing I'll pray, And maybeinsongs worthy of theeI'll voice thy rich glories some day. Till then,mykind friend, please bepatient, Andlistnsa.humbleheartsings. IbutwaitfOrthebreath of the Muses I'mthe barp,buttheystrikeon tbe strings. 89

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PERHAPS.Iam afraid ofthat which lies within My "cry soul, andlikea smouldering fire Seems on the verge ofburstingintoftnme And80ccn$llme my very being's might. Itrytofathomwbattheurgemay be, And8omct,jmcsitI'c'-calsits l)l'csence thereLike fluttering-a of thetinywingsthatgrow Upontheficdgling and with wbichitsoarsTo heightsinlateryears.AndcanitbeThatthisvague consciousnesswithinmysoulIsbutthe firstfaintforecastthatsomedayThis youngandhumble lover ofallthingsMaygladlygiveuntothe wol'1d she10\'C8,Innouncertainorenfeebled DOtes Somelittlegiftherheartdoth longtogive, Somegiftin )O\"C thatwillnotdie withher?90

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THETIDAL WAVE.Itwas in bleak OctoberthatIleftthe city's roar, And onallworkandworry for two long weeks closedthedoor, A. holiday beside thesea, how wonderfulitseemed,Atlastthe coming of the days of wbich I often dreamed. One evening whileweyoungsterschattedoninmerrymood, AndstarsshoDefcrtbin splendour rare andalltheworld seemed good,Isaw abrightlightmovingtotheswing of someone'shand, "As'Mass John,'some one whispered, "he is known amongourband!'And soon he joinedOurparty,wehadmetbutoncebefore,Hewas abrothertomyhostandthere he li'l'"ed nertdoor,"Howdo you likeyourholiday beside tbe mighty sea?" "Delightful, 'MassJohn,' I replied,"butit'stoo calmforme. "1 loveto see herwben sbe moaosand roars thewholedaylong, And in thenightwhen I awaketohearbel' restless song,Notonce since I ba\-e been here ha\-e I seen herfumeand fre4" He answered in amannerthatIshallnot SOOn forget."Soyou likeangry seas," hesaid, "WellfiftyyearsagoI used to say the same thingbut I've cbanged my mind, oh no,IpraythatImay neverliveto witness such a night,I'mnotso youngasIwas whenI witnessed thatdreadsight. "It wasinbleak Octoberandthenightwascalmandstill,Wewere checking oil bananasandworking with a will, The wharf waslined with bunchesyetwekepton piling more, Wehadourordersstraightandplaiuto load ahundredscore.91

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"Asharpringfrom the telephone! I answereditinhaste,'Shiftup as best you can,'Ibeard, 'thereisno timetowaste. Lookatyourown barometer,it'sfalling very fust, A $torm or tidal wave will come before the nightispast.'''1looked at ourbarometer,itwas downtendegrees,Ilooked outside andnota breathatwindstirredinthe trees; Ilooked acrossthemighty deep,itseemed sereneandcalm, One scarcely could believethatit was brooding any harm.''1 gave thementhewarning and we started intowork,Witheager hands eachtellin,nota man was seen toshirk;A stony vault, thevestige of agrandoldsugarmill, Stoodjnstacrosstheroad,andthiswithfruitwe soughttofill. ''We hadbuthallway finished whentherecame a mighty roar, And the wa,oes in one brief second like mountains seemedtosoar;Thewharf 600n started creaking, weallhustledtothe cal"e, Fortoremain without wouldbetoseek a watery grave. "And, huddled there we trembled aswe watched theoceanswell,Butuponthat scene terrificI searcely caretodweI1Withina single hourthewholewharfwas washed away, AndtheOfficefollowedafterina most mysterious way. ''We lookedat all in silence,nota man was heardtospeak, Our eyes grew large with wonderandourbravestmen grew weak;Butit was no time for weakness or'Wondering, for, lo! Across theroadthebillows cameandwe would have togo. 92

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"Afew brief acconds mOfe and the floods rose toourwaist, 'Come on, MassJohn,'one whispered, 'mount my back and do makehaste';We scrambledouttogether andwetried to climb a hill,Notastarwasintbeheavcns, we gl'oped on cold and chill."AndthercwestoodfOrhOUfSlisteningtothebillows roar, Seeing only the white foaming creststhatbeatagainstthe shore, No moon abo"e to give us light, thick darkness round us lay. Ourhearts were very eager for theswiftreturnof day. "And, ohthechangethatcameat dawn! The sea grew calmandstillIt seemed we were in otherlandsagainstourfeeblewill,Forwherewehad sought shelter had become a rocL.J" shore, AndallthelaboursotOur hands had gonetor e,'er more." Weheardinbreathless silence this fiercetaleof tidal wave, And wondered howtheworking men wereallso calm andbrave."Itmusthave been a fearful night,"Isaid mO"ed by the W., "It'swonderfultothinkthat ;your bra\-espiritdid notfail""YetNature'sways arewise," he said "from evil cometh good, We should have no fine harbours werethe sea in gentlemood ThroughaU the years, Ah, yes,we sometimes need these ruthless seas; The thingsthatoften do most good are notthethingsthatplease,03

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"The sea has onegreatlesson, too, for all who wishtohear,'I'velearntitwell, and oftenit has savedmemany a tear, 'Vhen storms and tempests come and seem to shake my very life,Iknowthatthey can only make me braver for the strife."Heroseandtook thelanternashe bade a fond goodnight, The lesson had gone to my heartandgiven megreatlight,I blessed himaswepartedfor God's calm was in his eyesIfeltthathe had weathered storms and many cloudy skies. Butstill the longinghauntsme for rough seas full of unrest, Like tbese tiel'ce storms nnd tempeststhatoftrage within my Hercalmness seems to mockme;her wildroar would fitmymoodAnd hark, 'Mass John'still whispers,"Outof evil comethgood." 9.

PAGE 106

THEREWILL COME ATIME.Eachracethatbreathes the air of God'sfairworld Is sobO\lOdupwithinitslittleself,So jealous formaterialwealthandpowerThatitforgetstolook outsideitselfSave when tbereis Borneprospect of ricbgain;Forgetfulyetthateachandevery raceIs brotheruntohis,andin theheartOfeveryhuman being excepting none, There lies the selfsame love,the selfsame fear, The selfsame craving for the best that is.False prideandpettyprejudice prevailWhere love and brotherhood should have full sway.When shalltbis cease? 'TisGod alone who knows; Butwe who see throughthishypocrisyAnd feel thebloodofblackandwhitealike Course t.hroughourveinsasour strong heritage Must range onrselvestobuild the younger race.Whatmatterthat we beas cagM birdsWhobeattheirbreastsagainsttileironbarsTillblooddropsfall,andinheartbreakingsongs Our souls pass outtoGod? These very wordsInanguish sung, will mightily prevail.Wewillnotbe among thehappy heir$ Ofthisgrandheritage-butllnto llil Willcometheirgratitudeandpraise,Andchildrenyetunborn will reap" in joyWhatwehave sown intears.Forthere willcome A time wbenallthe races oftheearthGrown weary of theinnerurge for gain, Grown sick ofallthe fatness of tbew!le.lvell Andalltheirboasted prejudiceandpride'Villsee this visionthatnow comes tome. Aye, therewill rome a time whene"erymanWillfeelthatotbermenare brethren untobimWhen menwilllookintoeach other'sheartsAnd soula,andnotupontheirskinandbrain,And difference inthecustoms of tbe race. Though I should Ii\'e a hundred yearsorworeI shouldnot see thistime,butwhile I live,'Tismine toshareinthisgigantic task oroneness for the world's humanity. '5


STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076705/00001
 Material Information
Title: Heights and depths
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Marson, Una M.
Publisher: Gleaner Co.
Place of Publication: Kingston, Jamaica
Publication Date: 1931
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: Caribbean
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 50381118
System ID: UF00076705:00001


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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Dedication
        Dedication 1
        Dedication 2
    Introduction
        Introduction 1
        Introduction 2
    Foreword
        Foreword
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    Poems of Nature
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Poems of Love
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Miscellaneous Poems
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
Full Text





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HEIGHTS AND DEPTHS







POEMS

BY
UNA M. MARSON







WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY
SIR WILLIAM MORRISON, KT.













PRINTED BY THE GLEANER CO., LTD.,
KINGSTON, JAMAICA, B.W.I.
















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By the same AuIthor'
Orvpir RIttwrito


All Rights Reserved.





















TO
THE MEMORY OF
MY BELOVED MOTHER AND FATHER,
AND TO ALL THOSE WHO LOVE BEAUTY
AND WHO LOVE LOVE,
I DEDICATE THESE
POEMS.
























"As high as we have mounted in delight
In our dejection do we sink as low."
Wordsworth.














INTRODUCTION BY
SIR WILLIAM MORRISON, KT.


The Title of this excellent Book of Poems is
strongly indicative of the poetic temperament of its
Author as, with varying degrees of light and shade,
she takes you up to dazzling heights, and then brings
you down with startling rapidity to the lowest depths
of dejection and despair. But there is a strong note
running throughout which breathes a spirit of hope
and confidence, and so the ultimate effect is to leave
the Reader in a glad frame of mind refreshed and
invigorated by the inspiration he has received.

I like the simplicity of language in which all
these verses are couched, the lilt and tone which run
so smoothly, and the absence of any artificial striving
after effect, all of which produce a fine harmonious
whole.

The poems are in three groups, and deal with
Nature, Love, the passing of time and the peculiar
beauties and joys of our Island Home. I like well
the character sketch of "The Peanut Boy," the beauty


VII






and pathos of "Heights and Depths," (from which
the volume is named), and the refreshing touch of
"The Nameless Flowers." But they are all good and
full of interest, and my hearty congratulations and
warmest thanks are tendered to Miss Marson for the
delightful entertainment she has given me and the
privilege which I have been afforded in writing this
Introduction.


A 4L. C


VIll
















AUTHOR'S FOREWORD.


The warm reception accorded my first book of poems
has encouraged me to present to the public a second
volume.
I wish to thank all those who have so generously ex-
pressed their appreciation of my efforts in this direction,
and trust that they will find further pleasure in "Heights
and Depths"; and particularly Mr. J. E. Clare McFar-
lane, Secretary of the Poetry League for Jamaica, who
has always advised and encouraged me.
I am deeply indebted to Mr. Astley Clerk and Mr.
W. J. Masterton without whose very practical assistance
it would have been impossible for me to carry through
both publications.
UNA M. MASON.
Kingston,
Jamaica, B.W.I.
September, 1931.






CONTENTS.


POEMS OF NATURE:
'Tis June .
Discord .
Sunshine and Rain
The Speedwell
The Coming of the Raindrops
Nature's Heart .
Confidences
The Rivals .
The Approach
The Meeting of the Clouds .
Gold of the Cassia
The Nameless Flowers
Jamaica .
A Moonlight Reverie .
POEMS OF LOVE:
The Captive
A Great Love
The Call .
I Care Not .
Dreaming .
Communion
Would You? .
A Complaint
Unawares .
Heights and Depths
The Letter .
Greed .
The Heart's Cruelty
A Dream .
Resignation .
Ethereal
Ecstasy
Forgetfulness
Some Day .
The Ingrate
Love's Eclipse
Pleading
To-
Poverty .


PAGE

3
* 4
5
6
7
9
10
12
14
15
16
17
19
20


27
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52





CONTENTS- (Continued)


MISCELLANEOUS POEMS:
My Hope .
Respite .
The Passing of the Year
A Mother's Cry .
To Molly .
Friends .
Henry's Ambition
Invocation .
Waiting .
The Breath of Morn
Fostered
Joy Cometh ....
Sad Songs .
Thanksgiving .
The Peanut Boy.
To .
To Poesie .
Another Mould .
A Little Prayer .
To Mothers .
Conflict .
The Little Guest.
In Jamaica .
Refuge .
Reasoning .
The Snare .
To My Sister
Time .
My Heart is Sad .
Songs of Jamaica
Perhaps .
The Tidal Wave .
There Will Come a Time


55
S 56
S 57
S 58
S 60
62
S 63
. 64
S 65
S 66
S 67
S 68
S 71
S 73
S 74
75
S 76
S 77
78
79
S 80
81
S 82
.83
84
85
86
87
S 88
89
90
91
95


PAGE
























POEMS OF NATURE.






















'TIS JUNE.
0 my heart be glad and sing,
For 'tis June!
List the music song-birds bring,
All in tune;
See the roses rich and rare,
Smell the fragrance everywhere,
O what joys beyond compare
Come in June!







DISCORD.
How can ye be merry, ye songbirds,
And sing such glad songs all the day,
When my heart is a-weary, a-weary,
And cannot respond to your lay?
How can ye be merry ye blossoms
And sweet fragrance breathe on the air,
When your perfume can only remind me
Of things that awaken despair?
How can ye be merry, ye wild winds?
I hear your bright laughter and shout,
When all my sad heart is a-wailing,
With grief and unrest tossed about?
How can ye be merry, ye sunbeams,
And proudly display your white crest,
When billows and tempests within me
Forbid any friendlier guest?
How can ye be filled with gay laughter,
Ye days of sunshine and good cheer,
When there is no gladness within me,
And gloom dwells with me everywhere.
O, break through the darkness within me,
Fond love of my heart with a smile,
For the birds and the flowers are calling,
And I am so weary meanwhile.
They will not be sad or be dreary,
They are calling for me to come home,
But how can I go, my beloved,
O how can I greet them alone?
Your sweet smile their splendour enhances,
Your love keeps my heart all in tune,
O, come, for Fair Nature is calling,
0 Love, I am here and 'tis June!

















SUNSHINE AND RAIN.
How lovely the sun shines forth
After rain;
How fair are the joys that come
After pain.
How sweet are the flowers that bloom
After rain;
How tender the heart doth grow
After pain.
How quickly the fruit grows ripe
After rain;
How swiftly the soul finds gain
After pain.
How rich is the taste of the fruit
After rain;
How large is the heart of God's child
After pain.











THE SPEEDWELL.
I love the little speedwell flowers
That grow beside my door,
They close their eyes and go to sleep
Just as the clock strikes four.
But at the songbird's waking cry,
They open their blue eyes,
Eyes bluer than the ocean's breast,
And fairer than the skies.
One day the busy honeybee
Came just at break of day,
The speedwells had scarce ope'd their eyes
Ere he was on the way.
"Awake, awake, my loves," he said
And gently kissed each,
"I love your eyes of dainty blue,
You rob my heart of speech."
Then, with a promise to return,
He on his errands went,
The speedwells laughed and whispered low,
"This has been some event."
"He has not been to us for weeks
He has so many loves,
But how can we resist his charms
Though often far he roves?"
And then they laughed and danced about
The while I loved them more,
I hope that I shall always see
Fair speedwells at my door.






THE COMING OF THE RAINDROPS.
For months my poor flowers were drooping,
All brown with the heat of the day,
They lived for the soft dews of night time,
To soothe the bright sun's scorching ray.
I lovingly coold them at evening,
When I had a few drops to spare,
But often they sighed for the raindrops
That unto their hearts were so dear.
One eve, as I wandered among them,
They seemed in a mood of delight,
"Lift up your fair heads," said the Lily.
"The raindrops are coming tonight."
And soon the news spread thro' the garden,
The wee violet popped out her head,
"Are the raindrops coming to greet us?
Oh I am so happy," she said.
I looked at the sky, it was cloudless,
A crescent moon shone from above,
The flowers all seemed very happy,
And sang of bright laughter and love.
I was glad that they all were so happy,
And I kissed them a tender goodnight,
As I came to the Lily she whispered,
"Madam, have you seen the fair sight?"
"Look up at the horns of the crescent,
What do you see sparkling there?
Why, the raindrops all glisten already,
They will come before morn, so prepare!"
I rejoiced with them all as we parted;
And I prayed that their vision was true,
But I slept with my windows all open,
I feared not the rain nor the dew.
I woke at the call of a wee voice
Which whispered, "My lady, beware,
The cool crystal raindrops would kiss you,
So draw close your curtains,-take care."






Before I had opened my eyelids,
I felt some cold drops on my face,
And I heard the wild rose at my window
As she sighed at their loving embrace.
And now since His Rain came to cheer them,
There's never a sigh or a tear,
Every flower is happy and cheerful,
And no one has ever a care.
They dance every day in the sunlight,
And talk of that wonderful time
When the raindrops returned to caress them,
And gave them that glorious sign.
And the raindrops have promised the flowers
Never to linger so long,
But to woo them and love them more often,
And cheer their fond hearts with a song.











NATURE'S HEART.
Give me a life of indolence and ease
Close 'to the heal t of Nature. When I please,
Let me revisit man's relentless mart
And feel the pulse of her swift throbbing heart.
Let me be free to wander by yon stream,
And sit beneath the trees and dream and dream
With song of birds to soothe my heart's dull pain,
And join the rushing river's sweet refrain.
And let me listen while the dainty flowers
Whisper and laugh away the golden hours,
And learn from them how they such fragrance give
Although so brief a time on earth they live.
Let me adore the beauty of a tree
So graceful and so full of majesty,
And learn the secret that to birds belong
How I may lift life's burden with a song.
Oh give me heaven's blue above my head,
And fragrant wild flowers on a mossy bed;
And when I seek again life's busy mart,
May Nature's peace sustain my fevered heart.






CONFIDENCES.
It was a perfect day in perfect June
When evening shadows come, alas, too soon;
I had been wandering in the woods all day,
And now upon a mossy bank I lay,
When, lo! two birds upon a flowering tree,
Who sought its shade, no doubt, for privacy,
Conversed in this wise, though it was quite clear
They had no wish that I should overhear.
Said the Old Squire, "Look there, my love, look there,"
The dame replied, "Look where, my love, look where?"
"There on the grass beneath us," he replied,
And most suspiciously my form he eyed.
Then drawing up himself to his full height,
Quite satisfied that he had seen aright,
He drew a little closer to his wife,
And thus he mused upon this human life.
"Do you remember, love, that dusty town
Where creatures of this kind rush up and down,
With faces worn and sad and weary eyes
That find no joy and comfort in the skies?
"How grieved we were for them! It seems to me
That this fair creature, longing to be free,
Sought our fair woods, but she is dead, is dead,
Indeed she is my love; look at her head."
"She is not dead, but sleeps," the dame replied,
"Poor, toilworn creature," and she deeply sighed,
And brushed away a tear from her bright face
That of sad tears had never worn a trace.
"Cheer up, dear heart, cheer up," the Old Squire said,
"And since she sleeps and is not really dead,
Let's sing a roundelay to fill her dreams
Of these fair glades and yonder merry streams."
And then they ministered to me in song,
Such cadences as unto them belong;
Sweet melodies straight from the heart of God,
Sent down to cheer us as thro' life we plod.






Oh, I could thus have lain a thousand years,
And eased my broken heart with joyous tears,
Could these fair minstrels sing their plaintive song
To me, whose soul had hungered for so long.
How quickly deepest joys forever end!
How soon we lose the comfort of a friend!
A thoughtless move, and lo, this kindly pair
In but a flash had vanished in the air.
It was their wish that I should never know
From whence the music to my heart did flow,
That I should wake with music in my soul
And yet not know the source from which it stole.
0, gentle Minstrels, your sweet plaintive lay
Has soothed my heartache, borne my cares away,
For this sweet peace which never shall depart,
Accept my love and deeply thankful heart.






THE RIVALS.
The sea and I are lovers,
All through these changeful years,
In times of merry laughter,
In days of bitter tears.
We have long talks together,
We sing full many a song,
But, oh, sometimes we quarrel,
Altho' we know 'tis wrong.
Last eve I walked beside him,
He was in merry mood;
In sweetest tones he wooed me,
And all the world seemed good.
But as the hour grew later,
My footsteps I retraced;
What was it caught my vision,
And all beside effaced?
A sunset such as never
Had caught my eyes before,
I longed for power to hold it
In view forevermore.
I walked on as a dreamer
Who treads enchanted ground,
Or as a child enraptured
With toys but newly found.
The glory of that vision!
It thrilled me thro' and thro,'
Would that I had the power
To bring it into view.
But oh, the sea grew jealous,
And murmured all the way
Because he thought the sunset
Might steal my heart away.


12






I told him that the sunset
Would never come again;
He grumbled that his beauty,
Would in my heart remain.
I said it would, but whispered,
"You know my love is true:
What, if fair sunsets thrill me?
My love, I've chosen you!"





THE APPROACH.
The flowers have heard
That June is near,
The little bird
With plumage fair
Has told the flowers
To beware
And deck their bowers,
And prepare
For June draws near.
And all around
The signs I see,
Rich buds abound;
The June-rose tree
All in her haste
In flower will be,
(Which is bad taste
You will agree,)
Ere June we see.
The birds are glad,
The flowers are gay,
Since they have had
Long hours for play.
And so am I,
For with each day
The fields and sky
Are shouting "May!
'Tis June-Away!"





THE MEETING OF THE CLOUDS.
One day upon the soft green grass
I lay in idle mood,
The sunshine glittered on the leaves,
All things to me seemed good.
The sky bore but two fleecy clouds,
One east, the other west,
And each seemed lonely wondering there,
And full of vague unrest.
And as I watched, these fleecy clouds
Towards each other drew,
And in what seemed a moment's space,
How close to each they grew.
Then, in one eager breathless rush,
They melted into one;
And lingered but a moment there,
And were forever gone.
The sky became a cloudless blue,
I turned towards the sea,
And bore with me a tender thought
Of you, dear heart, and me.
E'en so our souls would fain unite
In one long, fond embrace,
And slip from off this weary earth
To some ethereal place.
But now our bodies intervene,
Yet there will come a time
When, as the clouds became but one,
Your soul will join with mine;
In some fond place where spirits meet,
We shall know endless joy,
No weariness of earth and flesh
Shall then our peace annoy.























GOLD OF THE CASSIA.
Come, feast with thine eyes, and store in thy heart
Treasures that fade yet never depart,
Gold from the heart of God straight into thine,
Gold that is thine for the taking, and mine.






THE NAMELESS FLOWERS.
Flowers! the Sun and Moon and stars of Earth!
I love them dearly, whatever they be named,
Pansies and Pinks, Asters, Hollyhock, Rose,
The dainty Black-eyed Susan as it grows,
Twining its slender stem about the herbs
That grow along the wayside and in woods.
The dainty Periwinkle, pink or white,
I love them all, and in the busy mart
I buy me flowers for my little room.
A week ago I bought some blossoms rare,
The loveliest bunch that ever I had seen.
The stems were long and slender and the flowers
Were rich in gold, and red as dark as wine:
Some petals glowing richer still in gold,
While others were more wine with golden fringe.
O, they were lovely! As I held them close,
A ragged beggar, very old and grey,
Came near, and gazed at them in awe,
And smiling, said, "What pretty flowers, Miss."
I smiled and said, "Yes, they are very sweet."
"What be they called?" she further questioned me,
"I know not," I replied, and then I looked
Intently at the wrinkled face of her
Whose heart was warmed and cheered at such a
sight.
She might have seen full eighty summers here.
What blossoms and what thorns had strewn her
path
I knew not. Now she stood in strange delight.
She did not ask for alms as might have been
Her first intent, the flowers had blest her heart.
I ventured a small gift, she smiled again,
And thanked me in her deep and mellow tones-
(I think she once possessed a heavenly voice).
Then she moved on and I could hear her sigh,
"What lovely roses," as she joined the throng.
As I stood lost in thought, another came,
A solemn faced old man who lost a leg
In fighting for his country and his King.
He leaned upon the crutch beneath his arm,
And gazed upon my flowers for a while.






And then, as though recalling I was there,
He touched his hat, and asked me for their name.
I told him I knew not, and he moved on
More pleased than when he first came by that way.
I took the car for home, and there I set
My golden flowers in two dainty jars.
The stems were all so long, they leant and kissed
Each other 'cross the mirror's tell-tale face.
And so I had them with me for six days,
A double portion, they and their reflection.
How many hearts they cheered before they came
Into my hands, I know not, but I know
tThat two had smiled that might have been yet sad
Save that their beauty touched a tender chord
Within those hearts that had been pierced by thorns.
And as for me, what need is there to tell?
I buy me flowers for my little vase
Instead of other things I sometimes need.
I must have flowers, any flowers at all,
So that they come from God's artistic Hand.



















JAMAICA.
J ust a lovely little jewel floating on fair Carib's breast,
A 11 a-glittering in her verdure neathh a blazing tropic
sky.
M ust have been a part of Eden, it's so full of peace and
rest,
A nd the flowers in their splendour make you feel it's
good to die
I n a spot that's so near heaven where one never feels
depressed,
'C ause Dame Nature makes you lazy and Dame Fortune
lingers nigh,
A nd you feel just like a fledgling in your mother's cosy
nest.






A MOONLIGHT REVERIE.
Weary of life and all my heart's dull pain,
I left my lonely room and sought to gain
Brief respite somewhere out beneath God's sky,
And urged my heart the open road to try.
Late was the hour, the moon, now growing old,
Had long since risen; the stars were none too bold
As though, in fond allegiance to their Queen,
They wished that all her glory should be seen;
And so they faintly glimmered here and there
Like scanty Daisies seen in meadows fair,
The lovely Queen enjoyed her short reign,
Proud of the love of all her starry train.
The tropic sky wore not the smallest cloud,
In voiceless sound her beauty cried aloud.
"Fair moon," thought I, "there on thy glorious throne,
Dost thou not tire of being all alone?
Here is another, but she is no Queen
No throne is hers, and no worlds has she seen,
No golden crested servants on her wait,
And she has never slept at heaven's gate;
But lonely is she now like unto thee,
And so to-night she seeks thy company.
Queen of the realms on high, tho' thou dost reign
And art content thus ever to remain
In lonely state with no King at thy side,
Nor dost thou weary of thy tedious ride,
I know that thou art sad, and oftentimes
Thou hidest thy pale face from earth's sad crimes;
Thou see'st lovers kiss beneath the shade,
And seek fair loved ones over hill and glade;
Thou see'st when one wearies of the way,
And how these fickle hearts change day by day.
But be not weary of me, for tonight
I seek thy love and thy fair guiding light."
Methought she answered sweet and tenderly:-
"I see thy heart is sad, come thou with me,
And this thy heavy load shall lighter be.
If thou be constant thou shalt surely know
Great things for thy soul's good that I will show;






Only be patient, and forget thy grief,
And soon to thee will come a full relief."
And I took courage, opened wide my eyes,
"Look round about thee," Queen Moon whispered low,
For close to thee are things thy heart should know."
With almost noiseless tread I paced the ground
For fear of losing aught by noisy sound.
Some tall and graceful trees came into view;
To these I turned my tired heart anew,
And there beside the noisy street they slept,
No little wind among them rudely crept.
Amid the noise of horns and passing feet,
Serene they slept, caressed by pale moonbeams,
Lost to all sound-a sleep that knew no dreams.
At morn they would awake to feel 'the kiss
Of jealous sunbeams, which in perfect bliss
Would gambol all the day, forgetful still
That all their untamed heat made leaflets ill;
And tho' they frolicked and seemed glad at heart,
They were not sorry with such love to part.
The lesson came: These trees all bear the heat
And burden of the day, but night is sweet;
And always they add splendour to the day.
What silent eloquence! What fine display!
They soothe with loveliness earth's dreary eye,
And give their shade to travellers passing by.
"How well they do their part," the Queen Moon said.
"How well," I answered, and I bowed my head.
The lesson conned, I sought to find the next.
No longer was my heart forlorn and vexed.
I had not long to wait, for soon I saw
What tears of sorrow to my eyes did draw.
A woman placed both hands upon her head
And wept as one who mourned a loved one dead.
Great choking sobs now swayed her slender form
As some deep sorrow unto her was born.
I sought for some solution to her pain,
And very soon the truth to me was plain.
While I walked slowly, just before me strolled
A couple who some secret did unfold
Which wakened anxious thoughts: this I could see







From the strained voice of one in agony.
Now as I saw this woman weeping there,
I called to mind again the unknown pair,
And as I moved my eyes from her pale face,
I saw her lover who with quickened pace,
Moved on and left her desolate and sad
As tho' she had lost everything she had.
A tempest roared within her aching breast,
A mighty struggle filled her with unrest.
Grown weak with grief, she sat upon the bank,
And into further sobbing there she sank.
A moment passed, then up she sprang as tho'
The storm had ceased, and all her woe
Had gone in that dark hour. A flash of light
Had shone upon her path: and now she ran
As tho' her very life were with the man
She sought to overtake. I turned, and lo,
I saw her hand steal round his form, and so
They passed into the night.

Then came to me
Thoughts, clear and plain as they could be,
Of man, the victor, woman, vanquished still,
Who to his thraldom bends her every will.
I thought of all the talk about the sexes
The women with equality complexes-
And then I saw before me plain and clear
Eternal man-eternal woman fair.
But still I sought the lesson to be learned,
And did not find and so once more I turned
To my wise guide, and thus she made reply:-
"For thy heart's good on these wise words rely:-
Woman is born to eat the bread of sorrow
To weep today, and know no glad tomorrow.
It is her privilege. Dost thou forget
That, tho' the Mother of our Lord, yet
Mary's heart with grief and tears was torn
E'en from the moment that her Son was born?
What agony like unto hers was there,
Who saw her Child stretch'd on the cruel cross,
With crown of thorns, and feet and hands each pierced





With bloody nails, His face in suffering veiled!
How often since have weary mothers wept
O'er some belov'd son, and vigil kept
For prodigals who still no more return
E'er the dim lamp of life has ceased to burn!
How many women at this very hour
Are filled with anxious thoughts, and deeply pray
That lover, husband, child may mend his way?
Until the earth shall cease shall woman lay
Her all at manhood's feet and seek in vain
Love constant firm and true from him to gain.
It is her lot. Be thou content-love on
And always welcome him. When he is gone
In vanity some conquest fresh to make,
Console thyself, let not thy lone heart break.
Know thou that God, who formed and fashioned thee,
Gave thee a heart to love, a mind to serve
And never from this noble purpose swerve.
For sorrow is the torch that lights the way
To God-and man will follow thee or stay
Content amid the houses he can raise,
And give himself all glory and all praise.
Fear not to love: to love is always right
So that thy heart be pure. The beacon light
Thou see'st comes from God's own hand to Thee,
And thou wilt see, when sorrow's stormy blast
O'erwhelms thy troubled life, if thou hold fast,
The light shall brighter shine thy soul to lead,
And unto this some wanderer will give heed.
Woman thou art: rejoice in sorrow's hour
That God to thee hast given this great power
To suffer and to love tho' oft unloved;
To give and seek for naught; to be reproved,
And tho' not guilty, still for love's dear sake
Accept the wrong and all the burden take.
Man may be master of the land and sea,
And even of thy heart may keep the key,
But unto woman comes alone the joy
Of shielding in her form a girl or boy.
A blessing on thy heart: rejoice, be glad,
Thank God for womanhood and be not sad."





I raised my head, and tears were in my eyes
That cast a dreary shadow o'er the skies.
But not of sorrow were the tears that came,
But joy that to the world I would proclaim.
I homeward turned enriched with heavy thought
Of all that now had come to me unsought.
These lessons I would keep within my breast,
And, henceforth they would bring me peace and rest.
But lo-another still remained.
The smell
Of jasmine flowers sweet came to foretell
That nearby grew the plant I used to love
When long among the flowers I would rove.
I saw it growing near and scanned the ground
For some small flower-but one at length I found,
Crushed by a tread. I gathered it in haste,
And, oh, what fragrance! what exquisite waste!
Two petals had been lost; those that remained
With dust and earth and passing feet were stained;
But it was sweeter far than any flower
That on that tree had blossomed but an hour.
I mused awhile.
My Queen smiled down at me.
"I need not tell thee aught for I can see
That thou dost understand," she softly said.
Tears filled my eyes again, I bowed my head
And whispered low, "0 Queen, I am content
With whatsoever unto me is sent,
If, being torn and bruised and tossed about,
And sometimes crossed by burdens, guilt and doubt,
I to the world can still some fragrance give.
For this alone oh Queen, now let me live!"
Long was it e'er sleep came to close my eyes;
I pondered o'er these lessons from the skies,
I pressed the bruised blossom to my breast;
The lessons of the Queen had brought me rest.
"Oh God," I prayed, "how wondrous are Thy ways
The Universe must ever hymn Thy praise;
The broken heart Thou wilt forever bind
And ways to comfort Thy frail children find.
Accept my thanks for Nature's fond caress,
And with Thy peace my wayward spirit bless.
























POEMS OF LOVE.






THE CAPTIVE.
Alas, how hapless was this fate of mine
Thus to be ruled by legions of pale imps
Who, at their King's command, had stormed my heart,
Torn down my battlements, and caused me thus
To live in bondage like a fettered slave!
How loyal were these soldiers to their King!
They cared not if the chains about me hurt;
In loyalty to him they pressed me sore:
But this their King was kind in very truth.
One day I heard him sternly chide the guard:-
"Slaves are not made of wood and stone," he said,
And, 0! his voice fell on my hungry ears
Like that of lover unto one beloved.
My guard then kinder grew, and I forgot
That there were chains about my throbbing heart.
Then my captivity grew very sweet,
Till I began to fear that this kind King
Might one day bid his soldiers set me free;
Aye, feared that freedom unto me would come;
For, though they broke the fetters round my heart,
I knew I should not flee-who flees from light?
Flee? when as captive I had stormed the gates
Of heaven, and felt the kiss of fleecy clouds
Upon my lips, and drank their honeyed dews.
O! in that bondage there was life for me,
And in my freedom death. For oft the King
Came down to see how well his captive fared.
He came today, and though my eyes were bright
With unshed tears, my face was radiant still
With happiness that bore no sign of grief.
He seemed less proud today than he was wont.
He was perplexed, and so, in gentle tone
He sought to know the secret of my joy.
The eyes of all his imps still brighter grew
To hear the gentle sweetness of his voice.
My guard commanded me to heed the King
And answer make; but I was silent still,
For in their presence would I naught unfold.
The King divined my thoughts, and gave command
That all his imps retreat into their tents.






And then he knelt, and with his own dear hands
Undid the chains that bound me, and my heart
Almost forgot its use when I beheld
How soft and gentle his proud face had grown.
Then he held out his hands to me, his slave,
And thus he spoke in accents soft and sweet:-
"My lovely slave, how cruel I must seem
Now in thine eyes. I must confess
That I had thought to see thee pine away,
Grow paler day by day, and then at length
Petition me to set thee free. But here,
In captive bonds, thy life seems sweet to thee:
Thou art more fair than on that dreary day
When first I looked upon thy tear-stained face.
Tell me what secret spring doth feed thy soul?
From whence this bloom of roses in thy cheeks,
Those smiles that speak to me of rosy dawns?"
He ceased, and looked at me full tenderly.
I tried to hush the tumult in my breast
That kept my lips from speech, then made reply:-
"I know not what was in that heart of thine
That thou didst seek to keep me here in bonds;
For thee I have not wronged, except it be
That once I looked upon thy face too long.
If thou hast sought to feed thy endless pride,
To reap the fruits of conquest by the sight
Of my pale face and dark imploring eyes,
Thou hast failed sadly; for life unto me
Has sweeter grown since now thy slave am I.
I had not lived until I saw thy face,
And as thy captive now I can behold
Thy form and press my lips unto the ground
On which thy feet have trod. Now I can hear
Thy voice in golden tones of cold command,
Mark thy proud visage which my love transforms
To something Godlike.
One fear alone is mine-
That thou wilt one day set this captive free.
Then whither shall I go in all the world
Which needs must darkened be if thy fair face
Therein I shall not see?" And all the love
Which long had been concealed within my breast





Burst forth. I clasped my hands about his feet
And cried with all the anguish of my soul:-
"0 King, thou wilt not, wilt not set me free?"
I ceased, my heart overwhelmed with anxious thought,
And, for reply, he raised me from the earth,
And kissed my lips with such sweet tenderness
That in his arms I swooned. When I awoke,
Around me I beheld no longer imps
But fairies four who ministered to me,
And smiled at me with large and wistful eyes.
And soon their King a sign made unto them;
Then two came forward with a crown of gold
Like that he sometimes wore upon his head
And placed it in his hands: he gazed at me,
His eyes more tender grown, and placed the crown
Upon my head. "My Captive Queen," he said,
"Canst thou forgive?" and kissed me once again
More gently than before. "My King," I sighed,
And now I did not swoon.













A GREAT LOVE.
I asked the gods to send a wondrous love
To wake my soul and lift my heart above;
I was impatient at the long delay,
And in deep earnest did my young heart pray.
This great love came, but brought with it unrest
With peace and calm no longer was I blest;
Within my heart a mighty tempest rose,
But on this love the door I could not close.
Then to the gods I prayed and sadly said,
"I asked a wondrous Love, but now instead
Pain and unrest have my full heart undone,
Could ye not grant me then this love alone?"
The answer came, "Such love we never give
To mortal souls that on this fair earth live
Unless they ask: have therefore thou no fear,
Since thou desirest, thou hast strength to bear.
"The gods have honoured thee in granting this;
These sorrows are but partners in thy bliss,
Hadst thou known love alone, thou wert not fit
Among the fair immortal souls to sit."
I dried my tears and clasped the fragrant rose
With all its thorns; then softly I arose,
And blessed the gods for such a gift divine;
May love, with all its pain, be ever mine.














THE CALL.
Friends have been here,
But I'm lonely,
Friends who are kind,
Sweet and true;
Glad smiling faces
Surround me,
But I just sit thinking
Of you.
Thinking just how
You are faring,
Wondering who shares
Your smile,
Alone, or with friends
In the gloaming,
My thoughts travel
Many a mile.
O! love of my soul
Thro' the distance
Can't you hear my heart
Calling thine?
Send me an answer
Beloved,
Whisper to me
Love of mine.




















I CARE NOT.
I care not for the sunshine
or for the silver rain,
I care not for the flowers
that still to me remain,
I care not for the moonlight
or for the evening Star,
I care not for the zephyr
that cometh from afar.
I care not for life's wonders
unless thou smile on me,
For in thy smile the beauty
of all the world I see.









DREAMING.
Sitting by my window
Looking at each flower,
Dreaming dreams about you
All this sunlit hour;
Birdies come a-singing,
Bees are on the wing,
Sunbeams round a-playing
Tempt my heart to sing.
Shall it be a sonnet
To your lovely eyes?
Or a lithesome lyric
Of the deep blue skies?
Or the wondrous beauty
Of a budding rose,
And the tender fragrance
That she doth disclose?
O I'm sure I'm puzzled,
Don't know what to do,
Think I'll leave the writing
And just dream of you;
Dream I see your dear eyes
In the blue above,
And I hear you calling
As the birds make love.
But the streets grow noisy,
Folks rush on to work,
Better quit my dreaming
For I mustn't shirk;
But when day is over
Stars shine through the blue,
Then I'll sit a-dreaming
Lovely dreams of you.






















COMMUNION.
I love beyond all times the silent hours
At eve, when pale stars glimmer in the sky,
And we two sit among the fragrant flowers
And watch the moon rise calmly up on high.
Those golden hours when you hold my hand
And our glad hearts are far too full for speech,
As our twin souls commune, I understand
What heights in silence mortal souls can reach.


















WOULD YOU?
If you knew my heart was hungry
for one tender word from you,
If you knew my lips were thirsty
as the roses for the dew,
If you knew my eyes were turning
to the crimson sunset sky,
And my life was passing from me
in each deep and broken sigh,
Would you come to me beloved
hold my trembling hand and say,
"Little one, I love you truly,
let me cheer your lonely way,"
Would you speak kind words of comfort,
fill my heart and bid me live?
Would you come to me beloved,
even one smile would you give?




















A COMPLAINT.
I was content with life until you came
And smiled on me,
Now life can nevermore be just the same;
For now I see
Bright stars that I had never seen before,
And oft I hear
Sweet silver-throated mock-birds at my door,
And yet I fear
My heart shall never be content again
With less than thee;
O wherefore couldst thou not refrain
From loving me?


















UNAWARES.
Last night I passed your window
As oft I've done before,
The usual light was burning
And closed was every door.
I've never seen your shadow,
Not even through the glass,
I've never heard your footsteps
Tho' I so often pass.
But I find joy, beloved,
In being near to you
And wishing I could linger
To guard you all night through.
And ere I turn my footsteps
Upon my homeward way,
I leave my longing spirit
To guard you until day.

















HEIGHTS AND DEPTHS.
We have known the heights together,
I have known the depths alone;
We have joined in merry laughter,
But the tears have been mine own.
Ah, to reason thus, how selfish,
Hast thou not thy vale of tears
And thy hidden depths of anguish
Thro' the ever:lengthening years?
Yet we linger on the hill-tops,
And we part as we descend
Strengthened thus to seek the valley
All alone, without a friend.
Ah! the heights grow still more lofty
Since we two go hand in hand,
But alone the depths grow deeper;
Yet we seem to understand.
There are words too sad for sounding,
There are thoughts too deep for speech,
But no heights too high for climbing
And no depths too low to reach.


















THE LETTER.
I've written you a letter,
I wrote it days ago;
But now I think it better
The sending to forego.
It lies among my treasures,
I've read it through again;
I will not send it to you,
Because it might give pain.
And so I send this poem,
Since we must be apart,
To tell you I still love you
As I did from the start.
These words are often spoken,
So you will be at rest
And never know the tumult
That rages in my breast.


























GREED.
I have most everything to make me glad:
A cosy little room with fairest view,
Friends, books, and flowers, yet my heart is sad
Because I still need you.




















THE HEART'S CRUELTY.
What sayest thou my heart? Wilt thou not yield
To my control? Or thus rebellious still
Wilt thou toss from my hand this iron shield
And leave me captive to thy fickle will?
What pleasure dost thou find in subtle pain?
Why dost thou counsel take of cruel grief?
My flesh is weary, and my feeble brain
Cries out to thee imploring some relief.
Yield thou for pity's sake-be not unkind,
Or wilt thou seek to take my very breath?
If so I prithee, faster measures find,
And let me feel the welcome kiss of death:
Yield, or thy leave of me forever take,
For life is death the while I feel this ache.






A DREAM.
"I arise from dreams of thee..."
Shelley.
Last night beloved one, I dreamt
That in some Paradise
We roamed, and unto us was sent
The peace that has no price.
A bower built by fairies' hand
Was ours and ours alone,
There never was a fairer land,
Or more exquisite home.
The perfume of the lovely rose
Pervaded all the place,-
And when the lonely moon arose,
We met in fond embrace.
No wish for aught beside had we-
We felt no earthly need,
From all life's burdens we were free
We had won heaven's meed.
Then I awoke-and felt the pain
That pierced the heart of Eve
When, thrust from Eden, the vast plain
She wandered through at eve.
O fitful fancy's fatal flight!
O dreams that wake my heart
To sorrows dark and dreary night,
Come ye not back, depart.
Why mock me thus? I thee implore;
Where didst thou find the key
With which to ope again this door
And wake my memory?
Oh peaceful Death, thy kiss I seek,
Come, free my prisoned soul,
For love so strong has proven weak,
Life's billows o'er me roll.
Come, and make life an endless dream:
No more may I awake-
But in oblivion's dark stream
This hapless fate forsake.


















RESIGNATION.
Last night when you said you had to play bridge,
And asked me if I liked the game,
For a moment it pained me and somehow I thought
That my darling was not just the same.
Play bridge! when each fibre of my aching heart
Yearned just for the touch of your hand,
When naught that the world could give to me then
Could grant me my soul's demand?
What madness came o'er me that made me forget
That only in dreams you are mine-
Altho' from the moment when first we two met,
My heart has been sealed as thine.
Forgive me, beloved; whatever you do
My full heart must praise and condone,
Since out of the great world I have chosen you
And set you as king on my throne.























ETHEREAL.
Because I love you more than it is given
To mortal souls to love beneath the heaven,
I needs must go above where love supreme
Pervades the heart and is a waking dream.
Because I love you so, the gods I'll sue
That this unearthly flame your soul embue
So that you cannot rest on earth but come
And join me there in that ethereal home.


















ECSTASY.
Today you smiled on me and since that hour
My heart has been enriched a thousandfold;
Today I heard your voice and every flower
Since then my tale of happiness has told.
Today I saw your lovely laughing eyes,
Since then, naught but their radiance have I seen;
Today you held my hands, and from my skies
Vanished the gloomy clouds that there had been.
Today I saw you after many days,
Saw you to whom my heart's love doth belong,
And, 0, the joy I find in life's dull ways
As my glad heart keeps singing love's old song.
Today I saw you for a little while
And heaven on earth I find within your smile.

















FORGETFULNESS.
Methinks that somewhere underneath God's sky
There must be waiting still a little spot,
Where I shall ease the burden of each sigh
And where all haunting strains will be forgot.
Methinks that somewhere there must be a heart
That lacks completeness since I am alone;
A heart that must be restless thus apart
And all this wealth of love should fully own.
Methinks that somewhere there must be a soul
That wanders on in dreary solitude,
Seeking in vain the love that can console
And even now with saddened heart doth brood:
Methinks that fate holds wealth for all in store
But often she forgets to ope the door.


















SOME DAY.
Some day you will grow weary of my love,
And so forsake this constant heart of mine
That cherishes no other thought above
This love for you which seems to me divine.
Some day, your face now tender with love's smile
Will sullen grow, dispassionate and cold,
And you will murmur in your heart meanwhile,
"It wearies me that she should be so bold."
Some day, 0 bitter thought, you will forget
That my great love once moved your tender heart,
And once-what bliss, in fond embrace we met
As though the world should not keep us apart:
For constancy to man is grave unrest
Although it nestles calm in woman's breast.


















THE INGRATE.
My life in love is rich beyond compare,
Far richer than my feeble worth doth claim,
Since Good Dame Fortune has not made me fair,
Nor am I blest with wisdom's noble name.
My life in love is rich, where'er I go
True tender hearts have opened unto me,
And made me humble, such fond love they show
To one whose deepest love they hold in fee.
My life in love is rich, and I am blest
With kindness that enriches more than gold,
And I should be more happy than the rest
Or else an ingrate prove of blackest mould-
And yet my life in love is poor indeed
Since fate withholds from me the love I need.



















LOVE'S ECLIPSE.
Your love failed from my sky so suddenly
That darkness such as comes before the morn
Would seem as light to that which came to me
When thus you left me lonely and forlorn.
And like a child who leaves a lighted room
For one unlit, finds all at first more dark
Then gradually there fades the deeper gloom
And fixtures here and there his eyes can mark;
My changed world that seemed so black at first
To my accustomed eyes has lighter grown,
I do not fear the dark, nor am I curst
Since I can claim fond memory for my own:
O grief! though thou hast changed my day to night,
Thou still doth send this star to give me light.



















PLEADING.
Unlearn me how to love thee, love of mine,
Give me once more the happiness I knew
Ere my unknowing eyes gazed into thine
And to my soul's sweet calm I bade adieu.
Unlearn me how to love thee, set me free,
Ease thou the burden of my restless heart
And give me once again tranquillity;
The days seem years, the nights fresh grief impart.
Unlearn me how to love thee, to forget
The haunting melody of love's refrain
And all the world that lies in thee, and yet
When I forget how shall I live again?
Unlearn me how to love thee, though I die,
Death is a welcome kiss to such as I.
























TO ...
I love you for what I know you could be
I hate you for what you are,
May I hope that some beautiful day I shall see
My glow-worm transformed to a star.















POVERTY.
What can I bring to thee-what have I yet?
Yea, answer make-thou who dost come to me
With love so deep and strong, draw near and let
Me list again the music of thy plea.
How should I answer thee? For I am poor,
The riches of my love were spent in vain,
Thou bringest me thy heart's own wealth in store
Shall I bring thee the ashes that remain?
And dost thou hope to find therein a spark
Rekindled by thy true and steadfast love?
That will burst forth and so dispel the dark
And dreary damps 'mid which I sadly rove?
It may be that thou wilt, I cannot tell;
For sad and lonely hearts make dull the brain,
And since my sorrow doth not thee repel,
Thou mayst tune my heart to love again.
Then, if thou must be answered, here's my heart,'
The home of grief and sorrow and dull fear,
And since thou art content we will not part;
The strength of thy great love shall mine repair.

























MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.



















MY HOPE.
I do not hope that some day I shall write
A poem whereon all mankind shall look
And pause in wonder as they close the book
And marvel at the grandeur of the flight;
Nor do I hope to be among the few
Whose works are lauded by the great and wise,
But do not bind the heart by simple ties,
Nor simple human faith within renew.
Nay, rather, may my hope be something more,
Some simple songs that steal up from the heart,
Born of great love, great longing and great pain,
That humble souls who have but little lore
May feel therein a comrade's teardrops start,
And clasp a hand that presses theirs again.



















MY HOPE.
I do not hope that some day I shall write
A poem whereon all mankind shall look
And pause in wonder as they close the book
And marvel at the grandeur of the flight;
Nor do I hope to be among the few
Whose works are lauded by the great and wise,
But do not bind the heart by simple ties,
Nor simple human faith within renew.
Nay, rather, may my hope be something more,
Some simple songs that steal up from the heart,
Born of great love, great longing and great pain,
That humble souls who have but little lore
May feel therein a comrade's teardrops start,
And clasp a hand that presses theirs again.

















RESPITE.
Think not my life is sad
Because in minor strain
My songs must flow to thee;
Deep peace and joy remain.
When that I am distressed,
My harp I take in.hand,
And in these soulful songs
I reach a happier land.
And then I rest my harp
With all my griefs forgot,
I toil and smile awhile,
Whate'er may be my lot.
And when new griefs appear,
And my heart hurts again,
My faithful harp and I,
We sing our plaintive strain.






















`THE PASSING OF THE YEAR.
Old Year, thou art dying,
Would I were too;
Soon should I be lying
Close beside you.
Old Year, thou art dead,
Would I were too;
But the New Year has said
There's work yet to do.





A MOTHER'S CRY.
And he is dead, my child, my only son,-
Aye, dead indeed, and for these ten long years
I have not seen his face nor heard his voice,
Nor put my arms about his tender form
And drawn him to my hungry longing breast.
Cold in his early grave
He lies, my well beloved son has gone
Whom ten years since I left a tiny babe,
Left him my darling child with many tears.
Oh, heart of mine, how didst thou undertake
So hard a task, to bid farewell to one
So tender and so sweet? Oh, woeful day
When I unclasped those tiny baby hands
Which clung to me, amidst the blinding tears
I could not stem; oh why did I persist?
Why did I not grow weak and answer 'No,'
Stay with my infant child, my first born son
Or bear him with me o'er the restless seas?
And now thou'lt never know, my darling child,
That love for thee (a mockery now it seems),
Bore me away from thee to unknown lands,
Where night and day my thoughts have been of thee.
The sleepless nights I passed in waking dreams
When oft I felt your baby fingers cling
So eagerly to me! How oft at dawn
I seemed to hear your tender, birdlike coo!
How long the years have been, how dark and drear!
How often have I sat alone in tears,
And wished and longed to hold you in my arms,
My babe whose infant cry was sweetest music
To mine ear, mine own fair son, whose life
For one short year, one glorious, lovely year
Was nourished, cherished, tended by these hands!
Oh God, and thou wilt never know my kvb,
Ne'er prove a Mother's heart of sacrifice:
For thou art dead, my child, my only son,
When my fond dreams had to fruition come,
And I should clasp thee to my breast again.
A few short months and I should see my babe






To splendid boyhood grown, him for whom
Both day and night I laboured, prayed and planned.
No, nevermore shall I behold his face,
Or hear him call me Mother. Oh, my God,
My heart cries out in anguish unto Thee,
The child Thou gavest me Thou hast recalled.
Maybe because I failed Thy trust to me,
Failed hopelessly when thus I went away
E'er he had learnt to lisp Thy name in prayer.
Tho' fostered still by loving gentle hands
What heart can understand like Mother's heart?
What other love can feed an infant's soul?
I sinned, though good intent was then my guide,
And now my cross is more than I can bear.
My son has gone from me:
O God in deep distress of soul I cry,
Come to mine aid; my son, my only child,
Thou hast called home to Thee, and my faint heart
In anguish sore is aching in my breast.
He will return no more, ah nevermore.
Oh, Thou who stood by Lazarus' grave long since
Come Thou to me, forgive my sin and calm
This tumult in my soul-help me, oh God;
The waves of sorrow o'er me fiercely roll,
Grant Thou to me, Thy erring sorrowing child,
Beyond this cross to see Thy loving face,
To hear Thee say, "Sufficient is My Grace."









iTO MOLLY.
Come on little Molly,
Climb upon my knees,
Open your big grey eyes
So that you can see.
Don't you know I love you,
Love you such a lot
That not for a moment
Are you e'er forgot?
Why, you have been sleeping
All the live long day!
Wake up now and greet me,
Let us have some play.
Tell me that you love me,
By your gentle purr,
While I hold you closely
Stroking down your fur.
Tell me what you dreamed of,
Oft I saw you start;
Did you find a birdie?
Bless your little heart.
Did you see your babies
While you lay asleep?
Molly, I still love you
Though I made you weep.
How you miss those infants,
Call them every night,
Makes my own heart ache so,
Surely 'tis not right.
Molly, they are safe, love,
Safe from every harm,
Hush your restless crying,
I will bring you calm.






Soon will come some others,
And I promise you
That these little darlings
Shall remain with you.
And you will be happy
With them all the day;
Cheer up pretty, Molly,
Come along and play.


















FRIENDS.
Oh Lord, please send me some good friends
Whose hearts are true as steel,
Whose smiles come from their inmost souls,
And tell the love they feel.
Not many Lord, but just a few
With understanding heart
And love that takes in all the world,
Nor shuns the busy mart.
True friends who will not smile awhile,
Then frown behind my back;
But loyal friends whom I can trust
To stand true to the rack.
Lord, make me such a friend to all,
Firm, faithful, true and bold;
Even through sorrow, be it Lord,
Oh make my heart true gold.









HENRY'S AMBITION.
(A True Incident).
Little Henry was just ten and lived beside the sea
You would think he was ambitious a sailor man to be,
But no, though he went fishing and rowing many a day,
His hopes for future happiness did hardly lie that way.
To none he told his secret, though often one would ask
If when he grew to manhood he would like a special task;
His large brown eyes grew larger but he never said a
word,
And he kept it as a secret, so that nobody heard.
But out it came one morning in a most mysterious way,
The little man went fishing with his Uncle in the Bay.
The sea was very angry and huge waves dashed about,
To hear each other speaking at length each had to shout.
A mighty wave above them rose, they had to sink or
swim,
Poor Henry sank beneath the waves, his eyes with fright
grew dim.
Full twice he rose and sank again when strong arms
caught his waist
And bore him o'er the water; there was no time to waste.
With eyes shut tight, and sputtering mouth his Uncle
heard him say,
"I cannot drive a motor car yet I must drown to-day."
And this was followed by a groan and consciousness then
fled.
When next he opened his brown eyes he found himself in
bed.
To-day Henry to manhood grown can drive a motor car,
And never tires or makes a slip although the way be far.
He now has new ambitions, and I hope they will come
true
As the cherished one he uttered when he thought his life
was through.
















INVOCATION.
Gentle Muses, come and bless me,
Take me to your bower again,
I have wandered, lone and weary,
'Mid earth's joy and 'mid earth's pain
Prodigal, returning homeward,
Sick at heart and tossed about,
I can only still go forward
If you stay this anxious doubt.
Roaming far from thy caresses,
Yet some treasure have I found,
Oases in wildernesses
Deep I dug beneath the ground.
These will serve me if your blessing
Falls upon my soul to-night,
For I need your tender guidance
In this fresh adventurous flight.
Gentle Muses, come and bless me,
I would soar, but know not how,
Sweet inspirers, I am only
Waiting for your voices now.














WAITING.
Here I sit the long, lone evening,
Pen in hand and scroll on knee,
Waiting for an inspiration
For to write some poetry.
Everything seems in my favour,
All the strings in perfect tune,
But the melody still lingers,
On this lovely night in June.
Diana with magic splendour
O'er me casts her potent spell,
Fragrant roses round my window
Still insist that all is well.
Yet I cannot write a sonnet
Or a lyric clear and sweet,
Not a breath of inspiration
Comes to-night my sotl to greet.
Now I feel a call from dreamland,
I will go, for doubtless there
I shall find the inspiration
That I waited vainly here.
Off to dreamland then I'll wander,
Sleep will soothe my discontent,
And perhaps the Muse will greet me
When the veil of night is rent.






















"THE BREATH OF MORN."
Oh God, I thank Thee for this beauteous Morn
That unto us Thy children has been born,
Her tender breath blows soft upon my face,
And all the land is wrapped in her embrace.
O God, give all Thy children eyes to see
The splendour that in common days there be,
And grant that I may ever live Thy praise
For Thy great gifts in Nature's wondrous ways.
















FOSTERED.
I clasp your hand in mine and say no word,
Trusting the silence to convey to you
The depth of feeling that has sealed my lips
Now when they most should speak consoling words.
The tale you tell goes to my very soul-
So deep that, even in these silent hours,
I long to take you to my throbbing breast,
And bid you weep again as when a child
You must have wept to gain a fond caress
From her who bore you.
Still, you prospered well,
And she who gave you all her heart could give
Has lived to see your manhood rich and strong.
Yet that heart hunger, yes, I know it well,
Has only strengthened with the lengthening years.
I feel your sorrow and it hurts the more
Because I have no power to heal your wound.
But it may comfort you at least to know
That my heart feels with you your every hurt,
And, when I clasp your hand in silence still,
I pray the years will bring you happiness.





"JOY COMETH ..."
I laid me down with grief to pass the night,
And tears unbidden flowed thro' weary hours
And watered all my couch; but ere the light
Of dawn arose, sleep led me to her bowers,
And there as on her mossy bed I lay,
My soul forsook the fever of the day.
And, while in troubled sleep, one came to me
In garments white; less white her lovely face,
Her eyes were wet, but still she smiled at me
And beckoned me to follow her apace.
I rose and followed with no anxious fear:
Were not her eyelids wet with many a tear?
We wandered thro' the woods, I grasped her hand,
"Haste for the dawn will soon be here," I said,
"And now I know that thou dost understand
For in thine eyes some message I have read."
"The time is long," she said; "be patient still;
Dawn will not come till I my task fulfil."
And soon we came upon a fragrant bower
Securely made and with wild flowers o'er-run,
Safe from harsh wind and heavy frost and shower,
With casements for the bright beams of the sun.
"Sit here," she said, "and I to thee will tell
Why I alone within this bower dwell.
"Once, like to thee, I had my youthful dreams,
Great longings and desires for distant things;
Like thee I wandered far by lonely streams,
And sighed that like the birds I might have wings.
I prayed for love and comfort, wealth and fame,
And felt I'd weep no more if these but came.
"And love did come,.bNt not as I had dreamt,
With sweeping fire that dazzled all my soul
And filled my youthful dreams, and so I sent
To heaven a cry that from my anguish stole
Up to the throne of God, 'Send me such love
As poets dream while thro' the woods they rove.'







"I had not long to wait, for this love came,
A mighty force that shook my very life,
And with it all the comfort wealth and fame
That I had sighed for in my early strife;
And all the things I craved were at my feet:
Truly, I thought, my life is now complete.
"Vain thought! for there were longings in my breast
That would not silent be, and so I wept;
But unto none was this my grief confessed.
I woke and sighed the while my lover slept,
I could not pray-how pray when God had given
Each boon for which my soul had cried to heaven?
"My lover asked, 'Why are thine eyelids wet?
Hast thou not all that this vain world can give?
Thou ever hast a smile for me and yet
I know that deep in sorrow thou dost live.
Thy grief to fathom oft in vain I try;
Come, kiss me now and still that weary sigh.'
"That eve they brought my lover home to me,
A lifeless clay. 'An accident,' they said;
I heard as in a dream-I could not see
For tears, but yet I knew that he was dead.
Then, one by one, fame, wealth and comforts went,
And all the joys that unto me were sent.
"Nature was all the comfort left to me.
I lingered long beside the selfsame stream
Where in years past I had so loved to be,
And where I had full many a glorious dream.
I laid me down upon her banks and wept
Until my tears flowed in a rivulet.
"The river sang the selfsame merry song
That charmed my soul in happy days gone by,
No note of sorrow could to her belong,
She never felt the burden of a sigh;
Then my heart smote me, for I surely knew
That crags, and caverns dark obscured her view.
"The scales fell from my eyes. There came at last
In wondrous clearness to my startled eyes
A vision true of all my changeful past







That filled me now with wonder and surprise;
God had grown weary of my discontent,
And so He took to heaven what once He lent.
"And I who had not prayed for many a day
Looked up to heaven's vault in deep distress;
In agony of heart I sought to pray
And asked for mercy in His tenderness;
He had been merciful and kind to me,
But I from discontent was never free.
"'Thou art forgiven,' He said, 'but rise and go
Unto a place I have prepared for thee;
Thou shalt my servant be and live to show
Unto the world what thou hast learnt of Me,
And to My discontented children teach
What sages have all tried in vain to preach.
"'When thou dost see a child of Mine in pain
And full of discontent, go, give thine hand:
Thine eyes forevermore shall wear the strain
Of tears, and this will make them understand,
For sorrow's language is so plain to all,
That they will rise and follow at thy call.'
"And so I came for thee and brought thee here;
Weep not, but think indeed how blest thou art;
God's love surrounds his children everywhere.
Be thou content and trust to God thine heart;
If thou wilt humbly drink life's gall and wine,
Eternal gladness shall some day be thine.
"Now learn from one who is content with aught;
I once had all the joys that life can give,
Yet was I not content-but God has taught
That knowing discontent is not to live.
So come what may, grief, longing, loss or pain
Let sweet content within thy soul remain."
I woke with all the music of her voice
Within my heart, and birds were singing sweet,
And sunbeams danced about. I had no choice
But to be glad and worship at His Feet:
In sorrow I had lain me down to rest;
I woke with sweet contentment in my breast.






SAD SONGS.
"Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest
thought."
Shelley.
You ask me why I sit and sing sad songs
Instead of joyful ones. Is life not sad?
Nature can sing glad songs, to her belongs
The power to sing when we cannot be glad.
She hath no heart to feel life's bitter pain;
She hath no eyes for tragedies of life;
She hath no ears to hear man's sad refrain,
No feet to jostle in the endless strife.
But how can I who daily feel life's strain,
Whose eyes have witnessed scenes too sad for tears,
Whose ears have heard of sorrow and disdain
Sing always joyous songs 'mid hopes and fears?
How sing glad songs, when oft my brethren weep,
When burdened saints lift up their hands to God,
When cares and need do rob their eyes of sleep,
And mourners weep for loved ones neathh the sod?
How sing glad songs, when hate doth yet abound,
And man still lifts a hand against a brother;
When selfish deeds and thoughtless words abound,
And men feel not the woes of one another?
How sing glad songs, when, in life's bitter school,
The lessons taught are lovely but severe;
Yet we must learn to keep each well planned rule
Only for love and not for frightful fear?
Does he who first attempts, sweet music draw
From any instrument? Nay, he must strive
For many a year, (it is of life the law),
Ere at his precious hope he doth arrive.
Kind friend, forgive me, I am young in years;
What you have mastered is to me so new;
I strive to seek life's meaning e'en thro' tears,
And so oft saddened thus I seem to you.






But I shall sing glad songs for you some day
When life's true meaning is to me made clear,
When my heart's tumult shall have died away,
And my philosophy can dry the tear.
Till then, ask me no more to sing glad songs,
For now I feel that saddest songs are sweet;
When I have learnt the mystery of life's wrongs,
Then I shall cast sweet trophies at your feet.
Till then, ask me no more; for in sad hours
The heart doth calmly sow the golden grain
That shall spring up and send forth lovely flowers,
And so abundant fruit shall then remain.
Then shall my songs flow always calm and sweet,
Grand melodies with joy and sorrow blent,
With chords majestic and rich tones and deep,
As never unto mortal souls were sent.






TiHANKSGIVING.
I thank Thee, Lord, for all the joys that come to me
in life,
For Nature's gentle soothing balm that comes to aid
our strife;
For friends, for health, for books, for food and every-
thing beside,
For Thy sweet words of love and cheer that in our
hearts abide.

But Lord, I want to give Thee thanks for my own
quiet room,
With windows open to the east and roses round in
bloom,
With Nature pictures on the wall and books upon
the shelf
Where I can leave the world outside and seek to
know myself.

To some it's but a trifle, but, dear Lord, it's all to
me,
For in its calm and quiet I can often speak to Thee,
I can sing my songs of gladness or find relief in
tears,
And in Thy love find refuge from life's many ills
and fears.

What peace comes to my heart here in this quiet
little spot,
Where I sit and write at leisure and where conflict
enters not;
I can read or write a poem or a letter to a friend,
Or tune my little phonograph with my own mood to
blend.

And so, Lord, though I may not own a house that is
all mine;
I'm grateful for this little spot and will no more
repine;
I only need a resting place the while I journey here,
For daily I am nearing my fair homeland Over
There.


















THE PEANUT BOY.
Lord, look upon this peanut boy,
He's rough and coarse and rude;
He has been selling all the day,
His words are very crude.
But, Lord, he's worn and weary now,
See how he stands asleep;
His head is resting on the post,
The basket at his feet.
Dear Lord, he has not sold them all,
But he has done his best:
And, while he stands and sleeps awhile,
With sweet dreams make him blest.
And, Lord, when I shall fall asleep
With my tasks incomplete,
Remember I was weary Lord,
And give me peaceful sleep.


















TO-
He was so young, so gentle and so sweet,
I needed not a second glance to see
That in his heart did tender graces meet
And from base thoughts and actions he was free.
I looked at him and loved his youthful face,
I heard him speak and loved his mellow voice,
I saw him smile, and therein I could trace
The loveliness that made my soul rejoice.
His thoughts were wondrous deep for one so young,
But, child of Nature, he had learnt her ways,
And all her beauteous secrets yet unsung
He whispered to me in those sunny days.
I loved him as he spake-and love him still
With love that longs to shield him from all harm;
Oh, God of heaven, mould his gentle will,
And all the foes that seek his hurt disarm.




















TO POESIE.
Come, let me clasp Thee to my breast again,
Sweet Poesie, ah, whither should I flee
From earth's dull thraldom, save alone to Thee
And there abide in painful ecstasy?
Come, let me feel thy kiss upon my lips,
And quench my thirst with thy fresh honeyed dews,
For naught unto thy love wilt thou refuse,
Though earthly love away so swiftly slips.
I had foresaken Thee, my truest Love,
But now I seek Thee with a famished heart,
Remembering how thou nourished me of yore;
Now I relinquish all with whom I strove
And turn again from life's absorbing mart
To bless Thee, love Thee, serve Thee evermore.















ANOTHER MOULD.
You can talk about your babies
With blue eyes and hair of gold,
But I'll tell you 'bout an angel
That's cast in another mould.
She is brown just like a biscuit,
And she has the blackest eyes
That don't for once remind you
Of the blue of tropic skies.
And her hair is black and shiny
And her little teeth are pearls,
She's just a year I'll tell you,
But the best of baby girls.
O, she's sweeter than the sweetest
Of all babies neathh the sun,
And I feel that I could eat her,
Thinking she's a sugar bun.
O, the little ivory babies
Are as sweet as they can be,
But give me my brown skin cherub
Still a-dangling on my knee.

















A LITTLE PRAYER.
Lord, let me be content to do
The little things that come my way,
E'en when my heart is longing for
A bigger and a brighter day.
Lord, let me love the little gifts
Thou sendest to enrich my heart,
The friends, the books, the tender flowers
The merry birds that ne'er depart.
Lord, help me love the ugly things
That try my patience and my soul,
And let me keep a heart that smiles
Tho' trials fierce around me roll.
And Lord, when oft I feel alone
In this thy wondrous universe,
Come, and thy love to me reveal
And all the dreary gloom disperse.


















TO MOTHERS.
Here's a song to the Mothers
The Mothers of every race,
In every country under the sun
In every clime and place.
The Mothers whose hearts are happy,
And those whose hearts are sad,
The Mothers whose children are angels,
And those whose children are bad.
0, there's no heart like a Mother's,
There's no such love sublime
As fills the heart of the women
Who are mothers in every clime.
Then here's a song to the Mothers,
To yours, and yours, and mine,
Young or old, be they here or There,
They are touched with the spark divine!

















CONFLICT.
My heart is sick and sad today,
To me there comes no joy,
For my soul yearns to soar away,
Where cares no more annoy.
My spirit fain would gather wings
And soar beyond the sky;
A longing now within me springs
From this dull earth to fly.
But this frail earthly frame of mine
My soul in bondage keeps,
And seeks to rob the spark divine
While my sad spirit weeps.
Oh, soul, be patient; soon will come
The time for thy release;
Then thou shalt preen thy wings for home
Where thou shalt be at peace.









THE LITTLE GUEST.
There's a baby in the house,
So beware,
Just be quiet as a mouse,
And take care
How you shut that noisy door,.
How you strut upon the floor;
If you wake him I'll be sore,
So prepare.
He just came two months ago,
And I'll say
He's the sweetest boy I know
Any day;
Hear his mammy singing sweet,
How her joy becomes complete
As he kicks his little feet
In his play!
See the pride in her fair eyes
Shining bright,
In her arms her baby lies
Soft and light-
As she dreams of future years,
Of the laughter and the tears,
O, the future that hope rears
In her flight.
And proud daddy, he can rave
O'er his boy.
To his charms he's now a slave
In his joy-
Baby is a peach for sure,
"Listen, dear, don't bang that door.
Didn't I say that before?
Here's your toy."






IN JAMAICA.
0! the sun shines warm in Jamaica,
From one year's end to the next,
The flowers bloom on in Jamaica,
And songbirds are never perplexed;
It's a lazy life that we live here,
Tho' we carry a fair share of work;
And tho' the warmth makes us weary,
It's seldom we really do shirk.
0! the darkies smile on in Jamaica,
And whistle or sing all the day;
There's always a song ringing somewhere,
To them it is always bright May.
It's little we need for our comfort,
When we live in a wee cosy cot
In the heart of the hills where kind Nature
Gives all, and the towns are forgot.
0! it's a glorious life in Jamaica
For the man who has merely enough,
But it's a dreary life for the beggars,
And the large slums are all pretty rough.
It's a gay life too for the children
Not poor, and whose skin is light,
But the darker set are striving
And facing a very stiff fight.
0, it's a wonderful life in Jamaica
For the tourists who visit this shore,
There's golf, there's dancing, and swimming,
And charms that they ne'er saw before.
They call it a garden of Eden,
They love the fair hills of St. Ann,
And they say on the white sands of Mo. Bay
They get such a wonderful tan!
0, there's beauty in most every country,
And scenes that bring thrills of delight,
But there's no place like sunny Jamaica,
And no people whose hearts are so light.
Should I leave these fair shores for another,
Be that land yet the fairest of all,
I should pine for the hills of Jamaica,
And hasten to answer her call.



















REFUGE.
I sought the earthly comforts I could find
To calm the tempests in my troubled soul,
I said a prayer for my peace of mind
And sought to give the poor some trifling dole.
On one frail hope I staked my happiness,
And closed my eyes to all that came between,
To earthly friends I went in my distress
And hard on wavering props I sought to lean.
All failed me; and in agony of heart
I turned to Him Who saith, "Come unto Me"-
And in our sorrows seeks to share a part,
To Him for refuge did my sad soul flee:
And O, though last of all His love I sought,
How wonderful the peace to me He brought.






IN JAMAICA.
0! the sun shines warm in Jamaica,
From one year's end to the next,
The flowers bloom on in Jamaica,
And songbirds are never perplexed;
It's a lazy life that we live here,
Tho' we carry a fair share of work;
And tho' the warmth makes us weary,
It's seldom we really do shirk.
0! the darkies smile on in Jamaica,
And whistle or sing all the day;
There's always a song ringing somewhere,
To them it is always bright May.
It's little we need for our comfort,
When we live in a wee cosy cot
In the heart of the hills where kind Nature
Gives all, and the towns are forgot.
0! it's a glorious life in Jamaica
For the man who has merely enough,
But it's a dreary life for the beggars,
And the large slums are all pretty rough.
It's a gay life too for the children
Not poor, and whose skin is light,
But the darker set are striving
And facing a very stiff fight.
0, it's a wonderful life in Jamaica
For the tourists who visit this shore,
There's golf, there's dancing, and swimming,
And charms that they ne'er saw before.
They call it a garden of Eden,
They love the fair hills of St. Ann,
And they say on the white sands of Mo. Bay
They get such a wonderful tan!
0, there's beauty in most every country,
And scenes that bring thrills of delight,
But there's no place like sunny Jamaica,
And no people whose hearts are so light.
Should I leave these fair shores for another,
Be that land yet the fairest of all,
I should pine for the hills of Jamaica,
And hasten to answer her call.



















REFUGE.
I sought the earthly comforts I could find
To calm the tempests in my troubled soul,
I said a prayer for my peace of mind
And sought to give the poor some trifling dole.
On one frail hope I staked my happiness,
And closed my eyes to all that came between,
To earthly friends I went in my distress
And hard on wavering props I sought to lean.
All failed me; and in agony of heart
I turned to Him Who saith, "Come unto Me"-
And in our sorrows seeks to share a part,
To Him for refuge did my sad soul flee:
And O, though last of all His love I sought,
How wonderful the peace to me He brought.



















REASONING.
O heart of mine, canst thou not be content
With all the glories life lays at thy feet,
The rosy dawns that unto thee are sent,
The laughing children with their faces sweet?
The roses bloom for thee on every hand,
For thee the birds are singing in the trees,
Fair Nature's beauties overspread the land
And thine are all the wonders of the seas.
Oh heart, what need is this that all earth's balm
Cannot assauge? What is this mighty boon
That thou wouldst have to bring thee perfect calm?
Thou growest weary of the years too soon:
Take thou life's gifts upon thy bended knee,
Naught for thy good will God withhold from thee.




















THE SNARE.
Wherefore do joys that are fairest and best
Fade as fast as the frailest of flowers?
Wherefore do hearts that have stood the great test
Pass away in the briefest of hours?
Wherefore does fate stir the heart of desire
When she means not to whisper her peace?
Wherefore do hearts grow a-weary and tire
When there is no timely release?
Wherefore doth God send us sorrow and pain
And hearts that know little of joy?
Wherefore my heart dost thou sadly complain?
It is ease that thy soul will destroy.




















TO MY SISTER.
I watched them as they laid you in the earth,
Not you, but what remained of mortal clay
After your soul had left its feeble berth
For realms beyond of everlasting day.
The peace of God was in your calm sweet face,
For you, beloved, death had lost its sting;
Loved ones were waiting you in some fair place
Where there are neither tears nor journeying.
You bade us not to weep or mourn your loss;
Truly, we would not have you suffer more;
But, ah, tears are but weak when such a cross
Weighs on the heart, now you have gone before.
Now you have gone I am indeed alone,
Such love as yours no more on earth is shown.



















TIME.
0 Time, though all the world doth sing thy praise,
Yet will not I, but curse thy very name,
And hate thy coming nights and speeding days
Who for my sorrows are the most to blame.
0 Time, thou stealer of sweet childhood's hours
Who takest all and giveth but the earth,
Wilt thou not grant me but these simple flowers
To give my leaden soul a little mirth?
My kindred, near and dearest to my heart,
Thou takest from me, I am left alone;
And now again I feel thy wicked dart
Speed on to rob me of the all I own.
Since thou hast taken all that life holds dear,
Here is my heart, be swift, I have no fear.












MY HEART IS SAD.
Although the day is perfect as can be,
A sight fit for the gods and for humanity
To wander round in perfect ecstasy,
My heart is sad.
Though fairest roses bloom on every hand,
And trees wear golden flowers throughout the land
And sparkling waves caress the throbbing sand,
My heart is sad.
Because, beyond the beauties I behold,
I see world sorrow and distress untold
In God's supreme creation still unfold,
My heart is sad.
Because my restless soul is far too strong
For this enfeebled flesh in which it long
Must linger, and disturb my perfect song,
My heart is sad.
Because I must keep on this weary way,
And still be brave though trials will have sway
Until the dawn brings in a fairer day,
My heart is sad.
Because those dearest to this heart of mine
Are sharing in the glory that is Thine,
And this poor dross Thou seekest to refine,
My heart is sad.
Because earth's beauty is so rich and deep,
And we can only see through eyes that weep,
Because we must clasp pain from steep to steep,
My heart is sad.










SONGS OF JAMAICA.
'Write a song about lovely Jamaica,'
You ask with a smile in your voice;
And I would be happy to please you,
But it seems that I haven't a choice..
I thought I'd write of Dunn's River,
Or of the White Sands at Mo. Bay,
But the pen it just stuck to my fingers,
It seemed I had nothing to say.
Then I thought of the peak of Blue Mountain
By the fair fickle clouds oft caressed,
Of the soft flowing river at Bog Walk
And the lilies that bloom on her breast.
I wandered in lovely Hope Gardens,
Smelt the fragrance of orchids so rare,
Sat down neathh the flowery arbours,
And saw poetry round everywhere.
I recapture these scenes as I'm writing,
And I'm moved by their charm rich and deep,
But for fine words to paint a fair picture,
To the muses still vainly I weep.
O, Jamaica, the Muse will not grant me
The power to praise thee in song,
For where in God's earth is such beauty
Or where doth such splendour belong?
It may be that I am not worthy,
But still for this blessing I'll pray,
And maybe in songs worthy of thee
I'll voice thy rich glories some day.
Till then, my kind friend, please be patient,
And list as a humble heart sings.
I but wait for the breath of the Muses
I'm the harp, but they strike on the strings.




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