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Title: Florida physician
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Title: Florida physician
Series Title: Florida physician
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: College of Medicine, University of Florida
Publisher: College of Medicine, University of Florida
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Publication Date: Spring 2006
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Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
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    Table of Contents
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    Main
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Full Text


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FI. HILSMILRT


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4 THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF A MEDICAL SCHOOL

12 ACROSS THE GENERATIONS
tho Ii imes have changed for UF medical students

22 CHARTER MEMBERS
HandpickEa to teach UF -; first medical students, the
Colleni of Medicine's first faculty ihajped their careers,
repotations and families in ,ialnesilie over the decades

30 STORYTELLERS
Meet seven people who represent the thousands of
stories from UF medicine

38 A PURPOSE AND A PASSION
Teaching the doctors of tomorrow is more than their job;
it's their mission

44 THE FEMININE FACE OF MEDICINE
A historical look at the role of women within the
College of Medicine

52 DRIVEN BY CURIOSITY, INSPIRED BY DREAMS
An essay by former Health Science Center
communications professional
Arline Phillips-Han

58 NEW HORIZONS
Dean Craig Tisher shares his vision for the next 50 years

64 RAISING THE STANDARDS
Jerry Eidson ushered in the era of private fundraisiog at
the College of Medicine


UF COLLEGE OF MEDICINE TIMELINE
The First Decade 10
The Second Decade 20
The Third Decade 28
The Fourth Decade 42
The Fifth Decade 50











'~1 I''


Delicate and
aged glass slides
belonging to Dr.
George Harrell
depict early plans for
UF's health science
center as well as
scenes from the first
year at the College of
Medicine. Harrell's
slides are property of
the George T. Harrell
History Archives.


The tale of Dr. George T. Harrell and his wooden blocks is an oft-told one in the

Harrell family. Legend has it that Harrell, the founding dean of the University

of Florida College of Medicine, once tried to stop Barbara Walters from cutting to

a commercial break during a television interview. Harrell insisted he had to set the

blocks actually architectural models up just right for the TV cameras, said

Harrell's granddaughter, Dr. Heather Harrell, a UF assistant professor of internal

medicine. "It sounds like classic George Harrell in action," she said. But

they were no ordinary set of blocks. The wooden rectangles he displayed for

\\alters were similar to the ones Harrell

hauled years earlier to Florida doctor's

.o ihes, medical society meetings and press

gatherings. They fit together to create the

model of what UF's health science center

.would become a vision conceived

in 1947 when J. Hillis Miller became

the university's fourth president.


4 I FLORIDA PHYSICIAN





























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-------- ------

A SARESUi,

UF'S y lu.ILUS

MILLER H EA LTH -

CENTER BECAME

ONE OF THE MOST

NOVLL HEALTH

UNDERTAKINGS OF

ITS TIME.


J. Hillis Miller. UFs fourth president


,. -- jernment leaders,
1. i administrators
ird citizens realized
rlie state needed a
i-- medical school in
I he 1940s. Florida
was growing and
with nearly 1,000
patients to every
doctor, the need
1,,, ,.I.~ lr- in Floridian com-
u ~:.. ,,. u-,; ,,_. But Miller, a psy-
dViuuglvL by Lraining, rivisioned something
bigger than a medical school. During his
inaugural address, Miller predicted that UF
would build a health center with schools
of medicine, nursing, dentistry, pharmacy
and other health professions.
Years of political squabbling and tedious
planning would ensue before UF's health
science center would open in 1956. Miller
unexpectedly passed away three years before
his vision became reality. But he and his
ideas attracted leaders who would each add
a different piece to the puzzle. As a result,
UF's J. Hillis '.hil.[,r Health Center became
one of the most novel health undertakings
of its time.
"There's nothing like it," said Nina
Stoyan-Rosenzweig, the health science
center's archivist. "The people involved were
amazingly visionary."

BUILDING FRIENDSHIPS
The state authorized UF to build schools
of nursing and medicine in 1949. With no
money to start the project, however, it was
a year before Miller contacted architect Jef-
ferson Hamilton to begin the first stages of
planning.
As part of the early planning, Hamilton
toured a handful of other medical colleges
around the country, according to a history of
the medical school written in 1968 by Mark
Barrow, MD60, an alumnus from the College
of Medicine's first graduating class. It was on
one of these trips that Hamilton met George
Harrell, then a professor at Bowman Gray
School of Medicine in North Carolina.
Meanwhile, Miller chose Russell S. Poor,
director of university relations at the Oak


Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies in Ten-
nessee and a former dean of the Alabama
Polytechnical Institute to lead the study
gauging Florida's health-care needs to plan
for the health center. Harrell was recruited
to help with the study
Poor was no medical doctor. His field
was geology, but newspaper articles from the
time tout his reputation in education circles.
After the five-volume study was completed,
Miller chose Poor to be the health center's
first provost, a position known today as the
vice president for health affairs.
"1 think they felt they wanted someone
who had had administrative experience at the
dean's level," Harrell said in an oral history
interview he gave as part of the Samuel Proc-
tor Oral History Program. "We would look
at health in a far broader sense, and if you
put a medical man in then medicine would
dominate the health center."
Poor also had a knack for picking admin-
istrators and personnel, and Miller recog-
nized that, remembered Poor's son, Robert.
Harrell, who had visited nearly 20 medi-
cal schools with Hamilton to plan for the
center, was an easy choice as the College
of Medicine's first dean. He had an eye for
detail and specific ideas about how medi-
cal students should be trained, and Miller


--------- ---------

A FTER THE FIVE-

V VOLUMiE STIU. Y.

WAS COMPLETED,

MILLER CH OSE POOR

TO BE THE H EALTHl

CENTER'S FIRST

PROVOST, POSITION

KNOWN TODAY AS

THE VICE PRESIDENT

FOR HIEALTI AFF,/ IRS.


6 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN










































































. *?


sc

*
~ ;i*

s
-
c










i MEDICINE ITSELF WAS CHANGING

RAPIDLY DURING THIS TIME, AND

WHAT FLORIDA REALLY NEEDED WAS A

TERTIARY CARE CENTER WHERE SERIOUSLY

ILL PATIENTS COULD BE SENT FOR HIGHLY

SPECIALIZED CARE."

RICHARD SMITH,MD


accepted many of these ideas, according to
Harrell's oral history interview.
"He had very strong views about medi-
cine and tying it into the community," said
Heather Harrell, herself a 1995 graduate of
the College of Medicine. "He was involved
in every aspect of planning the medical
school."
Poor, Hamilton and Harrell worked well
together and met nearly everyday while the
center was being built, Barrow said.
"It was built over a sinkhole and was
more complicated than they thought it would
be," he said. "They worked well together and
became extremely close friends."

IDEAS -
SOME TOOK, SOME DIDN'T
Harrell lobbied for student study cubicles to
reinforce the importance of self-study and
believed windows should be a certain height
so students and patients could look outside.
He also felt medical training should include
other disciplines, particularly humanities.
One of the original goals of the health center
was to train nursing students and medical
students together, although the idea never
came to fruition, Stoyan-Rosenzweig said.
He fought to establish family practice at
the university to train students in primary
care an idea local doctors opposed. Harrell
struggled to convince local doctors that UF's
health center would help them not hurt their
practices. He eventually began a program
with rural doctors allowing students to train
with them in family practice.
And during the early years, Harrell was
8 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN


the health center's most active pitchman.
He visited county medical societies across
the state, armed with his wooden model
of the health center as v. II as leather cases
full of dramatic and fragile glass slides that
captured the spirit and the benefits of the
young college.
After the health center opened in 1956,
Harrell set high standards for his new medi-
cal faculty, emphasizing that they were work-
ing in academic medicine and not to drive
"ostentatious" vehicles to work, said Joachim
Gravenstein, MD, the first division chief of
anesthesiology and now a graduate research
professor emeritus in the anesthesiology
department. The dean also required faculty
members to staff a general medical clinic in
the early years. The practice, which many
specialists did not like, eventually stopped as
medical specialties grew more focused.
"He said first and foremost you are phy-
sicians and you will take care of patients,"
Gravenstein said. "Whatever came, we were
supposed to handle it."




H ARRELL

WAS THE

HEALTH CENTER'S

MOST ACTIVE

PITCHMAN.


The types of patients who came to the
new hospital after it opened in 1958 also
subtly changed the original vision of the
health center, said Richard Smith, MD, the
first chairman of pediatrics, in an article pub-
lished in a special issue of the Journal of the
Florida Medical Association commemorating
20 years of UF medical classes.
The mission to educate the next genera-
tion of primary care doctors who would be
trained alongside nurses to work together in
Florida changed when the hospital started
receiving rare cases that were stumping other
state doctors, Smith said.








George Harrell (sitting) broke ground for UF's colleges of
Medicine and Nursing on June 1,1954. The founding dean is
pictured with Sen. J. Emory (Red) Cross, Sen. William A. Shands,
Rep. Ralph Turlington, and John Allen, acting UF president.


"Medicine itself was changing rapidly
during this time and what Florida really
needed was a tertiary care center where se-
riously ill patients could be sent for highly
specialized care."
Reflecting back on that now, Smith, now
retired, said the health center has filled a
niche in Florida. That niche and the faculty
who came to the university are part of what
made the medical school grow, he said.
"We grew as a medical school based on
great people," Smith said.
Fifty years have passed since the health
science center was founded and the key


planners have all passed away. Miller never
got to see his vision. Poor, who left UF in
1961, died in 1972. But Poor's son said
his father always was proud of the medical
school. He died while a patient at the teach-
ing hospital and donated his body to the
medical school.
"I know he was very proud of having
seen that school come out of the ground,"
Robert said. "We saw it go from a blueprint
to a reality We often wonder what he would
think of it now."
Harrell never accomplished all his goals
at UE His cubicles, an idea other colleges


mirrored, were torn down to make space for
offices in the late 1960s and he never was
able to establish a humanities program in the
college. He eventually established the first
medical humanities program in the country
when he left UF to develop the new Penn
State University medical school in 1964.
Harrell died in 1999 at the age of 91.
"He was always ahead of his time,"
Heather Harrell said of her grandfather. "But
a lot of his ideas are coming back. I think, all
in all, he was proud of what he accomplished
here. He was extremely proud of his medical
student classes. ,
SPRING 2006 9














1956
Doors open for first class at COM.


1958
Dr. Russell Poor is acting director of
UF Teaching Hospital. The Hospital
admits first patient. Hospital's first
baby, Ruprecht Gravenstein, is born.


George T.
Harrell Jr.,
is the first
dean of the
College of
Medicine.


Dorothy
Smith, left
center, hired
as the first
dean of the
College of
Nursing.
The College
of Nursing
opens.
















1959
Shands first open heart surgery is
performed by UF physicians on a
child from Tampa, below.
* L. Russell Jordan became
director of UF Teaching Hospital.


1962
New eye clinic,
artificial kidney
machine, Clinical
Research Center
opens. The UF
Teaching Hospital
receives one
of state's four
kidney dialysis
machines.

1963 UF's first transplant
program (corneal transplant)
is initiated by college
ophthalmologists.

1964
Emanuel Suter
becomes dean of the
College of Medicine.
The ground-breaking
ceremony for the VA
Hospital is held.


1960 First medical school class
graduates, and the first Asian,
Latinos, and women to attend are
in the graduating class. The first
nursing class graduates.

Veterans
Administration 1961
Hospital in Gainesville is
approved. Pharmacy moves
into building and classes are
held. Dr. Samuel Martin,
right, is named provost (this
position is later renamed vice
president for health affairs).


1965
The hospital is officially renamed
the W A. Shands Teaching Hospital
and Clinics after former Florida
Senator William A. Shands of
Gainesville. Gatorade
is invented
by College
of Medicine
faculty member
Robert Cade,
MD, and fellows
Jim Free,
MD60; Dana
Shires, MD61;
and Alex de
Quesada, MD
HS68.


SPRING 2006 i 11












ACROSS THE

The new medical school dean was unpacking when Mark Barrow walked into
the Grove Hall office to ask for an application. There were no applications
yet. No office staff either. The only person in the new University of Florida Col-

lege of Medicine's temporary office was the dean, George T. Harrell, MD, who
talked with the UF junior for two hours. "He looked at my transcript for a
few minutes and said, 'Great, you're in,"' said Barrow, the first student accepted
into the College of Medicine's inaugural graduating class of 1960. "I had good
grades but I thought getting into medical school was supposed
to be difficult. He said, 'Hell, son, I was worried we wouldn't
have anybody"' For Nina Mayer, getting into UF's medical
school in 2004 wasn't quite so effortless. There were the ardu-

ous prerequisites, the resume-boosting volunteer hours, the
\ elaborate application and those nerve-racking interviews.

SI But with five decades stretching between Barrow's chat in
S ^ Grove Hall with Harrell and Mayer's acceptance into medi-
cal school, how each got in may be the least of the ways the

SCollege of Medicine has changed for students since 1956.



12 | FLORIDA PHYSICIAN













GE N ERATIO NS


HOW TIM\


AVE CHANGED FOR UF MEDICAL
..." ,al


STUDENTS


-I-



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Ia-'Par. ['Irl. k 'rti, I Inkk, L n;r ac jure
Lh


SPRING 2006 1 13


III.l. liA.!


EaCh 1ludrni
aud, Iblel-e


89





















C H RI STY

CAVANAG H,

A THIRD-YEAR

MEDICAL STUDENT.

DOESN'T CARRY

BOOKS IN HER

POCKETS. BUT

SHE DOES KEEP A

COMPUTER IN ONE.


CHALKBOARDS TO MESSAGE
BOARDS
SI. lh.:-i rrr,..v and his classmates started
in.h.icil *:...I-.,ol, construction of the medi-
.Il I r.., n building wasn't finished, and
t ilc :.h-ii.tl 1 ad yet to be built. There were
I1.-, lil.--ip no Internet, and many of the
r-,:ic. it l.t, i..nologies students learn today,
li c r ,,ai r,.: i resonance imaging, were not
'..1 ri L-
ra 1 .... .p ent hours researching journal
arll: r, Ilhi. library when he had to pres-
cnt I p.II, nI to one of the faculty members
i.,rri,-, his clinical rotations. Most of
ih. notes were written in a black
book he kept in the pocket of his
white coat.
Christy Cavanagh, a third-
.' r medical student, doesn't
.:rr-. books in her pockets. But she
d,.. I., p a computer in one.
.'ii;i I i r pocket PC, Cavanagh can
r, it, r Ill. rmation on certain conditions
whenever she needs it, access journals online
through the library and more importantly,
she can pull up patients' lab results without


having to run back and forth to the lab.
"That's been really nice," Cavanagh said.
"The residents were really impressed."
Computers have impacted almost every-
thing medical students do today. The informa-
tion age has even affected a staple of medical
education gross anatomy Students review
an online version of the dissection before they
enter lab, Cavanagh said.
And chalkboards are passe. Most lectures
today are delivered through PowerPoint pre-
sentations, said Mayer, now a second-year
medical student.
Even office hours for professors are dif-
ferent. These days students seldom trek to
a professor's ,lltn.. to ask questions, Mayer
said. They email. Some faculty members hold
"online" office hours, and some courses have
corresponding message boards on the Web
where students can ask questions.
"The access to knowledge is unbelievable
right now," said Ron Butendieck, also a second-
year student. "We have unlimited resources.
Back then they didn't have the information
superhighway But the amount of informa-
tion we are expected to know is vast."


14 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN




























Left: Dr. Emanuel
Suter teaching a
class in the early
days of the COM;
Right: A medical l,
student's study
cubicle, the
brainchild of George
T. Harrell.


STUDY TIME
But students in the 1950s and 1960s had
something many of today's medical stu-
dents probably didn't even know existed:
cubicles.
The brainchild of Harrell, the cubicles
gave medical students their own miniature
office where they could read, study and even
use microscopes.
"Most of us spent our study hours,
evenings and weekends in those cubicles,"
said Jean Bennett, MD, an alumna of the
1960 class. "I think it was a marvelous
concept because it simulated a physicians




B ARROW SPF' :T HOURS RESEARCHING IOURNA ARTICLES IN

-.,;;. *p ,- ", } .. -!w I; .p r [_,,,NT \ Tip. 'r- TT o1r.

OF TI E FACULTY MBERS DURING HIS CLINICAL ROTATIONS.

MOST OF S NOi ES '"ERE writtenTE N IN A BLACK BOOK IHE KEPT IN


SPRING 2006 1 15











6r.*'
'~hG~P";IA~EP~ '
9 ~PIPI
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:1.1.1.,


SOT OF TI4E


DOI ..G LAB IROJQEL .i D


JIM FREE MD 6 0


office. We were able to establish good work
habits there."
By the late 1960s, the cubicles were
phased out to make room for office space in
the growing college. To Barrow it was a "tragic
mistake (that) broke Dr. Harrell's heart."
Most medical students today prefer to
work in groups, Mayer said.
Although students :I 1I spend their first
two years hitting the books and the second


two years of medical school working in the
hospital, the curriculum has changed through
the years. Mayer and her classmates will learn
more about radiology andJim Free, MD60, an
alumnus of the first class and a co-inventor
of Gatorade, remembers having more time in
the lab when he was a student.
"We would spend a lot of time doing lab
projects and learning from lab work," he said.
"Today they learn more from virtual methods


than hands-on laboratory methods."
With Shands now a large health care sys-
tem, students also see far more patients and
different types of conditions than they did
years ago. Cavanagh has already performed
an emergency procedure during her surgery
rotation. But the hospital wasn't quite so
busy in 1958.
"We had maybe three patients a week and
we were scrounging to get those sometimes,"
Free remembered. "But I feel like we learned
more from those few patients than we could
have learned from a thousand patients."
Barrow said he does worry that students
today aren't learning as much at the bedside
as he and his classmates did.
"Technology is good, but it shouldn't
interfere with bedside diagnosis and bedside
manner," he said.
SPRING 2006 i 17


I ,' t i. , '


"--7 AL


"iwi


















I I


JE A BENNETT MD60


SOCIAL HOUR
Studying. That pretty much sums up how
the first medical school students spent their
evenings and weekends. With no upperclass-
men to advise them, Bennett said they spent
most of their time in their cubicles or study-
ing together during the first year.
Eventually, some students went to a
football game or two or on a date. But there
wasn't much to do in Gainesville then.
"The county was dry so if you had a party
you had to make a run to I- u.h in Marion
County or Henry's in Putman County,"
Barrow said. "We made something with
grape juice and vodka. We called it 'Purple
Passion.'"
Free mostly remembers that they were
"tight-knit" with each other and with faculty
members.
"We all knew the dean," Free said. "We all
knew everybody It was like a small family"
"There was an attitude of all for one and
one for all," Bennett remembered.
18 I FLORIDA PHYSICIAN


RWENNT Tr r T. I- ".

OR TWO) OR ON A t L


T I I r '. F) I

GAINES\ i i .


Some things never change. That attitude
of teamwork and friendship is something
college faculty members continue to instill
in students, Mayer said.
And students still spend most of their
time studying. But when they do need to
unwind, there are more options. Medical
students work out and play basketball and
volleyball together at the Southwest Recre-
ation Center, watch movies and eat dinner
together too.
"They keep telling us to be balanced,"
Butendieck said. "It's a huge change from
undergraduate. But I still play the violin.


That's definitely something I don't want to
give up."

OIPORTUN CITIES
Cavanagh delivered her first baby in Haiti.
She was there on a mission trip to help
medically underserved Haitians with her
classmates during spring break when it
happened.
It's a trip she would not have been able
to take 50 years ago.
"It was her 10th baby," Cavanagh re-
called. "It was the first time she ever went to
a doctor for help delivering the baby."


F,


;.!

rcr ,r 1 i ri





















































CONTINUE TO I. ILI'' S


JDENTS


NINA MAYER, CLASS OF 2008


Student-sponsored medical
mission trips, such as Project
Haiti (below), are now common.
Students still attend UF football
games, work together in small
groups and relieve classroom
tension like impromptu games of
Hacky Sack (page 18, far left).


Butendieck said he thinks medical students
today definitely have more opportunities.
There are more clubs for students and more
specialties and niches in the medical field.
The student body of UFs first medical
school class was quite diverse for its time.
There were three women and Asian and La-
tino students in the class, and everybody was
treated equally, said Bennett, the first female
UF medical school graduate.
But five decades later, there are more
female students than male and more stu-
dents from foreign countries in the mix,
Mayer said.


And with student loans and more schol-
arship opportunities in Florida such as
Florida Bright Futures for undergraduate
students, going to medical school is no lon-
ger limited only to students from financially
secure families.
"It was never a question of whether I
would be able to go to medical school,"
Mayer said. "I think a lot of us know how
fortunate we are."
The technology may be advanced. The
classes may have changed. But the end re-
sult is still the same: More Gators practicing
medicine.


SPRING 2006 1 19


S-~I


, ]












1967
The Veteran's Administration
Hospital is dedicated.


1969
Now.a"^


K /.
Dr. William Enneking,
above, performs
Florida's first hip
replacement surgery.


The First Hippocratic award is
given by fourth-year students at the
College of Medicine.
Dr. Edmund Ackell becomes provost
of the Health Science Center.
The first kidney transplant from a
live donor is performed on UF law
student, Jimmy Acosta, right, at
Shands Hospital.


20 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN










1972
College of Dentistry
opens. Chandler
Stetson becomes
dean of the College
of Medicine. The
200,000th patient is
treated at Shands
Hospital.


1975 Dr. Chandler Stetson becomes vice president for health
7 s affairs. The Theodore Gildred Microsurgery Education
1 Center opens as the nation's first center for training surgeons in the
1 latest techniques in microscopic brain surgery


"e College of
Medicine graduates its
first African American
physicians above,
Dr. Earl Cotman, left,
and Dr. Reuben Brigety,
right. UF performs a
limb-saving surgery for
osteogenic sarcoma.

1971
Project I construction
begins, and ground is
broken for the Dental
Tower, Communicore
building, and three new
patient floors.


1976 College of Veterinary Medicine opens.


SPRING 2006 21


I


i


I'


I

'$






~------ --------


I C HART ER
HANDPICKED TO TEACH UF'S FIRST MEDICAL
FIRST FACULTY SHAPED THEIR CAREERS, REPUTATIONS


22 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN












MEMBERS

STUDENTS, THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE'S
AND FAMILIES IN GAINESVILLE OVER THE DECADES
It was an C.,lclient turnout. Close to a dozen retired or semi-retired
physicians and professors from the College of Medicine gathered in
downtown Gainesville on a beautiful November day. They arrived at the
Hippodrome State Theatre in coat and tie of course Jape Taylor wore
his signature bow tie. Some needed the assistance of a cane, or his wife,
or an old friend. But in general, getting this particular group together
for a photograph was relatively easy. We contacted the College of
Medicine's original faculty members who lived in the Gainesville area
and all were agreeable to our request of their time and most were
enthusiastic. With the exception of a few who had scheduling conflicts,
everyone arrived for the photo. Buck Ruffin's weekly fishing trip every
Thursday meant that Tuesday would be better. Joachim Gravenstein
took a rare break from lecturing, and Mel Fried came eager to share his
own photos from faculty reunions of years past. It was an impromptu
reunion for those who were the very first to teach UF medical stu-
dents including the basic science professors who greeted that first
class in 1956 and the clinical teachers who took them over in 1958.





























( T HE FACULTY

"T FULFILLED

EXPECTATIONS

AND WAS THE

YOUNGEST

OVERALL OF ANY

MEDICAL SCHOOL

AT THE TIME."

GE O R GE T. HARREL DEAN


The photo shoot
went smoothly
as the gentlemen
were positioned
and posed in a
fashion not unlike
the game of mu-
sical chairs until
S the photographer
was satisfied with
his subject. They
reminisced, kidded each other and
caught up on careers, grandchildren
and retirements. The photographer got
his shot and the men continued their
conversations over lunch at a nearby
restaurant.
Unfortunately, Dr. Fried, from the
department of biochemistry, (now bio-
chemistry and molecular biology) never
saw the final picture. He succumbed to
an extended illness in January and died
at his home at the age of 81. Fried, who
retired from UF as an emeritus professor
in 1993, described the first faculty and
first group of students as very close and
friendly. "I think I could have recited
the names of those first students in al-
phabetical order," he said in November.
"We played on their softball teams and


their wives babysat for us."
The camaraderie among the young
faculty was not surprising. In Dean
Harrell's own words, the early planners
of the College of Medicine made it a
point to "attempt unconventional things
in a conventional framework" while
piecing together Florida's first public
medical school. The most important
job in organizing a new school, he said,
was the selection of faculty And rather
than going after the most experienced,
esteemed experts in their fields, Harrell
interviewed faculty ranking third or lower
in their respective departments. The dean
himself handpicked his new faculty, by-
passing the top-tier for a younger, more
energetic group.
"It was felt older, nationally known
people would duplicate existing pro-
grams, which they knew to work, and be
reluctant to try new things," Harrell wrote
20 years later. Harrell wanted the faculty
from the University of Florida to build
their reputations in Gainesville. "The fac-
ulty brilliantly fulfilled expectations and
was the youngest overall of any medical
school at the time. Three of the depart-
ment heads were only 33 years old."
"We weren't much older than the stu-
dents," said Joseph Gennaro, PhD, who
moved to Gainesville from New York in
1956 to teach gross anatomy. "Dr. Harrell
interviewed each one of us personally. He
had this vision of a young, disciplined
faculty rather than hiring people with a
lot of experience and great reputations
who would come down to Florida mainly
to retire on a boat."
As was Harrell's plan, reputations
were forged at the University of Florida.
Dr. Gravenstein built an anesthesiology
department that has been recognized
as one of the nation's largest and most
prestigious programs of its type. Dr. Wil-
liam Enneking became world-renowned
in musculoskeletal pathology and mus-
culoskeletal tumor surgery Under his
direction, the department of orthopaedic


24 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN














































Aw




































H ARRELL HAND-
PICKED HIS

NEW FAC U LTY,

BYPASSING THE

TOP-TIER FOR A

YOUNG R, MORE

ENERGIC GROUP.


surgery moved to the forefront of the
world's orthopaedic programs.
And, of course, Thomas Maren, MD,
and Robert Cade, MD, are responsible for
the top-two income-generating products
created from UF research. Maren, the
first chairman of the department of
pharmacology, arrived on the UF campus
in 1955 and helped recruit many of
the charter medical faculty and helped
the college prepare for its first class
of students. His four decades of basic
scientific research led to the development
of a top-selling drug for glaucoma,
Trusopt. Dr. Maren died Aug. 15,


1999, at his home in Maine at the age of
81. Cade arrived at the UF department
of medicine's renal division in 1961 as
an assistant professor of medicine and
quickly rose through the academic ranks
to earn the title of professor in 1971. His
four decades of academic achievement
at UF is underscored by the invention in
1965 of the sports drink, Gatorade.
Just as Cade and his wife, Mary, chose
to remain in Gainesville and raise their
family in North Central Florida, a num-
ber of young medical school professors
stayed for several decades and carved
out their own careers at the University of


YP-.


26 i FLORIDA PHYSICIAN





















*1


/


Florida. Ira Gessner, one of the College
of Medicine's first pediatric residents, is
currently an eminent scholar in pediat-
ric cardiology and the assistant dean of
admissions. Gessner has gained national
recognition for his work in improving
the care of infants and children with
heart defects.
Melvin Greer, MD, the Bob Paul
family professor of r..,r..r.-.L joined
the UF faculty in 1961 and became the
first chair in the department of neurol-
ogy. He and Dr. George Singleton, who
also came to UF in 1961. continue to


serve the C.I ll of Medicine.
And Gerold Schiebler, one of the
College of Medicine's best-known clinical
mentors, retired in 2000 after more than
40 years at the University of Florida. A pe-
diatric cardiologist, Schiebler is renown
for his tireless work to improve the health
care of Florida's children.
November's photo shoot certainly
did not include a complete picture of the
college's first, and possibly most impor-
tant, faculty There were several whose
absences were strongly felt none more
so than that of Hugh Hill's. The former


associate dean for student and alumni
affairs who joined the medical faculty in
1959, earned a reputation as a one-of-a-
kind doctor and teacher who supported
students and earned their trust during his
42 years at UF Dr. Hill died at his home
on July 31.
Hopefully for all who have since
passed away or moved on from UF, the
14 individuals in the photograph rep-
resent the friendship, the commitment
and the unique spirit that was present in
those first four years at the UF College
of Medicine. I


SPRING 2006 1 27


i\


%*- JO













1978
Dr. Will Deal becomes dean
of the College of Medicine
and vice president for
health affairs.


1980 UF's kidney
transplantation program,
founded by Dr. William
Pfaff, above,- who
performed the first
successful transplant in
Florida performs landmark 400th transplant.
* Florida's first bone marrow transplant unit
opens at Shands at UF. The College of
Medicine becomes the first to establish the
benefits of parenteral intravenous nutrition in
the care of malnourished cancer patients.


1982
Dr. David Challoner, below, is appointed vice
president of health affairs. Nation's first
neonatal foal intensive care unit opens at UF
veterinary hospital. A Ronald McDonald
House opens near Shands.


Wi I F


















1984
UF researchers pioneered
the use of the adeno-
associated virus (AAV)
as a gene therapy
vector (below) to treat
a wide range of human
genetic and acquired
diseases. The Xylose
breath test, a quick and
easy test designed to
detect a potentially life-
threatening overgrowth of
bacteria in the intestine,
is developed.


1985
First cochlear implant device to restore
hearing impairment is performed at Shands;
Bioglass implants are used by UF researchers
to restore hearing in first human patients with
damaged middle-ear bones, helping patients
to hear again. Heart and liver transplant
programs are initiated by a multidisciplinary
team of UF health-care professionals.
* University Hospital of Jacksonville affiliates
with UF Health Science Center.



1986
STAN, the Human
Patient Simulator
is developed. The
simulator is a training
system consisting
of a lifelike patient
mannequin that can
replicate any type and
severity of illness in
patients. -


SPRING 2006 29


















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-------f,--(----



A PURPOSE AND A

TEACHING TOMORROW'S DOCTORS IS MORE





Once you look beyond the wooden

models, the political squabbling and u.

the tedious planning that led to the

construction of the University of Florida

College of Medicine, you'll discover

oio Uw thle true mission back in the

1950s the education

of medical students.

Officials within UF's

I medical education program today understand and
embrace the challenge that was defined by college

planners and are dedicated to finding the most up-
to-date and creative ways to train physicians. "The

one thing a medical school does that no other entity


38 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN











PAS S ION
THAN THEIR JOB: IT'S THEIR MISSION




can claim is award the
M.D. degree," explains
Robert Watson, MD69,
senior associate dean
for educational affairs.
"It is the only unique attribute a medical school
has." Watson
and his colleagues
work passionately
to uphold that mission, and their commitment to the
student's needs has meant a steady stream of first-rate
physicians graduating from the University of Florida. Their
methods both high-tech and tried-and-true prepare
graduates to be the best first-year residents they can be.


A


SPRING 2006 1 39











can come here and practice their clini-
cal skills with standardized patients in
a low-stress environment until they get
comfortable," Duerson said. Working
with standardized patients in the Har-
rell Center has become a critical part of
educating students, in part because the
United States Medical Licensing Exam
has added a clinical skills exam.
Because students cannot practice
invasive procedures on standardized
patients, a team of UF faculty including
Samsun Lampotang, PhD, a UF associ-
ate professor of anesthesiology, helped
develop the Human Patient Simulator,
a programmable, computerized manne-
quin that displays vital signs and reacts
realistically to medical procedures.
"If you're an instructor and see a
[student] doing something wrong, you


FACT: TWE N TY
FIVE PERCENT OF
FTIFI STUDENTS
IN Tll ClIASS OF
2 () (,,, '"', ,

:i i I CAI L

LICE NSING EXAM
''i:' I i
i I I
OF TIE FIRST-
TIME TEST TAKERS
NATIONALLY,


Robert T. Watson, MD69, and Lynn Romrell, PhD.


INNC 'A IVI: A 'RIA(
UF is among the nation's top-10 institu-
tions for use and development of per-
formance-based education technology,
Watson says. The university leads the
way in its use of standardized patients,
patient simulators, paperless testing, and
self-teaching software.
UF's Harrell Professional Develop-
ment and Assessment Center houses
one of the nation's foremost standardized
patient programs, "creating" patients
for students to interview and examine
by training actors to portray disease
symptoms, said Margaret Duerson, PhD,
associate professor of medicine and the
center's director.
"One of the advantages I see in having
the Harrell Center is that novice students



FACT. '

t1 C( 1 I G[


FACT: U i I,


__WN
F1.1TE TIACI IIN(G

SOCIETY, '1 H LI



SCH


can let them make mistakes and learn
from them, whereas with a real patient,
you would have to intervene," Lampo-
tang said.
Faculty use other technological
tools to help maximize student learn-
ing, including online testing and course
software. In fact, UF does more online
- teaching, testing, and assessing
students and faculty than any other
medical school in the country, says Lynn
Romrell, PhD, professor of anatomy and
cell biology and associate dean of medi-
cal education.
Students take nearly all exams online
and have instant access to their perfor-
mance, helping them to quickly learn
from test-taking experiences, Romrell


40 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN











says. Online testing also helps students
prepare for the future, since the USMLE
Step 2 exams now take place online.
"When we get the scores back on that,
the students tell us they didn't feel any
added anxiety because they were so accus-
tomed to the format," says Romrell, who
joined the UF medical faculty in 1975.
UF medical professors also have
developed teaching software packages
used in more than 300 medical schools
around the world, Romrell says. The
specialized software covers a number of
JdIfi r: Ii,. i;jl. i. and uses state-of-the-art
text, photographs and learning exercises,
allowing students to bone up on details
before coming to lab.


THE HUMAN ELEMENT
Cutting-edge technology may help the
students learn, but it's not usually a
school's equipment that leaves a lasting
impression on graduates. That honor lies



FACT: AT THE END
OF THEIR FIRST
SEMESTER. ALL UF
MEDICAL STUDENTS
WORK WITH
PRIMARY-CARE
PHYSICIANS FOR
TWO WEEKS.


FACT: TllE COLLEGE
OF MEDICINE IS
ONE OF THF FEW\

HAV AN ELITE
HONC' AR Y
SOCI EIY
DEDICATED
1-O MEDICAL
U MAN ISM AND
COMPASSIONATE

CHlAPMAN SOCIETY.


with the college's human element the
dedicated faculty. "We try to provide a
nurturing environment that allows stu-
dents to focus on learning and developing
the knowledge, skills and personal quali-
ties that distinguish great physicians,"
Watson said. "I think there x II always
be one teacher that personified that goal
better than anyone.
"One of the first things alumni think
of when remembering this College of
Medicine is Smiley Hill," said Watson, who
eulogized Hill at his funeral in August.
The numbers that can be used to sum
up Hill's life are impressive in his 42
years at UF, he worked with more than
3,500 students, was named outstanding
clinical teacher 12 times, and received
the most prestigious among all faculty
awards, the Hippocratic Award, a record
four times.


"Smiley saw only the good in stu-
dents," Watson continued. "He stuck with
us during hard times and even during
our sometimes questionable behavior;
he helped us get residencies, sometimes
better than deserved; and he stuck with
us thereafter.
Through the influence of medical ed-
ucators like Drs. Hill, Watson and Rom-
rell, UF's medical curriculum embraces
the importance of the art of medicine as
well as the science of medicine
"Of the two, the art of medicine is
more difficult to learn because it's based
on things that are less tangible that make
a physician a healer, not merely a tech-
nician," explained Watson, the Jules B.
Chapman, MD, professor in clinical care
and humaneness. "It only makes sense
for us to encourage our students to care
about their future patients while helping
them learn how to take care of them."
Thanks to the ideals set forth by the
College of Medicine's founding fathers
and a dedicated faculty, UF students
emerge from medical school ready to pass
their boards and secure top residency
positions.
I;. ,...I -ii the history, our students
do remarkably well. They can go basically
anywhere they want to go," Romrell says.
"You build your reputation on your gradu-
ates, and we've done well." U


The control room at the Harrell Professional Development and Assessment Center



w. I,'


SPRING 2006 1 41














'1


1988


Dr. J. Lee Docker\. leit, become s
interim dean of the College of1
lMedicine. Frank J. Bova, PhD,
and William A. Friedman, NID,
develop, refine and patent the
LINAC Scalpel, right, one of the world's most accurate
systems for targeting radiation therapy to brain tumors.


1989
Dr. Allen Neims,
below, appointed
dean of COM. *
University Hospital
of Jacksonville is
designated a major
affiliate and urban
campus of UF Health
Science Center
- name changed to
University Medical
Center (UMC).


1990
Lab-grown
skin grafts for
burn victims
developed by
UF researcher
Dr. Ammon
Peck, right.
President
George Bush
declares the
1990s "Decade
of the Brain"
in support
of basic
research.


42 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN


_ J. -__


,~zt~l
~---~--.
_i-~













1992
UF receives $18
million grant from
the U.S. Department
of Defense to build
a neuroscience
research center, the
UF Brain Institute.


1995
SSoutheast's first umbilical cord
blood transplant on an infant and
adult is performed. The state's first
kidney/pancreas transplant occurs,
and the first gene therapy treatment
;9 2 5, mi for brain cancer is performed.
MPIRETA'0n. Thirteen-week-old Gary Weems
H of Pensacola, Fla., has a heart
transplant performed at Shands,
becoming first infant to undergo a
heart transplant in Florida.
STrusopt, a glaucoma drug developed at
UF by Thomas Maren, MD, is released to
the market by Merck and Company.


1994
ProFibeTM, a powdered form of grapefruit
pectin invented by UF's James Cerda, MD,
below, is released to the market showing
promising results
in lowering
cholesterol levels
in consumers.
First lung
S transplant
Performed at
Shands.


Dr. Edward Copeland,
right, becomes interim
dean of the College of
Medicine. Florida's first
gene therapy for cystic
fibrosis is performed
by UF pediatrician and
microbiologists Terrence
Flotte, MD, left.












THE FEMININE

A HISTORICAL LOOK AT THE ROLE OF WOMEN
WITHIN THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

This summer, the College of Medicine will open its much-anticipated
proton therapy institute at its Jacksonville campus. Directed by Dr. Nancy
Mendenhall, UFs facility will join only three other centers in the country
currently providing cancer treatment in the form of proton beam technology
and is expected to launch UFs radiation oncology program to the forefront
of patient care. It was Mendenhall, a 1980
College of Medicine graduate, who convinced
college administrators almost eight years ago
to commit an unprecedented amount of time
and resources into the technology and bring
the $100 million facility to Florida. But that
wasn't the first time Mendenhall was part of
a college transformation. She became the first female department chair
in the history of the College of Medicine when she assumed the head
of radiation oncology in 1992. Her appointment and influence is an
example of how the practice of medicine has changed over the decades
and continues to change as more and more women enter the profession.


44 I FLORIDA PHYSICIAN

















E FACE OF MEDICINE


















.... .


. .... -
. .:... ". . Opposite page:
S(:j "Lucy Birzis, PhD, is
pictured with Thomas
"~ ::.-.... Maren, MD, (center)
the first chairman of
pharmacology at UF.

Right: V. Suzanne
Klimberg, MD84, is a
professor of surgery
and chief of the
division of breast
surgical oncology
at the University of
Arkansas for the
Medical Sciences.
.,,,. 1In 1999, Klimberg
became the second
,. woman elected
president of the
Association of
Academic Surgery.


SPRING 2006 i 45



















































Jean Bennett, MD60


New technologies, Medicare, HMOs and
PPOs have altered the medical profession
over the last 20 years, but none more
than the increasing number of women
practitioners, says Kenneth Kellner, MD,
a UF professor of obstetrics and gynecol-
ogy. According to Kellner, before women
entered the field in significant numbers,
medicine was "more like a paternalistic
fraternity."
"Women are more family oriented and
tend to view their patients in the same
way," he said. "In this way, they make
medicine more holistic. They also have
made the practice itself kinder, gentler
and warmer."
Mendenhall agrees, saying that the
difference in medicine today has been
brought about by a "bottom-up change."


"Women have become part of the
culture of medicine," says Mendenhall, a
physician, wife and mother of two teen-
aged daugthers.
The increase in total numbers has
been dramatic both nationally and
at UE For instance, the three women in
the first graduating class of 1960 made
up 8 percent of the class. The class of
2009 includes 77 women, or 58 percent
of the students. UF's figures mirror those
at most U.S. medical schools, where the
number of women studying medicine
hovers around 50 percent. Thus, in 50
years the face of medicine has indeed
changed in a feminine way
For many women, however, this
revolution was far from painless, and for
some it may not be over. There still are


46 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN















Janet Silverstein, MD, examines
a patient at UF's diabetes clinic.
Silverstein is chief of pediatric
endocrinology in the College
of Medicine. She joined the UF
faculty in 1978.


fewer women in practice and even fewer
in administrative positions. At the College
of Medicine, there is still only one woman
serving as chair of a department Betsy
Shenkman, PhD, in the department of
epidemiology and health policy research.
In 2002, there were only 10 female
medical school deans across the country.
Women have yet to break through the
"glass ceiling" in both academic medicine
and private practice.

E EA ),\ S AY \ A IT
But numbers don't tell the whole story.
The College of Medicine didn't always
conform to the rest of the country's medi-
cal schools, especially in its earliest years.
In 1956, the newly established medical
school, run by visionary Dean George


T. Harrell and staffed by young faculty
members eager to create new traditions,
was special for medical students. Dr. Jean
Lester Bennett, the first woman to gradu-
ate, says she was never treated dcll, I r .:, !
because she was female and "nothing was
ever taken away."
"I sensed during my entire career
here that the playing field was as level
as it could be," says Bennett, a retired
pediatrician. "I have friends from other
schools where that was absolutely not
true in the 1950s."
However, the atmosphere may not
have been as comfortable for minority
women. The first African American wom-
an enrolled at the college left after only
one semester. The first black woman did
not graduate until 1972, and it was the


late 1970s before the first Asian female
received a medical degree from UE

IHl IIRSTI OUR
Four women were among the earliest
faculty in 1958. Most were based in the
laboratory rather than in clinical special-
ties. They all pursued distinguished careers
although their experiences in the College
of Medicine varied. Dr. Margaret Waid,
who joined the department of pathology
in 1957, was the only member of the
American College of Pathologists within
the department. She left UF in 1962.
Lucy Birzis, PhD, a member of
the pharmacology department, was a
pioneer in the field of microelectrode
studies of brain function. Along with
Allan Hemingway, she was one of the first

SPRING 2006 47






































-------~------- ^ ---------
Y THE 1980s AND 1 9)0.s,
B ENOUGH CUMULATI L
CHANGE BEGAN TO RESULT
IN 'AORE OPPORTUNITIES,
N, f~ 1 I ~ A (Iy' I I I K I

WOMEN'S HEALTH AND
E- U'i OPPORTU CITIES FOR
'," O EN IN MEDICINE AT 1THE
UNIVERSITY OF FLO D11


48 I FLORIDA PHYSICIAN










researchers to produce "unit measures"
of hypothalamic control of shivering to
localize brain function. She arrived at
UF in 1956 but left by 1959 and went to
the Stanford Research Institute. Louise
Odor, PhD, was an anatomist whose
work in electron microscopy of oocytes
was well published and led her to a
position as distinguished faculty member
at the Medical University of South
Carolina. Clinician Harriet Gillette, MD,
practiced in the relatively new specialty
of physical medicine and was a fellow
of the American College of Physicians
when she passed away in 2002. She left
UF by 1960, continuing her practice. She
was president of the American Academy
for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental
Medicine in 1970.
Their reasons for leaving the college
may have related directly to gender or
indirectly to the need to develop and
maintain credibility in their fields. This
process was more difficult for women
and especially for those women in new
specialties. Harriet Gillette, for instance,
said in a publication of the Florida Society
of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
that she had "faced an uphill battle in
gaining respect and acceptance for the
specialty, although patients and service
providers welcomed the new specialty
with enthusiasm."
UF's College of Medicine was a mixed
experience for Waid. Although she had
certain opportunities that did not exist in
established departments, she faced other
problems. She worked with male faculty
members who, she said, did not think
women pathologists could accurately
read slides. One colleague reread all of
her slides because he believed a woman
could not give trustworthy results, she
recalls from her home in Ft. Pierce.
The biggest problem for women,
Waid suggests, was others' unwillingness
to trust their knowledge and abilities
- until they proved themselves. For ex-
ample, Dr. Waid remembers a colleague's
comments: "Dr. Waid, I thought you
were a lady doctor. I did not know you
knew anything."


"T i n p "1 'L!

SF VID'S SLIDES BECAUSE HE


BELIEVE D A WOMAN COULD NOT GIVE

TRU. I WORTHY RESULTS.


Kellner suggests women had to
behave more like men to fit in. It was
only when they were present in larger
numbers that they could exert pressure
for change.

INFLUENCING CI ANGE
But a transformation was under way.
Early opportunities for women gave way
to slow changes. In the 1970s the num-
ber of women on the faculty began to
increase, and in 1974 the first woman to
become full professor, Helen Hillinic was
hired in the department of community
health and family medicine.
When Mendenhall entered medical
school in 1976, only about 20 percent
of the class was female and there were
few role models.
"What was odd was observing some
of the behaviors of some of my medical
mentors and not really knowing how to
fit in," she says. "There were many times
when some of us felt very uncomfortable.
The culture of the language was aimed at
building camaraderie and establishing re-
lationships, and we just didn't fit in at
least that was my feeling. I think what I
see over the last 24 years is a significant
change. I feel very much a part of things
now at all of the levels."
F, ll,, by the 1980s and 1990s,


enough cumulative change began to
result in more opportunities, including
a focus on women's health and equal
opportunities for women in medicine at
the University of Florida. However, as
the ranks rise from assistant, to associate
to full professor, their numbers decrease.
Many times that is due to self-selection,
not inequity, says Rebecca Pauly, MD,
the associate chair of the department of
medicine for education and the chief of
the division of internal medicine at the
College of Medicine.
"1 think it is a bit harder for women
to build a medical career when they have
to consider balancing their time to raise
children," says Pauly, a mother of two
teenaged children. "The reality has been
for hundreds of years, that women are
considered the main childcare provider."
Pauly, who also serves as the medi-
cal director of the Harrell Professional
Development and Assessment Center,
added that she feels a responsibility to
act as a role model to female medical
students since few women are found in
key administrative roles at the college.
"I think we're in a catch-up period
now," Pauly continues. "It's a matter of
penetrating the structure. But the climate
here is supportive and encouraging for
women." E


SPRING 2006 1 49

























1997
Dr. Kenneth Berns
becomes dean of the
College of Medicine.
* A UF neurosurgical
team performs the nation's
first embryonic tissue
transplant in a patient
with spinal cord injury


1998
Brain Institute
is opened
to help UF
researchers
achieve
dramatic
advances in
the treatment
of brain
and central
nervous
system
disorders.


1999
UMC, Methodist Hospital
and Shands merge
to create Shands
Jacksonville, below.


2000
Dr. Kenneth
Berns appointed
vice president
for Health
Affairs. UFs
Brain Institute
is named the
Evelyn E and
William L.
McKnight Brain
Institute of the
University of
Florida after
a $15 million
donation from
the McKnight
Brain Research
Foundation.


CIO.,~ ~~
or r
onl
V. Mr Vi























2002
Dr. Douglas Barrett,
above, appointed vice
president for health
affairs. Dr. C. Craig
Tisher, below, becomes
dean of the College of
Medicine.


2003
Ground is
broken for
Florida's
first proton
beam cancer
treatment
facility on the Shands
Jacksonville campus.


2004
The UF&Shands Orthopaedics and
Sports Medicine Institute (below),
a 120,000-square-foot facility at
the corer of Southwest 34th Street
and Hull Road, opens. Florida
Governor Jeb Bush helps break
ground for UFs $85 million Cancer
and Genetics Research building.


2005
Shands
at UF
designated
a Level 1
Trauma
Center.

SPRING 2006 1 51








('Lti ..... u I | l< .........; /t(' .. I I c I C c rl| .. ............ icnc" ...... ^clnj [.p ..i t l 'i (nr1 { ,, I )' l (1 p I. .



DRIVEN BY CURIOSITY,

In the 50 years since its founding a blink in history the UF College

of Medicine has evolved into a seedbed of discovery and service so broad

it seems a travesty to highlight only five faculty members for incredible,

far-reaching medical advancements. Yet I'm doing exactly that, with an

excuse I hope is pardonable. The individuals featured here inspired my

career and life as we crossed paths often during my 33 years at the Health

Science Center. In and out of their labs and offices, I tracked pioneering

work in progress and gradually became aware that their contributions to

health care will make a long-lasting impact. Common denominators

among the group include large dreams and perseverance. Each has been

captivated by grand ideas, drawn by curiosity, inspired to try new ways

to solve problems, and excited by learning, teaching and help-

ing people. They are, in random order: Gerold L. Schiebler,

MD; Parker A. Small Jr., MD; Albert L. Rhoton Jr., MD; James
Robert (Bob) Cade, MD, and the late Thomas H. Maren, MD.


52 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN











INSPIRED BY DREAMS






IyI
'- /* 4' '





I 4k J.,






A'..' i:. -.t -


'-- i ' '"' "> .-.,
... .. .. "- , .













d ----


SPRING 2006 1 53













ALBERT L. RHOTON JR., MD
In 1972, while interviewing Al Rhoton for a story to introduce him
as the new chairman of the department of neurosurgery, he defined
a goal that challenged the department to make a global impact on
the practice of brain surgery. (He's now chairman emeritus).
"I hope to see the time when every second of every day, a
patient somewhere in the world benefits from work done at UF to
refine neurosurgery with the aid of surgical microscopes." At the
time, neurosurgeons had only recently begun to use microscopes
and were guided by crude brain maps lacking most of the complex
blood vessel network.
Rhoton did not come across as a grandstanding person, and
over the years I discovered his giant-sized dreams were surpassed
by painstaking, sacrificial work that continues today
When I telephoned him shortly before last Thal.,,l:i ;.>, he
had just returned to UF's McKnight Brain Institute from Beijing
where he was appointed an honorary faculty member of a new
International Neurosurgical Institute to be built in the shape of
a brain. On the same trip, he visited Korea. Now he was back in
the neurosurgical teaching labs working with fellows from a half
dozen countries.
Today Rhoton's dream of "someone in the world benefiting
every second of every day" is surely a reality
What has brought it about? Start with more accurate, gentler and safer surgical procedures devel-
.,,.,: ri-.n ,e .. i lhigh-precision miniaturized instruments he designed specifically for
r,, ,L. .il .._,- ur r I.1.1. I i.,r h,; published work, including the 2002 millenial edition of the journal
,.:ur,,u:,.o,. i. ,. rt.,,inr, 100, I I is articles chosen by the editors as likely to make an impact into the
ner-,..1 rt, ii I tu .i1 li 1i, I- 00 ,Illstrated textbook, Cranial Anatomy and Surgical Approaches. And
I.,-IJd I II.: ILc rl I, r ... r, I r. -u rgical fellows from around the world have completed training courses

At I hi p~lt, R,, mI. .,, n.. Jcl: I ,.garded as the father of microneurosurgery, concedes there is no finish
line t,., thi l .. :; HI: i-i t b d h..ly-imaging technologies, which help surgeons see inside the brain and
vic .:.,.,mn i 1 -I iIn._tr, ,, i t-h .~i eater clarity, evoke the need for better roadmaps of brain anatomy.
\,'iih ins1t.po ,or, ,:-, nt.,d ti ring his 40-year career, Rhoton has reshaped his goal.
"God has put this body of knowledge in my brain, and my job
is to get it integrated in the minds of neurosurgeons in every part
of the world."

JAMES ROBERT (BOB) CADE, MD
Robert (Bob) Cade can't escape his popular reputation as "Gatorade
Cade." He happens to be the inventor of the world's leading sports
drink, which hit the market 39 years ago.
A September 2005 article in Army Times, highlighting the thirst
for Gatorade among military troops in the hot humid terrain of
Iraq, included the statement, "Supplies have never been tighter as
warehouses of the thirst quencher empty faster than a cold Riptide
Rush on a hot afternoon."
Soldiers, athletes, everyone who exercises or works in the heat,
patients with severe diarrhea and in post-surgical recovery, help to
explain the galloping sales of Gatorade. But regardless of whether


54 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN













it remains a hot item on global grocery shelves, Cad Ir Agra '
inquisitive physician (specialist I n-,. r.,r. -r,.1. 'is mat I; AN' TH7
a lasting impact on medicine. z
Physician Assistant Malcolm Privette, resea _- I, Ai
associate to Cade for more than 30 years, says I-,:
mentor looks at problems d(.1, 11,Ij unbound b.
convention.
By looking at problems in new ways, Cade ha; em fi'
in many stances stepped outside standard medi-
cine to aid the recovery of patients for whom there
was no known cure. For example, he examined a
relationship between kidney function and schizo-
phrenia and studied how hemodialysis might
work to cleanse patients of the substances that "
cause the disease.
More recently, he identified metabolic disorders thi .i
underlie the intellectual deficits associated with aicli r. ri -. ,hre.i
He found that children with these two disorders J.- .-Ii... '.'.. :: ,n., .. :.1 ,.,. .1 i.li, il..
compounds derived from casein in milk and gliadin Iruiii gim11i. hrllinallli LIthI... itLt, Iromii thtii dLh.t
often leads to significant improvement, enabling some to advance from social and scholastic isolation
to mainstream schooling.
Cade the scientist and Cade the humanitarian are the same. Compassion motivates both his ongo-
ing research and outflow of assistance to students, patients, and
to his church.
Yet Cade is much more a lover of song, a poet, violinist,
developer of six hybrid roses named for his six children, collec-
tor/restorer of vintage Studebakers, and inventor. Beyond Gatorade,
there is a high-protein drink called Go!, a better rat trap designed
to solve a problem in his own lab, and a protective hydraulic sports
helmet. He is an unstoppable creative thinker.

GEROLD L. SCHIEBLER, MD
Gerold L. Schiebler lives restlessly in my mind as one who would
call in a booming voice, "Arline, how are you? I have news for you!"
(He's the former associate vice president for health affairs for external
relations, now an adjunct distinguished
service professor in pediatrics.)
Many times, his news would startle
me with its significance as I scrambled
for paper and pen. When I tried to
compliment him on the far-reaching
benefits of what he was d .... ,l-;, he
would impress upon me that nothing,
absolutely nothing is done without lots
of help, and "for this story, you need to
highlight the roles of WHO and WHO
S and WHO!"
Yet Schiebler himself is a lively
sparkplug for change in health care.
Thousands of children are living testi-


SPRING 2006 1 55












mony to programs borne of his initiative and persuasive networking starting in Florida and emulated
in other parts of the nation.
As close associates of Schiebler predicted, there's been little let-up since his UF "retirement" in 2000
and his move to Amelia Island.
Former chief of pediatric ._i i id 1 .. c-, and chairman of pediatrics, Schiebler had already made a huge
impact on the care of sick children before electing to tackle gaps in pediatric care by melding medicine
and politics.
Out of that union has sprung more than 50 pro-child state laws, some of which are the brainchild of
his wife, Audrey He drew Audrey into political activism, but she carved out her own niche by crusading
for the passage of child abuse legislation, legal representation for children in the courts and other legal
measures, while he focused on health and safety issues.
Schiebler says the most significant piece of legislation he nurtured to the finish line is the babies'
medical insurance bill, providing full coverage from birth. It took several years to refine the legislation
and tenacious persistence against opponents in the insurance industry, who claimed the bill would
bankrupt the insurance companies. (It didn't.)
Counsel from his German immigrant parents, who returned to Germany late in life after raising their
children in Hamburg, Pa., apparently fortified Schiebler's dedication to many campaigns to strengthen
health care for children, as well as frail elders.

PARKERA. SMALL JR., MD
Parker Small Jr., is an innovative teacher-scientist, who dreamed
about the potential of student-to-student teaching strategies not
only in medical schools, but also in the public schools in Alachua
County and throughout the nation.
He came up with imaginative, ambitious ways to address some
of the most critical health issues confronting students, especially
from middle school through college AIDS, drug abuse, teenage
pregnancy, herpes and gonorrhea.
Small's key strategy began in the department of immunology and
medical microbiology where he developed a group instructional ap-
proach called Patient-Oriented Problem Solving (POPS). The system
involves presenting a clinical problem to four students, giving them
each a booklet containing one-fourth of the needed information,
and then challenging them to work together to solve it.
The POPS system found its way into more than half of U.S.
1 medical schools, and some foreign schools, and was shown to be
effective in helping students recall complex medical issues.
He and his wife, Natalie Small, PhD, an educational specialist,
then considered
how a POPS-like
approach might
ie help school chil-
dren understand
health hazards in
a way that could
positively influ-
ence behaviors.
They, along with UF i.:11,. Lg,, ., i!d.l local teachers, devel-
oped the TEAMPACKS approach to engage adolescents
in teaching each other.


56 | FLORIDA PHYSICIAN












One of the high school sex education TEAMPACKS was a key component of the Gainesville High School
AIDS education program, which in 1988 was selected by the National PTA as the best in the U.S.
In medical science, Small has gained significant insights into the body's defense mechanisms against
influenza. He and Robert Waldman, MD, pioneered the concept of nasally administered flu vaccines
using a dead virus, which laid the groundwork for current flu sprays using live attenuated flu virus.
He and Bradley Bender, MD, later continued the work with the development of a U.S.-patented nasal
flu vaccine.
Now a professor emeritus "flunking" retirement through his ongoing research engagements, Small
devoted 38 years to the COM as former chairman of the department of immunology and medical mi-
crobiology, and as a professor in both the departments of pediatrics, and _":i.;:l,...,:, immunology and
laboratory medicine. He has given new dimension to teaching, demonstrating the superiority of peer
instruction over rote learning. Add to that the impact of students teaching students the wisdom of fol-
lowing a lifestyle that helps to prevent devastating diseases.

THOMAS H. MAREN, MD.
When I first met pharmacologist Tom Maren in 1970, he had spent more than 20
years studying an enzyme called carbonic anhydrase. The same enzyme would
fascinate him for another 30-plus years and lead to the 1995 release of a new
glaucoma drug called Trusopt, still a top-seller.
Sadly, Maren died at age 81, only three years after the drug made its market
debut. However, through the many interviews I enjoyed with him over the years,
I sensed he was as excited by the journey of discovery as in the resulting producT
Over the years, his pioneering studies of the enzyme's role ir, i ,.Hi production and fl'.. ri
the eyes, brain, spinal cord and lymph system earned him international recognition"
What 1 didn't know, until after his death, was the extent to which he had bucked conven-
tional wisdom in pursuing CA inhibitors that would be applied
directly to the eye via the cornea so as to avoid the debilitating
side effects of oral inhibitors. Maren neglected to tell me that
virtually all leaders in his field at that time opposed his idea.
Perhaps his optimism in the face of cynics came from the
fact that hardly a facet of this enzyme escaped his curiosity or
his analysis. Beyond the genius and perseverance through which
he brought acclaim to UF, Maren will be remembered as one of
the COM founders. He became founding chairman of the depart-
ment of pharmacology and therapeutics, and served in that role
for 23 years. A consummate teacher, he was always surrounded by
students, even during his summers in research at the Mt. Desert
Island Biological Laboratory in Salsbury Cove, Maine.
Maren's legacy in science looms so large that it's hard to
believe he was once torn between humanities and science,
and opted for chemistry as a way to support himself in the
depression era. One was not completely given up for the other, .
however. He often enlivened his science lectures with literary "
allusions and urged medical students to read classic literature. --
Today his encouragement is still carried out through the Maren
Student Reading Room at the COM. -

S....- "
Arline: 'o in r U mcmb, I of ihle ,n s and publi( ,chitions _

lhe position o f c hifcl onn n uIcat n ii, and director of HiSC Ncv is adI
( .1 u 'tifif in,1 xv h .br m it it n h ) s]


SPRING 2006 1 57
















INSPIRED BY VISIONARIES WHO LED BEFORE HIM,
DEAN C. CRAIG TISHER, MD, PURSUES A PROMINENT
FUTURE FOR THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

Don't bother asking C. Craig Tisher to foretell the future of the College of

Medicine 50 years hence. He's not built that way. Analytical and methodi-

cal, the dean of the college is, first and foremost, a physician-scientist and,

second, an administrator known for running a tight ship.

Palm-reading and crystal ball-gazing aren't in keeping with

his Midwestern sensibilities. But make no mistake. Tisher

has a vision and a plan for the College of Medicine And

he works that plan assiduously every day. The result, if

Tisher's plans come to full fruition, will be in his words "a truly outstand-

ing College of Medicine that will have significant prominence through-

out the country and certainly in the Southeast." What follows are Dean

Tisher's unvarnished observations on what the immediate future holds.


58 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN




































































































SPRING 2006 1 59



























H IGH ON THE DEAN'S WISH LIST IS A $25 MILLION

EDUCATIONAL FACILITY OUTFITTED WITH THE LATEST

TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT SIMULATION AND COMPUTER-

AIDED INSTRUCTION-TECHNOLOGIES THE COLLEGE OF

MEDICINE PIONEERED.


ON MEDICAL EDUCATION. As
Florida's population continues to ex-
plode, the state faces a looming shortage
of physicians. With talk of new state-
supported medical schools in full swing,
the UF College of Medicine is answer-
ing the challenge by increasing its class
size this year from 110 to 135 students.
Tisher foresees growth to 160 students
in the next five years, depending in part
on increasing the number of residency
training slots in Florida. Data show that
physicians are apt to stay in states where
they do their residency training, regard-
less of where they attended medical
school. And Florida has a relative dearth
of residency slots.
"It seems foolish to me to dramati-
cally increase either the total number of
medical schools or the total number of
medical students too rapidly in the ab-
sence of increased residency positions, or
we're simply going to be a large exporter
of talent to other states where they'll get
their residency training," he said.
Expansion of the medical education

60 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN


program will also intensify the need for
a new education building on the HSC's
Gainesville campus. Most classroom and
teaching laboratory work now occurs in
the Communicore i.i.linr,. which was
constructed in 1974. High on the dean's
wish list is a $25 million educational
facility outfitted with the latest technol-
ogy to support simulation and computer-
aided instruction technologies the
College of Medicine pioneered.

ON JACKSONVILLE. Jacksonville
will continue to be a regional campus
for the College of Medicine, said Tisher,
but there's no question its importance is
growing. In a subtle but pivotal change,
leaders of the clinical departments in
:,._ -.-, il I. are now classified as chairs
instead of associate chairs, giving them
comparable footing to their counterparts
in Gainesville and allowing the regional
campus to recruit or retain higher-caliber
leadership to foster growth of clinical and
research programs.
With more students and faculty, the


Jacksonville campus will need additional
space. Tisher and Senior Associate Dean
Robert Nuss, MD, his steady right hand
in Jacksonville, will be looking for at
least 50,000 square feet to accommodate
this growth. With improvements to the
Shands Jacksonville inpatient facility and
the construction of a Veterans Affairs
clinic near the medical center also slated,
Tisher and Nuss envision a much more
coherent and user-friendly campus with
a hotel, medical student housing and
bustling clinical services.
A major driver of growth will be the
proton therapy institute, which will open
this summer. One of those "they said it
couldn't be done" projects that Tisher has
personally shepherded since its incep-
tion, the facility will make Jacksonville
one of only a handful of cities in the
country to offer this mode of therapy. As
he follows the progress on a near-daily
basis, the matter-of-fact dean can sound
almost gleeful.
"The cyclotron is humming, we
have protons streaming down the beam






















































































































































































. ...












































IN THE NEXT DOZEN YEARS, TISHER
EXPECTS TO SEE AS MANY AS THREE

MORE RESEARCH BUILDINGS SPRING UP

A .i ". 1 0 .", i" .' I, i i l l 1i I .' i .... .

BECOME AVAILABLE.

transport system, and technicians are
measuring the intensity of the delivery of
those protons," he said. "All of the pieces
are coming together."

ON RISFAl RCH PR()OGRAMS,
The Gainesville campus i11I continue to
build its research portfolio, with an eye
toward helping the university become
a top 10 public research institution. A
series of construction projects, beginning
with the near-completed Cancer-Genetics
building, will move much of the research
enterprise west of the Health Science
Center. In the next dozen years, Tisher


expects to see as many as three more
research buildings spring up around
the Cancer-Genetics building as funds
become available.
One of those buildings is likely to
be home to a new institute on emerging
pathogens. This campuswide effort is
essentially a recognition that we live in a
dangerous world, where plants, animals
and human beings are subject to biologi-
cal threats both natural and manmade,
many of which we barely understand.
"We have so many agents out there
- viruses, fungi, bacteria that can
impact this state that there needs to be
a more concerted effort to be able to
respond, to identify through accurate
diagnosis and to treat or eradicate,"
said Tisher.
Along with emerging pathogens, the
college will continue to plow resources
into foundational research programs
such as cancer, aging, diabetes and other
autoimmune diseases, neuroscience and
imaging. Earning comprehensive cancer


62 1 FLORIDA PHYSICIAN











center status from the National Cancer
Institute is a critical objective, as is be-
ing named a Claude D. Pepper Older
Americans Independence Center a
center of excellence in geriatrics research
and training. In keeping with the Na-
tional Institutes of Health Roadmap, the
emphasis will increasingly be on transla-
tional research that ushers basic science
discoveries from the lab to patients.

OCN CLINICAL PROG) RAMS. If re-
search is moving west, then Gainesville's
clinical programs are moving south,
across Archer Road. The planned 200-
bed cancer tower, scheduled to open in
2009 on the site of the old University
Centre Hotel, will be the first step in
the development of a new, multitower
clinical campus. Distinct facilities for
women, children, cardiovascular disease
and even a new general hospital could
be built. One prominent scenario calls
for vehicle traffic to be diverted and a
segment of Archer Road transformed into
a pedestrian mall.
In developing these plans, Tisher
and others are working closely with the
leadership of Shands HealthCare. In ad-
dition to inpatient facilities, the team is
planning a new outpatient surgery center
for the western edge of campus adjacent
to the Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine
Institute. And then there is the college's
relationship with the Veterans Affairs
Administration, whose Malcom Randall
VA Medical Center is slated to build a new
tower with 225 replacement beds.

ON WHAT CONCERNS HIM.
The short answer, money "As we try to
move into the upper echelon of public,
research-intense medical schools, it really
takes enormous resources, and resources
translate into money," he said.
And yet the revenue streams that
medical school deans count on from
state government, from research grants,
and from both the public and private
purchasers of clinical services are far
from stable. The prospect of new medical


schools in Florida raises additional worry
that state funds will have to be split four
or five ways instead of three.
"A reduction in operating funds from
the State of Florida, even though it's only
8 percent of our overall budget at $38
million a year, is cause for concern,"
Tisher said. "If we lose those dollars or
they continue to shrink, that means we
have to look elsewhere to retrench or
make up that dltrfererntl "
The silver bullet to these threats is
philanthropy, which Tisher expects to
be more personally involved in during
the next few years. With the same steely
resolve that's gotten a proton beam built
in Jacksonville, he seems ready to make
the case to donors "that we are a good
institution to invest in, and something
good will happen with the dollars that
you give us."

ON BEING D EAN. WhenTisherwas
appointed dean in 2002, he was well into
his 60s, an age when many faculty mem-
bers think of retirement. Yet he seems
to relish the role and works with the
physical and intellectual vigor of someone
much younger. He gives a lot of credit for
any success he's had to the support he's
received from chairs and other adminis-


trators. He's characteristically understated
about his own contributions.
"This happened very late in my career,
and it gave me an opportunity to take
some of the experiences I've had over
30-plus years in academic life and try to
apply them to problem-solving in this
position," he said, adding, "I really like
coming to work every day."
One of the roles he especially enjoys is
recruiting, and it's one of the dean's most
important jobs.
"It's an interesting challenge to try
to identify the very best talent out there
and to successfully recruit them, in an
affordable fashion, to the institution,"
he said. "It's always nice when you hit a
home run."
He's had a lot of "at-bats" lately, as the
College of Medicine builds the programs
that will define its future. That he pays
such close attention to this detail reflects
his conviction that the faculty are the
college's most important asset, not just for
what they do, but for how they do it.
"We have great people here, and I
enjoy working with them," he said. "We
don't always agree on everything, but I
think every day when we come to work
we have a common vision of how to make
this place better."l

SPRING 2006 63


ST'S AN INTERESTING

CHALLENGE TO TRY TO

IDENTIFY THE VERY BEST

TALENT OUT THERE AND TO

SUCCESSFULLY RECRUIT THEM,

IN AN AFFORDABLE FASHION,

TO THE INSTITUTION. IT'S

ALWAYS NICE WHEN YOU HIT

A HOME RUN."

C CRA I G TISHER DEAN


















RAISING THE STANDARDS


JERRY EIDSON USHERED IN THE ERA OF

PRIVATE FUNDRAISING AT THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE


He is not a physician or
a scientist. He's not responsible
for groundbreaking research or a revo-
lutionary treatment technique. But Jerry
Eidson can be linked to tens of millions
of dollars received by UF's College of
Medicine over the last three decades.
Eidson, a professional fundraiser,
came to the Health Science Center in
1975 fromJohns Hopkins School of Med-
icine to raise money for the center's six
colleges and create a development office
where none existed. Twenty-seven years
later, Eidson retired from fundraising and
the College of Medicine leaving a legacy
that includes the first $1 million gift ever
received by a state university in Florida as
well as UF's largest gift to date.
Eidson arrived on the UF campus at
a time when private support was not a
conventional means of funding public
universities. He set up shop in a small
office off a hallway that is now the food
court in Shands Hospital and immedi-
ately introduced himself and his mission
64 | FLORIDA PHYSICIAN


to every department chairman.
"Most of them said you can't raise
money for a state institution," Eidson
recalls from his home in southwest
Gainesville. "I said 'I'll leave you to prac-
tice medicine and you leave me to raise
money, and we'll be fine.'"
It took a few large gifts mostly the
state's first $1 million in 1978 from the
R.D. Keene family in Orlando support-
ing an endowed chair in neurosurgery
- to get the attention of faculty and
administrators.
"After that (Keene gift) other chair-
men kept their ear to the ground looking
for possible gifts," Eidson says.
Eidson points out that a development
officer is only as good as the people he's rais-
ing the money for, and his most memorable
partner in fundraising is Albert Rhoton,
MD. The two logged many miles traveling
the state visiting potential donors.
"He is the best fundraiser I have
ever seen," Eidson says of Rhoton. "He
is very upfront and sincere about his
work. People recognize that and can see
the concern he has for his patients. They
know Al Rhoton is real."
Rhoton was the recipient of the Keene
family's gift in 1978 and was honored
in 1999 with the Albert L. Rhoton Jr.,
MD, chairman's professorship. Eidson
worked on the latter gift for months with-
out Rhoton's knowledge, encouraging
Iiu-.ion, former residents and patients
as well as colleagues and friends from
around the world to create the $2 million
professorship.
Rhoton, widely regarded as the father
of microneurosurgery, realized the impor-


tance of fundraising early and appreciated
what Eidson was trying to accomplish.
"One of the great joys of my experi-
ence at the College of Medicine has been
working with Jerry," Rhoton said.
The relationship Eidson cultivated
with J. Lee Dockery, MD, former interim
medical dean and associate vice president
for clinical ilT-i,, at UF, led to the largest
gift ever received by the university. The
McKnight Brain Research Foundation
(MBRF), of Miami, gave $15 million to
the UF Brain Institute in 2000 to support
research into memory loss associated
with aging. The foundation was created
by the late Evelyn E McKnight. She and
her late husband, William L. McKnight,
were very interested in the effects of aging
on memory Dockery, retired and living in
Gainesville, is professor emeritus in the
department of obstetrics and gynecology
and a trustee for the MBRE
Eidson looks back at his career and is
proud of the part he played in the success
of the College of Medicine.
"It was my role to help those guys be
able to do what they do best," he says.
The Health Science Center's devel-
opment office has changed locations
seven times since Eidson began raising
money in 1975. Today 19 fundraisers
and four alumni directors work among
the six health-related colleges and will be
responsible for raising several hundred
million dollars during the university's
upcoming capital campaign.
Jerry Eidson won't miss any of it.
"I'm grateful every day for all the time
I have on my hands," he admits. "I like
not having to rush anymore."l







9ii~


loR
~1EIVIO .


CAROL IN
^kII J .1 Lc i- rl,


r- I










"The practice of medicine is an art, not a science, though

it uses scientific tools which may be of high precision."
George Harrell, ID, mnia 1 54- document outhlnmg the planned U1F College of Mledicinme




This painrtin by Zophia
hlowlCki MD03. entitled
Chest Eam. hangs in the
Thomas H Maren Medical
Student Reading Room
on the ground floor of the
Communicore Building
The reading room was
designed as a place
where medical students
could step away from the
rigors of medical school
and recharge their souls
by connecting with the
humanities


UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA
College of Medicine
Office of Development
Alumni Affairs
P.O. Box 103560
Gainesville, FL 32610-3560


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Organization
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