• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Early years
 After the honeymoon...
 Time passes timelessly
 Exhibit
 Collection
 Back Cover







PAGE 1

On Display in the Exhibit Gallery Second Floor Smathers Library (East) George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida October 1 … October 31, 2005 Special Collections presents

PAGE 2

ON SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, THE COMIC STRIP Blondie celebrated its 75th anniversary. Created by Murat Bernard ChicŽ Young (1901-1973), Blondie is one of the longest running newspaper strips. Young produced Blondie seven days a week until his death, at which time his son, Dean Young, assumed creative control of the comic strip. This exhibit commemorates Blondie s anniversary by exploring its early history. Few realize or remember that Blondies origins are in the genre of ” apper strips that were popular in the twenties and thirties. Prior to Blondie Chic Young produced other strips in this style with titles such as Dumb Dora, Beautiful Babs and The Affairs of Jane Blondie was not always Mrs. Bumstead, mother of two with a dog named Daisy. Blondie Boopadoop was a single girl from a working class background. She exempli“ ed the dumb blondeŽ stereotype and her strategically deployed ditziness initially provided much of the strips humor. Although the comic strip is seventy-“ ve years old, Blondie and Dagwood have only been married for seventy-three of those years. Blondie had many suitors, but her early leading man was Hiho. Hiho Hennepin was a shorter prototype of Dagwood right down to the trademark bow tie they both sport. Young fazed out Hiho shortly after Blondies marriage to his taller and richer rival. Dagwood was introduced in 1933 as the rich playboy and son of railroad tycoon J. Bollinger Bumstead. Blondie had to make a choice between the neer-do-well Hiho and Dagwoods millions. We all know whom she chose, but the adventures of a rich playboy and a gorgeous ” apper during the centurys greatest economic recession failed to generate mass audience appeal. So Young stripped Dagwood of his millions leaving the newlyweds to live on love.ŽThe Early YearsAbove : Hiho courted Blondie from 1930 to 1933, without success. Bottom Right : This early example of Dagwoods classic food balancing technique shows how he is visually distinguishable from Hiho only by a small difference in height and hairstyle. Left : Hiho Hennepin.

PAGE 3

After the Honeymoon...In the early stages of the marriage, many of the gags centered on the class con” ict that ensued from the interaction of Blondie with her blusterous and social climbing in-laws. In one strip, Dagwoods parents refuse to allow Blondie to accompany her husband on their yacht for fear that she will disgrace them in front of the guests. In order to sneak on the ship, Blondie dresses in drag as a manservant. She is eventually discovered by her fatherin-law who chases her up a pole in a “ t of rage! It is dif“ cult to imagine the modern Blondie going to such lengths for a free cruise. Young soon abandoned this approach of making strips that concentrated on the clash between Blondie and her in-laws and shifted his direction toward the creation of an image of Blondie and Dagwood as the average white, middle class, American couple. Having been disowned by his parents for marrying Blondie, Dagwood got a job at the J. C. Dithers Construction Company, effacing all traces of his af” uent origins. As with Dagwoods wealthy parents, Hiho was left behind in the thirties. Hiho married a girl named Betty in the same week Blondie married Dagwood. All of Hihos appearances afterward centered on his relationship with Betty which was an endless cycle of violent “ ghts and passionate make-ups. Young did not wish to continue making strips based on the dynamic between the two couples, so Hiho and Betty soon disappeared and Herb and Tootsie Woodley were introduced as the Bumsteads neighbors. Instead of Hiho and Bettys brawling which would today be regarded as domestic violence, Young now depicted a rivalry between Herb and Dagwood in which they often exchanged blows.Right : Having been chased up a pole by her father-in-law, Blondie reveals her identity by removing a fake moustache. Although dressed as a man, she retains her heels (5/14/1933). Above Left : Dagwoods parents voice their objections to his marrying the lower class Blondie (2/5/1933). Above Right : Hiho and Bettys hot-blooded marriage was in direct contrast to Blondie and Dagwoods stable relationship (3/15/1933).

PAGE 4

Time Passes TimelesslyAlthough the characters do not obey the conventional laws of aging, Blondies marriage marked the beginning of a change in her personality. From that point forward, she gradually assumed her position as the sensible head of the Bumstead household. And Dagwood, who previously had been cast in the role of straight man to Blondies comic antics, took over as the comic strips clown. The many running gags centered on Dagwood have become Blondie s focal point„most famously the monstrous sandwiches he concocts from leftovers, but also his frustrated attempts at napping, chronic lateness, collisions with the mailman Mr. Beasley, struggles with door-to-door salesmen and ability to send Mr. Dithers into a rage. Dagwoods comic routines were established in the early years of the strip. Over the decades, adjustments for the changing times have been made to the content of the strip (although the characters stopped aging sometime in the sixties). Dagwood now rushes out of the house late for his carpool instead of the bus and although he still works for Mr. Dithers, he has entered the 21st century working as the companys webmaster. Blondie continues to be the households manager doing most of the cleaning and cooking. The big difference is that now, in keeping with the contemporary lifestyle of many women, she has a double workload since opening a catering business with her neighbor Tootsie Woodley in 1991. While Blondie may exist outside of linear time, Chic Young was a master of comic timing. Producing Blondie on a daily basis re“ ned his sense of pacing such that many of the early strips not only incorporated screwball slapstick, but moments of complete surrealism as well. While the post-marriage Blondie is collected and in control, Dagwood is forever losing his pants and depicted in situations over which he is completely powerless. Above : A glimpse into the dreaming mind of Dagwood (2/27/1944). Right : Mr. Dithers, who resembles Dagwoods father, plays the stereotypical of“ ce autocrat (11/1/1942). Left : Chic Young found countless ways to divest Dagwood of his pants (8/14/1949).

PAGE 5

The ExhibitWe hope that the comic strips exhibited will give the viewer a sense of Blondie in its formative years. There once was a time when Blondies culinary skills were not as advanced as they are today and Cookie and Alexander (formerly called Baby DumplingŽ) were not frozen in perpetual adolescence as the uncanny doubles of their parents. On display are strips that feature Blondie and Dagwoods tumultuous wedding, the successive birth and development of Cookie and Alexander, and the forgotten characters such as spirited Hiho and Dagwoods wealthy parents. We also chose strips that were representative of the different historical moments throughout which Young produced Blondie The CollectionThe Blondie strips are taken from the Don Ault collection, which has a run of the series from 1931-53 and is housed in The Special Collections Department in the University of Floridas Smathers Library. The newspaper strips that Dr. Ault has generously donated were initially given to him by the avid newspaper strip collector Bill Wright, a Disney comic artist who is known for his work on Mickey Mouse comics. Contemporary strips are courtesy of The Gainesville Sun and the Little Big Books, donated by Penny and Sol Davidson, are part of the librarys Baldwin Collection. We invite those interested in further examining the Blondie strips to visit the Smathers Library Special Collections and Area Studies Department which is open to the public. Special Thanks to : Mil Willis for his continual support and creative solutions without which the exhibit would not have been possible. Above : Alexander Baby DumplingŽ Bumstead. Top Right : Dagwood experimented with nuclear energy in strips from the 1940s. Below : One of the many Little Big Books in the Baldwin collection.

PAGE 6

Above : Panel from November 11, 1931 strip. George A. Smathers Librarieshttp://www.u” ib.u” .edu


75 years of Blondie : 1930 - 2005
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Title: 75 years of Blondie : 1930 - 2005
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Publication Date: 2005
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Subjects / Keywords: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Early years
        Page 1
    After the honeymoon...
        Page 2
    Time passes timelessly
        Page 3
    Exhibit
        Page 4
    Collection
        Page 4
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text




Si UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
Special Collections presents


.o0 200


October 1 October 31, 2005


Display in the Exhibit Gallery
Second Floor
Smathers Library (East)
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida



















The Early Years


ON SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, THE COMIC STRIP
Blondie celebrated its 75th anniversary. Created by
Murat Bernard "Chic" Young (1901-1973), Blondie
is one of the longest running newspaper strips.
Young produced Bloidt seven days a week until
his death, at which time
his son, Dean Young, as- w. -
sumed creative control of :
the comic strip. .


This exhibit commemo-
rates Blondie's anniver-
sary by exploring its early
history. Few realize or
remember that Blondie's
origins are in the genre
of flapper strips that were
popular in the twen-
ties and thirties. Prior
to Blondie, Chic Young
produced other strips in


Although the comic strip is seventy-fi e years old,
Blondie and Dagwood have only been married for
seventy-three of those years. Blondie had many
suitors, but her early leading man was Hiho. Hiho
Hennepin was a shorter prototype of Dagwood
right down to the trademark
bow tie they both sport.
1 ,-. Young fazed out Hiho
shortly after Blondie's
S 7 .i| marriage to his taller and
..richer rival.


Above: Hiho courted Blondie from 1930 to 1933, without success.
Bottom Right This early example of Dagwood's classic food balancing
technique shows how he is visually diringuishable from Hiho only by
a small difference in height and hairstyle.


this style with titles such
as Dumb Dora, Beautiful Babs and The .ffair-s of
Jane.

Blondie was not always Mrs. Bumstead. mother of
two with a dog named Daisy. Blond-
ie Boopadoop was a single girl
from a working class background.
She exemplified the "dumb
blonde" stereotype and her strategi-
cally deployed ditziness initially
provided much of the strip's humor.


Dagwood was introduced
in 1933 as the rich play-
boy and son of railroad
tycoon J. Bollinger
Bumstead. Blondie had
to make a choice between
the ne'er-do-well Hiho and
Dagwood's millions. We
all know whom she chose,


but the adventures of a rich
playboy and a gorgeous flapper during
the century's greatest economic reces-
sion failed to generate mass audience
appeal.

So Young stripped
Dagwood of his
millions leaving the
newlyweds to "live
on love."


Left: Hiho Hennepin.











After the Honeymoon...


In the early stages of the marriage, many of the
gags centered on the class conflict that ensued from
the interaction of Blondie with her blusterous and
social climbing in-laws. In one strip, Dagwood's
parents refuse to allow Blondci to accompany her
husband on their yacht for fear that she will dis-


wealthy
parents.
Hiho was
lelt behind
in the thir-
ties Hiho
married a girl named Berty in the same week
Blondie married Dagwood. All of Hiho's appear-
ances afterward centered on his relationship with
Betty which was an endless cycle of violent fights
and passionate make-ups. Young did not wish
to continue making strips based on the dynamic
between the two couples, so Hiho and Betty soon
disappeared and Herb and Tootsie Woodley were
introduced as the Bumstead's neighbors. Instead of
Hiho and Betty's brawling which would today be
regarded as domestic violence. Young now depict-
ed a rivalry between Herb and Dagwood in which
they often exchanged blows.


grace them in front of the guests. In order to sneak
on the ship. Blonde dresses in drag as a manser-
vant. She is eventually discovered by her father-
in-law who chases her up a pole in a fit ofrage! It
is difficult to imagine the modern Blondle going to
such lengths for a free cruise.

Young soon abandoned this approach of mak-
ing strips that concentrated on the clash between
Blondie and her in-laws and shifted his direc-
tion toward the creation of an image of Blondie
and Dagwood as the average white, middle class,
American couple. Having been diso owned by his
parents for marrying Blondie, Dagwood got a job
at the J. C. Dithers Construction Company, effacing
all traces of his affluent origins.


Right: Having been chased up a pole by her father-in-law, Blondle reveals
her identity by removing a fake moustache. Although dressed as a man,
she retains her hels (5/14/1933).
Above Left: Dagwoods parents voice their objections to his marrying the
lower dass Blondie (2/5/1933).
Above Right: Hiho and Bett's hot-blooded marriage was in direct contrast
to Blonde and Dagwood' stable relationship l1/15/1933).








Time Passes Timelessly

Although the characters do not obey the conven-
tional laws of aging. Blondie's marriage marked
the beginning of a change in her personality.
From that point forward, she gradually assumed
her position as the sensible head of the Bumstead
household. And Dag\% ood, who previously had
been cast in the role of straight man to Blondie's
comic antics, took over as the comic strip's clown.
The many running gags centered on Dag-
wood have become Blondie's focal
point-most famously the monstrous
sandwiches he concocts from leftovers,
but also his frustrated attempts at napping.
chronic lateness, collisions with the mail-
man Mr. Beasley, struggles with door-to-door
salesmen and ability to send Mr. Dithers into a
rage. Dagwood's comic routines were estab-
lished in the early years of the strip.

Over the decades, adjustments for the changing
times have been made to the content of the strip
(although the characters stopped aging sometime
in the sixties). Dagwood now rushes out of the
house late for his carpool instead of the bus and
although he still works for Mr.
Dithers, he has entered the .
21st century working
as the company's I
webmaster. Blondie JV ,, .i.
continues to be the O
household's manag- N
er doing most of the
cleaning and cooking.
The big difference is
that now, in keeping with
the contemporary lifestyle of many
women, she has a double workload since opening
a catering
business
with her
neighbor
Tootsie
Woodley
in 1991.


While Blondie may exist outside of linear time,
Chic Young was a master of comic timing. Pro-
ducing Blondie on a daily basis refined his sense of
pacing such that many of the early strips not only
incorporated screwball slapstick, but
moments of complete surreal-
ism as well. While


Blondie
is collected and in
control. Dagwood is for-
ever losing his pants and depicted
in situations over which he is completely
. powerless.


Above:A glimpse into
the dreaming mind of Dagwo
(2/27/1944).
Right: Mr. Dithers, who resembles
Dagwoods father, pla the
stereotypical office autocrat
(11/1/1942).
Left Chic Young found count-
less ways to divst Dagwood
of his pants (8/14/1949).


~REQ ?








The Exhibit

We hope that the comic strips exhibited will give
the viewer a sense of Blondie in its formative years.
There once was a time when Blondie's culinary
skills were not as advanced as they are today and
Cookie and Alexander (formerly called "Baby
Dumpling") were not frozen in perpetual adoles-
cence as the uncanny doubles of their parents. On
display are strips that feature Blondie and Dag-
wood's tumultuous wedding, the successive birth
and development of Cookie and Alexander,
and the forgotten characters such as spirited
Hiho and Dagwood's wealthy parents. We
also chose strips that were representa-
tive of the different historical moments
throughout which Young produced
Blondie.





Above Alexander "Baby Dumpling"
Bumstead.

with nuclear energy in strips
from the 1940s.
Below: One of the many Little
Big Books in the Baldwin
collection.


The Collection

The Blondie
strips are taken i-"..- P' rl L c A?
from the Don
Ault collection, er
which has a run
of the series
from 1931-53
and is housed
in The Special
Collections Department in the University of
Florida's Smathers Library. The newspaper
strips that Dr. Ault has generously donated
were initially given to him by the avid news-
paper strip collector Bill Wright, a Disney
comic artist who is known for his work on
Mickey Mouse comics. Contemporary
strips are courtesy of The Gainesville
Sun and the Little Big Books, donated by
Penny and Sol Davidson, are part of the
library's Baldwin Collection.

We invite those interested in further examining the
Blondie strips to visit the Smathers Library Special
Collections and Area Studies Department which is
open to the public.



Special Thanks to: Mil Willis for his continual support
and creative solutions without which the exhibit would
not have been possible.








The Exhibit

We hope that the comic strips exhibited will give
the viewer a sense of Blondie in its formative years.
There once was a time when Blondie's culinary
skills were not as advanced as they are today and
Cookie and Alexander (formerly called "Baby
Dumpling") were not frozen in perpetual adoles-
cence as the uncanny doubles of their parents. On
display are strips that feature Blondie and Dag-
wood's tumultuous wedding, the successive birth
and development of Cookie and Alexander,
and the forgotten characters such as spirited
Hiho and Dagwood's wealthy parents. We
also chose strips that were representa-
tive of the different historical moments
throughout which Young produced
Blondie.





Above Alexander "Baby Dumpling"
Bumstead.

with nuclear energy in strips
from the 1940s.
Below: One of the many Little
Big Books in the Baldwin
collection.


The Collection

The Blondie
strips are taken i-"..- P' rl L c A?
from the Don
Ault collection, er
which has a run
of the series
from 1931-53
and is housed
in The Special
Collections Department in the University of
Florida's Smathers Library. The newspaper
strips that Dr. Ault has generously donated
were initially given to him by the avid news-
paper strip collector Bill Wright, a Disney
comic artist who is known for his work on
Mickey Mouse comics. Contemporary
strips are courtesy of The Gainesville
Sun and the Little Big Books, donated by
Penny and Sol Davidson, are part of the
library's Baldwin Collection.

We invite those interested in further examining the
Blondie strips to visit the Smathers Library Special
Collections and Area Studies Department which is
open to the public.



Special Thanks to: Mil Willis for his continual support
and creative solutions without which the exhibit would
not have been possible.























M.'


Above: Panel from November II, 1931 strip.


..* UNIV'RSITYOF
tFLORIDA
George A. Smathers Libraries
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu




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