• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Acknowledgement
 Basic statement of problem
 Establishment of feasibility
 Investigation of site
 Historical analysis of region
 Economic feasibility
 Basic collection of functional...
 Statement of basic concept
 Limits of design
 Footnotes
 Bibliography
 Locator map
 Site map
 Tree map
 Steam, electricity, telephone main...
 Water, storm, sewerage, main duct...
 Sanitary, sewerage, irrigation...
 Contour map
 Photo locator map
 AE 634 program
 1976 needs architecture with...














Program for the design of additional instructional and social spaces for the College of Architecture and Fine Arts at th...
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076629/00001
 Material Information
Title: Program for the design of additional instructional and social spaces for the College of Architecture and Fine Arts at the University of Florida, Gainesville Student project (ARC634)
Physical Description: Scrapbook. 25p. ill., maps, photos
Language: English
Creator: Parks, John
Publisher: John Parks
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1972
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville -- University of Florida campus
Caribbean
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Architecture and Fine Arts Library, George A. Smathers Libraries
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: AE634
System ID: UF00076629:00001

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Acknowledgement
        Page 3
    Basic statement of problem
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Establishment of feasibility
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Investigation of site
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Historical analysis of region
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Economic feasibility
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Basic collection of functional data
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Statement of basic concept
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Limits of design
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Footnotes
        Page 39
    Bibliography
        Page 40
    Locator map
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Site map
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Tree map
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Steam, electricity, telephone main duct map
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Water, storm, sewerage, main duct map
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Sanitary, sewerage, irrigation main duct map
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Contour map
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Photo locator map
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    AE 634 program
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
    1976 needs architecture with planning
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
        Page A-9
        Page A-10
Full Text









A PROGRAM FOR


THE DESIGN OF ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL AND SOCIAL SPACES FOR THE

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA































FALL 1972

FOR AE634

BY: JOHN PARMS


/i;"t, M










CONTENTS


Acknowledgment

Basic Statement of Problem

Establishment of Feasibility

Investigation of Site

Historical Analysis of Region

Economic Feasibility

Basic Collection of Functional Data

Statement of Basic Concept

Limits of Design

Footnotes

Bibliography

Appendix See Second Binder









ACKNOWLEDGMENT


In 1969 Daniel Powers wrote a program concerning this addition to the

Architecture and Fine Arts Complex. The first four sections of this

program are the same first four sections of the Power's program with

the exception of fact updating, inclusion of maps and photos, and some

thoughts and ideas.












BASIC STATEMENT OF PROBLEM










BASIC STATEMENT OF PROBLEM

The purpose of this program is to establish meaningful information which
will enable a designer to formulate design concepts regarding the design
of an educational facility for the College of Architecture and Fine Arts
at the University of Florida.

This facility should contain office spaces, teaching and research labora-
tories, display and jury areas, and social gathering spaces. In addition,
due to the rapid growth of the university and.college, careful consideration
should be given regarding future expansion.



















ESTABLISHMENT OF FEASIBILITY









ESTABLISHMENT OF FEASIBILITY


The College of Architecture and Fine Arts, comprised of the Departments of
Music, Theater, Art, Building Construction and Architecture, is currently
housed in nine permanent and temporary buildings located throughout the
campus.

Conditions within the college have grown progressively worse. Consequently,
in 1965 three permanent structures were erected constituting the initial
phase of the construction of an architecture and fine arts complex. Desig-
nated as AFA Buildings A, B, and C they facilitate the college administra-
tion and library, a.small art gallery, the entire Department of Building
Construction, and portions of the Departments of Art and Architecture.
The remaining portions of these departments are housed in two temporary
structures, Grove Mall which lies adjacent to the AFA complex, and
Building I which is located in a remote location in relation to the AFA
complex. Also, portions of the college are located in the permanent
structures of Weil Hall Building 155 and in Constans Theater.

The Department of Music, on the other hand, having long been housed in
still another temporary structure across campus, has been relocated in a
new building. Thus, the second phase of the AFA complex has been com-
pleted.

Between 1965 and 1972 the size of the College of Architecture and Fine Arts
has nearly doubled. Studies indicate that by September 1976 the student
enrollment for all departments will increase 'approximately thirty-five
percent, thus bringing the university enrollment from over 20,000 to over
27,000.1

Whereas this increase has been anticipated by the Department of Music and
will be adequately housed in it's new structure, the same is not true for
the other departments in which physical conditions are already cramped.

Moreover, Building AFA C, the primary instructional building of the
existing complex, is in many ways inadequate in meeting the educational
needs of the college. Primarily a classroom and office structure,
conditions have forced it to perform laboratory and research functions
as well. Therefore, while being suitable in meeting the requirements
of the Department of Building Construction, which is primarily business
oriented, the facility is serving the needs of the Art and Architecture
Departments. In short, a classroom building is not a suitable environment
for creative activity and hinders, rather than stimulates, productivity
both on the part of the instructor and student.

The need for a new facility is many fold; to accommodate the increase in
size of the college; to centralize the college and allow for the necessary
exchange of ideas; to serve as a physical link between the existing struc-
tures and the new music building; and finally, to produce the needed
creative environment.


























INVESTIGATION OF SITE










INVESTIGATION OF SITE2


Site Location

The site consists of approximately 13.1 acres of partially wooded, gently
sloping land located in the eastern half of the University of Florida cam-
pus. The campus lies in the western half of the City of Gainesville, which
is located in the north central portion of Florida (See maps 1, 2, 3 and 4).
Thirteenth Street, Inner Drive, Newell Drive and Stadium Road are the bound-
aries of the site, but since the University has no zoning regulations, set-
back requirements or height limitations governing construction on campus it
is possible that the addition may extend over all the streets except Thir-
teenth Street.
At present, there are two temporary structures, Grove Hall and Bldg. AE, on
the site but they will be removed. In the south central area of the site
there is a parking lot that can be removed if necessary.


Climate Conditions

Gainesville is located in the north central region of the State of Florida
Hurricanes and tornadoes are the major threats to the area while heavy rains
and electrical storms constitute more frequent minor threats. The site
however, is located in a high region and flooding is unlikely to occur.
Gainesville's summers are generally hot and humid with temperatures ranging
from 70 to 95 degrees and a rainfall of 20 to 60 inches. The winters are
dry with only 10 to 12 inches of rain and temperatures ranging from 20 to
70 degrees. The wind is normally out of the northwest at an average speed
of 10 mph.


Soil Conditions

Although boring tests were made prior to the design and construction of the
AFA buildings A, B and C and the Music building. However, due to the
cavernous nature of the areas subsoil and the presence of the natural sink,
the results of these previous tests may be of little value. Boring tests
of the site proper must be made prior to a detailed structural analysis of
the building project. The soil is of the Arredondo type.


Surface Drainage

The site slopes gently, a difference of approximately 15 feet, from north
to south. During heavy rains however, there does occur some erosion and
washing on the western end of the present AFA Complex. This condition is
not serious and can easily be corrected by minor cut and fill.










Water and Trees


Gator Pond, a natural sink, located in the north central area of the site
measures approximately 120 feet in diameter. Clusters of large hickory,
oak, pine and magnolia trees measuring 60 feet in height surround the pond
and extend westward through the central and northern portions of the site.
Smaller oaks, camphors and sable palms are scattered throughout the area
(See map 5).


Utilities

The utilities available are steam, electricity, telephone, water, storm
sewerage, sanitary sewerage, irrigation and gas.

Steam is available to the south from a 6 inch main-running east west on
the south side of Inner Drive (See map 6).

Electricity is available to the north from underground cables running east -
west on the north side of Stadium Road and to the south from underground
cables running east west on the south side of Inner Drive (See map 6).

Telephone is available from an underground cable that is located on the
south side of Stadium Road (See map 6).

Water is available from a 6 inch main running east west on the north side
of Stadium Road and on the south side of Inner Drive (See map 7).

Storm sewerage lines are available from mains located south of Stadium Road
and north of Inner Drive (See map 7).

Sanitary sewerage lines are available along the south side of Stadium Road,
a 10 inch main (See map 8).

Irrigation is available from a line on the north side of Inner Drive and
one on the south side of Stadium Road (See map 8).

Gas is available along the 6 inch line running east west on the south side
of Stadium Road (No map available).


































HISTORICAL ANALYSIS OF REGION










HISTORICAL ANALYSIS OF REGION


History .o Gainesville

Named in honor of General Edmund Pendleton Gaines, a hero of the
Seminole Wars, the City of Gainesville was formed in 1853.

Basically an agricultural community, the village underwent it's first
boom with the completion -in 1860 of the Florida Railroad which ran from
Cedar Key to Fernandina and connected to.shipping lines to New Orleans
and New York. During the Civil War, because of the railroad and Gaines-
ville's safe position from a coastal invasion, it became a food depot for
the Confederacy. Large herds of cattle from South Florida were assembled
on-Paines Prairie and driven north for the use of the army. After the
war, again a result of the railroad, the community prospered. Cotton was
.in demand, it's price was high, and people from miles around came to
Gainesville to shop and to sell and ship their products to the northern
markets.

But an even greater influence than the railroad, a greater cause of the
'communities growth, was the establishment in Gainesville of the University
of Florida in 1905. Due to the universities presence the Florida land
boom of the 1920's, which normally affected only the southern portion of
the state, produced a substantial increase in the town's population. During
World War II, as a result of the university's facilities, Camp Blanding
located-35 miles north of the city became one of the largest army camps in
the nation. In the post-war period Gainesville, as other university
communities, underwent rapid growth as more and more ex-servicemen flooded
the campuses.

During the 1950's and 1960's the city underwent increased industrialization
and expanded it's services. Today Gainesville is a medium-sized city with
a population of more than 100,000 inhabitants.


Architectural History

The architectural development of Gainesville is in the period of styles
similar to many southern towns; styles based upon the fashions of the day.
Consequently, Gainesville has not been richly endowed with an architectural
heritage-. There has been an overall trend however, and it may best be
described as economic functionalism, where costs have limited design and
architects have T-erely planned.


History of the University

With the passage of the Buckman Act in 1905, the State of Florida estab-
lished a State Board of Controls and consolidated all of the existing










institutions of higher learning into a University of the State of Florida.
The oldest of these institutions was the East Florida Seminary of Ocala,
established in 1857. Many Florida communities competed for the site of
the new university and the Board of Control, and after a closely fought
battle selected Gainesville for its location. Classes opened in Septem-
ber 1905. With an initial emphasis on agriculture, the university be-
came co-educational in 1947. The university has an enrollment of more
than 20,000 students in 15 separate colleges, a School of Forestry and
a Graduate School.


Architectural History

The style consciousness which affected the City of Gainesville also in-
fluenced the architectural development of the university. In 1905 the
Board of Control decreed 'Tudor Gothic' as the style for all campus
structures. Evidence of this is Buckman and Thomas Halls, the first
permanent structures completed in 1906. Fortunately, however, this
ruling is no longer in effect and the university campus in its present
state consists of more than 600 buildings "which blend Gothic and Modern
architecture on spacious lawns studded with palm and pine trees".

Brick construction is used for most construction on the University of
Florida campus, but it should be noted that this is not due to a university
regulation. Brick is advantageous however, due to it's luow upkeep.
Generally an expensive means of construction the university purchases
brick-at a low cost from the Florida State Prison system. Likewise, con-
crete products have been used for their low costs, good weathering charac-
teristics and minimum maintenance requirements.


Architectural Scale and Surroundings

The campus of the University of Florida is located in the southwest portion
of Gainesville. The campus is bounded on all four sides by major traffic
carriers. The east boundary is Thirteenth Street, the south is ArChbr Road,
the hwesctThti'ty-fourth Street and on the north is University Avenue. The
general setting of Archer Road is rural in character, Thirty-fourth Street
has recently become a high density residential community and University
Avenue andThirteenth Street bordering the university are light commercial
and low to medium density residential in composition. Few structures ad-
jacent to the campus are taller than two-story in height or prominent in
architectural character.

The buildings on campus, as mentioned, are generally constructed of brick
and are institutional in scale. Few of the campus buildings are taller
than 100 feet in height.











































ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY













ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY


Since the new facilities are located on the University of Florida campus

and it is funded by public funds, the money is apportioned by a rule

allowing a set amount per square foot.

The following figures are the average allotment for 9 Florida Universities

for similar type spaces:

Teaching Lab $47.22 per sq. ft.

Research Lab $48.53 per sq. ft.

Office $30.22 per sq. ft.















































BASIC COLLECTION OF FUNCTIONAL DATA










BASIC COLLECTION OF FUNCTIONAL DATA


The following data is a planning guide for the physical plant of the new
facilities. This data starts with difinitions which give the reader a
background with which to understand the data. After the definitions is a
set of formulas (Table 1) by which the State of Florida allows space needs
to be determined. Next is a table (Table 2) which shows the square foot-
age within the existing Architecture and Fine Arts Complex. On the fifth
is Table 3 which shows the projected figures for students and faculty for
1976.

From all this data can be drawn some planning figures. On the bottom of
the fifth page are WASF (Table 4) of area as determined by the Chairman
of the Department of Architecture, Mr. Arnold Butt, by using the state
planning guidelines. These figures include the Planning Option and are for
1976.

Beginning on the sixth page is a list (Table 5) of spaces that the author
feels are necessary for proper architectural educational instruction.
Along with the space is listed the required number and the approximit
required square footage of floor area.

It is the authors intention that the existing facilities be used to their
fullest capacity, consequently the spaces in Table 5 must be accomodated
in both the existing and new facilities.










DEFINITIONS


Lower Division Student

Student enrolled in 100 and 200 level courses.


Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Lower Division Student

The total credit hours offered per quarter by the department
or college at the 100 and 200 levels divided by 15.


Upper Division Student

Student enrolled in 300, 400, 500 and 600 level courses.


Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Upper Division Student

The total credit hours offered per quarter by the department
or college at the 300, 400, 500 and 600 levels divided by 15.


Graduate Student

Student enrolled in 600 and 700 courses.


Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Graduate Student

The total credit hours offered per quarter by the department
or college at the 600 and 700 levels divided by 12.


Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Faculty

The number of full time equivalent instructors, administrators,
graduate assistants, and career service personnel is based upon
their contracted employment with the university. One instructor,
therefore, can be less than or equal to 1 FTE but never greater
than 1.0 FTE.


Station

The total facilities necessary to accommodate one person at a
given time. A student station is a chair, or a seat, or a
laboratory bench, or some other facility necessary to accommodate
one student during an instruction period.










Weekly Student Hours (WSH)


The number of clockhours that student stations are occupied on
a schedule basis.


Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF)

The area of a space assigned to, or available for assignment to
an occupant. The area is in square feet and is computed by
measuring distances between the inside finishes of permanent
building walls.


Gross Square Feet (GSF)

The sum of the floor areas included within the outside faces of
exterior walls for all stories as measured from the outside
face ofthe exterior walls.

Note: To determine the allowable GSF from the required NASF
multiply the NASF by 1.67.







TABLE I


DETERMINATION OF SPACE SQUARE FOOTAGE REQUIREMENTS FOR ARCHITECTURAL
EDUCATION SPACES AS SET FORTH BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA
3.
Teaching Laboratory Space Standards
Lower Division Lab
55 square foot per station
24 room periods per week
80% stations occupied
22.8 weekly student hours per FTE student
55
24 x x 22.8 = 65.21 NASF/FTE student.
24 x .80

Upper Division and Graduate Lab
85 square foot per station
30 room periods per week
80% stations occupied
16.5 weekly student hrs. per FTE student (upper)
25.0 weekly student hrs. per FTE student (graduate)
85 x 16.5 = 58-41 NASF/FTE Student (upper)
30 x .80
85 x 25.0 = 88.50 NASF/FTE Student (graduate).
30 x .80


Research Space Standards
,Beginning Graduates
Research Faculty


Office Space Standards
Faculty


75 NASF/FTE Student
375 NASF/FTE Faculty



145 NASF/FTE Faculty


TABLE 2


EXISTING SQUARE FOOTAGES IN THE ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS COMPLEX


Classroom


0
3184
8574


Teaching Lab


0
0
21842


11758 21842


Space

Building
AFA A
AFA B
AFA C


GSF
Total


23,688
7,828
61,273

92,789


NASF
Office


Research


5893
0
10340


16233 0







TABLE 3


STUDENTS AND FACULTY IN ARCHITECTURE AND
AND ART AS PROJECTED FOR 1976.,
ARCH.
ARCH.


Teaching Lab.
Lower
Upper
Graduate


Research Lab.
Graduate
Res. Faculty
Gra. Res. Ass.

Office
Acad. Fac.
Career Ser.
Gra. Ass.

Deans Office
Adminis.
Career Ser.


Total


Total

TABLE 4


899

Students
1289


PLANNING, BUILDING CONSTRUCTION


BLDG.
CONS.

30
153
18


0
0
0


0
0

221

Faculty
125


ART


94
170
14


0
0
0


0
0

307


TOTAL


244
743
302


270
3
6


4
7

1433


Career Service Administrative
20 4


1976 ADDITIONAL SPACE REQUIREMENTS AS SET FORTH BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE, NOT INCLUDING THE DEPARTMENTS OF ART AND
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. THESE FIGURES ARE ACHIEVED BY USING THE STATE
STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES. 3 (NASF)


Lab.
x 65.21 = 7825
x 58.41 = 24532
x 88.50 = 23895
56252


Research Lab.
270 x 75 =
9 x 375 =


Office Space
80 x 145 = 11600
11600


Total
Tea. Lab. =
Res. Lab. =
Off. Spa. =


Teaching
120
420
270


20250
3375
23625


56252
23625
11600
91477






TABLE 5


INDIVIDUAL SPACES, THE NUMBER REQUIRED
TO ACCOMMODATE FUNCTION.

Programmed learning
Bookstore
Metal Shop
Wood Shop
Audio Visual and Slide Room
Mailroom
Gallery
Deans Office
Reproduction and Printing Room
Darkroom
Model Construction
Lobby

Department Offices
Drafting
Storage
Information Display


General Classrooms
Student Organization Offices
Seminar
Faculty Offices
Research Offices
Jury
Lounges
Display


LABS.
Materials and Methods
Structures
Drawing
Wind
Earthquake
Soil
Water
Sound
Light
Textile
Furnishings
Design
Landscape
Interiors
Urban Planning
Ceramics
Photography
Painting


AND THE SIZE OF THE SPACE NEEDED


1@
1@
1'@
1@
1@
1@
1@
1@
1@
1@
2@
1@

3@
4@
3@
3@


750
1000
750
1000
750
50
5000
3250
500.
500
500
3000

1200
800
500
300


10 @ 800
7 @ 100
7 @ 500
50 @ 100,75 @ 150
2 @ 150
@ 5000
@ 2500
@ 2500



@ 2000

@ 1500
@ 1000
@ 1000
@ 1000
@.1000
@ 1000
@ 1000
@ 750
@ 1000


30 @ 800
@1000
@ 2000
@ 1000


750
1000
750
1000
750
50
5000
3250
500
500
1000
3000

3600
3200
1500
900


8000
700
3500
16500
300
5000
2500
2500



2000
5000
1500
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
750
1000



24000
1000
2000
1000










Sculptor
Printmaking
Printing and Lettering
Drawing
Jewelry
Etching and Chemicals
Individual Studios 1
2


Circulation
Rest Rooms
Mechanical Equipement
Janitorial



Parking
Outdoor Classrooms
Outdoor Psychology


Auditorium
Research
Museum


GSF = NASF x 1.67
. 132950 x 1.67 = 222026





Undetermined




Future


@ 1000
@ 1000
@ 1000
@ 2000
@ 1000
@ 1000
100 @ 100
50 @ 150


1000
1000
1000
2000
1000
1000
10000
7500

132950






















































STATEMENT OF BASIC CONCEPT










STATEMENT OF BASIC CONCEPT

Today, as in the recent past, the university is a place of higher education
and personal improvements. Also, throughout history the arts have been
part of a person's higher achievements. Consequently, it is my feeling
that the Architecture and Fine Arts complex ought to be the meeting ground
for those in the university community and those who are working exclusive-
ly within the Arts. It is the designer's responsibility to invite the
rest of the university into the complex and let them gain from the endeavors
of the Architecture and Fine Arts College.

This is to be achieved by creating pedestrian movement by spacial invita-
tion, project displays and information presentation. Also, creation of a
pleasant social environment is- necessary by means of personal as well as
group spaces.

The designer must produce a human scaled, environmentally comparable and
aesthetically pleasing structure within which creativity is.encouraged.




























































LIMITS OF DESIGN










LIMITS OF DESIGN


It is the designer's responsibility to produce a master site plan. The
pedestrian paths, bicycle paths and vehicular paths are prime factors in
the design. The spaces or non-spaces, as the case may be, that the build-
ings on the site and immediately adjacent to the site form are also im-
portant design criteria. A workable, integrated SYSTEM that is part of
the total campus is required.

Again, it is the designer's responsibility to produce a system within the
new and existing buildings of the Architecture and Fine Arts complex.
Circulation and interaction systems are important in gaining a complex
that works as a total entity. Lastly, it is the designers responsibility
to produce a typical instructional space system. Here all requirements
of an instructional space must be met.

In summary the designer will produce an Architectural and Fine Arts complex
that is a three level system. First and foremost, it will be a system that
works with the campus, next within the total complex and lastly within its
individual parts.














FOOTNOTES

1 "Fact Book University of Florida," Office of Academic Affairs,
Part 1, Enrollment Table 4.

Maps courtesy Physical Plant Division and Campus Design Group,
University of Florida.

All functional data courtesy of Brockman Hammacker,
Department of Architecture,-University of Florida.















BIBLIOGRAPHY


"Architectural Forum," Urban America Inc., New York, New York,
June 1956, Septeriber 1965, January 1966, July 1967, December 1968,
December 1969, June 1972.

"Architectural Record," McGraw-Hill Publishing Co., Hightstown, New Jersey
January 1962, February 1970, November 1972.

"Biennial Report from the Office of the Dean of the College of Architecture
and Fine Arts, June 70 June 72," University of Florida, Gainesville
Florida, June 1972.

"Fact Book," Office of Academic Affairs, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida, February 1971.

"Journal of Architectural Education," Association of Collegiate Schools
of Architecture, Washington, D. C., Vols. XVIII, No. 4, March 1964;
XXIII,-No. 1, January 1969; XXV, No. 4, Fall 1971; XXVI, Nos. 1 & 2,
Winter, Spring 1971; XXVI, No. 3, Summer 1971.

Powers, Daniel S., A Program for the College of Architecture and Fine Arts
at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, June 8, 1970.

"Progressive Architecture," Reinhold Publishing Co., Stamford, Connecticut,
Afril 1954, January 1966, November 1971.

"A Study of Education for Environmental Design," Princeton University,
Princeton, New Jersey, December 1967.

"Undergraduate Catalog Fall 72-73," University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida, September 1972.


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TO: AE 6 StJdi-,

RO. 7H ritt,t Chairman

RE: AE r^." Program

All pCrccw.:;g s for AE 613 pr,ojc-:,. shall folio?' the .jsic structure as
sh;wr be t lor.


A shrit ca: ..I.e'', o' tuh : is all that is ree-ed. T i- statement
is only to ."qve the ;u:i.c a basic in-derrst.-ndi:g of your projaci
pr'io to his ,::.tiia'-. ; f th, 'coi-. pr" -m.

*2 Estau 1sh' F' E i y


A dsIcusia;; S f eT ic .;
This may be a ,uatki.t '
Urban problem, or may be
of its' gqinerti-cf o it it
a men~arni-gfil purpose t.,-'

Irn~ve.t atAso. a Lite.

This area break.. down hn
and tic .'o b! i.s i nd.i t;'.,
as ci In;ma c crv:i tionfs
topography, >.tc iujst be
as -djacent-ro i ys (bo
.gas, seiwgae: dvllinrSag,;.


:bat i. ~s causer '.e needed ne o this project.
:- need of attention C,: as a c:it.- or
a client motivated p;rojict,. Rfgwrdhes:
the burden of the pv(rog ami to I:.tablish
's1 wh ih the rese ri,:: can be dedicate,.


many ftce..; uch as :CI'.3 a hfc locat on
s.to pa'r ticar loca' Aa 1 daata such
..A j ndi t ins -, dra i;.-E wind direct ans,
'lett;ri.' ed. Al ru :upport acIlt is such
.i ex s '...\g ,id proposed) eleB.l- c pow'" /
, Lt Iit 34 rorP d. C. v


The Raegca' l infb.Cen'.. the *.i .mA ty which tciludes traffic
flow and denit, populate rons deCsI, (both exis iinl, advI proposed)
po!.Lulti.n ,i.;,:" pa'.L"as, etc., ~.- :i:, be nc qn. A1so :3 her bu Idligs
in t 'e .ui-; .:id g ie ,-': t iust ':e er;,;.' and an u,~k i-".'.'orjding of
their mas nd and :.;a!t l .p etrd.aT.on ir o your deslgui IuS't. be had

istricaIl .p.ly : <* o .L',

All areas hv- -hid'. en ;"il tkh-ir I;.st history, a ?'s to the pulse
of the coe;iii-i: oy Man' rasa have a deep rrhtitct.-'.1i history-,
others, very little. Th' d:esic-r must .!i-:rri:'t.i: U.e gico a
irfluen-eS ThIt hevC to -o w'n. the "sc.t" o.f r. o's.mii'ity t
is thi-ougLi this underst-. fi, t.t 'r:':*,;m: n' l .. i me r in, ill' be
made in'any n,.ade:.i., n. hei. M ii not to convey that re';etiticr of
"styles" is 6es'-d; but. that i a hu!lnir.g is to take its place
comfortably withinn any :n.,u.nty, it must iU der:,'a % the forces
that have forged thn- are


3.


4 ;


x
~:""5~;










The :e's ,.eSr must ;:- l*. ierse-ir the ndigYn.:-;, 1at;als and
labo- .-; a region, It is : rd r-. 'ea .le T!.' new r1: Lr.ls
and &enith r- be n-ace.-rj; however a rLnn, .-:i ,'r.i 'look
should be taken :.f the is: tm rIn:.);a :~n : n prior to N y L;raqes
for r.hIag. s Ae. ndaee, in irny : :e, it is this t disid nous
rnae:l'dia s and labor tani ':L. cor. I lb to the i'R-dr o des ired

Economn'c Fasihili
SA


M/ ost b 5.ligLy t.yj'- must react tc co.' For examp',:, If the
project is rental housing:. lanr cos design costs, legal cost
Sbuildifg' '; tts, mortgage .;ts, malnt'nances tax, Al.d Insuraiic
costs minus all rea-t. to the rent l mt, '- ( and v-tew.rn the owner
a fair proi ). rherefor--, the ',esi :.'r mu'st -~eLlish the above
prior to a budget proposal for- hiM 1 b di n.'ir Ary projectt s uch
as an hIdust-rfal process, -eta'il sal :,, c r.fi;Ce rental, etc,, can
be analyzed In a sirmiloir aplero

It is the bv.:1rden of the "--grer to '>t.lisi- the a.oo-mTIc
feasibility cui-ing proqr,~mi ngn and to ,.s.~. the project
within tree "pirit'" of this ecci'mny

6. Basic ColIer:.'n of FunS., 'a Data

This Is always a labor"o-;s effn!"t. 'i.-; is a?,c the area In
v which the i!.et bec.-~s a ,r"-imeer ef the team". -Ai.data no
matter hea mua.ane, must be collected, e.aitl&ae,, and recorded.
A program can becoc- a very complex n'7'.ng, It is necessary to
seek out the esent .al elem IEnts in a la~.-agea.ble number. We do
ot want to stop the flow 6'f ii*'jatn # sn ietial, but our
objective must be to delioeate ~ the mcst iprctant factors. This
process may take t- o sept: The fir:t wi11 involve seeking the
form-givers for the uncer-tual deslgf.; the s..ood can Involve
rmaterals foy deg design oP t,. r by this time the details
will noa obscure whhat is rpo.,tarIt 1: planning.
The "Genius' in the above Is to recoor!ze a conp when!you
see one In the off~nq.

A glossary of temrs may a .s be required d, It is amazing how
confusing the program may seei with ithe use of asteric fterns.











7, i Coi cep't
M3iy "d. i et:--" -ee& that w'il l.onept will come during the
d~%i': p process. .This Is rarely .rue. If the rrL:-re has any
p"u.v'kr. it Is that within these efforts the fey to the
sol .';;in wiI be fouqd,
P-ir: to any ies! g:n ,fto. the .asiu.-Ir ,II Ut ha,. cofr;fid.nce in
his o:fc o, If he be',vees It, Yis concpDt, %' -git decIsions
can made with a valid c;hai ; of ir.tFleciti&l events. And,
e~veo though he di.co'-ers during tz-. ,.ieg'i pro'ees t, hat his
li-i.l c.tn0cept was false, Ms :r;v'efzed dedication to purpose
wil all the del ;neati n of new conl,,epC,

8a. ts s of L:?.^in.

A stitament as to Ares* .f inestyi:;ton into master planning,
complex design and or single L;.drgdir' design tha;. the designer
proposed: to solve.

The d~es- i.,.va is also 'v~q' .-t'd to keep all material submitted,
bound :'thin :;. 8 ,V" x 11" rchur-. Maps and tiber exhibits
mvit be fod.I4 to ft *';i t's ~ ir:.









1' 976 N EEDS ,
'ARCH ITECTURE


Vi ITAP


L A), ii h


I. TEACHING LABORATORY SPACE '
SF L; i ,' /- ,. C,
Upper -386.;0. 2,
Graduate -2-70-0 0

Lower Divis'i on :Lab 'Standards :
55 Square.feet 'per station
24 Room periods per week
80% Stati'ons Occupied ,

24- 'e 2..86 NASF per Weekly Student Hour
24 x o0 i .

Upper and Graduate Lab Standards: "
85 Square feetper station,
S30 Room per i.ods per week ,
80% Statipor.s :Occupied,


= 3'3 .54,NASp. per Weekly Student Hour
30 x .80

Weekly Studen t Hours' per FTE' s tuden t: '.'
Lower =.22.8.
Upper = 16,5
Graduate = 25.0 :


Lab Space Required:. '
-0-7- FTE X 22.8 Ws,/iFTE X 2.. 86 NASF/WSH
.36--FTE X 16.,5 WSH'/FT'E. X '3.54 NASF/WSH
-2-70-FTE X 25.0 ,WSH/FTE-:X 3.54 NASF/WSH
TOTAL NEEDS
. ..'~ : t "': ; .


rG&.978 Sq. -F~t;. 7
:22-,546 Sq.._Ft. .32V57_7
23-, Sa5sq. F-t. '3

~r3Li-r 9-q---~ /


a. RESEARCH SPACE
Graduates
Research Facul ty',
Research Graduate Asst.,
S TOTAL


-270--0 FTE
-75.0O-~FT E
Za4_O--FTi
Z8L~4-FTEE


Q7'~~ /-i


Research Lab Standards.
Beginning Graduates .
Research Faculty

R-search Lab Space Needs


270 FTE X 75 =
/ -.L- FTE X 375. =

TOTAL


75 ,Sq. Ft. .per FTE
325 Sq. Ft. per FTE


:20,250 Sq. Ft.
S 4,. 25. '".:. .*L
24,375 S .F -.


920

-270


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