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Group Title: Florida future farmer
Title: The Florida future farmer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076598/00067
 Material Information
Title: The Florida future farmer
Physical Description: v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Florida
Frequency: quarterly
regular
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Subject: Agricultural education -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1- 1938-
Numbering Peculiarities: Volumes for 1956-1957 both numbered v. 17.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076598
Volume ID: VID00067
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 01405300

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
Full Text

Winter, 1960


32nd National Convention


FFA Day
Florida


Program at
State Fair


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FFA Membership By Chapters & Districts


DISTRICT I
Allentown
Baker
Bethlehem
Bonifay
Campbellton
Chipley
Chumuckla
Cottondale
DeFuniak Springs (Walton)
Escambia Farms
Gonzalez (Tate)
Graceville
Greenwood
Jay
Laurel Hill
Malone
Marianna
Milton
Munson
Paxton
Ponce DeLeon
Poplar Springs
Vernon
Walnut Hill




DISTRICT II
Altha
Blountstown
Bristol
Crawfordville
Frink
Grand Ridge
Greensboro
Greenville
Havana
Jasper
Jennings
Lee
Madison
Mayo (Lafayette)
Monticello
Pinetta
Quincy
Sneads
Sopchoppy
Tallahassee (Leon)
Wewahitchka
White Springs




DISTRICT IHn
Alachua (Santa Fe)
Baldwin
Bell
Branford
Bronson
Bunnell
Callahan
Chiefland
Crescent City
Ft. White
Gainesville
Gainesville (Buchholtz)
Gainesville (Collegiate)
Green Cove Springs (Clay)
Hastings
Hawthorne
Hilliard
Lake Butler
Lake City (Columbia)
Live Oak (Suwannee)
Live Oak (Williams)
Macclenny (Baker Co.)
Melrose
Newberry
Palatka
Starke
Starke (Bradford)
Trenton
Williston


(1) (2) (3)
38 42 37
80 82 82
65 65 59
57 57 57
25
41 46 44
62 60 60
50 50 50
114 84 84
47 48 48
99 71 69
43 43 43
35
69 69 69
58 66 59
61 56 53
67 67
66 71 10
55 61 33
70 42 42
52 46
53 53 47
63 69 61
85 57 57





(1) (2) (3)
41 44 44
68 55
56 61 61
45 33 6
49 34 34
50 36
44 59
34 21
51 48 48
48 39
63 64 63
33 33
48
64 69 69
70 44 44
27 17 17
57 62 62
47
69 51 51
119 10
51 29 29
36 36 36





122 128 115
35 35
44 50 50
45 48 48
42 33 33
49 50 50
60 52 48
43 53 53
66
38 30 30
62 49
80 36 36
21 21 21
46
60 44 41
61 25
56 56 44
51 63 57
105 89 89
55 62 62
52 60 59
64 64 64
44 51 51
52 57
65 55
38 38
43 43
52 61 49
71 62


DISTRICT IV
(4)
4.30 Anthony
8.20 Apopka
6.50 Bushnell
6.70 Crystal River
DeLand
4.60 DeLand Jr.
6.00 Groveland
5.00 Inverness (Citrus)
8.40 Kissimmee
4.80 Leesburg
.50 New Smyrna Beach
4.30 Ocala
Ocala (Silver Springs)
Ocoee
6.00 Orlando (Boone)
5.00 Orlando (Colonial)
Orlando (Edgewater)
7.10 Orlando (Evans)
Orlando (Oak Ridge)
Pierson
Reddick
5.30 St. Cloud
Sanford (Seminole)
Summerfield (Lake Weir)
Tavares
Umatilla
Wildwood
Winter Garden (Lakeview)

(4)
DISTRICT V

Auburndale
10.00 Bartow
3.40 Bradenton
3.60 Bradenton (Southeast)
Bradenton (Walker Jr.)
2.10 Brandon
4.80 Brooksville (Hernando)
Dade City
6.40 Fort Meade
3.30 Frostproof
Haines City
6.90 Kathleen
Lakeland
1.70 Lake Wales
6.20 Largo
Mulberry
New Port Richey
Palmetto
Parkland
3.60 Pinecrest
Plant City
Plant City Jr.
Sarasota
Tampa (Chamberlain)
Tampa (Franklin Jr.)
Tampa (Hillsborough)
Turkey Creek
12.80 Wimauma (East Bay)
3.90 Winter Haven
5.00 Zephyrhills
4.80
5.00
5.00 DISTRICT VI
Arcadia
Belle Glade
Clewiston
Fort Myers
5.00 Fort Pierce
Hialeah
4.40 Homestead (South Dade)
2.50 LaBelle
5.00 Lake Placid
5.00 Miami-Edison
Miami-Jackson
18.45 Moore Haven
5.30 North Miami
Okeechobee (Brahman)
5.10 Pahokee
5.70 Pompano
Sebring
3.80 Stuart (Sailfish)
Vero Beach
Wauchula (Hardee)
6.20 Wauchula (Peace River)


60 61
74 47 47
80 85
60 28 44
31 35 35
48 48 48
91 79 79
70 70 65
71 72
48 45 45
52 51
52 55 53
56 59 1
43 50 6
58 55 55
63 53 52
46 18 18
66 66 66
64 43
66 63 63
40 36
100 66 65
49 48 48
74 60 74
70
59 64 64
41 49 49




40 42 42
121 104 104
60 69 65
72 72 72
61 61 61
102 72 72
59 59 59
115 73
128 117 117
53 41
33 34
103 104 104
82 84 84
42 37 22
49
38 50 50
63 65 7
40 40 40
30 18 18
65 51 51
73 76 76
59 40 40
43 45 44
52 36 34
47 44 43
58 50 50
204 145 130
69 70
116 84 84
78 28


53 55 51 5.50
63 64 44
69 45 45
71 56 50 1.50
43 46 46 5.00
35 36 36 4.00
54 54 54 5.40
52 35
58 26 26 2.60
33 33 33 4.00
35 35 35 3.50
47 45 45 4.50
29 32 32 3.20
70 73 73 8.20
49 54 54 5.40
39 40 40 5.00
71 55 55
33 33 33 5.00
54 30 30
55 60 60 6.00
60 66 66 6.60


(Column 1) number enrolled in Vocational Agriculture, (Column 2) membership, (Column 3) National Future Farmer Magazine Subscriptions, and
(Column 4) donations to the J. F. Williams Memorial Scholarship Fund.


Florida Future Farmer for Winter, 1960









By Way of Editorial Comment:


FFA Closely Allied With Gov.

By RAY E. GREEN
Comptroller, State of Florida


IT HAS been my pleasure and privilege to meet and work with the Fu-
ture Farmers of America many times during my service as a public official.
First, as Clerk of the Circuit Court and since then as State Comptroller.
My office and the FFA are closely tied together through the administra-
tion of the Sales Tax Law and the Gasoline Refund for farmers. Although
I do not always have the opportunity of dealing directly with all of you,
we are partners in building a sound and progressive Florida.
We need only to look around us to see
the number of former members of your
group who are leaders in varied fields
today. In addition to your many other
interests, I hope some of you will enter
the field of Government, at all levels, Lo-
cal, State and Federal. I am certain you
will be able to continue your interest and l
activity in agriculture and farming and
still take an active part in the operation
of YOUR government.
Your participation in this program,
FFA, is evidence of your interest in build-
ing a better Florida and you will be an
asset to your group, Community, County,
State and Nation. My father owned and
operated a livery stable for many years
and I know that at times I was tired,
discouraged and ready to do most any- .
thing else. But I am thankful today for
this experience and I am positive you
will also be grateful for the opportunities
given you through FFA. There is a spec-
ial satisfaction in hard work, especially
with one's hands and the soil, which can
be obtained in no other activity.
The high standards of FFA which
you will carry through life, guarantee
that this nation will never have to be is comforting to know your fine group
afraid to face any emergency. The Future will help plan and control the destiny of
of America is in the hands of youth. It our country.

Randy Kincaid, Florida State FFA President, of the
The Cover Lake Wales Chapter, presenting Florida oranges to the
members of the Traffic Club in Kansas City, Missouri,
October 12, during the annual Seaboard Air Line Railroad Forestry Award Winner
Program. Pictured left to right are: George A. Falcower, Director of Traffic,
Spencer Chemical Co., Kansas City, Mo.; Randy; Fred H. Meyer, General Agent,
Alton & Southern Railroad, Kansas City, Mo.; E. Norman Quayle, Ass't. Freight
Traffic Manager, Seaboard Railroad, Richmond, Va.; W. S. Lohnas, Ass't. Regional
Transportation Manager, Kansas City, Kansas; and Wm. E. Hafner, Commercial
Agent, St. Louis and Southwestern Railroad, Kansas City, Mo.


The Florida Future Farmer VOL. XXI, No. 1
Published quarterly by Cody Publications, Inc., Kissimmee, Florida, for the Florida Association, Future
Farmers of America. Entered as second class matter Jan. 28, 1954, under Act of March 3, 1879. at the
Post Office at Kissimmee, Florida.


STATE OFFICERS, 1959-60
President .......... Randy Kincaid, Lake Wales
1st Vice-President. ..... Carroll McElroy, Trenton
2nd Vice-President ........Ronald Nelson, Miami
3rd Vice President.Donnie Simmons, Florala, Ala.
4th Vice-President. ........ Gene Boyle, Palmetto
5th Vice-President. ....... Francis Ward, Live Oak
6th Vice-President.. .Wilson McCallister, Panacea
Executive Secretary...... A. R. Cox, Tallahassee
State Adviser.......... H. E. Wood, Tallahassee

Florida Future Farmer for Winter, 1960


NATIONAL OFFICERS F.F.A. 1959-60
President .......... Jim Thomas, Patterson, Ga.
1st Vice-Pres. ...... Dean Hoffer, Manheim, Pa.
2nd V.-Pres.L. G. 'Jack' Crews, Cheyenne, Wyo.
3rd V.-Pres. Joe Harold Hughes, Jr. Duncan, S.C.
4th V.-Pres. ........ Richard Poor, Neosho, Mo.
Student Sec'y Kenney Earl Gray, Dorsey, Miss.
Exec. Sec'y ........ Wm. Paul Gray, Wash. D. C.
Exec. Treasurer. .... R. E. Bass, Richmond, Va.
Nat. Advisor....Dr. W. T. Spanton, Wash. D. C.

3


or -e

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for
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profit and
profit


Yard lighting Vi'ARM ETTE^'
pays in < R ,t
convenience, '7RiCN
protection and
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corners of buildings to light
both sides atop poles to
avoid shadows.
There's NO MATCH for Electric Living
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
Helping Build Florida



























Some of the Florida Delegation at the 32nd Annual National FFA Convention, Kansas City, Missouri.



Florida Delegation at 32nd Annual FFA


Convention Numbered Over 150


THE FLORIDA delegation to the 32nd
National F.F.A. Convention, held at
Kansas City, Missouri, October 12-15,
1959, numbered more than 150. About
60 Chapters were represented, with 21
Chapter Advisers, 4 Principals, one
School Board member, two County Co-
ordinators, and several parents and
friends.
The official delegates representing
Florida were past State President Cecil
Tindel of the Graceville Chapter, and
State President Randy Kincaid of the
Lake Wales Chapter. Cecil was Chair-
man of the Public Speaking Committee
and Randy was a member of the Pro-
gram of Work Committee..
William and Wesley McNeely of the
North Miami Chapter, and Kenneth
Powell of the Bartow Chapter were
in the National Chorus, and Chuck
McIntosh, Turkey Creek Chapter ac-
companied on the piano. Mellaine Clyatt
of the Lake Butler Chapter, and Roy
Lister of the Wewahitchka Chapter were
in the National Band.
The Quincy, Mulberry and South Dade
Chapters received Gold Emblem ratings
in the National Chapter Contest.
Kenneth Tanner of the Callahan
Chapter, State winner in the Seaboard
Air Line Railroad Forestry Contest,
appeared on the Kansas City Traffic
Club and the Kansas City Lions Club
Programs, which were arranged by R. N.
Hoskins, General Forestry Agent of the
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Company,
Richmond, Virginia. Then Kenneth went
with the Forestry winners to Chicago,
Pittsburg, Washington and Richmond,
where they made several appearances.
Jeff Daughtry of the Peace River
Chapter, Wauchula, 1959 Star State
Farmer, carried the Florida State Flag
in the "Massing of the State Flags"


Ceremony during the presentation of the
Star Farmer Awards. The Star American
Farmer for 1959 was Lyle Rader, of
Tacoma, Washington.
Jeff Daughtry of the Peace River
Chapter at Wauchula, and alternates
Jerry Glass of the Marianna Chapter,
and Francis Ward of the Suwannee
Chapter at Live Oak, were recipients of
the Chilean Nitrate Leadership Award,
and attended the Convention with their
expenses paid by the Chilean Nitrate
Education Bureau.
The Baldwin Chapter, winner of the
Chapter Forestry Contest, sponsored by


the St. Regis Paper Company, was
awarded expenses, which were used for
some members and Robert E. Jones,
Chapter Adviser, to attend.
MacArthur Burnsed, first State FFA
Naval Store Forestry winner, with his
Adviser, Alan Harvey, Macclenny, at-
tended the Convention with their expenses
paid by many Naval Stores firms.
Larry Edwards of the Quincy Chapter,
in the State Feeder Steer Award, and his
Adviser, James C. McCall, attended the
Convention, with their expenses being
paid by the Florida Cattlemen's Associa-
tion.


1959 American Farmers from Florida, reading from left to right: Grey Robinson,
Kathleen; Ronald Wetherington, Turkey Creek; Myron Bryan, Alachua; Charles
Schack, Greenwood; Terry McDavid, Pompano; Jerry Smith, Poplar Springs; Ed
Norfleet, II, Newberry; and Mattox Ward, Jr., Live Oak. Not pictured P. K. Beck,
Chiefland.


Florida Future Farmer for Winter, 1960


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Don Alien, Director of Instruction,
Alachua County, attended, and Ted
Pendarvis, Livestock Marketing Specia-
list, Florida State Marketing Bureau,
Jacksonville, also attended, carrying with
him several of the State Vice-Presidents
and American Farmers.
Receiving the American Farmer Degree
Award were: Phillip Kenneth Beck,
Chiefland; Myron Bryan, Alachua; Terry
Roger McDavid, Pompano Beach; Ed-
ward Dudley Norfleet, II, Newberry;
Grey H. Robinson, Kathleen; Charles
Edward Schack, Greenwood; Jerry Eu-
gene Smith, Poplar Springs; Henry Mat-
tox Ward, Jr., Live Oak; Ronald Robert
Wetherington, Turkey Creek.
The Munson State Champion String
Band played on a special FFA Talent
Show and on the regular National Con-
vention Program. The members of the
band were Nicky Walker, Billy Sexton,
Steve Crain, James Crain, Olin Crain and
Maxium Evers, and their Adviser is C.
A. Rice, Jr.
The Vice-Presidents attending we-e Car-
roll McElroy, Chiefland; Ronald Nelson,
North Miami; Donnie Simmons, Paxton;
Gene Boyle, Palmetto; Francis Ward,
Suwannee Chapter at Live Oak; and
Wilson McCallister, Sopchoppy. They
were alternate delegates.
A. R. Cox, Executive FFA Secretary,
Tallahassee, received the Honorary
American Farmer Degree.
Principals attending were Wm. Ralph
Hall, Live Oak; Collis H. Land, New-
berry; J. G. Morrow, Kathleen; and C. F.
Amaden, Turkey Creek.
Other highlights of the Convention
were:
Some of the Florida delegation attend-
ed the official Delegates Dinner on Mon-
day; the Swift and Company Breakfast
honoring the American Farmers; Sears
Luncheon honoring the Foundation
winners; the Ford Motor Company
Dinner honoring the Vocational Agri-
cultural Teachers on Tuesday; Butler
Breakfast honoring the American Farm-
ers, State Star Farmers, and Foundation
winners; Air Force Base lunch for several
of the American Farmers; General Motors
Breakfast in honor of the delegates and
Foundation winners Thursday morning;
that afternoon, the Band and Chorus
members were special guests of the Saddle
and Sirloin Club for a special show and
dinner. Friday morning, the Judging
Teams from Arcadia and Santa Fe at
Alachua were the guests of the American
Royal Association for breakfast.
For example, here's what some 450 of
the farm youths consumed in a little less


Shown above are the 1959-60 National Officers, F.F.A. Left to right: Front Row,
L. G. "Jack" Crews, Cheyenne, Wyoming, vice president, Pacific Region; Richard
Poor, Anderson, Missouri, vice president, Central Region, and Dean Hoffer, Manheim,
Pennsylvania, vice president, North Atlantic Region. Back Row, Jim Thomas, Patter-
son, Georgia, president; Kenney Earl Gray, Fulton, Mississippi, student secretary,
and Joe Hughes, Jr., Duncan, South Carolina, vice president, Southern Region.


than a half hour at the annual FFA
breakfast sponsored by General Motors:
33 gallons of milk, 100 dozen eggs
(scrambled), 25 gallons of orange juice,
250 pounds of potatoes (hash brown),
125 pounds of ham, 130 pounds of bacon,
120 pounds of sausage, 750 assorted sweet
rolls, 200 long loaves of bread sliced and
toasted, 35 gallons of coffee, and 50
pounds of butter.
And, just in case anybody got hungry
by mid-morning, the hosts shipped in
500 special eating apples, which were
piled up in the bed of a GMC pickup
truck in the Hotel Muehlebach's Grand
Ballroom, for the young guests to take
along to their next convention meeting.
Speaker at the breakfast was Dr. R.
C. S. Young, educational consultant for
General Motors. His topic-"Recognizing
the Unique in the Commonplace."
Doctor Young, an immigrant Scot who
started working for General Motors as an
assembly line production worker, later
became a professor of moral philosophy
and director of admissions for the Atlanta
division of the University of Georgia.
He has been listed by the United States
Chamber of Commerce as one of the ten
most popular speakers in the U.S.
In his speech to the FFA youth, he


stressed the importance of seeking, and
mastering, challenges in routine assign-
ments we encounter throughout life.
Master of Ceremonies was W. L. Vande
Water, executive assistant to the general
manager of the GMC Truck and Coach
division, Pontiac, Michigan.

DeYoung Named Chairman
FFA Sponsoring Committee

RUSSELL DEYOUNG of Akron, Ohio, Presi-
dent of the Goodyear Tire & Rubber
Company, has been elected to serve dur-
ing 1960 as Chairman of the Sponsoring
Committee for the Future Farmers of
America Foundation, Inc.
The FFA Foundation is the organiza-
(Continued on page 6)

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Florida Future Farmer for Winter, 1960


National FFA Week, Feb. 20 to Feb. 27, 1960
"You'll Need Farmers in YOUR Future" will be the general theme
for National FFA Week, February 20-27, 1960, as observed by the 155 Chap-
ters and 8500 members in Florida. Kits of material will be available from
the Future Farmer Supply Service, Alexandria, Virginia, after the chapters
receive the samples.
Randy Kincaid, Lake Wales FFA Chapter, State President, will be
presented a Proclamation for Future Farmer Week by Governor LeRoy
Collins.
FFA members should plan what will be done in their community to ob-
serve Future Farmer Week.


























,
Officers of Brandon FFA Chapter who were guests of First National Bank of Tampa
at a Steak Luncheon. Left to right. Charles Noble, Reporter; Carter Bryant,
Treasurer, Ronald Padgett, President; Larry Brady, Vice President; Bill Bennett,
Secretary; 0. K. Alexander, Sentinel. Also, Nat Storms, Adviser; Oscar Lastinger,
Adviser; D. A. Storms, County Coordinator; and Robert Morris, Agriculture Re-
presentative, First National Bank of Tampa.


Awards Offered to FFA at State Fair


THE FFA members and Chapters will be
showing their beef and dairy cattle in
the Florida State Fair at Tampa. The
Florida State Fair offers awards: Blue
$10.00, Red $7.50, White $5.00.
All dairy entries are expected to be
in the barn by midnight Monday, Feb-
ruary 1, 1960, as judging will begin at
9:00 a.m. Tuesday, February 2. The
Guernsey and Jersey breeders in Florida
will present a special Trophy to the ex-
hibitors of the Champion male and fe-
male in their respective breeds. The
dairy cattle will be released at 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, February 6th and must clear
the fair grounds not later than 8:00 a.m.
Sunday, February 7th.
Tuesday, February 2nd, the Greater
Tampa Chamber of Commerce will be
host to all 4-H and FFA dairy exhibitors
in the Little Auditorium at noon.
Florida Dairy, Inc., is sponsoring a
Fitting Contest with awards of $15.00
distributed on a $5, $4, $3, $2, and $1
basis to the top five (5) animals.
The Florida Dairy Products Associa-
tion, Inc. Rotating Trophy will be a-
warded to the Future Farmer member
making the best record in the Dairy Show
at the Florida State Fair.
During the second week, the beef cattle
will be on exhibit. The beef cattle must
not be brought to the State Fair Grounds
until after 12:00 noon on Sunday, Febru-
ary 7th, and must be in place not later
than midnight, Sunday, February 7th.
Award Plaques will be presented by the
State Breeders' Association as in the past
to the FFA member showing the Cham-
pion male and female of the following
breeds: Aberdeen-Angus, Brahman, Here-
ford, and Shorthorns. Judging will begin
at 9:00 a.m. February 8.
These animals will be released after
8:00 p.m. Saturday, February 13th and


must clear the fair grounds not later
than 8:00 a.m. Sunday, February 14.
The Hillsborough County Cattlemen's
Association will present a trophy to the
outstanding FFA herdsman during Beef
Cattle Week.
The Florida Cattleman magazine will
present a trophy to the top FFA Show-
man during Beef Cattle Week.
Also, many Future Farmers are pre-
paring their fat cattle to show in the third
Florida State Fair Fat Cattle Show.
The Florida Power Corporation pre-
sents a permanent trophy for the best
barrow exhibited by a 4-H or FFA mem-
ber, determined in carcass competition.


The Florida State Poultrymen's Associ-
ation will award a trophy to the exhibitor
with the best exhibit in the FFA Division,
Youth Poultry Show. An FFA Poultry
Judging Contest will be held with team
awards of $75.00 in cash.
In the Youth Rabbit Show a rotating
trophy will be presented by the Depart-
ment of Agriculture of Florida.
Future Farmer members will be com-
peting for premiums and awards in the
Fat Stock Show and Gain-in-weight Con-
test sponsored by Florida Retail Feder-
ation.
The team with the highest combined
score in judging poultry and eggs will
represent Florida at the National Judg-
ing Contest in October, during the Na-
tional FFA Convention, through the
sponsorship of the State Department of
Agriculture.


DeYoung
(Continued from page 5)
tion which provides funds for award pro-
grams to stimulate higher achievement
among vocational agriculture students
throughout the nation. Some $180,000 is
spent for this purpose each year. Mr.
DeYoung's principal responsibility as
Chairman of the Sponsoring Committee
will be to contact potential fund donors
during the coming year.
He succeeds Merritt D. Hill, Birming-
ham, Michigan, vice president of Ford
Motor Company and general manager of
Ford's Tractor and Implement Division.
Currently, more than 300 business and
industrial companies, organizations, and
individuals make annual contributions to
support the FFA Foundation program.
DeYoung's election took place during a
dinner meeting of the donors, held in
conjunction with the 32nd annual national
convention of Future Farmers of America
at Kansas City, Missouri.


Florida Exhibit at the National FFA Convention, thanks to Florida Citrus Com-
mission, Hillsborough County Future Farmers and Board of Public Instruction, and
D. A. Storms, County Coordinator. The artificial citrus tree is loaded with oranges
which light up, and a revolving picture display of Florida scenery.


Florida Future Farmer for Winter, 1983







Many Florida

FFA Winners

In Various Shows

THE KATHLEEN FFA Dairy Judging
Team, composed of Tommy Thompson,
Jimmy Thompson, Charles Young and
Tommy Cave, and Adviser Walter W.
Massey, represented Florida at the Na-
tional Dairy Judging Congress at Water-
loo, Iowa, October 5 and 6.
In "Dairy Prod*fc.t," the team re-
ceived Honorable Mention. Individual -
placings were: Tommy Thompson re-
ceived a Bronze Emblem; Tommy Cave
and Charles Young received Participation
Certificates.
In "Dairy Cattle," the team won a
Bronze Plaque. Individual placings:
Tommy Thompson, Gold Emblem; Tom-
my Cave and Charles Young received
Honorable Mention. Jimmy Thompson,'
Silver Emblem for Showmanship.
The Marianna FFA Meats Identifica-
tion Judging Team, composed of Willis
Coulliette, Joe Padgett, Royace Hasty
and Jerry Glass as alternate, with their
Adviser Rex F. Toole, received participa-
tion certificates, with Willis receiving
Honorable Mention Certificate.
The Arcadia Poultry Judging Team,
composed of Jimmy Harrison, John Hay
and Neill Tyree, with their Adviser W. S.
Fletcher, received participation certifi-
cates, with John receiving a Bronze Em-
blem, in the National Poultry Judging
Contest.
The Santa Fe Livestock Judging Team
from Alachua, composed of Dean Nettles,
Tommy Crevasse, Jim Busby and James
Alligood, with their Adviser Henry Luns-
ford, represented Florida in the National
Livestock Judging Contest in Kansas
City, Missouri. The team and members
all received a Bronze Plaque and eT-
blems, with Dean receiving a silver eni-
blem, and James receiving a bronze em-
blem in individual placings. In Livestock
Showmanship, Tommy received a silver
emblem.


"I cut cow-cleaning time 4 hours


a week by paving my


Especially during the wet season, dairymen save time
with concrete barnyards. "Grade A" producers find that
meeting strict sanitary requirements is far less work.

A concrete yard is a sanitary yard. Easy to keep clean. And the
wetter the weather, the cleaner the yard.
Germs of infectious diseases like mastitis and foot rot have no
mud in which to collect and breed. Cows stay healthy. Produc-
tion stays high. Extra profits pay for the pavement over and
over again.
You'll find concrete's cost surprisingly low. Contact your
local ready-mixed concrete producer for prices. Literature on
concrete in and around the dairy barn is yours for the asking.


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Delegation who called on Deputy Mayor John Duba when State FFA forestry winners
were in Chicago (left to right) G. T. F. Schreiber, General Western Agent, Seaboard
Air Line Railroad, Boyd McLocklin, Edward Coble, John Gilman, Mr. Duba, John P.
Derham, Jr., Vice President, Seaboard Air Line Railroad, Harold Howard, Crawford
Welch, Robert N. Hoskins, General Forestry Agent, Eeaboard Air Line Railroad,
Kenneth Tanner and T. B. Holland, Vocational Agriculture Teacher from Apex, N. C.


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FFA Forestry

Winners Honored

SIx OUTSTANDING young Future Farmers
from the Southeast-winners of the coop-
erative FFA forestry program sponsored
by the Seaboard Air Line Railroad Com-
pany-were honored during the week of
October 12 These six boys appeared as
guest speakers before the Kansas City
Traffic Club on October 12, the Host Li-
ons Club of Kansas City on October 13,
a group of prominent business and in-
dustrial leaders of Chicago on October
14, and the Kiwanis Club in Pittsburgh
on October 15. On October 16 they ad-
dressed the Inter-Club Council in Rich-
mond at their monthly luncheon meeting.
Co-hosting the Pittsburgh Kiwanis
luncheon was the Koppers Company, and
serving as co-hosts at the Richmond
meeting were Miller Manufacturing
Company and the David M. Lea Com-
pany.
The six State FFA forestry winners
were welcomed to Chicago by the Hon-
orable John Duba, Deputy Mayor, and
to Pittsburgh by the Honorable Thomas
Gallagher, Mayor of Pittsburgh. They
had a conference with Governor J. Lind-


Kenneth Tanner shown presenting grape-
fruit spoons to Douglas Grymes, Vice
President, Koppers Company, Pittsburgh,
Pa.
10 Florida Future Farmer


- --









W. E. Harris, Teacher of Voca-
tional Agriculture in Apopka, was
killed in an automobile accident
near Brooksville on Saturday, No-
vember 21, 1959. He had taught Vo-
cational Agriculture in Alabama for
7 years before coming to Florida 3
years ago. He is survived by his
wife and two children. Expressions
of sympathy have been extended to
Mrs. Harris from the F.V.A.T.A.
and the F.F.A.


say Almond in Richmond before depart-
ing for their homes.
These young men ranging in age from
17 to 19 are: John D. Gilman, Ashland,
Va., Harold Howard, Morrisville, N. C.,
Edward Coble, Simpsonville, S. C., Boyd
McLocklin, Statham, Ga., Kenneth Tan-
ner, Callahan, Fla., and Crawford Welch,
Grove Hill, Ala. Accompanying them
were T. B. Holland, Vocational Agricul-
ture Teacher, Apex, N. C., and Robert
N. Hoskins, General Forestry Agent, Sea-
board Air Line Railroad.
The Advisor of State Winner from
Florida will accompany them in 1960.


Florida Winners Attend Jr.
Vegetable Growers Meet

FLORIDA FRUIT and Vegetable Association
FFA winners participated in the 25th
Anniversary Convention of the National
Junior Vegetable Growers Association in
Washington, D.C., December 6-10. The
Hastings Team composed of Rex Knorr,
Mike Thigpen and Billy Beach, and Ad-
viser, J. C. Dennis, winners in the Judg-
ing Contest, and the Turkey Creek Team
composed of Jack James, Lester Patrick,
Edward Webb, Malcolm Streetman, and
their Adviser, John St Martin, Jr., win-
ners in the Demonstration Contest.
The State Vegetable Production win-
ner, Russell Barnes of the Turkey
Creek Chapter accompanied the oth-
ers in attending the Convention. They.
were sponsored by the Florida Fruit and
Vegetable Association.
Besides participating in National
events, they were taken on a tour of
Washington and the surrounding areas
which included Arlington National Cem-
etery, Lincoln and Jefferson Memorials,
White House, Washington's home at Mt.
Vernon, U. S. Naval Academy at Annap-
olis, and the U.S.D.A Research Center
in Beltsville, Md.















Florida Future Farmer 11


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The Officers and Advisors
Florida Association Future Farmers of America
Tallahassee, Florida


Tallahassee, Florida
September 30, 1959


Pursuant to your request I have examined the cash records of the Florida Association
Future Farmers of America and present my report as follows:
EXHIBIT A-Balance sheet at June 30, 1959.
EXHIBIT B-Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements for the Period July 1, 1958
through June 30, 1959.
All recorded cash receipts were traced through the bank by means of original deposit
s'ips and bank transcripts, and all cancelled checks were inspected for regularity.
The bank account in the Capital City National Bank was satisfactorily reconciled with
statements furnished by the depository. Bank accounts with Leon Federal and Ta.lahass2e
Federal Savings and Loan Associations were verified from bank books.
United States Savings Bonds were not inspected by me at June 30, 1959 but are shown
as part of this report.
Accounts receivable are the result of expenditures made for thcs2 funds from the Surplus
Account. Surplus will be reimbursed upon receipt of the pledged funds.
Subject to the foregoing comments, it is my opinion that the attached Bala'-lc Fhrct
presents fairly the financial position of the Florida Association Future Farmers of America
at June 30, 1959 and the result of its operation for the year then ended.
S /Abncr Avirett, Jr., Certified Public Accountant


















Kenneth McMullen, District Agent, Agricultural Extension Service; Joe Busby, Ass't Director, Agricultural Extension Service;
F. L. Northrop and C. M. Lawrence, Area Supervisors, Agricultural Education, State Department of Education; E. W. Garris,
Head Teacher-Trainer, Agricultural Education, University of Florida; Woodrow Brown, State Boy's 4-H Club Agent; H. E.
Wood, State Supervisor for Vocational Agriculture, State Department of Education; G. C. Norman, Program Specialist, Agri-
cultural Education, State Department of Education; M. O. Watkins, Director, Agricultural Extension Service; W. T. Loften, As
sociate Professor, Agricultural Education, University of Florida; T. L. Barrineau, Area Supervisor, Agricultural Education, State
Department of Education; Franklin Perry and W. J. Platt, District Agents, Agricultural Extension Service; Forrest E. Myers
Ass't. to the Director, Agricultural Extension Service; and A. R.Cox, State FFA Executive Secretary.


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Florida Sets Pace

For Cooperation

By HERVEY SHARPE
Assistant Editor,
Florida Agricultural Service
TWO-WAY communication paves the way
for amicable relations between FFA and
4-H in Florida. The two sponsoring agen-
cies-Vocational Agriculture and Agricul-
tural Extension Service-find that frank
face-to-face discussions eliminate prob-
lems before misunderstandings set in.
In the Sunshine State good working re-
lations between Agricultural Extension
and Smith-Hughes agriculture isn't of
recent vintage-the agencies have been
good neighbors for years.
During one of the many friendly chats,
Harry Wood, state supervisor of Voca-
tional Agriculture, and Dr. M. O. Wat-
kins, director of the Agricultural Exten-
sion Service, agreed to scheduling a con-
ference table discussion. The meeting
met with such success that it will become
an annual event. In between there'll still
be the usual friendly communiques-writ-
ten, 'phone and face-to-face.
At the first annual administrative ses-
sion both agencies lent cooperative ears.
Discussions paved the way for better mu-
tual agreements. Policy changes were
blueprinted that will insure smooth op-
eration of both youth programs. It was
agreed that the Golden Rule will serve
as a guide in mapping out the youth pro-
grams. And just as important, they'll
keep the interest of the boys' at heart be-
fore taking any action.
Project work was one of the confer-
ence topics. It was agreed that any boy,
4-H or FFA, who enrolled after Septem-
ber 1 in a project running more than one
year, would be expected to continue this
project in the organization until August
31 of the following year. Further, it was
suggested that any boy who transfer-
red a project from one organization to
the other at the end of the year should
inform his teacher or agent of the change.
It then is the responsibility of the tea-
cher or the agent concerned to inform
(Continued on page 14)
12 Florida Future Farmer























JET
A little over five years ago, on a warm,
rainy night, yes, in Florida, a son
was born to the Plane family of Home-
stead.
Homestead is a farming community,
also the site of a big S.A.C. air base. The
Plane farm adjoins the base, naturally
making them air conscious. So with the
name and the place being what they are
it was inevitable they name him Jet.
With a name like Jet, they reasoned, al-
most logically, he should go far fast,
noisily perhaps, but fast.
The big planes taking off and landing
almost continuously made considerable
noise and conversation difficult. As Jet
didn't like difficulties he just never tried
to talk, besides what can one say to a
cow or chicken, that hasn't been said be-
fore, and better, by some one with a tal-
ent for language.
Jet enjoys living on the farm, playing
with the animals, and exploring the fasci-
nating buildings. He also helps his
father with some of the chores. He's not
much help so far but he's getting there.
He also likes to help his mother gather
the eggs. He heard her remark once that
there was no money in eggs. After break-
ing a number and examining the con-
tents, he agreed she was right. He likes
living close to the land. Sometimes it's
difficult to tell where the land ends and
Jet begins, but a little soap and water
takes care of that. He would like a
brother or sister, not to talk to, but he's
never really lonesome. There is so much
to do, so many places to play and hide
in, the chores that have to be done, the
days are hardly long enough.
As you see Jet is a typical normal,
farm boy, good material for the F.F.A. I'm
sure he'll become a member some day.


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CIRCLE D RANCH
Rt. 2, Box 1000, Marianna, Fla.
Phone Cottondale 2461



Statement of Ownership
Statement required by the Act of August 24, 1912,
as amended by Acts of March 3, 1933, and
July 2, 1946 (Title 39, United States Code, Sec-
tion 233) showing the ownership, management,
and circulation of The Florida Future Farmer,
published quarterly at Kissimmee, Florida for Oc-
tober 1, 1959.
1. The names and addresses of the publisher,
editor, managing editor, and business managers
ae: Publisher Cody Publications, Inc., Al Cody,
pres., Box 891, Kissimmee, Fla.; Editor A. A.
Cox, State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee, Flor-
ida; Managing Editor George Y. Bast, Jr., Box
891, Kissimmee, Florida; Business manager Al
Cody, Box 891, Kissimmee, Florida.
2. The owner is: Florida Association, Future
Farmers of America, Tallahassee, Florida; Randy
Kincaid, president, Lake Wales, Florida; Carroll
McElroy, 1st vice president, Trenton, Florida;
A. R. Cox, executive secretary, State Dept. of
Education, Tallahassee, Fla.
3. The known bondholders, mortgagees, and
other security holders owning or holding 1 percent
or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or
other securities are: (if there are none, so state)
None.
4. Paragraphs 2 and 3 include, in cases where
the stockholder or security holder appears upon
the books of the company as trustee or in any
other fiduciary relation, the name of the person
or corporation for whom such trustee is acting;
also the statements in the two paragraphs show
the affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the
circumstances and conditions under which stock-
holders and security holders who do not appear
upon the books of the company as trustees, hold
stock and securities in a capacity other than that
of a bona fide owner.
AL CODY, business manager
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 1st
day of October, 1959.
(SEAL) DELLA ENGLE
My commission expires December 19, 1962


Top photograph shows the Munson FFA String Band at the National Convention in
Kansas City. Bottom photograph was taken at the time of the presentation of a
pickup truck to the FFA Chapter of Apopka Memorial High School by Holler Motors,
Inc. of Winter Garden. From left to right are shown Mr. Malvin Rowe, Sales Manager
of Holler Chevrolet, Tom Hart, Don Conner, John Odom, Bobby Chandler, Kenneth
Eldridge, (in truck) Tom Russell, salesman for Holler Motors, Murray King, Fred
McNeil, Billy Joe Chandler, Ken Gilliam, Larry Hudson, Dillard Alligood, Cledis
Fort, Mr. W. E. Harris, former Ag. Teacher (deceased) and Mr. Robert E. King,
assistant principal.


Sets Pace
(Continued from page 12)
the other agency representative of the
change in project program.
Where seasonal projects are involved
the boys will not be permitted to transfer


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the project or show an exhibit from the
project in another organization.
Ground rules for judging contest par-
ticipation included: When a 4-H or FFA
member participates on a state winning
team or activity he is not eligible to par-
ticipate again in the same activity with
the other organization. This rule would
apply on a state or national level only.
Further when a boy qualifies himself
to participate on a state team or activity
in both 4-H and FFA during the same
club or chapter year, he must make a
decision as to which team he chooses to
participate on for that year.
The group reaffirmed that the two or-
ganizations go on record as continuing
the policy of recommending to show and
fair managements that they keep 4-H and
FFA divisions separate.
For a check on Florida's good neighbor
policy, follow the fair circuit this win-
ter-or any place where the sponsoring
agencies gather-and you'll see congenial
agents and teachers cooperating as if they
were members of the same educational
team. This sharing of educational re-
sponsibilities is not by accident-remem-
ber it began at the administrative con-
ference table.


Florida Future Farmer





68IYpDF


1

'. 4 ;






South Dade Exhibit at the American Institute of Cooperation in Urbana, Illinois.
Seated (L to R): Maurice Ennis, Paul Konsky, Donald King and Don Davis, Jr.
Standing: Lansing Gordon, Adviser, Dr. E. K. Cake, Marketing Specialist, Extension
Division, University of Florida, Eddie Starling and Adviser, Gene Herring.


WINNING THE American Institute of Co-
operation Southern Regional Award of
$500 for chapter cooperative activities
this year was the South Dade Chapter
at Homestead. Attending the National
meeting and participating were Paul
Kensky, Eddie Starling, Donald King,
Maurice Ennis, Don Davis, and their
Advisors, Lansing Gordon, and Gene
Herring.
Each member presented a talk about
"Going Into Business in America." Star-
ling gave the chapter report for the
year, which covered: 16 projects, in
which chapter members spent 1303 hours
of work, 952 hours of chapter coopera-


ABERDEEN-ANGUS


GULFSTREAM FARM
of the Glades Sod Company
Registered
Aberdeen-Angus
FT. LAUDERDALE FLORIDA


For
REGISTERED
ABERDEEN-ANGUS
See

SUN LAKE RANCH
P. 0. Box 37 Lutz, Florida


TRIPSON'S DAIRY


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FLORIDA


tive activities. They cooperated with 14
school, community, and civic organiza-
tions in 35 different projects. They had
183 hours of instruction, demonstrations,
and field trips pertaining to education
on farm cooperatives.
The members are to be congratulated
on their work during the year and for
their exhibit of tropical and sub-tropi-
cal fruit at the American Institute of
Cooperation Convention.
The 1960 American Institute of Co-
operation Convention will be held at the
University of California at Berkley, Au-
gust 7-10. South Dade Chapter will not
be eligible for this award next year.


BRAHMAN

A. DUDA & SONS
Breeders of
REGISTERED BRAHMAN CATTLE
Ph. 456-W COCOA, FLA.
G. A. TUCKER, Manager
H. J. FULFORD, Herdsman

BRANGUS

BRANGUS-will
breed better beef for you
WOLFE RANCH
H. E. Wolfe, owner-St. Augustine, Fla.
Located midway between
St. Augustine & Green Cove Springs




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