Group Title: New era, or, Home journal.
Title: The New era, or, Home journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076591/00012
 Material Information
Title: The New era, or, Home journal
Alternate Title: Home journal
Physical Description: v. : ; 55 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: A.L. Spedon
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda -- Hamilton
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 2 (Oct. 15, 1884).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076591
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 19568994
lccn - sn 89049270

Full Text








TI


OR


A


A- Weekly Newspaper, Specially


Devoted to the G-eneral Interests of the rInhabitants of"


Bermuda.,


'.4


SOur Colony,-a United people with undivided interests.
__ .': ..- ,. .^ .nt t e e e .s .


No. 27.-VOL. 1.1



T"If NEW ERA
or
HOME JOURNAL.
IS PUBLISHED
Every Tuesday,
AT NOON,
:1 THI TOW Of HAMTOn.

51 papirs comprise the annual issue ;
one week being reserved for the printers
during4he Christmas Holidays.,
PmoE--12 Shillings per annum--paid,
vemi-fetrly (in advance.)
R&TES o1 ADVERTISING-One or more
inches of Column, in depth : 1st inser-
tion, 1 shilling each ; 2nd ditto, 6d. ;
each additional insertion, 3d. per inch.
A. L. SPEDON,
SEditor aml Proprietor.

Tinie Calendar.
APRIL. MAY.
8 M T'W T F S NI MT \V T F
1 1 2 3 4 5 6
2 8 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 910 11 1213
9 10 1 13 14 1514 15 16 17 18 1920
16 17 18 19 20 21 2221 22 23 24 25 26 27
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 30 31
30
C4l,,ii'ch Scrvo ce M.
In the TO WN of HAMIL TON,
BERMUD) A.

CHURCH or ENGLAND.
PARsIB CHURCH OF PMBROKE :
tours of 8ervi'v--
Mor:,ipig and Evening.
11 o'clock, A. M., and 4. p. m.-alter.
uately.
Snnday School -9.30, A. M. and 2. 30, P.M
TRINITY CHURCH :
Chnrah Service-11, A. M. and 4. P. x.-
alternately.
Evening 'servie--7.30, p. M.
Sunday bcbhow--9.30, A. M. and 2.30, p. M.


PR E'BYT1IRIAN.
ST. ANDREW's :
Pastor, Rev. J. A. McKEEN.
Morning S8rvice-11. A. M.
Evening ditto 7, P. M.
unday ,'ehool-3. P. tM.
Prayer'Meeting-Thursday, 7.30, P. M.
METHODIST.
Ws8LBY .CHRU H, Chiurch Street.
?astuor, lIev. A. W. NICHOLSON.
SudAny Services --11, A. M and 7, P. MH.
Sabbath Stelol-3. p. M.
Prayer Meetiing-Tuesday at 7.30, p. M.
BRITISH METIODI)IST EPISCOPAL.
Pastor,. Rev. J. H. BUCKNEB.
MeWring Service 11, A M.
Evening ditto 7, P. M.
Sabbath School-2.30. P M.
prayer .leeting-Thursday, 7. P. .L
It. C. CHURCH.
Rev. Dr. WALss, V I0.
Morning Service at 8.30, A. M. and 10, A.M.,
,ternmtely.
Vespers and Dtyvotions-7 o'clock, P. M.
No=r.-Seats provided SPECIALLY for
Strangers in all of the above-men-
tidond Churches.
I


'BERMBUDA
Rafts of Postage.
LETTERS:
To th,United Kingdom.... 4d. per oz.
S. ominiou of Canada. 3d.
** "United States....... 2td. "
'West India Islands.. 4d. ** "
British India ........... d. "
Countries of the Postal
Vnion on theContineut
of Evrope, France, Ger-
mat-Yt, &0............ 4d. '
SSouth Africa...........9d. "
Astiardliiaud New Zealand lOd. "
NEWS APERS :
14. for efich-not exceeding 4 ounces.
Nipaitpts and Periodicals printed and
pubiliZ d itn 'Bermuda may be sent by Post
to anya partof the Islands free of charge.
BOOK PArKETS:
Ciria.lrOW ; and Prices Current, Books,
PaniMhe.lPrnts-, Drawings, &c., to any
part of Bermuda--"
r't o i ; ,' Id. per 4 oz. ea. packet.
Limit of *eight--3 bsa:
Book Paokvets of the above descriptions,
to Foreign' Countries, ld. per 2 oz. enchl
Packet. :No such packet may exceed 24
inches in length, or 12 incheSiu width or
dib9or 21,i'n weight.
'6ST CARDS:
Island PObt-Oards are issued at id. each,
and miy be.aaet to any part of the Islands._
Foreign Post aords are issued rat lia.
each for transmission to the United King-
dora, ~ait ed"taW,, and other Postal Conu-

R GIBTRATIO.N.
otters. ua ay be Registered by paying
a fe of .4-addition to .th ordinary
postap*. *-*


HAMILTON,, BERMUDA, TUESDAY, APRIL ,4, 1882.


HOE' OUT YOUR ROW.
-o-o-
One day a'fertmer's lazy boy
Was hoeing out the corn.
And moodily had listened long
To hear the dinner horn.
The welcome sound was heard at last,
And down he dropped his hioe ,
But the good man shouted in his ear,
My boy, hoe out your row,"
Although a 'hard one' wva the row,
To use a plowman's phraze,
The lad, as sailors have it,
Beginning well to haze'
I can,' said he, and manfully
He seized again his hoe, ,.
And the good man smiled to see
The boy hoe out his row.
The lad the text remembered,
And proved the moral wall,
That perseverance to the end
At last will nobly tell.
Take courage, man! resolve you can
And strike a vigorous blow ;
In life's great field of varied toil,
Always 'hoe out your row.'

Conquered at Last.

There were wild scholars at that
school. The girls were well-grown
romps, who were, almost without ex-
ception, handsome, and they knew it.
A nice time fair-headed, blue-eyed,
gentle young Harry Munn was to
have with them. He guessed that as
he arose at his desk on the first morn-
ing.
Five young men and one elderly
woman had departed from that school-
house vanquished, and now he headed
the forlorn hope-a man not five-and
twenty yet, with a collegiate education,
sensitive feeling, and no physique.
He knew nothing about girls. His
two demure sisters might not have
been of the same race, for all the like-
ness there was between them and these
romps. And they/were so pretty, es-
pecially Violet'Raynor, the worst romp
of all.
- In those first days they tried all
their old tricks- -hid their slate pencils
and heated his, chalked faces on the
blackboard, and wrote rhymes in the
copybooks ;passed some simple answer
that every one knew up and down the
class : talked, ate apples, and cracked
nuts: wrote him a love letter, which
they signed with. the name of the late-
ly deposed spinster, and sent to him
by a small child, who arrived in school
time; sent flies on the wing with
paper slips tied to their legs; tripped
over his toes and apologized; overset
his inkstand s,on purpose, and did a
thousand other such impish things.
He kept thinking that Violet was
the prettiest girl he had ever seen.
She looked so good and sweet, too.
How could she join in these frolics ?
And, indeed, she was not as bad as
the rest, and once or twice actually
behaved beautifully.
Violet certainly could be charming
if she chose. She, on her part, thought
the teacher very handsome and very
pleasant. But that was all in secret.
he was seventeen, and old enough to
think of handsome men with some in-
terest. His delicate manner and gen-
tlemanly habits pleased her, and she
would have behaved herself in a lady-
like way but for popular opinion. But,
alas! the "girls" had resolved not
to give in to any young man teacher.
They were proud of their horrible
conduct, and when she had endeavored
to do well had taunted her with being
cowardly. Violet could not yield to
htier better impulses-dared not. And
then she knew very well that the young
teacher admired her, and undei such
circumstances it became a sort of tri-
umph to hold out. "He'll think I've
taken a fancy to him if I give in,"
said she. And in the queerest spirit
she fairly led the riot from that mo-
ment.
Henry Munn found this very hard
to bear, but he had no intention of
giving in One by one he conquered
the girls. The small ones he switched
on the palms. As a last resort, the
elder ones were consigned, dinnerless,
to long lessons, or had private lectures,
which shamed them into decency.
Of course he did not wish to switch


Violet Raynor. She was a young
woman. Nor did lectures have any
effect on her whatever. She giggled
and pouted, and played some trick on
him ten minutes after. At last one
day hear.oatgeous sauciness became
-more than he could bear, and he de-


termined to endure it no long. am.'
He waited until she w:as qu~ for a I Miss Violet," said Henry I beg
moment-she was drawi ag a carica- you will not, reproach yourself so
ture of him--and arose at his desk. much. You only me iait to tease me,
iss Violet Raynor." said he. not to hurt me-and th en, I shall not
,' Here she is," said Violet. "Where be blind. I have been thanking God
are your eyes ?" all day for that-that I shall not be
"Miss Violet Rayno0 repeated blind."
Mr Munn, "I have somi to a ,con- She burst into tear's.
elusion concerning you." I "You patient angel," she said, "you'll
Ah!" said Violet, "is it possible?" hate me always, I know ; I deserve
-" You are demorraitzin, the school, that."
Miss Raynor," said Henry. "You "Hate you?" he suid.
are setting a bad and unladylike ex- Then he pansed.
ample to every one here. When such "I shall never forget my gentle
scholars are found in the p art I came nurse," he said; th-e kind girl who
from, it is customary to expel them. has never forgotten me all these
Therefore, I now expel you. Take weeks.",
your hat and books, and leave this He took her hand..
room, and never enter it agairi while "If I could do you some great
I am teacher." good," she said, "scon sething to com-,
Violet Raynor stared at him in pensate for the harm .1 have done-
amazement, and laughed. but there is nothing.'
"I'll go when I'm, re fdy, Mr. "There is something," he said, and
Munn, and come back when Iplease," then sighed.
she said. I suppose you forget who There might be something."
I am-that I am Colonal Raynor's Then she blushel(1 rosy red and
daughter, and that no s( hoolmaster knelt down beside hbai.
can turn me out of school." "Will you kiss -me, Violet ?" he
Mr. Munn arose, went t o the ward- asked.
robe, took down the coq:aettish hat She kissed him once on the lips
and sacque and parisol, carefully de- and once on the redl scar on the fore"
posited the books in the neat strap, head.
and hand ed them to her. Then Mrs. Raynor came in with his
"Put your things on, MiA 's Raynor," tea and toast.
said the e. ,iniT. teacher, "' and allow But Violet went io sleep happy that
me to open the door for y ou, unless, night, and Henry bh ad such a dream
indeed, you prefer to apolgize, and that he thought he must be dead and
behave henceforth in a m manner that have gone to heaven.
shall not disgrace the school and And in the spring the two were
yourself." married.
Apologize," said Viole-t, who be- Violet Raynor w:a s her father's only
gan to tremble, reflecting o:1a the ques- daughter, and could do as she pleased
tions that would,be asked at home. with him ; aud he difd not wait to die
" I certainly shall do no s uch thing. before he made her :rich.
" You'll apologize to me be fore long." i Wild now ? 0, dxa no. The sweet-
Then she put on her hat and walk- est, most ladylike li t tle woman. And
ed slowly to the door. the two are as 'p -rfectly happy as
T'Pi whole .c-l foll owe d her with mortals can be.
its many eyes and she wagi conscious -"
of a signal defeat. Wint could she For the .ew Era.
do, she asked herself, teo turn the SHORT SERMONS FOR BIG
table on this conqueror of hers, and at SIN] K ERS.
least set the school laugh ng at him Nua B i ri.
before she opened the door? She Text:- Where the hen scratches she ex-
had not much chance. Sh' was yery pects to find a bug. Oainticles chapt. I 16.
near it, and there was he, polite and Fellow Brother n, sisters, men, wo-
calm as possible, wi t his hand on the, men and children, generally and
latch. Her black eyes da r ced about particularly; spe: king. You need'nt
her. Near her was a shelf. On the hustle' any pageE; for the text, for it
shelf stood what Violet sup posed was ain't there. It iu; a special dispensa-
an ink bottle. To toss the contents tion to your appointed pastor; and
in the teachers face was n ot a 'very he hurls it at you for what it is worth.
elegant piece of revenge,, bi it it would Where the hen scratchess there she
make him look fanny and cause a expects to find a bug. Did you come
shout She caught it in h er hands. from the race track of the world to
I'll set you a copy before I go, as well parade your tr( tting harness" before
as a bad example, girls," ,she cried, the meek and lc vldy? Have you drop-
and then the contents we re dashed ped the dazzling; rattles of busineas
full in the teacher's face. and pleasure, t,3 while an idle hour
Alas! the result was not a. laugh- away listening t3 the mournful melo-
it was a scream of terro r, as the dy that is rung by angel hands from
young man rolled in ierril le agony the sacred hart s that hang forgotten
on the floor. Mr. Munn taught a upon the drool ing willows-of mortali-
class in chemistry in the sci .ool-room ty ? Or are y ( to tussel the arch
in the afternoon of Saturd ays, and enemy for the ?Jdmighty dollar ? Tru-
that shelf was devoted to th, e articles ly I say unto you, where the hen
for that study. It was a bottle of scratches there, she expects to find a'
some terrible acid which Vi( let Ray- bug.
nor had taken in her hand, and she My drowsy hearers, we are all of
had flung it right into Henri Munn's us a lot of dai aged goods, trying to
blue eyes. She was beside him on palm ourselv is off upon each other
her knees now, crying and praying, for more than our market value ; and
and vowing her ignorance ol the con- the old firm cf Time, Death & Co., is
.tents of the jar; and he at idst his doing a heavy commission business
agony, found voice to assure her that upon our stock. in trade. I hear the
he believed her, before ho lost all mallet of dea t a, with its mechanical
consciousness. tap, tap, and stolid monotone of "go-
Eight weeks after this a yc ung man ing, going," an.d the next minute down
lay upon the pillows of the sp ,are room it will come tpon some of our uncon-
in Colonel Raynor's house, He was scious heads, and we shall be folded
thin and woru, and thore wa as an in- up like the te its of the Arabs, and as
delible scar on his forehead and one silently born, away to the other side
of his blue eyes was closed forever, of Jordon, where the dry-goods man


But matters were better than
hoped for a long time for it ws
ed that he would be blind.
him sat a young girl. It wa
Raynor. She was also a lit
andher whole manner seen
ed. she had been reading
Now, in the twilight, she put-
down, and looked at him iw
in her eyes.
"Mr. Munn," she said,
wanted to say something tc
long time, but I feared to af >,
Now you are so much bette
say it. If I could live 'ovey c
school time, I would be so I '
ent, indeed I would. I ai'i
ashamed of all that. And a
that I have done to you, I sli
forgive myself all my lif e.
shall be happy for an hnatu


had been
s expect-
Beside
s Violet
tIe worn,
ied alter-
to him.
the book
ith tears

" I have
you for a
itate you.
r, I must
that old
ery differ-
so much
is for this
hall never
I never
I never


refrains from troubling, and the gro-
cer has nothi rig to say, and the weary
hen ceases f :)m scratching and the
precious bug is found. In the midst
of life we ar-e in debt, says a notable
prophet, who was near akin to your
beloved past o r. If any of you are
tempted to ta cry in the tavern of life,
and fail to settle your account with
your landlo rd, may the text rise up
before you 1 ike a fabulous Arabian
hero only to rest from the rough and
tumble giant, and deter you from that
sink of uttir depravity where bum-
mers lead -tru stful hens to scratch up
the bugs they- devour.
Your undivided attention is further-
more solicited, on the signification of
the text, met aphorically and collect-
ively, in smadPl passages, to suit every
Capacity, fro the boy shucking pea-


(12,%. or f3.00 Per Ann.


nuts peacefully in the corner, to 'the
hardened sinner who stalks so proud-
ly into your pastor's presence.-And
woe unto you, young woman,' seasaw-
i.ig up the broad aisle with your new
coal-scuttle bonnet and streamers a
flyin' for you are 'vanity of vanities.
And you, young men in your fancy
neck-cloths, go on until you slip up
over a bale of cotton and are left to
drift away over the broad brimstone
sea of national disgrace, a byword
and a jest unto the world thatyou
love not wisely, but too well. My be-
loved, I warn you now, if you manifest
symptoms of such cowardice as has
been handed down to you from high
places, the biggest pair ofstoggy boots
in this congregation will rise up in
judgement against you, and kick you
out into the broad road that leads to
everlasting ruin.
And finally, when you cut the crust,
from your brown bread loaf, and scrape
the hard beans from the top of your
noon-tide pot, if you cut a little into
the soft and scrape a little below the'
crisp for the beggar's and outcast's
portion, your conscience and diges-
tion will trouble you less; and as you
steal out, as some of you will to-night;
where the silver moon of memory
hangs low over the haunted hills 'of
the past, to bow at some hallowed
finger-post that points the way a be-
loved one went over your broken
heart to heaven, may the eternal ver-
dure of evergreen hope spring up' in
the barren spots trod hard 'by the
busy feet of the absorbing noW, and
bring you to the sweetness of that
peace and the tenderness of that love
that overflows continually in deeds
and words, for the elevation of raga"rT u
ffins who march in the rear ranks of
the great army of humanity ; for th.e
barbarians.are not all in..the ragged
file, but many a gem of purest ray,
serene" wants but a lifting from the
filth to shine. So mote it b6. Bro-
ther Slowfast circulate the platted
for the root of evil, until it is rooter
out of this place. For verily I say
unto you, the hen that scratches here,
expects to find a bug. Shell out!'
JASPER HAZELROD.
The South Shore Beer.
Coral Cliff Castle.
Bermuda, April 1st, 1882,

tumorous Itelms.

"1 know every rook on the coast,"
cried the Irish pilot, when the ship
then bumped, "and 'that's one of
them."
"Julia, my love, what do you think
of my moustache?" Julia, looking
earnestly at him for a moment-


"Why, 'Alfred, where is it ? Wh
didn't you bring it with you, darling?
The Momentous Question.-Augus-
tus-" Now, Emily, do you love me,
or do you not?" EImily-"Well, if I
say I don't, shall I have to return your
presents?"
A minister had preached an hour ;
then he remarked" Another wide fiel
opens from the sutject in another di-
rection. Just then an old colored saint
ejaculated' "Please, Lord, shut up ,e
bars!"
She went into a store to buy Bsopm,
toilet soap, and while the clerk yas'
expatiating on its merits, sahe made
up her mind to purchase ; but. when
he said "it would keep off chaps,"
she remarked that she didAt61 v wan
that kind. "' .
Husband-" You are qulte 'com-
fortable, dear ?,' Wife-Ies, love."
"The cushions are, easy _4d soft ?'
"Yes, darling." ".You don't feel a4yf
jolts ?" "No' my sweetes-" And
there is no draught on miy lamb, is
there ?' No my owners 'own" Then
change seat with me.' ':"';
"This world is all a fleeting show9"
said a priest to a culprit on th galta ,.
lows. Yes," .was .the prompt e.ly,
but if you have no objection, I'd Uik
to see the show a ftlittle longer." "
An inveterate. old chicken-thief, ia.
Albama, who had a -marvellous faculty,
of gliding out of a close corner, was at
last caught with a chicken ina'his hat,'
fie denied the stealing of it, ead,otk
being asked how then it got into hiq
bat, he solmnnly said: "-Dat, master,
is jes' what stoiAbhea me ;but fore d4
Lord, I spec'sit mu' hat'berawled iP
my br ches 1 ... .


/


V


'; ,


J7 ',,Q,








... ,. ___............

meon." Their comfort must be iaki-u
into account also, for if people'arbe in
astatewof discondort, or weatrinues
Slthey cannot possibly attend to. or be
influenced by a preacher, unless, in-
.-' deed. he be of such an 'exceptional
-- kind as is only met with once or twice
LlILTOt, APRIL 4, 1882.- in a generation. Above all, the occu
"pant of the pulpit should see to it that
Editorial Bureau the spiritual foovd he provides for the
..:._ .. occupants of the pews should not be
TO OUJR READERS &c. of that heavy, cloying, and mentally
With presentt number of the NEW indigestible kind that is so often ser-
E w commence the second half edupby injudicious prosers. Let
.year of. its exiatance. Notwithstanding the style, be keen, -pointed and inci-
the many difficulties and opposition we sive, each ;word having its proper
'have had to contend with, we have met place and weight of signification.
witla considerable encouragement and For this purpose brevity is indispen-
sueoess. Owing to rot having yet sold sable. The days are past when long
our property in Canada, and having services were considered a kind of
purchased, another here, besides the ne- spiritual discipline. What is required
cessary outlay, with occasional ill health, now is not long labour discussions on
we have therefore, not yet found our- difficult points of doctrine or scienti-
selves in a. position and condition to fic subjects of dispute,--for the press
carry on our enterprise as largely, and has opened up .a wide and appropriate
do the justice to our paper as under field for these,-but plain, and yet
more favorable circumstances we would well constructed, declarations of those
most certainly have done. Our main Truth
object in startifig the NEw ERA was that bear on tci lfe of Gospelman in th
merely, to make it as a means that bear on te ife of man in the
to a necessary snbitae, and yet, in great hereafter, and on the regulation
6 d aoing, to also identify ourselves of his life here. r'he limit of human
with" the general public interests, endurance can pretty well be fixed by
in common with the inhabitants of the system of averages, and we are
these Islands. In principle we feel too not far wide of the mark when we say
independent to. make ourselves or our that twenty-five .minutes of a ser-
paperaubservient :to. the selfish inter- mon is as much as is desirable, or
esta of any person 'or party, either likely to be productive of good. If
through fear or favor. Our actions are the subject be too wide to be exhaus-
guided by a conscientiousness of: senti- ted in that time it can be taken up
meat and feeling, and if we should err, again, and even a series of discourses
at any time, let it be. put down ,as an on it prepared. But the series sys-
error of the head, not the heart. It has te also may be pushed too ar es-
never been, nor is still, our intention to ecial if the subject be intrinsically
selfishly compete with our contempora- peciay if the subject be intrinsically
ries of the Press, All we ask,'is a fair a narrow one, such as that selecte
and correspondingly equal privelege to by the Irish minister who gave eight
live, and enjoy with freedom the favors discourses on the subject of Balaam's
of a friendly community. I To those who ass. A ninth was in preparation,
have already, through' a selfish, envious when one of his elders remonstrated
and malicious spirit attempted to root us with him ; one said that the whole con-
out even of existence and subsistence gregation were, by this time, earnest-
we would say :- ly wishing '"that Balaam's ass had
Don't crowd ; Bermuda's large enough never been foaled !"'
For you as well as me :
The doors of all are open wide- *
The realm of tlhoughtis free. MECHANICAL EDUCATION.
Inuall earth's pioes you are right MECHANICAL EDUCATION.
To chose the best you can- This is a mechanical age, and the
Provided that you do not try claims for the means for a technical.
To crowd some other ma.,- education are becoming daily more
We came to these Islands in the search education are becoming daily more
of health, and to a certain extent have paramount. Never before in the his-
Sxperienced the feelings of that enjoy- tory of the world has it been govern-
ab e blessing : while, to return to Cana- de so largely by the combined forces in
da to reside, medical men have assured iron and steam, and he who would do
us would be only to subject us to linger- the age the greatest amount of good is
ing out of a miserable and, painful ex- he who will assist in supplying the
istence, therefore all our common inter- means by which it may be governed
eata are in a country in which we intend well. So far the world may be said
to establish a permanent home for our- to have been drifting promiscuously
selves, and family--among an intelli- among all the possibilities of these
tgent and friendly people, whom we re- two potent forces, without aim or ob-
apect' and 'love, and with a climate ject, picking up hdre and there a
which has no parallel under the sun. germ of truth' and now and then uti-
Hitherto.We have made no special ef- lizin a modicum of the many and I
forts to obtain patrons or public patron- zst benefits whicum of the awaiting deve
age, nevertheless, we have been the reci-vast benefits which are awaiting dove- i
pients of a continued gradual public lopment. One of the chief causes, if
support and encouragement, and with not the only cause, of this aimless
uch, in ou own huble quietway, way, we drifting is the lack of a true apprecia-
have been enabled to move along, corn- tion of the need of systematic educa- t
paratively successful, with brightening tion and training. There is, indeed, i
pr6spectsbeckoning ua forwardto better a general appreciation of the need of t
es. Werfeel that we have a cer- inechanical or technical training, but
tain claim upon' the public for patron- an utter lack of individual apprecia- r
age, which exists in the fact of the cor- tion ; and not until the father, indivi- (
parativelylow'price of the NEw Es, and dually, recognizes this need will the t
oven at that we consider it a high figure influence be universal or strong enough g
for so. smll a paper, To charge more to bring about the establishment of
would be evident of dishonest impost- the proper schools in sufficient num- -
tis on; and to decrease the price, .which ber or character' There is, certainly, ]
we may dd6 at some future date, would ed h hat
be more in accordance with the princi- needed, but it is yet ar from what
pie of conscience, and moral duty as it the age demands. As we pro gress,
would enable us to place it in the hands the a demands. As inwe progress
efa great number who on account of a however, and grow in the knowledge
high price,. would be debarred from en- of the vast and comprehensive capa-
joying a perusal of its contents. Mon- abilities ot the human race, and a more t
opolies are a' curse to any country they thoroughh appreciation of the value
are allowed to exist in, and the man who of education in developing these ca-
honorably attempts to make a breach abilities, we are gradually coming to
in the Ring, should be liberally support- pay more attention to the question of
ed and 'encouraged. For this reason special training for special pursuits
we have certain claims upon the commu- The time has not yet come when we
nity, and trust a hearty and liberal re- shall seek to .turn the whole course
eponse will be given. We trust that not of the education of these boy towards y
only a continued patronage "may be ex- the bent of his mind, and consequent- t
tended tous, but that our List of sub- l i t o ho t figh tnhe battle of i


.....E .. i_____ ___


acriberasmay,4e amply increased durig
the 6r mayt.uponly which we have euing hfe-reliantly, but it is approaching. t
tered. We ,if health, and cireu- And the time when mechanical col- c
tred. We halif health es shall be ,in supply equal tothe
stances permit, exert our best energies ege ha bein supply equal toath i
to make' the Nzw En.4,'i every respect demand,, though the ,real demand is f
A iimpkoe Npasper as yet unrecognized, will be the time' t
Ina colusion, we cordially express which will witness the greatest strides a
thanksto-onr many kind patrons and in the knowledge and utilization of c
friends foinpast ,and highly appreciated vast possibilities of this age of iron t
Savors, trusting that in turn we may be and steam.
enabled to-give them a good readable The proper place for the influence e
paper, 'iub~las we hope will be a wel- to begin, which shall force a proper T
oome sad interesti.,g guest to many a realization of this want isin the family. (
household i the lles of Bermuda: Parents have a great responsibility e
Sin the proper education of their chil- t
ABOUT L ONG SERMONS. dren, and in no direction is the respon- 1
T, U is fa ra.a -,for the pew rather sibility graver than in this of a pro-
-than the pulpit to settle.. And for per discrimination. The real point
obvioi reasons. The main purpose to be determined upon, in deciding i
of all teaohing is the good of the o.- upon the education of a boy, is as to
capante of the pew, not the oxhibi. the natural bent of his mind. The
tion of the preaoer's staying powers great majority of parents recognize 1
of spaki4gd6r reading. Th former this as a true principle, but few of C
should be exhibited always as subser -. them follow it when their own precon-
vient to,-and regulated by, the amount ceived plans, or, sometimes, conven-
of good likely tobe done. it 'is. or ience even, run counter to it. For
nght to be, ~iite.a s8eeonuarY matter the sake of making a poor lawyer,
Sm"chteionai .onor nd glory 4octor, or merchant. thy will ell-
(hai!,aeoruito; th |,rea-eier.. do* :berately proceed to spoi a good me-t
tin m4 th his grand oj may, e elianic, and thereby inflict upon the .
Bre4-^b^ ^^cer tmut, u e awayed I ay and the world n irreparable in- 1
b vari aidrationti~Tea 4taste jury.' There is a principle involved -'
1 ,i8.drte'"Bdst C6 .onsulted. ii this 'which parents should take to.
Iot i *wa"y of.sriletr ickIIngtog heart and shld act upon, if they
,b& Iitii theSpirit thift in-.'-wold.more thoroughly perform their
^hi.a 0 to AU woed uty ,
'' .' .,'.** 9 ~ '1 ,: V. ,* ''


THE UNION JACK.
Bt-fore the crowns of England and
Scotland were united under James the
First, the flag carried by English
ships was white, with the red cross of
St. George embelished on it; and that
hoisted on board the ships of Scotland
was blue, with the cross of St. And-',
rew on it; the red lines of the first,
being perpendicular and horizontal,
those of the latter diagonal.
Some differences having arisen be-
tween the ships of the two countries,
his Majesty, to prevent this in future,
and to teach his people that they
formed oue nation, ordered that a
new flag should be adopted. This
flag having the cross of St. George
inlerlaced with that of St. Andrew,
on the blue ground of the flag of
Scotland, all ships were to carry at
the main-masthead, but the E!!-..-.h
ships were tod. .' vy the 8t. George's
red cross their. .4' ri.s, and the
Scotch, thaiof St. Andrew.
On *the 12zhli of April, 1606, the
Union Jack ,was first hoisted at sea,
but it was not till the parliamentary
union of the two countries in 1707
that it was adol i as the military
flag also of gt :cL.ritain. It repre-
sents the colors f the three nations
of England, Scotland, and Ireland.
The blue field of St. Andrew (Scot-
land) forms the field. The narrow
edging of white, added to the red
cross represents the white field of St.
Patrick (Ireland,) and the red cross
of St. George (England is charged
over all. Both services therefore,
now use it as the national banner.

Corresponder ce
For the New Era.


A WOMAN'S EXEMPLARY CHARACTER
WORTHY OF EULOGIUM
When gieat men fall in life's
battlefield, and die, but to moulder
gradually and silently away to the
dust, the living monuments of God's
ever bounteous mercy, are invariably
subject to the following impression:
" Great and noble deeds have been
done by these men," their fame is
spread abroad, throughout the whole
civilized world, their good !nd gener-
ous qualities are proclaimed by the
press and people, causing the sound
of their name to echo and reecho
through the earth telling in different
languages, that a great calamity has
come about, and universal sympathy
is earnestly manefested. But when a
poor,; but honest and industrious
widow, with full resignation to the
will of the Divino Master, has bre:'ith-d
her last' such as' Mrs. Venus ;,obinson
of Devonshire Parish, whose eyelids
were closed in death on Thursday,
March 23rd, 1882, whose characterr
and mode of living is'an example to
all, excepting the irretrievable loss
which is keenly felt by those who
move in their immediate circle, and
the friends and neighbors in connect-
ion, little or nothing is known about,
them. But the manner in which that
woman conducted herself through life
revealed to us too profound a sense
of her realization of the value of
the christian graces,. to allow her to
go down to the grave unnoticed
and her exemplary' life to be
almost entirely forgotten. Mrs. Venus
Robinson was born in Devonshire
Parish on the 10th, Nov. 1810. At an
early age, though h bound with the strong
letterss of slavery, she learned that
igh above all, here reigned a great
and universal king, to whom vengence
)elongeth, whose kingdom she re-
solved first to seek, and his righteous-
ness, with an earnest belief that all
theirr things would be added unto her.
As she grew in those years of toil, so
she grew more and more awakened
with a deeper sense of her duty to-
wards God and man. A few more
years rolled round on the wheels of
ime turning off slowly but surely the
rusty fetters of bondage from their
tyrannical grasp, until eventually on
one sultry day on the 1st Augu.;t, the
ast link waa broken, and she was
ree, .free from the ties of slavery, and
two fond heal ts -were 'fi that memor-
able day united, bound close within
cords of love and truth, and she con-
tinued to hold closer communion
with the Divine Sovereign, laboring
earnestly and diligently to obtain that
rest which reimaineth for the people
of God, unceaisingly setting forth gbod
examples such as regular attendance
to the churchL service, She was known
not to neglect public worship on Sun-
day, duringia large number of years,:
and another very.important feature
n her character, well worthy of imi-
tation, was that on the morning of
sabbath, her? first care would be to
look over the subjects which the
church has provided for the days
meditation, then for morning or even-
ing service make timely preparation,
proceeding a length with all due cir-
cumspection to the house of the
Lord, and there devoutly and revent- i
ly take her seat long ere the devotional
exercises i egan, and when she failed
to be one of the three' gathered to-
gether for Divine worship, her ab-
sence was unavoidably occasioned,
andnotby carelessnessor indifference
Her disposition wasmild andpeacable,


with .benevolence, ever ready to
perform the work. of mercy and of
charity, such as visiting the sick, and
ministering to their relief, as far -as
she was able to, never refusing to share
a part of her noble generosity with
the necessitous poor, gave valuable
counsel to both old and young, so
gready was she impressed with the
words, It is better to give than to
receive" that she considered it her
duty to scatter continually the seeds
of kindness round about her fellow-
creatures, she was in reality a true
friend to her people, and a faithful
servant of her God, such was the
character of Mrs. Venus Robinson,
widow of the late Mr. Thomas Robin-
son who departed this life October
1881 only, five months, were they di-
vided by the narrow stream of death,
*when she was called away to join him
with the saints above, and to reap her
everlasting reward, and now let the
'dead and the beautiful rest, but let us
learn to cherish the seeds of benevo-
lence which she has strewn along our
paths in order that it may facilitate
our progress on our journey towards
the realms of the blest, where the
wicked ease from troubling, and the
weary are at rest.
J. RD.
*
To the Editor of the New Era.
MR. EDIToR.-Permit me to say that
I can scarcely agree with Patriot's"
views, as published in last issue, with
respect to the Goverment taking
hold of the scheme of shipping our Pro-
duce to England, as a test experiment, I
would prefer the Planters themselves
managing their own business instead of
the Government or Legislature, their
agent or trustee. It would be a dis-
grace to them should they permit to a
transfer of their powers and privile-
ges, as it would have a direct tendency
to exhibit an imbecility and incapacity in
the Agricultural Community which above
all others is entitled to independence
and respect. If the majority of the
House" were Planters then I would be
most willing to place the matter into
their hands, as I feel assured they would
have a more direct influence and interest
in behalf of the Agricultural Commu-
nity of Bermuda.
When next Election takes place I hope
every planter will come boldly forward
and with his vote endeavor to unseat
some of the old drones by a substitution
of better and younger men-those who
are either planters, or are known to have
the planters interests under their foster-
ing care. With such a House the Agri-
cultural Community might entrust their
interests, but for the present I think the
planters had better stear clear of the old-
fashioned Daddies.
Yours, &c.,
EX-PL.t-. i':
rch 25th,1882. '
NoTu --The writer of the aboye seuins to
be a sort of doubting Thomas, wio has no,
faith in the Government. tni thr'iefore
opposes the idea of ,entrunstlug It Hous'
with so important a matter as the shipping
of Onions as a test.experiment for opening up
a new outlet for a part of our' produce.
Ever since the generall Public Meeting of
last September was held the Agicult ral
Question, in different aspects Ihas been agi-
tated, and discussed in the papers giving
the planters every opp rt.unity of taking
hold of the question at issue, anI putting
one or more of them into pib:ie shape.
Through this agitation the hed Quest,.n
received it quietus. Tiie new steamer
and the schemneof opening a new market, are
still afloat.
In the first the Corporatimn readiill
came to the planter's rescue lia the o her
two tlhe lauheis will have a great deal to do.
in carrying them out sncci'ssfnily. 'Tlie
*;ovtrnimnent through the Legislat 're mnist
necessarilly t:ikean active part. T ie plan-
tf,. may 'uild the steamer, bht tiie G'v,''n
meat must subsidize it, in order to give a
firmer bases to) the enteril ise
In the expert scheme the Government iidand
a cei ain control are essentially necsssary
in order to give solidity and stability to the
scheme, unles~, and until, the plonteis formu'
themselves into organizations similar to
ths't ot the Grange Order.
Until this is affected, and the farmers are
prot.ced by themselves in united organiza-
tions they will, never fully realize the rela-
iv,' ,>nd remunerative values of their laluots.
'Oritanize at once' 'T. the rescue should be
the Plantets watchword and war cry, until
they are in a position to triumph in theit
victory.


LIST OF JURORS.
The following are the names of those
who have been selected to ser e ,as
Jurors during the present Court Assize.
ST, GEORGES, .
John Burgess, Edward Win. Wolff,
John Spurling, Thomas Bust Hayward,
Charles Somner, Agustus PaschaL
HAm.-rTON.
Dudley Albert Hollis, John Brownell
North, Thomas Haskins Davis, Julian
Irwin Wilkinson, Thomas Furbert, John
Henry Outerbridge.
SMITHS,
John Thompson Peniston, William
Isaac Smith, William Andrew Taylor,
Adolphus Smith, Mortimer Outerbridge,
Thaddeus Trott.
DEVONSHIRE.
Joseph Edward Stowe, Ihomas Thad-
deus Robinson, Henry James Cox,
Richard Jennings, Clarkson Tynes, Nat-
hanial Vesey,
Samual Canton, Junr,, George Eves
gfamuel David Robinson, John Somer,
Masters, Timothy Kerrisk, John Henry
Thomas Jackson.
PAGET.
Joseph Darrell, Frances John Eve
Hinson, John McRonald, James Moore,
Henry Arthur James, Thonal Driver
MuMaoU. -"*.


Enock Matson Frith, William T.
R, ynor Arthur Wallace Frith, George
Moris DeShielM, Joseph Smith Co(ep
oer, EtLbiu.s John Lightbourn.
So, i".AMTON.
William James Vickers, George Bean
Fubler, Joseph Thomas D orrefl Robert
Bishop Munroe, William Mallory Ma-
honey, Thomas Simmons.
SANDYS.
Joseph Norman Harvey, Thomas Sey-
more, Israel Wilson, John Simons,
John Mackey, Robert Henry Young.
For the New Era.
LOCAL QUERIES AND MAXIMS.
Special from our own "Wag."
What is triumph inr the cards at
present?
Farmers Clubs."
A farmer asks, What are the best
means for self-protection under the
present existing produce difficulty ?
A farmer's "Club." cl
A powerful weopon indeed with
which he can knock down imposing
onion agents, potato swindlers and all
of like sort who come within the
"R ing.', ,* v*.
Who is the fittest person to tap the
beer-barrel, during the War wick eleo-
tion campaign? ,
S u A Cooper I spouse'
But a few bottles of sham-pain in-
haled by each of the candidates would
ease the "pain," of suspense during
the" cam-pain.
What is much needed in Hamilton
as a "sign of the Times," and to im-
prove the "times" ?
A Town clock, that will "' !el the"
hour when it 'is toll"d.
Where is the safest place for the
planter to put his onions during the
existing "rain" of terrors? ,.
Under the "Big" shed when they
are sold at a Big" price.
Barrels are preferable ;" exclaims
the honest planter, for boxes are leaky
things for, Juvenile Onions."
I see no plausible reason for 'farm-
ers defending themselves with "clubs"
exclaimed the onion agent, "as' they
are already excellent boxers," and
know all of our weak points," and
are now straining" a point," but
in so doing maydisap-" point" them -:
selves.
How does the honest' planter look
when he completes the filling of each "
box of onions?
she looks upward like the hen when
she drinks : while the dishonest :one
looks downward as she does when she
scratches for bugs: but' both th%.:
honest and' dishone'tt look "down"'
cast when prices are low.



e' z The prospects for good prices .,
for Bermdua produce,. are whispeid ..
from New York, per. Steamer Ber-
muda.
i The little daughter of Mr.'
Benjamin Trott of St. Georges fell in-
to a tank on Tuesday last, and wheni
taken out, life was nearly extinct.
fli The Royal Mail Steamer
"Beta" from Jamaica arrived at St..
Georges last Friday morning, ',nd&
left in the afternoon of the suame day
for Halifax.
g@I The Lecture to be, delivered
by Mr. Walker Smith, in the Temper.
ance Hall, at the Crawl owing to the
disagreeableness of the weather' on
the night as advertised, has been
postponed till, to-morrow evening
Wednesday the 5th, inst.
.i A large and influential :ar .
mers Meeting was held last evening
at Warwick. A society was former
officers appointed, and Resolutiona: '
and By-laws drawn up. Copies o.f,
which are to be forwarded to the other'.
Parishes, soliciting Co-operation. ,
; gn The Crimiinal Session of the
Court of General Assige, (Sprig. '
Term) began yesterday, Monday April
3rd. Comparatively few cases mn
the docket. No hard nuts to crack, .
but thby may however be sent t.
S'Cracking Stones" with which to pave
some 'other road than the Brpad REad ..
that leadeth to destruction .. ,


fi& We would most respectfully`,
apologize to our,, readers..,for :the. 3
unavoidable delay, errors, etc., ."
last week's issue-- caused by printer "
No 1, of the New Era without any
promonition or warning, having been.
suddenly, at the 11th hour, attracted
Lee-ward by,the golden magnet' annd
' Grant'-ed a vacuum amid the aalyss
and rusty relics of the musty archives
of the Editorial sanctum. For full.and
further particulars see ANALYsis of St"
Gregory's'Calendar for 1883..
ijr" At an early hour last' Friday ,
morning Mr. Alexander .iDeshiel- 1
while fishing beyond the reefs west
Somerset captured a large shark withk
a hook he was using for catching Reck-
fish. After some considerable' dif"f-w
culty he killed it.- On Friday after-
noon it was brought to, thi port at.
Hamilton, where quite a number of
people visited the'boat'to" get a' sigh.
of it as it lay upon deck. It measure' "
about 6 feet in kenglh and weiglhd '
about 150 lbs-Mr..Deshield-has. been
successful in caplnring. a- larg.e.puW.
ber of these can".balistic., haakr
During his "' '. *


i,. /-, .





- -. ~~~TILEXE* RV


LATEST NEWS.
Tife'lods in the Soith W. stern Sta es
are sh.n ; subsiding;
A Gitviouse withi. i5 refuges was washed
away and all perished.
The.cA'l-brut d Amnwrican po-t. Long fel-
low is dead the evyeinvt cu i. d on March
24th.
," T. JONS N. F, Marchi 27.-Thiis city
hliaS just exrieied thei. mpst terrific. snow
stoiin ithas had in many years. It. cm-
,i,-ie-*.-l'oii Satur'lin 'ight and continued
till thi- .monriiig Tlhednifts in some places
are- teni fet't high.. Thle roads -re blockaded
iu every direction.
-Wt'r.LrNo. West -V.., Ma e,' 27.---The
xMo-t severe lhailstorm that i has visited i lie
city since 1869 occurad this afternoon about
21,elock.
The'8. S. 'B rmuda, Capt. Owen left
New York, at 5 P. M. on Friday ; sightel
ilitb.ighthlionse about 6 It.-t evening. and
aruivd at. Hamniltvn at o'clock this m,,rn-
ing (Tureday) -
TERmIBLE DTSsASTEE.
MEipII, TenIn., Mareh 30 1,82. '-A most
lafivntabile occurrence took police on the
rive otfthi inorziing.' The steamer Golden
City, of: the Southern Transpoit.,tion line,,
was discovered to be on fire about half-
fitr A. M. She was headed for the shore,
and .lwien she reached it an effort was made
to tie her up to, the )ank Thi- fail.-d. how-
ever, and she driftted out in'o their stream b--
fore a number of h'r p:'selngers and crew
had suceedd in e capifui fioil her dieeks.
Noune.of these were sived, but eitihier pIerisih-
ed .lby. suffocation or found deaid i1i the waters
of the river. 'The vei.sel was burned t, the
water's edge. Upwards of 50 are supposed
to late perished.

""A 1M/1RIC A.I N.
OnFriday last a gun loaded with buck
shot was laid on a bed in the house of
Mrs. Stewart, near Lebanon, Missouri,
within the reach of her little boy, four
years old. *He got his hand upon the
plaything, and in pulling it towards
him the contents of one barrel was dis-
dharged, passing through i is body and
causing instant death. "
LWRiiENCE. MAss., March.-A freshet
in the MNI erimac river to-day caused a
p.artiil suspension of all the mills in this
city. A large-quantity of ice came down
the- river, -aking With it the second span
of the iron bridge now in process of
construction, causing a loss of over $10,
000. The river is still i-imn, and there
probably, will.. be a mere suspension of
the mills to-morrow.
A monster oyster-shell, weighing 528
pounds, purchased by 'Prof. Ward, of
Rochester, N. Y., at Singapore, has been
resold to the1. Mining -Bureau of San
Fraci.ico. It is shortly expected to ar-
rive'in New York; but will be reshipped
at once on a"shiip bound direct to San
Francisco.
Two huigdred arid thirteen doctors
graduated at the University of the city
of N'ew York, last night.
PAMA, Match 3.-Intelligence has
rea-,hed'here' of an appaling. earthquake
at Coato Rica. The towns ojA0.ljuela, S,.n
in ]arnon, Grecia and Herida have been
destroyed.-' Ii"'TAlajuela alone several
thousand lives have been lost. Those
left alive there are homeless.
DAMAGE BY FLOODS.-LITTLE
ROCK, March 26.-The damage by floods
in AshIley ,. eha and Chicot countries,
is estfimted'at a million. One thousand
people :f, Ashley country alone are utter-
ly destitute. It is the opinion of pro-
minent planters that the State will not,-
recover fom the effects of the flood in
ten y i .'
A IIEEO'S SAD END-PHILADELPHIA,
March 22.-General7.Wm. W. Wright, a
well-known engineer, who marched with
Sherman.tb the sea, and prominent in
political-:affairs, died at Moymensing
prison. .i "was. .sent there for lying
drunk in.the street.
A petition' has been presented to the
Washington House 35 feet long, signed
by business men of New York city re-
presenting $1O0,000,000, praying for a
termination of the 'treatywith the Sand-
wich island. : -


IN iELL-rGENCF,`
7 ()' F H MIL 'ION.
ENTERED.
bml u'es .i igzur zaf M'ol*09e.-Agkent, ThusW.
3 s !l1 '. B-flnwoiwnu, Griif,, Tl~ilifax,
~. s O4l*Oiliib a-ter;d, so., -toJ. H3. T.
Jaehksoil,.

Mire 9b-Flen~ner Orinoc6, Frnsr,0r, New
'York;'3V65bds. 'abd 3 li('Moapotati es, 6527
boxes df.biRAe, '6186 loxt s--towatoes WAid4
cin"t4. 496,bo 'z4bept8,,26 bx-b. Xes avlift 'wer.
4 bla. a404fb xe nioppI-evijuen

PORT 0F ST,,.-:-GeIOR GE.

Mfarchob R :SdA~i teamner at~,
hhav, 3zuraaica; ; Uz$ U idd- curg.-A gent,

MarciI~RomI~j1 Steaumcc Beta.
Sbaw, IiIauifikx -7iadl~i, T Dar~.
Norwegianl3aik 'A.~ .I99s'~


LIST OF. PASSENGERS
SAILED.
Ill the steamer Orinoco, on Thursday for
N w York :-Capt. and Mrs. Leo'h. Mr. and
Mrs. A. Raddoiph, Mr. Mrs. Go. E. Marshall.
Mr.aiid Mrs. J. Einis. Mr Mrs E. P.
(eorgeand ehi:d, Mr ind Mr,. G. A. htj,-
m;in, Mr. ;nd iMrs. Itissey Ci>lt: and Mis.
Itriggs. Mr. ad Mis. D Bedford "Miss Bed-
ford, Miss Gray. Mr. C. l:ill-.,ro hh aid
wile, Janie and M a ter Hill-Ibr..ugh, Mr.
Win. Gordon and .11i-. Gordon. \Iiss Wood-
ruff, '"iss Goodrick, Capt. A. Peterson.' iss
L Westbrook, Mrs. W. K. Greene, Mios OG
Byrne, Mrs. \icNish. Mi-,E. 1 innett Miss
Weddle, Mrs. Wvddlo and child, \rs. 11.
Marcallas, Miss K. A. N]leiil-, Messrs WV.
C.. Baiid, J. C. Watlingio', Bi ownlow Gray,
Jnr.. C. II. Smith, P1. '. Allen, S. 'ie endict.
I. H. McCreerv, F. Luekenback. J. H. Wat-
liigtoia E. F. Darreill, ,I W. IShepar:,C.
T. Whiting ciHuill. Chas. Hall, l'ri-lil,
-2nd Cabin', M. Pascal, Mrs. 'Lyou-, .Mi:-
Neigle, Wm. PughliAnna Pylin, Wm and
\1 r.us r, Win. rr, Jun Ma, y <', r.i
BnuJ, Johln Vear.-Steeiag.e, \. .Pyblit:..
Sin 6nCialas, M". Coughlau, J.. Hammner,
Oscar Johnson. :
ARRIVED.
In R' v. Steamer Beta from Jamaica :-
Mr- A. Mailli'd, Mr. G. 11. Dick.Caion, I
children and narse.
In R R.l. eaine, Beta for Halifax :-.-Scon,'
Cabin.-Nirs. Win, Sib. y, ,Mrs E. I Me
Gregor, \ir. Jnams. ParJ. per cciraci,.--
.Mrs. flarriss and two children .
ARRIVED.
In thle Mail S', van. r B ranida April 4th,
1882 -A. Whitneyv and wife-, -c. !*1 lvirett
-2nd. Cabin \rs-. Cl.gphto.


Burdick, Mlaniel Barj,'sei, Jo e de R B1,t-
tercn'uli,.JTiins Bain, K L Brown, Joseph De
Csta, C(itrles T 'ooper, Miss D),il.nest,
(hrorge Edwards, P Fubbler, A J Fog!a,,
Win Harforl, A lamilton, Josph I Hr-
vey. Mr Horn, Captain Hooper, Edward
Ingham, \Iiss FR Joell, Mr Keary, Mrs S
Martin, Agostnio Nicolini, M Vieira Nunes,
John Richa;dson, Armanda Robinson, M A
'Robinson, Sarah J Richardson, Eliza E
Simons. Juliatn Smith, M J Stiith. ,R RSmith
J A Smith, Jonathan Smith. Carl .-'oder-
,blain. Eb'nezer Smith, Chas Smith Il enry
T Tuck'r, I'eter Williams,. Wyman Wiliams,
Sarah Wood
Post Office, Hamilton, March 31, 1832.

ST GEORGES.
Ebby Bascome, \\ 11 Bully, FT Brown.
W A Canton, Julia Castner, iirig D A Sinail '
"iguor <;erolaimo Job )ia J-anes, Wm J.
Talbhot, Josepl> W Vallis.
St. Georges, March 29, 1882.


THE S'l'E. Eii.

BERMJ 1UD/Al
CAPT. OWEN.
In order to enable the "Bermuda" to
fulfill that work which her owners des-
ire she will accomplish this week,, viz;
relieve the Farmers of Bermuda, fully,
of Iroduce r ,d-.' for packing, and to an-
nihilate the effect of certai-n rumors as
her "Coming for Sugar" the "Bermu-
da" will work as follows :
SHE WILL NOT TAKE SUGAR, and there has
been none available for hei to take.
Rumors about "Sugar" tended to retard
packing and to promote u,,due accum-
ulation during the next fortnight.
Freight, parcels, and Specie on Freight
will be received, until 6 p. m. THURSDAY,
6th April, and Bills of Lading will be
signed for freight until 8 p.m. that even-
ing.
'The 'Bermuda'

WILL '
Go to Sea at 8.30 al i. m.on


FRIDAY 7th. APRIL 1882.
She has well kniowin crnfortable pas-
setner euvonleinodation and is iot i lilev t, i
be crowded.-'asseigiers are r, q, sIed tto
be on lonual at 8 a.m., 7th APkh:L, anit
are envitid to bieakfu.i-t.
TROTT & COX,
AgIets.'
Slamilt'n, April 4t.t, I. '~ ,


By Public AuAtion
UNDER THE BIG SilED.
Oni 'huIrsdaiv
Next, the 6th Inst.,
At 12 o'clock, M.,
rO Superior New York HAMS,
S4 Halfl Clh:st Oohong TEA,'
20 Cases TI N. sititithle for eoveiing Sheil
Roofs. 10 boes Fit mily SOAP,',
4 l' Is Jamaiva GINGER, in fine order,
9 Cta,,iing..Rockiiing (C'hairs,
4 larg'- lot of'assortedlTINWARE.
,`3tdids Englisth A I.E, ,
A lot of New ILINIS .
A lot of DIY GOODS.
A lot of GROCERI ES
5 ihlf Boxes G- Id 6'.,f T'OIACCO,
Lot of N-,w GARDEN TOOLS,
Lot of HIAM N\'EIES ad HATCH ETS,
25 reaims N :TE P'APER, Iut i
Horse IBRITSII ES, 01 tlhe LINES.
Hlntd SAWS 22 iin 26 inche-,
5 kits HERRINGS,
And matn other G- .Is that will appear"
at the Sa,. .
B. W. WALKER &.CO.,

-awilton, April 3rd 1882.


SFire Insuranmce

Polices on STORES, DWELLING
i HOUSES, & :RCHANDISE,
Insured by the

.H wtem -f-


w a ,e
Company. of TORONTO,
the lowest rates -


CANADA. at


Capital-o;.e Million Dollars.
Polices frte of charge.
A 'PL P Y TO .-
SAML. A. MASTERI",.
M ,Age.,.
March, 25. 1882. .


FOR REN


--~-~U-
' i--' _


ACottage norih of Victoria'
V'ark, possession given 15th
April next.
Apply to


W. T. JAMES.
F2 Front Street.
Hamilton, March. 27 181)2.-2in3p



r ..i L SItI.Ir



Would respectfully inform the public
that he has fitted up the rooms above
the store of Mr W. T, James.
NO 42 IfONT" SlRE T
A S A
:1- m,''. ^vA^ Gallery
and is now prepared to do any kind
of work pertaining to his profession
Hain -*'i ... 1 several years ia
S. \'sa I. T S
-: d ^
he fels coflde-rt tiat any work entrusted
with him will give satisfaction.
H1-vin. a' nI r g eat xpei-I in lfiting
il1p his No ii-, lo silt thie Puiiblic ; pilr-
ihias.ng i ho I1,tii Noveltes. Iiick-grunitlds,
et-,., lie would kin \ -solicit a share of the
Pu.iic pai ronaie :
J !r. LUSFER will resiwectfiully in-
,ii, Ladis and Go'i'kliIeI> visiting IZ ri-
il on i1 iiiaki hi, lKo"'l t re-iiirg place,
whil, wa.iti,,g ,lr ".'B lats, M ,1 its. etc. VI
ANo 42 Front S/reet,
(T(Upstairs) ,
Opposite Str., 'Dispatch.' Landing.
11 ,n-iton. March 13 1882.


ea l


1;OR .TEASo?
I lity and cheai
Black
0 OL


upprior flavor,'qua-
I comprising
& Green
0 ,)G,


english h Breakfast, &c., &c.,
GO TO W. H. WATLINGtON
A long oxperiance is tha est
-That Watlingtoii refails the best,
Iheni buy a pound to taste and see
Thel virtue of his charming tea.
W. 11. WATLINGTON.,
Reed Street, Hamilton


AN APPRENTICE
To 1Lea1ni the

failoring ijusifCss.
A xLSO.,


A Jou1neyman Tailor.
N None but a First-Ctas,. workman
need apply.
EL-GAl F. SIMMONS,
1 /, chant T lador.


Front Street, Hamilton.
March 20,.1882.

WI LLIAM JAMES IIENEY,


Shipping and Conm-
mission Agent.
Q.UEE $TT f*'T,
HAMILTON, BERMUDA.
Prompt attention given to
CONSIGNMEN TS.
AUCTION, WEDNESDAY &
and FRIDAYS.
March 20th 1882.,


NOIf7ICES -

Piff,1, 19, Orgafns,


R'paLedUand Tnued
Vy
I .-;:j01IN 14.iI&fLIAMS,
W~rwA OfTVp. 4 2A 188Lw


rj gHE UNDERSIGNED woald re- '
spectfilly inta,'ia the public that
she hashad several years experience in
the making, DI _ii, and r.:,. i-i'.; of
MATTRESSES & -,BEDS, ,
and still continues at the business.
.All orders ior such work will be puhctual-i
Sl attended to,
iThe f l11. ~ ii_- are" the prices,;-
For. cleaning and otherwise prepairng
tl hair, and making new mattresses.
S.. TWELVE -SHILLINGS.
FOR re-making, cleaning ticking &
hair of -old i mattresses &c,'. ,&c,.
S'" EiGHT SHILLINGS.
Otherwise repairing, &c., done cheaply'
- APPLEY TO .
' ,l .- .l. e Mms. JANE RILEY.
Salt Kettle, Paget. .


March 25


i1832


I -


*M.'F JUDGE.
WITH


WHOLESALE -'DEALERS and RECEIVER m
IN ALL KINDS OF
BERMtJ'IIA PinRUnUCE,
42-& 4S Vcse)y Street Pier.
West Washington Market.


"- ^ TWELLIN
S' and STORES,
S* Three Doors West of
SR^oyal Gazette' Office.
Premises can be inspected on after-
noons of Wednesday und Thursday.
TE R MS made known -on applica-
tion to
JT. C. KEENEY.
March 13th, 1382.



.W Goods.


R:edc e i v ed:'V r o M




W 'EW I OR

A fine assortment of
Fancy Co, -ing, Suiting&
Trwersery,,'
:4ij Please 0iIl and examine. -
O. L. DICKINSON,
Queen ,Strcetr .
Hamilton, Miarch 27, -1882.
.,.. .


_New York, March 1st 1882.
Dear Sir. '
As the Season for Shipping all Good Coffee.
kinds of BERMUDA PRODUCE to
this market is now at hand, we again F really good COFFEE is wanted ,
take the liberty of placing our services at I th o e t t, .
your disposal for the sae f any the only certain way o get it, is
your disposalforthe'sale anycon-to purchase the t ure' gram as picked
signments you may make to this market.
We are certain from the long experi- by hand, offtthemountains of "Jamai- .
ence we have had in the BERMUDA ca," at the store of ... .
TRADE, besides being very large re-. B. W.:WALKER.&.C0:ji:;1,'
ceivers and dealers in this City, and all 25 Front Sreet,
over the country, we have the facilities And have -it prepl.r,.-.Il by. your .own
to handle all consignments of Shippers servants, when it will only cost you '
the best advantage and realize them the 7-d per pound. .iow you payi ls. Ad.
highest market prices. a pound for COFFEE that is one'
Our business location for t he past half Chickory, which article can..be
THIRTY-FIVE (35) YEARS is one of purchased at 6d. per pound.
the best in our market and it gives us Hamilton, March 20,1882.-3ins3p,
every advantage to dispose of the Ship- ,
pers' produce with quick despatch,
herby enabling us to make prompt re- .
turns with net proceeds. A Delicious Cup of ea.
We are sure after you have given us
a trial you will be satisfied with our --
dealings and willbe only too anxious to r' lE Undersigue.l hiavilg accept e the -
continue shipping to us all through the fpPointmnent ais a -OrE AGENT for ,
season. BER \UDA. for the Sale of TEAS for
MR THOS. H. PITT of HAMILTON. The Halifax China Tea 'Co., :-
who forwards for us in Bermuda, will be e Which ,il .jDiie 1i to pc .. i
mostr happy, o furnish you with t, thi,s Mt'k*. s. O th"t every 'aiily
Sr LN.-ILs UN AP IAcITON, aud give you igh st ejoy a ait of i i-. reat y Lxr
all the neces~rr'y -information you re- I .A. J"rI f11 .- rt LRxN'".
quire. Any .fiii' you write to us about 1 A. J. 'Ii IA RDON.i
Marketss,. business prospects, etc.; we I St. GIeorges. March 21, 1882.
will give yow-all -the information in our W- N. B. -A few Cddies-5 and 10
*power. lbs. each now on Sal. '
Meanwhile assuring -you of the satis- A.J.t
, faction and pleasure it Would afford us
to hear from you soon, and thanking
you for past favors, and hoping you
will still continue entrusting us, with received per "Orin.O co.' '
your confidence, we are, Dear Sir, A
O'CONN rs Respectfully, A New Supply o"
0o'CoNNOR& JUDGE. d .
onnnpit B'^ ^I


A'otice.


TTANTED, an industrious Married
I' MAN to live on TUCKER'S
SLAND, and. Plant that and Mo.-
SGAN'S ISLAND. '
The Soil is very rich ad productive.
Tomatoes grow very fine and give
heavy crops, the soil is.particularly
aptepadfor growing early onions with
sufficient quantity togrow 5,000 boxes.
Fish are easily cauglit from any part
of the Islands, and: poultry can be
raised .in any quantity. Its 'western 1
extremity b.-ig about 300.yards from
the nearest Somerset shore, prevents
trespassing, except by Boat. A single
Dog will. give .notice of a landig on
ny part of theIsland. "
For further particulars please apply
-to : i' .:r. '- .
B.il W A. LKE & CO.
Hamnilton, March 13, 1882. -


Onion Bfxes!

Tomato Boxes.

The Clipper Schooner

'E GOOD WI.AV

PROM1VIHA EiIFAX
N.S. has arrive d with mia-
terial for
ONION BOXES,
TOMATO-.BOXES, -.
Onion ind tomatoo box NAILS,
Barrels Vineger,
Tierces Codfish,.
Bags Oats;
Cases Matches,
Cases Lobsters, etc.,
Persons having engaged Onion Box
material will receive the same as soon as
landed.
A few more for sale if applied for at
once.
S IJ. H:. T., JACKSON,
. Opposite Post Offiao
|.latuilton, March 28 1882


Of Superior Quality, which will
be Sold at lesosii;ble Prices
S At '..
HR. RECHT'S,
Parl Inm .nt Street.
Hamilton, March 43, 1882.
",,'/ ],: "' : = '


ForSle




good' foiraykid-fwok

'A Market". Wgo,
in perfect wxorking'brde'r, will bfa wU~~d; -'-
::,.togeth rf r --

P1,yable ii, iOiilui,-- in ti~'o uioht g -
~~ ;. W..WAVLK.E-R 'IO.





--AFIRST-C.L-ASS9 COAiT-A IA KER,

0. .DI)CK1N&~
April 3, 181


THE FrvpDeiirra .

C x '-9-


W~ill sail fepei'tTc'zlu"r o nr L ofl 'r g-
D)AY, tlhe 12 jaistan't, ttovMumt 1117veirt,
1' t.~ii des*, ivus ,Of avsiliug thenr,
of this fir-4h-lab"8h ol'p.'I-tani~y fol. u guo4 -
liOte Captlau6ain. oil Or, 0 ~-
-to "d Jt~T. J'AC KS( 0 --


*' lit .


4


i

i


', "I-
.*.*. ?,. ':*


1
















at
IF


US ..i
h.b I I .. ~ ~l. t
'~
~w1I


'Io


H i G00DS, NOTIONS,
Set's 1 'ursi M ,
b r r !"*
P .ats, Caps and Shoes.

it &e0 FRONT STREET,
HAMI;TON,


.Tnuary 9. I8,2.





Selerch1MAt Tailor,
eCspectfully iformns the Public that he
has 9pened a
Tailoring Establishment
Uver the Stior'e b'IAIXAND9R J. FrnTH,

o 9,.F0ront Street.


Gvara nt,(e to; give satisfaction and
s lieits a1 ,,'ti ol the Public patronage.
SW A itw ,pply of GOODS always

iamuilton, F'eby. '21, 1882.



*or 1Sale,
Ort side~BA R-TOP

a-hw a ~o, assortment of canned
god,, A[uirl TLard, Butter. &c, &c.,
,*Al'SO,
Ua Variety 6f ine Harness, &c.,
CheCaFp For Cash.
., B:. STAHL, & Co.
East, 'Proadway.
Ham iliton. Feb. '13,1882.


J0!N* E. BERG
(East End Wanmilton)
In tbrud, ri gb l,'Tli iha iks to the Public for
their'" htra patronage, begs again
:'t)o 'v illittention to his
tF OOK
OF
RST CLASS

FAMILY GROCERIES
and

Pit 0 'IsIOVS,
Amt nA i "'L": ', si et attention to their
ovr'. 'r. i 'nfire a further share
a tii'ir patrout go.
BECEIyED FROM NEW YORK,
Ka '. 'Orinoco,"


.A. ND
CHQICE COFFEES,

Hamts tand Bacon,
oj thei' ,,,tp popular Brands,

S ROKI)D BEE F!I
And other MEATS,
Tiw SALMON; LOBSTER, OYS-
TERS, HEEF. MUTrTON,
SPOU I'RY, &c.,
7T,. of FR UITS of all descrip-
*'.4ns.
1:'.., ,,f III0' and Potted MEATS,
.,ow Siock ,,? Jellies of all
tav r, itti Wine-glasses, Butter-
t ,r' idSit.ts, Tumblers. &c.,
HU'TTIER. LARD, CHEESE,
t .AXN'A 1 -' LINSEED MEAL,
FLOI. {.. ,;'uperior Brands,
* Il;Is lt e frscd !


A' 1.1 t fi?4 Sale are of the
k ,o jl, iAyt auMl are put uip.'t the
m'~w tM ,,A.lie prices for CASH.
,I;,\..,t,,, F, .% 7, i?8l.


Ik

oods


AND

FANGY GOODS.
ALSO,


All Auction Goods
Sent for Sale" 1.,
limits
Must Pay a V- 1 v-,C .
If Said Limits CCaniot be &b
stained.
B. W. WALKERI & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton. Jany. 2, 1882.


Just Ileceived,
Per '01FIOC0,'
FRENCII CORSETS.,
SWhile COTTNS,
Brown COTTONS, \Vhit- SHI RTS,
Colored SHIRTS, PRINTS,
Worsted PETTICOATS-ve y cheap,
ULSTERS and JACKETS-very chenp.
ALSO,
F ISH GUANO-cheap,
CROCKERY WARE.
GLASS WARE, CIGARS,
FURNITURE, White SUGAR,
Porto Iico SUGAR-superior to Vacu-
um-pan.
R. H. DEURDEN.
Hamilton, Feby. 6th, 1882.







Watches, Clocks,

v M-1: I a leBT I
ZILaVI WAR


CHEAP GROCERIES.


PIANOS, ORGANS, ---
and lots of useful articles Fi i r
Just Received, o. I. ItI ,
FROM EUROPE AND AMERICA, DEALER IN
Comprising in all the finest stock of English and American Staple
and
noIidayGoods aFd
HolidayGoodsjFa cy Groceries,
Ever offered in Bermuda. n (-r o i ,
An early call and inspection is respectfuly P VISION 1'
solicited by "c., &c. '


E. T. CHuI LD,
Watchmaker & Jeweler.
Hamilton, Bermuda, Deer. 6, 1881.


THE UNDERSIGNED


Specialities,
LA RRiT BKJE'S
Facn cy Biscuits,
Choice Selections of


11as )ust Opened CANN-ED GOODS.

Groceries, FINE TsEAS and COFFEES
nV!4T LTnPTCTT T.AVOR-


ARRIVED FROM ENGLAND
and NEW YORK,
.H AMS. BACON,
SHOULDERS,
BEEF, PORK,
Tins Roast Beef, Mutton, Duck,
Chicken, Goose,
Lunch TONGUES,
Potted Ham, Beef and Tongue,
Tins SALMON, LOBSTER, OYSTERS,
Green PEAS, BEANS, CORN andl
ASPARAGUS,
Bottles Assorted PICKLES, Red Cab-
bage and SAUCES,
Corned BEEF in Tins,
BISCUITS of all kinds,
SUGAR-white and brown,
FLOUR, Tins Cocoa & Milk.
COFEEE and MILK,
Chocolate and Milk. FRY'S COCOA,
EPP'S CHOCOLATE. Oolong TEA,
Green and Burned COFFEE,
Oatmeal, Oilmeal, Corn Meal,
Flaxseed, Linseed Meal,
Bottles of SYRUPS of all flavors,
Bottles of PIE FRUIT, Damson,
Gooseberries, Cranbheries, Green-
gages, Ilhubarb Plums, Cherries,
&'., &c,
Tins of FRUITS in Syrups, Cherries,
I'eaches, Plums, Pears. Pineapple,
Strawberry, Apples, and Apricuts,
JAMS of all flavors,
BUTTER, LARD, RICE,
Table SALT, CHIIEESRE,
liam SAUSAGE,,
oz. Bottles of ESsENCES Lemon,
Raipherry, Vailla, &c., &c.,
Condensed MILK,
Tartaric ACID---powdered,
IHAIR Oll.--assorted flavors,
Fine Olive OIL, ICURRIE, powdered in
bottles,
Fresh EGGS, DATES, FIGS,
RAISINS, CURRANTS,
SPICES. NUTM EG S, MACE,
CLOVES, ALMONDS in and out of
shell,
Jars Preserved GI GER, SAGO,
TAPIOCA. TURNIPS,
POTATOES, CORN,
OATS, BRAN, &c., &c.
JOHN BARRITT,


Corner of V
** and Eas
Hamilton. Jan. 9, 1882.


ictoria Street,
t Broadway.


Baker & Clark's

Smoked Meats.

A Lot of Useful Articles
In Tin Ware,
Notions, &c., &c.

Next to the Melbourn House.
Hamilton, Sptember 26, 1881


Hair Dressing Hall.

FRED. D AVIS,
Hair Dreser, &c.,
Formerly of Boston, U.S.,
IN RETURNING THANKS TO llIS
NUMEROUS CUSTOMERS
For their liberal patronage dur-
ing the past year,
WOULD INFOI M THEM THAT HE IS
STILL IN fIS OLDl PLAGE,
And at all times ready during the day
and evening to devoto his
services to them,
AND OTHERiS
who may favor him with their patronage.
SHA VING & HAIR CUTTING
Executed with neatness and dis-
patch.

A CLEAN Ir TO WJEL
FOR EACH CU T OM E .

Outside Orders,
If not froin too great a distance,
WILL BE ATTENDED TO.

RASORS HONED
At the shortest notice.,
.. ;. .. S,
In Mr. T. H. PITT'S FBuildings,
I; FRONT STREET,
HIamilton .3ermada.'
Septr, 26,188 L.-if I


Eclectic Labora-
tory,

TANX.K.FI ELD


r 1ITE PRO PRIE1 OR of this Estab-
'" isl:e~!t. gtiaraillit.es SATISFACTION ill
GeneI Il LRE AIRS to P'anofortes,
Hi arnioiu'.s, P.rlor Orgawi, Coitneetiias,
Accordoiis, Fitiias, Fiddles, Flutes, CIa-
rioiiet,, E\VING MACI N ES, Orguiu-
rttes, Cabinettus, REVOlNVERS.
BANJOS muude 0o order or lImported.
1Fancy CABINET Work, Furniture up-
holj ter, d.
STENCIL PLATES cut.
Koros-e I A VPS and lBroken 0GLASS
anud C I[NA repaired.
IGNS and BANNERS Painted to
order.
No Bad Worl--but sound Work,
warranted.
C!ip)abilities well known.
Visits all parts of the Island, hy order.
Does not mention all Wotk here.
Ask your next oir neighbor whether
lie was satisfied with Tlhe work done for
hii by
JAMES T. ANDERSON.
Paget, Jan). 2, 1882.


FOR SA-LE.
ALF Chests Oolong TEA
-very cheap,
Cases Quarter Tins SARDINES,
Boxes Assorted PIPES-1 gross
each,
Cases Card MATCH ES, 10 gross
each,
AssorteG JAMS, per 10 dozen or
imore-cheap.
B. E. DICKINSON,
Front Street, Hamilton.


LARRABEE'S FANY
B UISCUIT.
The celebrated Lady Finger,
Vanilla, Cream-Bar, Demi Lune,
Star Lemon, Nic Nacs &c.,
Constantly fresh and crisp
AT H. RECHT'S.

Received per "Orinoco."
Cincinnati Sausage,
Head Cheese, or Brawn,
Dutch Head Cheese,
(Genuine Edam)
At H. RECHT'S.

Coffee.
If you wish Coffee unadulterated with
Chicory or other substances, Call at
H. RECHT'S,
PAWLtAMENT STREET.
Next the Melbourne House.
Hamilton, Jany. 31,1882.


DEALER IN
General Dry Goods,
WEST EN D,
DTRESS GOODS-very cheap,
UNDER SKIR IS, JACKETS,
ULSTERS, Wool SIIAWLS,
Frencl C ORSETS-so,,e large, T
PI!RINT., COTTONS, Neck TIES,
GLOVES, H TS. SILESIAS,
TRIMMINGS, UNDERCI.OT iiING,
J EWEiLRY. EM BROII)ERY,
FANCY GOODS, &e.,
Gent's Good RIIady-mado CLOTHING
of all sorts,
T)ress SI IRTS, Working SHIRTS,
BRA CE, Cardigan JACKETS,
SOCKS, COLLARS,
50 Bis. New Portland CEMENT
at 15s. 6d.,
FISH POTS. Fish Pot WIRE,
G LASSWARE,
CROCKERY WARE in great variety,
COBBETTzS BATS. BALL, STUMPS,
Leg GUARDS, GLOVES.
English STARCH, CAND1 ES,
TEAS, Cheap CIGARS, 4s. 41d. per
box up,
Bags iRICj-15s. 6d. per 100 lbs.,
8s. 6d. per 50 lbs. ; 4s. 61d. per.
25 ls.,
FiJuini LINES, HOOKS,
K Oil LAMPS, and a Great Variety of
other GOODS-all at Very Low
Prices.
Hamilton Nov. 19th, 1881.


THE UNDERSIGNED
HAVING lately received orders to
purchase
MILCH COWS,
Found great difficulty and much loss
in doing so.
We have decided to make a special-
ty of the SALE AND PURCHASE
OF COWS on Commission. Any
person wishing to sell a Cow will
please communicate with us, giving a
description of the Cow, how many
Calves had, what quantity of milk
given per day, &c., the price wanted,
and where she can be seen,
Persons wishing to purchase, can,
by calling at our Office, 25 Front
Street, have a reliable description of
COWS for sale, and the price of each ;
and as we have spacious enclosed Lots
adjoining our Stores, Cows will be
quite safe and attended to, should they
have to stay in Town over night, when
sent for delivery. .
All Sales will be for CASH on deli-
x B. W WAfKERvt Co.


THE UNDERSIGNED
(Worker in Cane)
Is prepared to clean and put in order
CANE SEATS
IN BOTTOMS OF


XSOF, fS,
&, &c

Also Polish them.
He guarantees to give satisfaction.
MANY REFERENCES-:
Address
RICOHAID S. SIMONS,
Near the Rectory, Paget.
Paget, Feby. 14, 1881.


LIME.
---
Two Thousand Bushels
Hard Stone Lime
In Quantities to suit Pur-
chasers.
Orders "promptly attended to.
CHAS. A. V. FRITH.
Paget, Jany. 11th, 1882.-3ms.


GLOSSY STARCH.-Take three cups of
water, take three round tablespoonfuls.
of starch, a pinch of salt and one tea,-
spoonful of powdered borax.-" Dissolve
your borax in part of the water ; then
add starch and salt ; dip your collars.
cuffs and bosoms into the starch. Your
irons must be good; rub themznwith
beeswax.
To CLEAN LADIES' KI Boots.-Dip .
rag in almond oil, and remove all th .
mud from the boot a piece at a time,
drying as you go, and never leaving the
leather moist. Polish with clean rag
and more oil. If you dislike the dull-
ness this process leaves, when quite dry
polish with the palm of the hand. Kid
is thus both cleaned and preserved.
FRESH HERRINGS FmED.-Cut off head,
fins and tail; split them up the back,
clean the inside well, take out the back-
bone deftly, scrape them, and salt aad
pepper well the inside. Now take up
two herrings, place the two insides to.
gether flat, dip them in toasted oatmeal,
and fry them for about seven or eight'
minutes on a clear fire in a pan. Thu.
prepared and served hot a herring i1
tasted in all its glorious perfection, and
is really a dainty dish to set before.
king. This is how they are prepared
on board the Clyde steamers, where they
are so much relished.
BOILED CusTARD.-Take six eggs
beat whites separately; have one quart
of milk boiling ; add four table-spoon-
fuls of powdered sugar; one teaspoou-
ful of vanilla ; put the whites in table-
spoonfuls to boil ; let them boil oue
minute, then turn them over and boil
one minute more ; remove them to a
dish ; stir the beaten yolks in the milk,
and boil three minutes, as more will cur-
dle them ; remove to another dishl;.
when cold, place the whites on the top,
and serve with jelly.
MOLASSEs SPONGE-CAKE.--Two cups o
molasses, two eggs, two tablespoonfuls
of soda, three-quarters of a cup of butter
three-quarters of a cup of cold water,
five cups of flour.
DRIED PEACH PIE.-Stew peaches nn-
til perfectly soft, mash fine, and add,
for two pies, half tea-cup sweet cream,
and one tea-cup sugar; bake with two
crusts. Or, omit cream, and add half
tea-cup boiling water, and butter size of
a hickory nut.
ORANGE Pm.-Grated rind and juice
of two oranges, four eggs, four
tablespoons sugar, and one of butter ;
cream the butter and sugar, and add
the beaten eggs, then the rind and
juice of the oranges, and, lastly, the
whites beaten to a froth, and mixed in
lightly. Bake with an under crust.
RICE PUDDING WITH FRUIT.-In an Im-
perial pint of new milk put two large
teaspoonfuls of rice, well washed ; then
add two apples, pared and quartered, or
a few currants or raisins. Simmer slow-
ly till the rice is very soft, then add one
egg, beaten; serve with cream and
sugar.
CURRANT PUDDING, PLAIN.--One pound
of chopped suet, one pound of flour,
three-quarters of a pound of currants,
four eggs, a little cinnamon powdered,
a pinch of salt, and one teaspoonful of
Royal baking powder; beat the eggs,
add as much milk as will mix the whole
together, tie in a cloth, boil about threo
hours, and serve with melted butter
plain in a boat.
For hoarseness, take the 'hites of
two eggs, beat them with twd teaspoon-
fuls of white sugar, grate in a little nut-
meg, then add a pint of luice-'arm
water, stir well, drink often, apd it will
cure the most obstinate case 6f hotre-
ness in a short time. "
CHICKEN PIE.-Choose a rather tender
fowl, pluck all the pin fethbr. sage ff
the hairs with a piece of, burning paper,
then wipe the fowl'with a dlea damps
cloth, draw it carefully bv lifting the
skin at the back of neck and taking out
the crop without tearing the: skin of the
breast; loosen the. heart, 1iver and lungs
by introducing the forefinger at the neck
and then draw them with the entrails,
from the rent.' Unless you have_broken
the gall, or the entrails, in drawing the
bird, "do not wash it;" for this great- .
ly impairs the flavor, and patly destroys
the nourishing qualities' 'of the flesh.
Cut it in joints and put it into a lht fry-
ing-pan with ounce oft butter and
two ounces' alt pork out' in dice, and
fry it brw Whe. .b.wn..ti


fry it brown. When it. .js brown, stir
an ounce of flour with it,' and lIt the
flour brow ; season it with a teaspoon-
ful of silt, a level teaspoonful of pepper,
and a tubliespoonfu -of chopped parsley;
cover it with .boiling ,water, .wdet .it,
simmer gently, frt boa thire rat ti t ..
Sehicken'w:l-e'dd. X Mean-time make thd
*-'"-^** no4. .. ,:* .... %' *


plop


Farm and Household.
----
To REMOvE INK FROM CARPETs.r-When
freshly spilled ink can befremoved from
carpets by wetting in milk. Take cot-
ton batting and soak up all of the ink"
that it will receive, being careful not to
let it spread. Then take fresh cotton
wet in .milk, and sop it up carefully.
Repeat this operation, changing cotton
and milk each time. After most of the
ink has been taken up in this way, with
fresh and clean cotton rub 'the spot.
Continue until all disappears ; then wash
the spot in clean, warm water and a lit-
tle soap; rinse in clear water and rub
until nearly dry. For ink spots" on
marble, wood, or paper, apply ammonia
clear, just wetting the spot repeatedly
till the ink disappears.




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