Title: Royal gazette and colonist daily
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076590/00002
 Material Information
Title: Royal gazette and colonist daily
Physical Description: 25 v. : ;
Language: English
Publisher: Bermuda Press
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: 1921-1945
Frequency: daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the Bermuda Library, Hamilton, Bermuda Islands.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1921)-v. 25, no. 305 (Dec. 31, 1945).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076590
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28952176
lccn - sn 93049163
 Related Items
Preceded by: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Succeeded by: Royal gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1946)

Full Text












IRoyal


a3eaette


anb


Colonist


I~atL'


INCORPORATING THE ROYAL GAZETTE (Established 1828) and THE BERMUDA COLONIST (Established 1866)


VOL IV NO. 76


HAMILTON, BERMUDA, SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 1924


PER COPY 3d or 6 cents -40/- PER ANNUM


English Speaking

Union


Famous Headmaster
Gives Delightful Address


Taking into consideration tlhe
very unpromising weather oil
Thursday which had culminated
in a severe thunderstorm dur-
ing the morning atnd the heavy
rain falling right up to the time
for the meeting of the English
Speaking Union, the attendance
of members was all that could
have been expected. About half
those of the Bermuda Branch
were present in th le grill-
room of the Hotel Bermudiana
where the meeting was held.
The principal speaker at this
meeting was the Rev. Di. Endicott
Peabody, headmaster of Groton
School, Mass., who has taken
the keinest interest in the move-
ment for closer links of fellowship
and sympathy between the two
great English-speaking Nations,
from its earliest inception.
In his introductory remarks
the Rev. Canon Marriott, Chair-
man of the Reception Committee,
said how imich lie regretted the
unfortunate weather and how
gratified they were to have with
them those brave souls who had
come in spite of thei stori;n to hear
Dr. Peabody's addlre--.. The Ber-
iluda Branch had( in c.-onnectionL
with this meetin._ adopted.i a rather
different rocedlure from that- fol-
lowied ai t ornim r 'g:rl-t, ri .- _, and
he hop.:d that those wlho would
like to hear about the special work
of the Union would ask qu-stioCps
of the Chai.rman before the end of
the meeting. He also made special
mention of the fa(t that there
were man', branches now of the
Union in Anmerica aid anyone -be-
longing to a- town where there
was ione-could be enrolled aL- a
niember of their own town branch
whilst staying in Bermuda.


The Chairman ,Sir Joseph Outer-
bridgei then introduced Dr. Pea-
body to the meeting: saying that
he had been closely connected
with the working of the E.S.U.
from the first and would be able
to tell them a great deal about it.
Referring to the unexpected state
of pubJi--"ftairs since the War,
--SI;: 7uo, said that no one could
have foreseeni what had taken
place. The two great English-
speaking nations, whose civiliza-
tion was not built up by war nor
supported by bayonets, were not
so deeply affected as other nations
Sbut they had received a shock.
But the war had brought them
closer, they had fought side by
side and it was his hope and prayer
that they would work together
to establish peace and banish war.
If this hope was accomplished the
Anglo-Saxon would rule the world
and it was the youth of each nation
who could carry this into effect,
whereas with the older generation
it must be a matter of faith alone.
Dr. Peabody was a guide of
youth, the head of the most tiL-
portant and advanced school for
boys in the United States. A
trainer of youth has an enormous
influence and in the earlier days
of education in tle States it may
be true that the teaching had-as
had been' said-an anti-British
tendency. Now, we believe, the


Continued on page 8.


BERMUDA HOTEL MEN'S
'ASSOCIATION.

The next meeting of this. newly-
formed association will take place
at the Hotel Bernlnudiana onl Thurs-
day next, April 3rd. when business
of an important nature will be
discussed.
Lunch will be served in the Grill
at 1 p.m. sharp and a full attend-
ance is reIquested.

--oo

THE ST. GEORGE'S
HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

Interesting Meeting.


On Wednesday afternoon March
26. the St. George's Historical So-
ciety had phe pleasure of a visit
from the President. J. Scott Pear-
imai1. Escir..and a few members of
the Bermuda Historical Society.
The l)arty first assembled in
the Library, where the President
at St. George's addressed a few
Swords of welcome to the visitors.
Papers were read by Mrs. Mercer.
SAli-s Soinier. and Rev. A. T. Tuck-
er and a short address givenby C. IM.
McCallan, Esq .
Much regret was expressed that
Miss A. M. Outerbridge who had
kindly prepared an interesting and
valuable sketch of the true "His-
tory of Walsingham House" was
unable to be present.
,Miss Somner read Miss Outer-
bridge's paper and at her 'request
left the copy with the St. George'!s
Historical -Society.
T.ri-. Mercer gave some data as to
the age of ,the Historical Society
Tui ilding, Sr. George's. As a result.
of her research 1730 is now the es-
;.,bli-hed date. Rev. A. T. Tucker's
paper dealt with Bermuda History
between the years 1780 and 1800 and
read Extracts from Letters written
to a merchant in St. George'c dur-
ing that interesting period.
Mr. McCallan spun some in-
teresting y-,rns of a Historical na-
ture and vas much applauded. The
ne'~r ing then adjourned, an old
:;ismioited rea was served of Johnny
Dread, Sponge Cake. etc.
After tea., Mr. Pearman planted
a palm in the front garden, West of
lhe ohld Well and a lignum ivitae tree
in the upper garden. both being
brought from Mr. Pearnian's own,
garden "'Mount Hope" Smith's
Parish.
Thus ended an enjoyable after-
noon, the only regret being that
more members from the West were
not present.

THE]CATHEDRAL.

Thlie usual short organ recital
after Evensong at the Cathedral
will be omitted to-morrow but on
the following Sunday evening an
interesting vocal and instru-
mental programme will be ren-
dered.
--00-
BENEFIT CONCERT.

We have been asked to say that
a benefit concert is being arranged
by Mr. J. B. Hunter for Sunday.
April 6th.
Thle full programme will be
given on Monday but this early
announcement is made in order
to avoid clashing of engagements.
--oo--
GRAND NATIONAL.
Liverpool, March 28th.
1. Alaster Robert.
2. Flymask.
3. Silvo.


ROUND THE WORLD BY CABLE


Hope for the London Situation. Prime Minis-

ter Acts as Mediator.--=Poincare will

Remain in Office and Form New

Government.-= What Defence

Costs Per Capita. England

well ahead.

American Senator asks for another Disarmament Con-
ference.-- Well known Canadian Banker
Dies after short illness.- English Football
Results


PRIME MINISTER BRINGS
DISPUTANTS TOGETHER.

London, March 27.-The Prime
Minister after having been in Con-
ference during the evening with all
the parties to the transport dispute,
including thlie railway leaders, was
able to announce to the House of
Commons late to-night that after
successful Conferences he had
succeeded in bringing the two sides
together and had impressed upon
them the necessity of a setile-
ment which they adniitted they
a'ere equally desirious of bringing
about.

POINCARE FORMING
NEW GOVERNMENT.

Paris, Iarch -7.-M. Poincare,
despite-the fact h is finding the
work of setting up a n:'w Govern-
ment harder than he ex.-eted and
has therefore been unable to com-
plete it, informed President- Mil-
lerand this evening that he ac-
c-epted the task of resuming the
Premiership and constructing a
Ministry. M. Poincare this after-
noon grappled with the difficulties
of organizing his Cabinet to hit
i the new political situation resulting
trout the Challiber's attitude on
the pensions and to accord with
the policy of economics for which
he had fought so hard for several
weeks in the Chamber and Senate.

FRENCH PREMIER MAY
REMAIN IN OFFICE.
Paris, March 27.-It was regarded
as virtually certain to-day that IM.
Poincare would reconsider his re-
signation,according to the opinion
of the majority of the pressandtihe
advice of his friends, and reconsti-
ture his Cabinet.

DEFENCE PER CAPITAL.
Ottawa. March 26.-Hon. E. IM.
Macdonald, Minister of Defence to-
day furnished the Houtse with comn-
iparative per capital figures of ex-
pienditures of military defence in
the different parts of the Empire.
The figures were Canada :1.46-ic per
head:; Newz-aland $2.33: ,toutith
\ifri(-c $2.92: Aiuitralia $3 30: Great
Britain $15.3i2.


BORAH ASKS FOR
DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE.

Washiiigton, March 27.-Senator
Borah. Republican. Idaho, offered
a joint resolution in the Senate t6-
day requesting the President to
invoke "'uclh nations as he deems
wise" to send repre-seitLaive, to
a combined economic and disar-
mament Conference in Washing-
ton.

ENGLISH FOOTBALL.
Loil.don. -March 2..-f- eult of
Football League games to-day
were. First Division. West Ham 2;
Hudder-tield 3; Nortlithei Section
Thi ri'i Division. Grimsby 1; Wiganl.

INTERNATIONAL FOOTBALL..
Paris, Marclh 27.-Wales defeated
France in their annual Rugby
iluthel here to-day by 10 to 6.

ARMS SURRENDERED IN
IRELAND.
Dublin. .Iarch 27.-It is officially
announced that further large .pinian-
t-i. of iunitiioni have been sur-
ri'e'id.le'ri to 1lie Free Statre a Hl:lio-
riries including six L'wis guns, ;7
Srnl' fi 7 D. b1i i)) ;m nil s ea:-'lv L6-.0i',
couad of aminlunltion l'roli (Colun--
ty Tipperary. Ot lihr t'urreilnd':r
:ire expected froll Tipperary to-ia.-
when only tlhoe -.eized in County
Roseomlnion will reliiain in the
)psessioIn of the Ar-imy mulItineers.

RED HATS FOR AMERICAN
CARDINALS.
Rome. March 27.-The Pope to-
da:,y publicly conferred the red liat
on Cardinals Hay.es land Mlunidelein
thlie filal act in the eliv tion of the
tW-o American Prelates to mieluber-
ship in the Sacred College.

DEATH OF CANADIAN BANKER.
Toronto, Out.. March 27.-Sir
Edmund Walker D.C.L. L.L.D..
one of the mllost oultstaidilig fig-
ures in the banking and financial
cw'orld in Canada anmd a11ho was in-
ternationally well 1l:nown, died this
inorning at his home after an ill-
nles of oinly a few da:;,- of pneu-
-n.:oniia. Sir Ediiulnd was in his
7bth year.


Thursday niglt's smoking
concert p r o i0i noted by the
entertainment cotilmmit tee of
Headquarter Companies full'.%
justified expectations. Thle Hamil-
ton Armoury wa. well filled, the
committee had got together an
excellent programnme of music.
etc.. and His Excellency the (Gov-
ernor gave an able speech which
will be read with interest.
Lieut. C, P. Pitt, chairman of
the committee, presided, and
among those present were; His
Excellency the Governor, Lieut.-
General Sir J. J. Asser, with Cap-
tain Hoskyn, A.D.C.. Brigade-Major
Imbert-Terry, D.S.O..MC., Major
T. M. Dill, Lieut.-Col. R. J. Tucker,
Major R. W. Appleby, Colonel
C. H. 0. Collins, Hon. H. D. Butter-
field, Messrs. A. M. Purcell. A.
Cooper, A. McNicol. Roundthwiaite,
and the following officers of the
Corps-Major T. S. Murdoch, O.C.,
Captains R. C. Earl, P.S. Ingham.
Lieuts. L. G. B. Powell, A. T. Gos-
ling, W. E. Cooper, S. P. Eve. A. C.
Smith, Rev. W. J. F. Groves CChap-
lain'), Surgeon-Captain C. B.
Wainwright, Captain Elliott (Ad-
jutant).
Simply as a matter of formality,
because the Governor has now
been in Bermuda 18 months or


more. Col. Collins briefly intro-
duced His Excellency.
In his speech. His Excellency al-
lu:hlca.. t Vo vcrOii- eienlt of the
pac.t 12 r tonitlhs. notably the retire-
iment from the Co-rip of C'ol. Tucker
S liill h was. a ,er1y i'grE.t lo: to, theIm.
He liad had the lhoitilfr of beillg
Contiina'.mding orficer of the Over-
seos Contingent, and its success
iwas largely attributable to .his
good qualities. His name would
go down' to listor, rt l.p.'inlg had
that collaand, uind sendllig that
Contingenit was one :of the finest
things the Corps had ever done.
Naturally. wilh his iname was as-
sociated that of Mrs. Tutck.:er, who
e:trn-ed thle thanal-:s -niid gratitude
of every member of thel Contingent
for her work during the war. The
Corps lad: also lost its Ad. iutant,
CX'ptain F. H. R. M umnsell. wiho
hadl earned the ,dtittnart in and
esteem of everyone for his work.
He was iniefly responsible for build-
ing up the Corp-- during a very
difficult period. Other departures
from their midst had been Brigade-
Major Glover, alwWa.ys interested
in the B.V.R.C. and Sergt.-Major
Jeffreys. It was all rhe more reason,

Continued .. n page 8.


ENTERTAINMENTS

Today--Band Concert. Par-la-
vmlle. 10.15-12.15.
Royal Naval and Military Ath-
letic Sports, Prospect. 1 p.m.
-00--
PERSONAL.

The Hon. J. F. Frelinghuysen,
formerly Senator of the United
States, with Mrs. Freylingliuysen,
their two daughters and son, ar-
rived by the S.S. Fort Victoria yes-
terday morning.
*
Mrs. H, H. Rogers a leader in
New York Society and her son0
Ma-.ster H. H. Rogers were passeng-
ers from New York. Mr. George H.
Benjamin also arrived.
,*
Front Pittsburg by this boat were
some well-known people, including
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Lawrence, Mrs.
W. T. Johnson,Miss M. L. Johnson,
Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Philips, and
Mr. T. G. Philips..
.* *
Mr. E. P. Gross who is connected
with E. P. Hutton and Co.. the New
York stock-brokers also arrived,
accompanied by Mrs. Gross.

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Van
Rennslaer. and Miss Sallie Henry
of Philadelphia. were also passen-
gers on the S.S. Fort Victoria.
*
Other arrivals included the Rev.
Ch.iries H. McAuliffe, New York;
i Ir.. W. Smithers and Mr. Wil-
liam Sinithers, Boston: Mr. Shep-
hard H. Patterson, Springfield.

*
MAii:iaay was the happy occasion
S ilf he.celebration ait their home in
Pcait West, of the golden wedding
o( Mr. and Mrs. Theodore 0. Rance,
who were the recipients of many
Conitinued oni page 8
-O0---
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

New York Market Conditions.
New York, 21st. March.-Had the
S. '. Fort Victoria arrived on time, I
thlil:n vegetables would have
brought higher prices, especially
beets and carrots.
There is now plenty of Florida
l,:ttuce on the market, so ship only
the best front Bermuda.
Potatoes continues move slowly
at from $12.00 to $13.00. About
3.J,'00 barrels remain unsold. Two
cari of Floridas on the market to-
(dy sold at $12.00.
The outlook for our celery crop
is brighter, as Florida celery is
beginning to decline in quality.
The best is now bringing $3.00 to
$4.00.
Last week.parsley should hWave
sold for not less than $9.00, I think.
From information I have gathered
it appears that the Sebastian sec-
tion of Florida lias been badly hurt
by frost, but the Hastings section
has not been hurt, and an average
yield is expected.
G. E. WINTER,
Inspector of Produce.


PROFESSIONAL

MADAME JEANNE BENEDICT of
the Conservatoire and Coined ie
Francalse. Paris, also Belasco
Theatre, New York, is now avail-
h-'ie for lessons in conversational
Fienlch, .lnd also for coaching and
staging (dr' matic performances.
Wrirte Box No. 174167 Bermuda
Pre ,--.
17467 !s.eito.fi4.


WANTED

And For Sale


FOR SALE-Upright Piano in
condition. A bargain for
J. M. Ferguson, Tel. 288.
17376'C521.tu.ei to.n31.


good
cash


FOR SALE--A Lady's Bicycle. Al-
most new. Apply Jack Burgess,
Porter's Room, Princess Hotel.
17425*4923.th.f.s.

FOR SALE--One Upright Grand
Piano, Thoroughly accelimatised,
anmid considered by Local Experts
to be a first class instrument.
"A Bargain for Someone".'! .
Write Box 17484 Bda. Press.
1748414978.s.eito.t4,

FOR SALE-Motor Boat, one
Brew;ter Carriage, glass enclosed.
Phone 398.
17479"4967.s.eito.f4,


FINAL SOCCER


MATCH
OF SEASON.


B.A.A. Play R.A. this Afternoon.

The soccer season will come to a
close so far as the B.A.A. and Army
are concerned, this afternoon,
when the B.A.A. play the Royal
Artillery, winners of the Governor's
Cup.
This match was arranged for
Thursday, but the heavy downpour
of rain put all thoughts of football
absolutely out of the question. As
it is, while the northern wind has
dried the ground up very well in-
deed, there still remains a top dress-
ing of slippery mud.
Nevertheless, the game should
be a good one, There is at stake
the right to hold a challenge cup,
with medals for winners and run-
ners up.
Kickoff will be at 2.45 p.m, the
game being on the B.A.A. Ground.


-00-
THEY SAY.

That at the B.V.R.O. Smoker
some nice things were said about
the retiring and new 0.0's.

That a splendid tribute was paid
to Mrs. R. J. Tucker.

That had ladies been present
they would have waxed satirical.
*: *
That they night have asked why
if women were so capable, they
couldn't vote.

That the corps has imitated
the Rotary Club and compiled a
song sheet.

That this enabled the company
to join in the singing.

That the weather is becoming
, like a ham sandwich.

That the ham can sometimes be
found between two thick layer e._ .
'ess desirable sustenance.
*
That the English Speaking Union
meeting was .thoroughly appre-
ciated by those present. '

That Dr. Peabodygave a delight-
ful address.

That perhaps this excellent so-
ciety will give an evening entertain-
inent soon.

That a ball, or concert or a cnom-
bination of both, would be an
agreeable change.

That His Excellency the Governor
had some pithy things to say on
Citizenship.

That he hit the nail on the head
when he distinguished between
holiday making and a permanent
diet of pleasure.

That the Concert by the band to-
morrow should be well attended.

That few more agreeable ways for
helping a good cause can be offer-
ed.

That the Hotel Men's Association
is really on the way.
*
That they have some knotty pro-
blenms to solve.
*
That the famous lecturer will
soon be here.

That his colleague, Dr. Fisher, is
coming officially to obtain Natural
History pictures for the American
Museum n.

That some of our local fishermen
can easily help.
*1. rc n
That neither Mr. Carveth Wells
nor Dr. Fisher is coming for cown-
mercial reasons.
*
That the results of their visit
will be valuable publicity to us.


EMPLOYMENT

EXPERIENCED BOOK-KKEEPER-
ACCOUNTANT requires spare time
evening employment, any clerical.
capacity excellent references.
Write Box 17465 Bda Press.
17165'4915.s.m.

WANTED-Oh1 board the Schooner
"'Rask" Hamilton 3 seamen (white)
Apply to Master.
17474is.m.


Another Shipment of new


"Raleighs"


just


received==-WADSON'S (FNextSto re}


a,-
~-'*~~- ~ -' 5-I -


S.-, .--'4.


B. V. R. C. SMOKER


Strong Address by His Excellency the Governor


THE BERMUDA VOLUNTEER FORCE ASSOCIATION.




RECRUITS




WANTED!


For The Bermuda Volunteer Rifle Corps

MUST BE OF EUROPEAN PARENTAGE AND
BETWEEN THE AGES OF 17 AND 40.

Men with Previous Service can be taken on as Trained Men

Apply at The ARMOURY at Hamilton,
St. George's or Somerset

17024t64. sS8. s15. s22. s29.


a:-. -
te'"1


r








77~~


OVER MENT


NOTICE

His Honour K. J. Beatty, Chief
Justice, is appointed to be Chair-
man of the Board of Education,
with effect from the 27th March,
.1924.

By Command,

T. M. DILL,
Acting Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office,
27th March, 1924.-v33.


Poyal gaz~e tte,


4 Colonist


Published by
rhe Bermuda Press Ltd.

THIS ISSUE CONSISTS OF
EIGHT PAGES



The DIARY of
Samuel Pepys Teucer
AesuammueuIsuei I W mIe


March 27.
The rain falling again this day
las though ashamed for being ab-
sent for two days.
And what our -weather is coming
tb I know not but it is most cer-
tainly vile and unpleasant.
'Some of my beloved countrymen
attribute it to our having sold our
souls to the devil whom they think
is the hotel proprietor in disguise.
But. these same people thought
the big guns in France did cause
the high winds in 1916 and 17. We
do, all attribute our troubles to an
evil we condemn.
Yet I would that men had a sense
of proportion.
There was long and loud laughter
when an enterprising man once
.asked our legislature to afford him
facilltie -for acquiring an hotel
of holding thirty guests.
-- There was a leader in our es-
teemed prJdecessor about 1870 in
which it congratulated the Colony
on possessing sufficient transporta-
Stion for the island fqr all time,
ocean and inland, because a steam-
er carrying fifty passengers had
been subsidized and a new mail cart
been -bought.
A few years ago we did all crowd
S, into Front Street when It was
blazoned abroad that 100 passeng-
ers were arriving by the fortnightly
Steamer.
To-day we are sorely perturbed
an a thousand do not arrive weekly.
Time Is a curious creature. By
S "- some freak an old masculine figure
is the symbol of time, but it is
surely a feminine character for it
.. changes so often, continuously and
completely, that no man's ward-
robe could cope with the demand.

Bidden to the B.V.R.C. Smoker
this evening and I do hear that it
Will be a bumper night.
Our wise Governor is to be there
S and all. the leading men of the
island will sing or talk.
There are some men I would
father hear sing than talk. These
are the talkers.
There are some men I would
rather hear talk than sing. These
S are the singers.
It is strange that men love to
hear their own voices. Perhaps
they are not aware that no man's
voice sounds to others as it does
to himself. The organs of speech
and hearing are soniewlhaT connect-
S.. and it is unfortunate that
every singer is agreeable to himself
whatever he may .be to others. .
I was once accompanying a sing
er when she rebuked me that I had
not played a chord following her
first nQte.
- So. I did apologise. I said that I
thought she was clearing her throat
:.and the foolish woman was offend-
ed whereas I had paid her a com-
pliment.
S- When I realised she was singing
-- begged her to try coughing. as it
Swas at any rate original.
S- I do hate vain persons!
--oo-----
i LANDSLIDES IN ITALY.

.. Amall, Italy, March 27.-Ninety-
oe persons were killed and lives of
-.lany tourists Imperilled when a
S sres of landslides devastated vil-
ages on the Gulf of Salerno yes-
'" ', terday. It was officially announe-
.-- ed to-dey that three towns where
,.-.- fifty .lives "were lost, Vettica and
-.. "'0oucaMarinawerepartly wiped out.'

3'I. BITISH FLYRS OFF AGAIN.
;." '..Lyons, March 27.-The British
u--.; aound the world flyers took off to-
;.'. RoQme at 11.05 a.m. to-day.


Correspondence

A FALSE IMPRESSION.

Hamilton, B'da.
March 27th, 1924.

The Editor, "R.G. & O.D."

Dear Sir,
Please allow me a small space
in your valuable paper in which
to correct a foolish and misleading
statement which appeared in the
"Mid-Ocean" on Wednesday eve-
ning last.
According to the writer in that
newspaper my horse, which had
fallen from the hill behind the
Opera House-a distance of 10
feet or more--"was left lying where
it fell, suffering and groaning and
kicking for nearly 2 hours, possi-
bly more."
The facts are as follows:-Im-
mnediately after the accident, which
occurred at 11.55 a.m., the Veteri-
nary Surgeon was sent for, who
arrived at 12.20 p.m. After inject-
ing a drug to ease the pain lie
promised to return shortly to
ascertain whether my horse would
then be better and able to be
moved. At 1.50 p.m. he returned
and pronounced that the horse
would have to be destroyed, .which
was accordingly done.
It is to be deplored that false
iripressions are )spread about
through the actions of some news-
paper reporters in not taking the
trouble to become acquainted with
actual facts before rushing their
opinions through for publication.
Thanking you. Sir.
I anr.
Yours faithfully.
H. U. CHRISTENSEN.

ADVERTISING BERMUDA.

Hamilton, Bermuda.
27th March, 1921.
No. 1300.24.

The Editor.
Royal Gazette & Colonist Daily.
Hamilton, Bermuda.

Dear Sir:-I am directed by the
Trade Development Board to for-
ward the accompanying copy of a-
report submitted by the secretary-
trea:,urer of the Co-operative Ber-
muda Advertising Pool. My Board
consider this report of such general
interest that I am directed to re-
Quest that you will publish same in
the coluD)ns of the Royal Gazette
and ColOnist Daily.
The date on which this report
imay be released for publication is
Saturday, the 29th instant.

I have the honour to be. Sir.
Your obedient servant,

F. C. MISICK,
Acting Clerk, Trade Development
Bo- rd.

I Interesting Analysis by
Secretary-Treasurer.

It is impossible to state the pre-
cise moment when suspicion that
Bermuda was not obtaining the
maximum benefit from her aggre-
gate advertising investment be-
came conviction, but a ye.-r ihas
now nearly elapsed since the Hon.
J. P. Hand. Chairman of the
Trade Development Board. invited
the leading Bermuda hotel mana-
gers to meet and discuss in all its
aspl)ects the qcluestion of co-opera-
tive advertising.
The upshot of that meeting w.as
the formation of a Co-operative Ad-
vertising Pool towards which it was
decided that local hotels, business
houses, banks and others should
be invited to subscribe. It was fur-
ther decided that an attempt
should be made to raise by such
means a sum of $15,000 to be ad-
mninistered by the Trade Develop-
mnient Board in the interests of all
concerned and in conjunction with


the Legislative Grant made to the
Board for advertising purposes.
Messrs. Tworoger and Sherrard
were appointed a Committee to
solicit subscriptions from local
business firms and as a -result of
their wholehearted effort, the value
of which cannot be overestimated
since it las formed the basis of one
year's successful operation, a sum of
$1,290.77 was collected. In addition
to these cash collections Messrs.
Tworoger and Sherrard obtained
signed pledges, subsequently hon-
oured upon presentation by me,
to the value of f134 in sterling and
$300 in American currency. Mr. W.
E. Rogers, whilst managing the
St. George Hotel, interested St.
George's merchants in the Pool to
an extent of f24. 10. 0.
The difference between the
amounts referred to above and the
total sum subscribed locally
1$11,801.27) was collected by me as
Secretary-Treasurer of the Pool.
In July last I went to New York
for the purpose of interesting the
Furness Bermuda Line and Royal
Mail Steam Packet Co. Ltd., in the
Pool. As the result of representa-
tions made to Messrs. H. C. Black-
iston and A. J. Outerbridge of the
former, and Mrssrs. F. G. Heller
and D. E. Bergten of the latter, sub.


scriptions of $5.000 from each o
the steamship companies were ob
trained. These amounts were ad
ministered separately by the Tr-dI
Development Board hence their
non-inclusion in the statement o
Revenue and Expenditure heret
attached. I refer to them, holwevel
as they were solicited and obtained
on the grounds that. a Co-operativ
Pool to be really representative o
the Bermuda Tourist Trade should,
include the Steamship Companies
I wish, at this juncture, to pay tri
bute to the splendid co-operativ
spirit shown by both companies
as well as by all other subscribers
1922
Novem ber .... .... .... ..... .. 1166
D ecem ber .............................1850
1923
January................ 82283
Febru ary ............... ........3281
M arch (to 27th) .............. 2694


As to (2):-It is a matter of conm-
nmon knowledge that the visitors
of this season have not only been
somewhat wealthier on the average,
but there lhas been a larger number
of persons of refinement and dis-
crimination-the kind of people
that are most wanted in Bermuda
and whose very names-judiciously
used. as they have been by Mr. I. E,
Shattuck., Publicity Director of tlie
Trade Development Board- will
stimulate travel Bermitdawards
during the rest of the year, for.the
rank and file of the great travelling
public are invariably drawn to
whatever resort is most freqLuen ted
by people of promineiece in the so-
cial and sporting world.
Considering the present season
month by month one finds that as
early as November beneficial re-
sults began to accrue from the Co-
operative Campaign. December
wals also good. January, partly duea
to ttnfavourable local weather con-
ditions and very mild weather up
North, did not come up to expecta-
tions though it was ahead of last
year mainly because of the National
Cash Register Company's visit.
February showed an inipiovenient
and the current month is very'
good. I am also informed that
bookings for April, which will be
tihe acid test of the campaign, are
excellent. The inquiries for May,
is reported by the New York rep-
resentatives of the Trade Develop-


A word as to the objects of the
Pool which were twofold:-fil To
lengthen thle sea.on. i2i To "-tone
up" the quality of tourists.

As to (1):-No more convincing
evidence can be adduced as to the
attainment of this objective-so far
at least as one end of the winter
season is concerned-than by com-
paring the number of arrivals dur-
ing Novenmber. December, January,
February and March of last winter
season with thle same months of the
present season. Here are the figures
exclusive of second class passen-
gers and transient tourists):


1923


Novem ber ... ... ..... 2098
Decem ber ...... ........ 2278
1924
January ... ...............3005
Februar.y- 3541
MlMrch (to 27thil .......3065


Increase"


260
371


nient Board, are better than ever
before. All of which goes to show
that prosperity has been spread out-
over a longer period and has not
been so much concentrated in the,
monthss of February and March.
The transient, character of Ber-
mnuda's tourist trade has this year
been the cause of much discussion'
among local hotel men who are the
principal sufferers by this seeming
chca-nge.I for "volume" business is
naturally very profitable to the
steamship companies and also-,
though to a slightly lesser degree,
to local merchants who report a
record year's business.
With your permission and arising
out 6f many discussions with all
parties,doncerned Iwill endeavour
to trace the cause or causes -why
most visitors have this season re-
mained for a shorter length of time
than usual. Bad weather has un-
deniably caused many to curn'tail
their visits. Some have tried other
resorts only to find that weather
conditions during the past two
months have been universally bad.
In my opinion however-and I
would not advance this opinion had
it not been confirmed by several
prominent A meriican business men
-unsettled financial conditions
ari-ing out of the recent Oil Scan-
dal have made big business 'men
10oth to spend-a holiday at any con-

Continuid on page *5.


Victory Theatre, Queen St. TO-NIGHT
Show from 7 to 10.30
"INTERNATIONAL NEWS"
The world before your eyes. rele .seId through Universal
.THE Sf1EEL TRAIL"
Universal New Thriller in 13 Episodes
Episodes 3 and 4 14 Reels
Starring WILLIAM DUNCAN and EDITH JOHNSON
J "NOBODY TO LOVE" .
Uiversal One-reel Comedy
Starring NEELY EDWARDS and BERT ROACH
"INTERNATIONAL NEWS" No. 17
The best news reel before the public to-day
CARL LAEMMILE presents
"THE -DANCIN' CHEAT"
Universal Latest Attraction in fire acts
Starring HERBERT RAWLINSON
"OUR. PET"
It's a two-reel Ceintury Comedy
Starring BABY PEGGY
ADMISSION-2 aad 1/6
UNIVERSAL HAS THE PICTURES!
THE BERMIUDA MOVING PIC URE CO.
17457 '6.s.
4-

In aid of the Funds of the


NORFOLK REGIMENT ASSOCIATION
(Old Comrades)
The objects of which are to find employment for mem-
bers on return to civil life, to assist widows and orphans,
sick and maimed.
By kind permission of
H. E. The GOVERNOR and COMMANDER in CHIEF
and
The MAYOR and CORPORATION of HAMILTON

A


GRAND


CONCERT


will be given at


PAR=LA=VILLE


TO-MORROW


at 3 p.m.

by the celebrated

BAND

of the
IST. BATT. THE NORFOLK REGIMENT
(Bandmaster, Mr. H. J. Coombes.)

'ADMISSION .2/6
17275t112.th.s.tu.th.f.s29


What's On When and Where


"FAIR


WEEK"


ME C H ANICS HALL

TO-NIGHT


6"4


Presenting WALTER HIER

"FAIR WEEK"
Comedy Drama in 5 parts "
Also VIOLA DANA, in
DON'T DOUBT YOUR HU
Drama in 6 parts
SStory by SADA COWAN
PATHE SERIAL
"PLUNDER" Episode 14
And PATH WEEKLY NEWS
Doors open 7.00


S, in





SBAND"





Show 7.30


ADMISSION-2'- and 1,6

MATINEE TO-DAY at 3 p.m.
A Paramount Picture presenting -
WALTe R HI5Rs, in

FAI R WEEK
Comedy Drama in 5 parts


17454 9.s.


Town Hall,


Also "PLUNDER" Episode 14
And PATHE WEEKLY NEWS
ADMISSION-I /6 and 9d.

THE -HUMANOPHONE CO.


St. Georges,


TO-NIGHT


First Run Paramount Picture, presenting

GLORIA SWANSON, in


"A SOCIETY SCANDAL"
Drama in 7 parts
5kg DON'T FAIL TO SEE THIS ENTERTAINING PICTURE


Also "SAVE THE SHIP"
And "GO WEST"
2 Pathe Comedies -
Doon open 7.80 ,


Show 8.00


THE HUMANOPHONE CO.
174551 48.s. ..... :




' COLONIAL OPERA HOUSE
FOR A LIMITED SEASON,
The Favourite

W. S. HARKINS PLAYERS


Start,


!ing Tuesday, Apr
OPENING PLAY
The New York and London Success


il 1st


You must see the Play to learn how all the characters
are "PAID IN FULL" in the iinal Act.

3 New Plays Each Week 3
MATINEE SATURDAY
THURSDAY NIGHT

"THE PLAY THINGS OF MEN"
Why should a man live two lives
when a woman stands or falls by one.
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS
; Just one continuous Laugh

"TWIN BE DS"

PRIES NIGHT 5/- 4/- 3/- 1/6
MATINEE 2/6 Children 1/6
Seals now on sale at the Phoenti.x Drug Store.
17327f96.s.m. Phone 719



AT THE MECHANICS HALL
Under the clistingUished paitro'naoae_ of His Ec:-'leic.- cihe Governor.
Lieut-General Sir J. J. Asser, K.C.B.. K.C.M.G., K.C.V.O.. and
Lady Asser.
MR. CARVETH WELLS
will deliver his fascinating Iecture


IWhere I&.,
-In Isde.


Rt (lib'flot


Friday, April 4th, at 8.30 p.m.
Tickets 2 6 each. cai be procured a lie office of tlie Royal
Gazette and Colonist Daily. from 9.00 to 1 0I) alid 2.15 ro 4.00
o'clock. No telephonic reservations. Sa.tle commences Tuesday.
s17485 48s.s.w.f.


For Further Whats On Advts.

See page 7


THE ROYAL GAZETTE AND COLONIST DAILY, SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 1924


Page2


I


_^.. -. --_,.. _-_^


8 ey?, / 8






1Ro-al -a3ette an6 Colonist Eailt
INCORPORATING THE ROYAL GAZETTE (Established 1828) and THE BERMUDA COLONIST (Established 1866)
VOL IV NO, 76 HAMILTON, BERMUDA, SATURDAY, M ARCH 29, 1924 PER COPY 3d or 6 cents -40/- PER ANNUM


THIS PAGE NOT AVAILABLE
AT TIME OF DIGITIZATION






1Ro-al -a3ette an6 Colonist Eailt
INCORPORATING THE ROYAL GAZETTE (Established 1828) and THE BERMUDA COLONIST (Established 1866)
VOL IV NO, 76 HAMILTON, BERMUDA, SATURDAY, M ARCH 29, 1924 PER COPY 3d or 6 cents -40/- PER ANNUM


THIS PAGE NOT AVAILABLE
AT TIME OF DIGITIZATION






1Ro-al -a3ette an6 Colonist Eailt
INCORPORATING THE ROYAL GAZETTE (Established 1828) and THE BERMUDA COLONIST (Established 1866)
VOL IV NO, 76 HAMILTON, BERMUDA, SATURDAY, M ARCH 29, 1924 PER COPY 3d or 6 cents -40/- PER ANNUM


THIS PAGE NOT AVAILABLE
AT TIME OF DIGITIZATION






1Ro-al -a3ette an6 Colonist Eailt
INCORPORATING THE ROYAL GAZETTE (Established 1828) and THE BERMUDA COLONIST (Established 1866)
VOL IV NO, 76 HAMILTON, BERMUDA, SATURDAY, M ARCH 29, 1924 PER COPY 3d or 6 cents -40/- PER ANNUM


THIS PAGE NOT AVAILABLE
AT TIME OF DIGITIZATION







THE ROYAL GAZETTE AND COLONIST DAILY, SATURDAY. MARCH 29, 1924


Continued from page 2

Under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Governor,
Lieut.-General Sir Joseph John Asser, K. C. B., K. 0. M. G., K. 0. V. 0.



ANNUAL


AGRICULTURAL


Agricultural Station, Paget East,

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday

9th, 10th and 11th April.

Exhibits of Live Stock, Fodders, Vegetables, Fruits, Flowers, Plants,
Food Products, Arts and Crafts.
Special Olasses for Exhibits from Boys' and Girls' Agricultural
Clubs.
Early Entries are Requested.
All entries close Sat urday, 5th. April.
Athletic Sports, Gymkhana, and other attractions.
Military Baud in Attendance. Tea and other refreshments on
Grounds.


Entry forms, ground space for 1.-ll' and advertising space in Cat-
alogue on application to
E. A. McCALLAN,


Phone 119, Hamilton.


Director of Agriculture,
Agricultural Station.


16060t96519. Feb.2,l6.. 1vlar,.j.1g)2L4 Ap.5.


Dinner Concert Every Evening-7.30 to 8.30, except Wednesdays.
Dancing in the Grill every evening from 9.00 p.m. to midnight
Wednesday: Afternoon Tea Concerts in the Lounge flom 4.00 to
5.00 o'clock.
From 7.00 to 9.00 p.'i- the Band of the 1st Battalion,
Norfollk Regiment. v1ll play in the Lounge, by kind
permission of Lieut.-Col. J. P. L. Mostyn and Officers.
Friday: Balloon Dance.
Sunday: Orchestral Concerts in the Lounge at 8.30 p.m.

Tables reserved for each evening, except Mondays,
50 cents per cover

April 1st.-Hunt Ball
April 2nd.-Staff Masquerade Dance.


17428f64.th.el .tp.


(ITl


ST. GEORGE'S, BERMUDA
Table D'Hote Luncheons a Specialty
MONDAY, March 31st
BLACK AND V HITE DANCE
Dancing 8 to 2
Prizes will be given
by the Hotel Management
Refreshments will be served
,Dinner Parties can now be booked
for the evening of the above event
Telephone No. 39, St. George's
BLACKISTON CUP RACES ON APRIL 1st.
Motor Launch "St. George" will leave Market Wharf,
St. George's (weather permitting) at 10 a.mi, April 1st,
for Shelly Hay Race Course. Cold Lunch will be ser-
ved on board.
ROUND trip, including lunch. $3.00
17305t64.th..f. ei to 31.


A Line of



Women's


Sweaters


J-op Coats


What's On When and


Agricultural Exhibition.
Special Prizes.-The list of spe-
cial prizes continues to grow. The
complete list at the time of writing
is as folo\s:-
Class 1. Live Stock.-For best
horse in show, two pounds from
Board of Agriculture.
For best cared-for working car-
riage horses, two pounds donated
by the local branch of the S.P.C.A.
and one pound donated by Mrs. F.
B. Tompkins.
For best cared-for working draft
horses, similar prizes.
For best dairy animal in show.
two pounds donated by Honble.
J. T. Trin ingham.
The following special cash prizes
,-re donated by the. Poultry and Pet
Stock Association., and are open to
aill:
For best trio, judged for !produc-
tion, only first-prize wimnnces eli-
gible, one pound ten shillings.
For best bird in show one pound
ten shillings.
For best duck in show. one pound.
For highest points won in lpoul-
try prizes, onel pounlId.
For best exhibit shown by novice,
ten shillings donated by Mr. P. C.
Hammlond.
For best bird exhibited by an
Agricultural Club Member, ten
.shillings donated by Mr. W. R.
Evans.
For best and second best grade
calves or heifers, under 1 year.
tired by pure bred Guernsey bulls.
two pounds and one pound donated
by Mr. and Mrs. J. Cameron Brad-
ley.
For best dairy animal. goat and
rabbit exhibited by Club Members.
ten shillings each donated by Mrs.
Edith York.
Class 111. Vegetables.-For high-
est points won for exhibits of vege-
tables. Open only to bona fide
f.rmers. Silver cup donated by
H.E. the Governor.
For best collection of vegetables.
Open only to bona fide farmers.
Five pounds donated by J. Roose-
velt. Esq..
For hIighest point for vegetable
prize- won by Bov and Girl MIem-
bers of Agricultlural (Club-. two
cash prizes of one pound each do-
nated by N. I. Bowditch. Esq.
Classes 111 & V.-For best col-
lections of vegetables and flowers,
16 each i grown respectively f'rom
Sutton's and Carter's seeds. two
silver challenge cups donated by
tlIe firliIs 0.named.
-Class V. Flowers.-For highest
and zece:nd highest points won for
exhibits of flowers by Members of
Agricultural Clubs. two.silver cups
donated by H.E. the Covernor.
For sprays of new\ vine or shrub.
two pounds donated by Bermuda
Garden Club.
For largest number of prizes won
for cut flowers-annuals. two
pounds donated by Mrs. Mont-
gomnery Sears.
For largest number of prizes won
for cut flowvers-bulbous and


REDUCTION IN WOOLLEN GOODS
___ i ____


Where


i DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Farmers' Meetings.
Southampton.-A f-,rmers' meet-
ing was held at Soutiampton on
Tuesday evening, the 25th inst. The
Director of Agriculture, Mr. E. A.
MeCallan, in introducing the speak-
ers spoke briefly on sundry agricul-
tural matters, including thle com-
ing Exhibition. Dr. Donald Folsom.
Dr. Donald Folsom, Ph.D.,
Plant Pathologist of the Maine
Agricultural Experiment Station.
and an expert on mosaic,
leaf-roll and other foliage diseases
of the potato, gave a most interest-
ing talk on these diseases and their
relation to Bermuda's Triumph
seed potato supply. Mr. Lawrence
Ogilvie, M.Sc., M.A.. B.Sc.. Plant
Pathologist of the Bermuda Agri-
cultural Station, in his maiden
speech at a Bermuda farmers'
meeting gave ample proof of his
interest in his work anld determi-
nation to assist Bermuda agricul-
ture.
Devonshire.-A s-inilar meeting
will be lield in Cavendish Hall, Dev-
onshire, on Tuesday next, Ist.
April. Mr. E. F. Zuill. M.C.P.. melenm-
ber of the Board of Agriculture will
take the chair. Farmers and those
interested( in farming resident in
Devonshire and the adjoining pa-
rishes of Pembroke, Paget and
Smith's are invited to attend this
meeting.


Weather


Proofs,


Cardigan


Golf and


I D

I

I


and Irish Tweeds and Homespuns.





SPECIAL LINE

HEAVY WINTER COATS


YOUNG

146S l,192.s


tuberous rooted, for best collec-
tion of roses, and for best staged
exhibits of flowers shown-by one
person, one pound each donated
b\- Mi Montgornerv Sears.
For ')esr collection of p)otte'.
plains., and for be ,t collection of
permeniol cut flower-, two pounds -
eA.c: donated by Mrs. J. Harper
Poor.
For largest number of prizeS wor,
I)'.- a novice. 1thir -i. one -,Aho lia-
t wonll prize dl inrg tlh. Exhi-
T.itions of 192? ,n.ild 19.3. one- po (nd
(Icnated by Mrs. J. H rper Po'or.
Class VI. Food Products.-- F, r
largest nn1ll)er of points- won bI
Agricultural Club Meib)lr for food
product exlbl)its, ten shilling_ do-
noted by MrIs. Edith Yorl:.
Class VII. Arts and Crafts.-For
Irrge st 1num1ber of point \WOOi re-
lpectively b'y boy and girl einebet
of Agricultural Clubs for art-s ond
crafts exhibits, teln slhilling.V each
donated by Mrs. Edith York. E,
For best \white embroidery and
belst pla in. sewing done by children
between the age; of nine stand ten.
ten shillinggs each donated by Mrs.
Jas. A. Conyers.
k.Classes 1 to VII.-For highest
points won by a n; Boys' and Girls'
Agricultural Club for exhil)it. in
ill Classes, the Rotary Challenge
SShield, donated by the Rotary Club
i, Han ilt on. I 1-.
Thle above prizes consist of five
cup)-', a shield and thirty-nine
poundss in cash.


Bermuda
Christian Science Society
Sunday
Sunday School 9.45 a.m.
Morning Service 11. a.m.
Wednesday
Testimonial Meeting 8p.m.
READ.!N, ROOM
and
iREE CIRCULAT'it.IG LIBRARY
,of
Authorized Christian Science
Literature
Open daily 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
ALL ARE CORDIALLY WELCOME
16322fs.tp.


S.nn ouncing,<-
AN EXHIBITION 0 PAINTINGS
AND DECORATIONS OF

John E. Hutchins
AT ERITH, EAST PAGET, BERMUDA
POMANDER WALK MARCH 37.28,29th




17377*4884.48.tu.ei. to s.


"The Willow"
Hamilton


Telephones


BROS.


tYOR,


Mount Pleasant
Shelly Bay
616


lave you heard the
Seal


Victor Double Sided Red
Records.


New records every Saturday.

Thos. J. Wadson & Son
17403 $ 48.W.th.f. Next Cable Office


YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO PURCHASE WOOLLEN
GOODS MADE BY THE BEST ENGLISH
AND SCOTCH MANUFACTURERS AT GREATLY
REDUCED PRICES.


Overcoats,


Page 7


Admission 1.'-


Jackets, Slip Ons, Mufflers and Golf Hose.


Children, half price.


Sack Suits in English, Scotch,


HOTEL


BERMUDIANA


4


Send Home

a Charming


Easter Gift


Pure I Vhite, fragrant, symbolic, these buds
will open by Easter and carry to your home,
your friends or your Church, an Easter
Message from you.

WE DESPATCH TO ANY ADDRESS
IN THE UNITED STATES, CANADA,
OR GREAT BRITAIN





THE E. WORRALL OUTERBRIDGE CO,


Knitted


Presses


GROWERS OF THE BERMUDA EASTER LILY BULB
17347 144.m.24.w.2- .s.26 9.m.31.


+ Off


17405 80.w.eitp


All the world's greatest artists record exclusively for

Victor Records


-V






)


.-,. *1

3
I.


G 7
VORGE


r-em


44


EXH I BITION


HESSAGIC


Im
LD)OK


0 TM
GOnUgfla LD a
)OTMUd


MLY BUDS


L49)-\A STER









THE ROYAL GAZETTE AND COLONIST DAILY, SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 1924,


TO-DAY



Band Concert at Par-la-Ville,
10.15 a.m.
*
Royal Naval and Military Athletic
Sports, Prospect. 1 a.m.
*
Mechanics Hall, "Fair Week" in
5 parts. also "Don't Doubt your
Husband"-the Pathe Serial and
Pathe Weekly. Matinee at 3 p.m.

Town Hall, St. George's, "A So-
ciety Scandal" in 7 parts and two
comedies.
*
Victory Theatre, Queen Street,
"The Steel Trail" International
News, from 7 to lu.5, p.m.
*
Football:-B.A.A. v. R.A. Chal-
lenge Cup Match. 2.45 p.m.-B.A.A.
Ground.
00-


BAND CONCERT AT
PAR-LA-VILLE-10.15 A.M.

By permission of Lt. Col. J. P. L.
Mostyn and Officers,. the Band of
the 1st. Battn. Norfolk Regiment.
(Bandmaster Mr. H J. Coombes);
will give the following progranume
this morning:-

1.-March....Mons Calpe....Barwood.
2.-Overture... A Children's Over-
ture ................................ Q uilter.

A cleverly constructed work
which has the nursery rhymes,
for its thematic material.
Quaint, but very modern, the
interesting treatment of the
themes and the delicate tone
colouring are its predominating
features. Roger Quilter is ra-
pidly coming to the forefront
of modern composers.
3.-Valse...Hanolo........Waldteufel.
4.- Selection......Sylvia.... ....Dellbes.
5.-Song...The Lost Chord..Sullivan
6.--Scottish Rhapsody....The Wed-
ding of Shon Maelean........ Bath

The composer of this work Mr.
Hubert Bath, is a native Barns-
taple. Devon. He was born in
1883. Entered the Royal Aca-
demy in 1901 and three years
later he won the Goring Scho-
larship for Composition. The
present work was written 1908
and has-been performed by the
principal Choral Societies of the
--.--- world with rie greatest suc-
cess. The Themes although
of Scottish inspiration and
treatment are all original.

7.- Idyll.. ............ Coates.
8.-Selection L.a Grand Via
Valverde.

Regimental March
"Rule Britannia".

GOD SAVE THE KING.


-00-


I.O.D.E.

At the General Monthly Meeting
of the I.O.D.E. which is to be held
at the Masonic Hall at 3.30 p.m. on
Monday next the meeting will be
addressed by Mrs. McDougald,
Hon. National Vice-President and
sometime National Councillor,
also organising Se\cy. for the Pro-
vince' of Quebec. During the War
Mrs. McDougald's very important
work was to organise chapters
throughout the Provin ce, thus
bringing the English and French
elements together in war work.
Mrs. MacAvitty, a visitor at the
Hotel Bermudiana, also hopes to
be present. She is the Regent of tilhe
Royal Standard Chapter of St. John
N.B., and Mrs. Kiely, another Na-
tional Councillor.


We are asked to say that it is
hoped that many members of the
Branch Ciap-ers of the I.O.D.E.
in Bermuda will be present on this
very interesting occasion.

-00---


SUNDAY CONCERT.

St. George's Hotel. 8.00 p.m.

(Under the direction of Mr. John
W. Riihiluonlal.

1.-Overture... ...Poet and Peasant.
Suppe.
2.-Selection....The Yankee Prin-
cess ........................... K alm an .
3.-Cornet Solo....My Heart at Thy-
Sweet Voice-........Herbert B. Dow
S.... ............ Saint-Saens.
4.-Bolero ............. Moszkowski.
5.-Suite ...Four Indian Love Lyrics
......... ................................ F in d e n .
I. The Temple Bells.
II. Loss Than the Dust.
III. Kashmir! Song.
IV. Till I Wake.

6.-Chanson Triste... Tschaikowsky
7.-Selection....La Travlata ....Verdi.

Star-Spangled Banner.
SGOD SAVE THE KING.


ENGLISH SPEAKING UNION.

Continued from page 1.
present system makes for friend-
ship between England and America.
Sir Joseph then introduced the
Rev. Dr. Endicott Peabody who Is,
with justice spoken of as "the Dr.
Arnold of America."
Dr. Peabody said that he felt it
was a great honourto speak to a
branch of the Union whose success
he had always had deeply at heart;
he wished, however,that they had
had Dr. Patton. who would have
been able to tell them so much of
interest in regard to the Bermuda
branch of the E.S.U.
He was glad to be able. after
having received the greater part
of his education at school and col-
lege In England, to pay back a
portion of the debt he owed to
them by helping on the Union of
the Anglo-Saxon race.
It was fortunate. Dr. Peabody
said, that between England and
America there were so many points
in sympathy, they looked at things
in the same way though with the
differences which might occur in
a family between older aand younger
brothers. The first, perhai-ps., a
tittle dogmatic and dictatorial,
the younger ones critical of their
elders and inclined to be boastful
of their own succseses.
But we belonged together., said
the speaker, and then went on
in o delightfully huinourous wayx
to give some details of the smaller
differences which mark each na-
tbion.
Pronounciation of certain words.
tones of voice. English reserve.
American curiosity, small things
which made each critical of the
other.
In a very charming way Dr.
Peabody commniented on the Eng-
lish "'genius for friendship" as it
was termed by Dr. Butler, by tell-
ing the story of tile members
of a conventional who found Boston
less enthusiastically friendly than
they had expected but before leav-
ing., experienced the genuine friend-
liness of the citizens so that one
member said that hlie had found
the Boston reception wallting inll
warilth at first bitt that after-
wards "'it froze to you." Great
laughter was roused by. this illus-
tration.
Dr. Peabody went on to say that
small differences often kept people
apart but great tilings drew them
together.
The chief points of sympathy
between the English-speaking na-
tions were:-their colulmon source,.
their coinmmon history and( tradition
and language, their love of sport
and games and their systems of
education-in which both lad
something to learn from the other.
The speaker- then gave many
interesting details of the resenl-
blances and differences between
English and American schools and
Colleges: lie mentioned Sir J. M.
Barrie's recent pl)ronouncement oil
the "something" which is the
the essential spirit of the Englishl
public school system which, said
Dr. Peabody. had in the last hun-
dred years produced a remarkable
race of young Englishmen.
There was now a constant inter-
change of students between tlhe
two countries which would estab-
lish the most important )and of
all, that of friendship. The E.S.U.
was to bIe a great factor in this
friendship. He had attended tlhe
first meeting of the Ulnionl ill
London four .\ears ago and since
then it hlad grown from 800 to
14,000 members. They 1lad ac-
complished much in that time
helped by thle great enthusiasm of
Major Evelyn Wrench, and among
other things had been instrumental
in placing thle tablet in West-
minister Abbey to the memory of
the great American Ambas:ador,
Walter Page, whlo. though a true
American, loved and understood
England as few have done.
Dr. Peabody in conclusion said
that lie would remand them of
thle story of Mr. Josephl Choate


who, inl the course of a gaine was
asked "'who would you rather be
if you were not yourself?" and re-
plied :-"Mrs. Choate's second hus-
band." He thought he might
say for Doctor Patton that if he
were not an Englishman he would
wish to be an American and for
himself he could say with certainty,
that if he were not an American
lie would wish to be an English-
nman.
Canon Marriott then rose to
propose a vote of thanks to Dr.
Peabody for his charming and most
interesting address: it had been
delightful to hear himi and he
was sure that both countries were
going to feel the benefits of the
great work which was being done
by tile Union. He hoped that
everyone in the room was either
a member'or going to become one.
Sir Joseph Outerbridge in second-
ing the vote of thanks said that in
regard to the love of games in both
countries he believed that the
first set of tennis which reached
the United States was taken by his
sister from Bermuda to Staten
Island; so that Bermuda might
claim to have been partly respon-
sible for the great popularity of
Lawn Tennis in America.
An excellent tea was served after
the speeches during which the


CHURCH SERVICES.

4th Sunday in Lent.

The Cathedral.
8.00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
11.00 a.m.-Matins and Sermon.
tPreacher His Grace the Archbishop
of Nova Scotia'.
7.30 p.m.-Evensong and Sermon.

St. Paul's, Paget.
8.00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
11.00 a.m.-Matins, Litany and
Sermon.
7.30 p.m.-Mission Service and
Hymns.


St. Mary's, Warwick.
8.00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
11.00 a.m.-Sung Eucharist.
4.00 p.m.-The Catechism.
7.30 p.m.-Mission Service and
Hymns.

Devonshire Parish Church.
11.00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and
Sermon.
4.00 p.m.-Evening Prayer and
Sermon. in Old Devonshire Church.
iPreacher His Grace the Archbis hop
of Nova Scotia .

Harrington Sound Chapel.
10.00 a.m.-Holy Con minunion.

Hamilton Parish.
11.00 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
Litany and Sermon.

Smith's Parish.
8.00p.m.-Evensong and Sermon.

St. James Church, Sandy's.
11.00 a.m.-Matin- and Sermon.
7.30 p.m.-Evensong and Sermon.

St. Anne's, Southampton.
4.00 p.m.-Evensong and Ser-
lnon.

Garrison Church, St. George's.
9.30 a.m.-Parade Service.

Parish Church. St. George's.
7.30 a.m.-Holy Communion.
11.00 a.m.-Mariins.
7.00 p.m.-Evensong.

St. David's.
9.01) a.m.-Holy Cotmmunion.
7.001) p. in.-Eve nson g.

Garrison Church, Prospect.
8.00 a.ni.--Holy Coinmunion.
11.00 a.m.---Parade Service.
6.30 p.m.-Evensong.

Wesley Church, Hamilton.
11.00 a.mn.- Christ the Good
Shepherd.
3.00 p.inl.-Sunday School.
7.30 p.m.-Soventh Sermon in
serie.- on Ten Colnmiandmentes.


orchestra of the Hotel Bermudiana
gave some musical selections.
The meeting was held in the
grill of the Hotel under most
comfortable condition, i.l)t a small
part being due to the ease with
which the speakers were heard
by all present.
Amongst those attending the
meeting were:-

Mr. W. P. Kent. American Consul.
M\ rs. Kent,
Mrs. Moncure Robinson.
Mr. & Mrs. Roosevelt Roosevelt.
General Shannon.
Mrs. McDougall.
Mr. Francis Wilson.
Mrs. McAvitty.
Mrs. Hamilton Parrish.
Miss Margaret ingham.
MAiss A. Lough.
Miss Talbot.
Miss Helen Talbot,
Colonel & Mrs. D. MacKenzie,
Judge Loring.
Mrs. A. M. Purcell. Hon. Sec:
Mr. J. T. Lynk.
\Ir. Howard Buck.
Miss Agnes Hastings.
General & Mrs. Oliver.
Mr. & Mrs. W. K. Shaw.
Mr. G. Shaw.
MIr. E. F. Darrell.
Miss Jones and Miss Wallace
i Cincinnlati
Mr. & Mrs. Thlomas D. Leonard.
Mrs. Hendrie.
Mrs. W. Hendrie.
Miss Nelson.
Miss H. Robinson.
Mir. and Mrs. Howard Clark.
Mis. Boiling.
Miss Larkin.
Rev. A. V. Sullivan.
Miss Bevens.
Rev: Dr. & Mrs. Saint.
Mrs. Ohudleigh Hicks & Miss
Rainsford.

--o00-

GRAND CONCERT
IN PAR-LA-VILLE.


To-morrow the band of the 1st
Battn. Norfolk Regiment will give
a grand Concert at Par-la-Ville
for the benefit of thle Norfplk
Regiment Association Old Com-
rades,.
The military band has given so
much pleasure to residents and
visitors that we are sure there will
be a big audience to show a prac-
tical appreciation of the work of
the bandmaster and his men.
and so augment the funds of a
very excellent and deserving cause.
The concert commences at 3 p.m.
and the charge for admission is I
2/6.


B.V.R.C. SMOKER.


i


pay 170,000 for troops in Ber-
nluda, and would withdraw them.
When that time arrived surely
- they had got to be prepared to de-
fend themselves, and a Corps of
any xalue such as the B.V.R.C.
could not be formed in a day.
If the young men d(lid not join
and do something and begin to
take parr In the affairs of the
Colony, who was going to do It?
There was no better way of helping
the Colony along than by joining,
learning discipline and self-control,
and a man would step into tile life
of the Colony. He urged them not
to be drones, because Bermuda
was not big enough to carry drones.
but to play their part.
In thanking the Governor for
his attendance, another evidence
of lhis interest in the Corps. Major
Murdock stated that inasmuch as
both the Imperial and local Gov-
ernments realized the value of
the Corps by contributing to its
finances, it was the duty of every
young man of Bermuda to recipro-
cate by becoming a member. It was
one of those things whici was
theirs by right, it was a young
man's job: "Don't come forward


i


Continued from page 7

therefore, that everybody should
help the new staff along.
The Governor welcomed Major
Murdoch as the new officer com-
manding, under whom lie felt that
the Corps was going to prosper;
and the new Adjutant. Captain
Elliott. When Capt. Maunsell left,
the Governor had written the AMli-
tary Secretary asking him to send
somebody essentially human. In
soldiering, a human man, a man /l
who would go out of his way to
understand human nature. was
invariably a success. and in Capt.
Elliott lie believed they had that
man.
His Excellency reminded his
hearers of his first inspection o)f
the Corps 18 months ago. whei)
lie told them lie regarded the men
of the B.V.R.C., the men wiho
put aside themselves and gave
their best for tile benefit of the
community, as the salt of tlhe
Island. And lie did. Since then
1 lie had frequently come in con-
tact with the Corps, and it was
good right through, they need
not doubt that. It had behind it
the Imperial Government and the
Colonial Parliament, which con-
tributed to their finances, and inl
the ranks were some of the most
prominent of the Island who gave
time to help the Corps along, and
the Corps had the reputation it
had won during tile war. There was
only one drawback, the Corps was
under strength.
After the war came a reaction
against militarism. That was 5
years ago, since when both the
Army and Territorial units in
England were being filled up.
But as regarded life in Bermuda,
the young men of the Island were
subjected to great temptations
when there were so many visitors
coming here for a good time. The
young men naturally fell in with
that sort of life in preference to
something harder, they adopted
the easy-going and preferred to
lmix with people who stood them
drinks. and liked to jazz in the eve-
nings. They put the harder side
of life oil one side, and left that to
somebody else.
Another thing to cope with here
was apathy and procrastination.
As anl example lie referred to a
portion of the lecture given by
Dr. Andrew Balfour. whlo spoke
of vases and bottles to hold flowers
oin graves which were nothing
but breeding places for mosquitoes.
k A month after, as His Excellency
liad noticed no change, lie drew the
attention of the audience at the
animnual meeting ot' the Bermuda
Church Society to the fact. That
was two months ago. and still
nothing had been done. That
was apathy, indifference, and pro-
crastination, and being inter-
)preted meant "to-morrow," It was
indifference to the welfare of tlie
conilmunity, or else it meant lazi-
ness. putting it off until to-nmorrow.
iThe following morning the Rev.
W. J. F. Groves. Vicar of Pembroke,
sent us an extract from his parish
magazine onil this subject, and it
will be found elsewhere.I
The Governor then put forward
several reasons why young mlen
should join the B.V.R.C'. Tey liad
as men to keel) their standards
high. and to do so must first be
physically fit, which would in-
crease their mentality. There was
again, thle comradeship of soldier-
ing. which was unknown except
to those who had served, and which
Enabled a man to learn that there
were other things beside himself.
More serious than that, and it
had occurred to the speaker: there
was the constant tendency in
present day politics to let thlie Colo-
nies look after themselves. Troops
hlad been withdrawn from New
Zealand only 40 to 50 years age,
from Halifax less than 30 years ago,
from Canada, South Africa, and
Ireland, and all these places now
undertook their own defence.
Possibly some day the conclusion
might be reached at home that the
Government could not afford to


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and ask to be a member, come and
demand it."
The Major regretted the breaking
tup of many old Bermuda customs.
and that by reason of coming in
contact so much with visitors
and inter-mnarriage there was a
tendency to become alienated from
the British Empire of which Ber-
muda was as yet proud to be a
part. Unless they taught their
children to be loyal British sub-
jects, the time would come when
they would find Bermuda drifting
away from the Empire, and it was
by rallying to the Corps that the
tendency could be offset.
He asked that all members should
work harder and make the Corps
a thorough success. They did not
merely, want a lot of names on
paper, they wanted the owners of
those names to take an active
part in everything.
Major Murdock proposed the
health of the Governor, which was
drunk with musical honours.
Sergt. E. M. Baker and Sergt. J.
Conyers were then presented by
His Excellency with long service
medals-20 years of loyal and true
service, and his only regret was that
lie was not presenting them before
thie whole population of Bermuda.
Captain R. C. Earl gave the health
of Colonel Tucker, the first Colonel
the Corps has ever had, and said
that both he and Mrs. Tucker
carried with them the best wishes
of everyone in Bermuda.
'Their health was heartily drunk,
and in reply the Colonel made
public what has; hitherto been
Corps property. Mrs. Tucker was a,
great deal more proud of the fact
that she was nicknamed by the
Overseas Contingent their "God-
ina" than of the decoration award-
ed by the King. The Colonel gave
many interesting details of his
service with the Corps, which has
extended over 29 years, and said
it was by personal service under
the fl g which made one feel it was
a duty well done.
Towards the prograIminie of the
evening 'songs were contributed
by Major Dill. Mr. J. MturrI Sergt.
A. H. Burrows, Sergt. .. N. T.
Williams, IxIr. Gunston and Mr.
W. Clihirlton, while Mr. C. Young
gave another clever exhibition of
sword swinging and Rfn. _T. N.
Dill club swinging. Mr. J. B.
Hunter was at the piano. It was
a very good idea to have printed
a song sheet so that wheh there
were no solos there were plenty of
good choruses to liven the evening.


---00--

PERSONAL.


Continued from page 1

hearty congratulations from
friends.


their


Mr. S. J. Griswold of the Hamil-
ton Hardware Co. N.Y.: brings his
visit to an end to-day when lie
leaves for New York.
Mr. Griswold has been a regular
visitor for twenty five years and a
tlhorough admirer of our island
where he combines pleasure with
business.

Miss Mabel Fullerton, a daughter
of Mrs. James G. Fullerron of
Minneapolis ,and a cousin of Mrs.
H. C. Adamns of Springfield, Paget
East; arrived with Mrs. W. J. Mur-
phy by the Fort Victoria yesterday.
They are guests at the Hotel Ber-
mnudiana.,


Will Morning

Never Come


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"I BERMUDA Mr. J. B. Vallis, luam
ton, is our representative and will
supply the trade promptly.


are often unnecessary if wo.
men secure in time, the aid of

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Page 8


Mental





THE MOST PREVALENT
OF MODERN COMPLAINTS

What Is the cause of
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bulk of oases It Is weak
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In ninety-nine oases out of a
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f.r vigorous health, eager, scintil.
lasting freshness of vision, both
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It is mainly a question of nreve
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instead of settling down into dull.
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appetite for food, new physical Nerve Weakness Kidney Complaint
vigour, a new mental outlook. Bodily Weakness Palnitation
Nerve Paralysis Heat Weaknesos
Dr. Cassell's Tablets will make you Nervous Debility., leeplessness
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