Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00325
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00325
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text
Tif E


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


No. 32-Vol. LI. STATE SUPER VIAS ASANTIQUAS. 24s per ani


Hlamilton, Bermuda, Tuesday, July 30, IS7S.


A Rare Chance of
Speculation.

I have been favored with Instruc-
\ tions to Sell,
By Public Auction,
To-morrow, Wednesday,
i31st Instant,
*It the Old Stand,
THAT VALUABLE
PROPERTY,
Known as WADE'S GREEN, at the Caicos
!Islands.
This d,.sirable FREEHOLD consists of about
1,800 AcRES of LAND,
A Large
DWELLING HOUSE.
'AND
:T Three OUT HOUSE S,
Axid- quite a number of Brasilitta, Yellow
Woqd and Fruit Trees.
Ab.ve one-half of; the LAND is not only
arable, but very productive, the other portion
Sis good Grazing Land, tlhi whole of it has a
goq6d Enclosure. T'
.JOHN HARNETT,
O .. ... ..l Auctioneer.
Hamilton, July 30, 1878.

Scond ."InnTal Mecting
OF THE
Hamilton
CO-OPERATIVR ASSOCIATION
THE Members of the Hamilton
S..' Coo'prnative As.diation are requested to
-meel at the Temp)erance Hall, at 7-30 p.ri., on
5th 'roxirmo.
By..orderi .. -
W ... T. JOELL,
Secretary II. A. C.
P.S.-All claims, of \ whatever nature, outstand-
ing against the Asocia tion, must be presented
fr. adjustment, at or prior to the meeting
hereinhefore mentioned.


Hamilton, July 22, 1878.-2


W. H. T. J.,
Secy. H. A. C.


01ICE,

THRE Managers of the "Union
Sports, Southamptoni," intend holding a
similar Meeting to that of 20th August, 1874
comprising:
Horse Racng, &c.,
About the beginning of September next,
.Should sullicient inducement be held out.
P.rticul:rs will be duly made known.
G.B, FUBL ER,
"- Secretary.
Soutlamln6. n, July 15, 1878.

PitCh Pine Lumber.

The Undersigned has Received a
very Choice CARGO of


-Ex Schr.. 1 Rockie E. Yates"
-From Jacksonville, Florida,
Consisting of-the usual assortment of
DRESSED FLOOR ING-1I & 14x 6.
DRESS PLANK, Square edge-I & li x 12,
AND,
SCANTLING of various sizes.
-| TERMS LOW FOR CASil.
S. S. IWGiHJ11.
22nd-July, 1878.

For Sale.


13HORSES,


A 3 BOX CART;I
1 DRItY, 1 Sliding Seat Caleche
CARRIAG-E,
1 Single Caleche CA RRI A G E,
Convertible as a Double.
ALSO,
That well-known fast Trotting Gray Mare

With SinOl- HARNESS,
AND, .
BUGGY CIRRIWGE, complete.


Apply to


July 22, I78.


E. CRAWLY,
Somerset.


AUCT I ON.


I am Instructed to Sell,
AT PUBLIC AUCTION,
ON TIE PREMISES,
On Thursday Ist August,
At 12 o'clock.


IIIf-'I


.1 CO oT Ti GEq,
WI4' AUcre of L \Nl),


SMore or Less.
The Property of' MR. FELIX SMIThi.
The above Cottage contains Six Rooms, Kitchen
and Tank, and is Situated near Hlarman's Bay,
Sandy's Parish.
JO HA FO WLE.
Sandy's Parish, 22nd July, 1878.



.lnlniversaryof the
FEDIALE CIIHAITABL ] U .-
ON SOCIETY.
rH E MEMBERS of the above na'nod Society,
S" (D.V.), will meet at the ODD FI.LLOW'S
HALL, HAMILTON,

ON TUESDAY,
The 6th day of August, at 9 a.m.
And proceed thence in order to ST. JOHNs's
CHURCH, PEMBROKE, where there will be
DIVINE SERVICE, commencing at 11 a.m.,
by the REVD. MARK JAMES, Rector of Pembroke
,and Devonshire.
Members are requested to be punctual and
to bear in mind that there will be a COLLE C-
TION after Service and LECTURE.
. There will be a PROMENADE CONCERT
at the, ToN IIALL, in the Elvniag, conmineke-
.ilua at.7 o'clock ; where tliere will be Refresh-
ments and FANGY ARTICLES for Sale.
SAdmission Gd. -
Th heALEXANDRIN \ B \ND will be in
attendatice.
N. B.-,Should the weather be unfavorable
on 6:h, .Procession on following day.
P. P .-"Persons in charge of Vehicles will please
not obstruct the Roadway as on last occasion.
Any person or persons so doing will be placed
in the hands of the Police.
By the request of the Committee,
JOHN C. SIMONS,
General Secretary F. C. U. S.
Iliamilton, July 9th, 1878.--2--9 & 30 J.

For Sale.

About 1000 Bushels

Hard Stone Lime,
Principally burnt with Cedar Wood.
Orders left with A,J. HIoosDoN, Esqr., Ham-
ilton, will be promptly attended to.
... JOHN '. STONE,
D)evonshire.
July 23rd, 1878.-tf.


14 Queen Street, Hamilton,
Between the Stores of Messrs. F. A.
WHITE & E. B. JONES.



Painter,
Dealer in PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLASS, PUTTY, BRUS.Ii';-,
&c., &c.
July 15, 1878.-12 m.

For Sale,
STHE YACIIT


Including SPAits, SAILS, BALIAST, &c.


For particulars apply to
LT. WILKINSON, R


Boaz.


Boaz, July 22nd, 1878.

NOVA SCOTIA
Steam .Marble 4* Gran-
ite WORKS,


. B. y.


Chib.


SFOR THF
Duke of Edinburgh's Challenge Cup,
Will take plrae in the
GREAT '0OUND,
ON .


A ugust 6th,


Under the

Entries close


IR. B.:. C. Regulations.
Start at 1'0 P.M.
on Fri,li \ ugu(st 2nd, 1878.
C. WILKINSON,
Secy. to Sailing Com.


shamnion, 3.,, so, say,


NOTICE! "

To Dealers in Dry Goods


''The Large Stock of'


AT
THE STORE-
Of the Late
Henry Trimingham, Esqr,,
Is N ,w

At a liberal discount ii ainoInts of .Twenty
Pounds and Ulp)a:irds.
These Goods having heei, taken great care of
and a large portion being ,if recent importations,
offer an inducement to those wi.' 'wish to add
to their Stock.
S ale will co.iniencce
TO-MORROW, 19h Inst1,
And continue to tlie end of the month.-
DANIEL THIMINGHAM,
Executor.
Hanmilton, July 16, 1878.-3

REWARD.


Fifty


Doll


ars


(50 DOLL \RS)
EWARD will be given for information
*"' that will lead to the Conviction of the
Party or Parties WIIO STOLE' from the
Lands of Mount Langton, on 30th June last,
"'welve Young 7Turkeys,
About two Months old.
ANrD,
One Hundred Dollars
(100 DOLLARS)
Reward will be given for such information as
will Convict the Party or Parties who purchased
or received the said TURIKEYS knowing them
to have been Stolen.
Hamilton, 10th July, 1878.

Money to be Lent,
On approved Mortgage Securities.
Applyto
MR. S. BIOWNLOW GRAY,
Haimilton.
June 10, 1878.

The Bermuda Ci-
gar Factory.
THI-E Undersigned having received a lot of
U HAVANA TOBACCO via New York
has commenced

And will be pleased to Supply parties require.
ing same. Quality -iarantee I and no Cabbage.
The Subscriber is willing to give Instructions
in CIGAR, MAKING to one or two Young
Men who are desirous of ma-ing themselves
generally useful at the business. Terms made
knowii on application to
T. S,.N CHEZ.
Hamilton, June 13th, 1878.


I I Q -1-A


Argyle Street, opposite St. Paul's Church. Ex. ROVER
M MONUMENTS, HEADSTONES From De er
Tomb TABLETS Yellow Vacuunm-pan-i
Grave MARKS in polished Granite or Marble h '
Marble Mantel Register GRATES, &c., &e. White Vacuum-pan
GEORGE A SANFORD, Muscovado,
Proprietor., At Low Rates for C \
Designs and Prices miy be obtained from
W. T. JAMES, Esqr., Front St., Hamilton, S. S.
Bermuda. 6m Llamilton, 25th Fe')uary, 1878.


tr' isa,
in Barrels
do
in Barrels
SH.
ING HAM.


Take Notice!


,iII1E SUBSCRIn I{ begs to inform those
who are Indebted to him to come forward
and pay their respective Amounts on or before the
31st day of July, instant, otherwise their Ac-
counts will be placed, without fail, in legal
hands for collection.
A. R. THOMPSON.
Hamilton, July 13, 1878.

Notice.
A LL DEMANDS against the Estate of WIL-
LIAM THO()MAS itOIINSON, late of
Devonshire Parish, Stone Mason, deceased are
requested to be forwarded to MR. ROBERT
WHIrT, Pembroke, on or before the 31st day of
July, Instant.
AlII'ersons INDEBTEID to the said Estate
are required to make PA YM ENT by the above
date.


ROBLRT WHITE,
lifecn/tor.
MARY A. ROBINSON,
Executrix.
Ist Ju!y, 1878.

INoiCe.


LL l'ersons having Claims against the Es-
State of the late JON WILLIAM AD-
KINS, deceased, are requested to forward their
Accounts to me, not later than the 31st Instant.
M RY ANN AI)KINS,
Administratrix.
July 15, 1878.-'3 0

Notice.
4 LL Persons having CiLAIMS against the
I late HENRY TR'IlllNGHAM, Esqr.,
of Pagvt Parish, are requested to send-the same
to the Subs riher on or before' the first day oft
September next; and all -IN'DEIBTE1I) to the
Estate will please make P' \Y.1ENT by that
time.
D AN IEL T R111 INGil A M,
Executor.
llanmilii, J.auy. 2ndI July, J878:3- -

Final Notice.

3I'lERISONS INDEBpTRD to th( late Firm of
S. S. INGHAM & CO(), are requested
to call at the Office of Undersigned and
Settle their respective ACCOUN 'S as no further
indulgence can be given.
ACCOUNTS remaining unpaid or not Satis-
factorily arranged on or before 20th lugust
next, will be placed in legal hands for Collec-
tion.
S. S. l GIJ11M.
July 22nd, 1678.

Notice.

1illHE Undersigned requests that all Persons
having received their ACCOUNTS from
him to 31st May nltihno, will please arrange
same.
The Subscriber begs to acquaint some of
those that have allowed their Accounts to re-
main unsettled for a ileth of time, that the
next reminder they receive will be from a legal
quarter.
F.W. VOSSME R.
Reid St., Hamilton, June 3rd, 1878.






O I
Ia 1p .0 'MD .S m s




i I CF- ; 4 ..- BE0.1.-1DA
o '03 0-:



jg., t01 N|14 A a



0. s.l 97 ls15-,a g g f




; 01 -. i FA












North of Trinity Church,
1AMILTO1 A BERMUDA


Colonial secretary's Offce.
JULY 15TH, 1878.
IpTHE following ACTS have been passed by
the Legislature of ,Bermuda during h'e
present Session, viz:
No. 2.-An Act for the better Auditing of the
Public Accounts.
(In force to December 31, 1881.)
No. 3.-An Act to consolidate the Laws re-
lating to Vaccination.
(In force indefinitely.)-
No. 4.-An Act to provide for the appoint-
ment of Official Iarine Surveyors.
(In force for three years from date of assent.)
R. E. WEBSTER,
3 Colqnial Secretary

Colonial Secretary's Office,
JULY 22ND, 1878.


THE following Acts have been passed by
the Legislature of Bermuda during the
present Session.
No. 5.-An Act to authorise the War Depart-
ment to carry on Warlike experiments on
the Coast of these Islands. ,
No. 6.-An Act further to amend the Act to
make provision for the erection of a Light.
house on St. David's Island.
By His E.Ici.lency's Command,
RB. E. WEBSTER,
3 Colonial Secrelaa.

.YNotice to J rin(ers, &c.
MASTERSS OF VESSELS, Pilots, Mariners,
-1'- Boatmen, and, others concerned, are
hereby informed that pursuant to An Act
passed during this present Session of Parlia-
ment entitled, Act No. 5 of 1878, An Act- to
huthorise the ,War Department to carry on
Warlike Experiments on the Coasts of these
Islands-the Commanding Royal Engineer and
the Offleers and men under his orders will oc-
ecupy.frora the 29th Jutly, instant, till the 30th
Selptembbe'r next, the wattu space inside the Ship
Chanm. l' le.en Frt Cunningham and the Mili-
tary HoaPitl t St.. Georges, for the purpose of
practising- therein TORPEDO EXPERIMENTS, and
vessels and boats coming within this water
space will be liable to come into collision with
sunken obstruction and incur some danger.
The water space thus occupied will be marked
by Red Buoys at either extremity, and all par-
ties are warned against entering upon the re-
served space.
W. L. MORRISON,
Colonel, R.E., and C.R.E.
Prospect, 22nd July, 1878.

NOTICE,
To all whom it may Concern.

T HE Undersigned intending to
Close Business, respectfully requests all
Persons who are Indebted to him to pay their
respective Amounts on or before the 31st of
May next. All unsettled Accounts after that
date, unless satisfactory arrangement be made
for the same, WILL, WITHOUT FAIL, be
placed in legal hands for collection.
All Accounts against the Subscriber are re-
quested to be rendered not later than 1st of
June, for adjustment.
BE MIUDA PRODUCE purchased
throughout the Season, at .Market prices.
JOHN HARNETT,
Hamilton, 9th April, 1878.





On hand from last Importation.
2 fine Horses,
Suitable for ,leavy Draft. Height 115 & 152.
T'LHEO. OUTERBRIDGE,
V.S.
Hamiilton, July 1, 1878.*

W. 0. F. BAS OM E,
Mi),


DENTIST,
REID) STREET, HAMILTON,
Has Received a supply of


EAST,
the fol-


lowing
PREP.IRTIEET S
YOR THE TEETH
Put up by the well known Dentists Messrs. GA
BRIEL, Ludgate IHill, London.
SEDA DENT, or Cure for Toothache
COIALITIE TOOTH PAST, for Cleansing
and Improving tlie Teeth
ROYAL I)ENTIFRICE, gives the Teeth i
pearl-like' whiteness
wVIIITE GUTTA 'EIRCIIA ENAMEL, for
Stopping decayed Teeth
OS EU- EN AMEL TOPPING, warranted to
remain while and firm as the Tooth itself
ODONTALGIQUE ELIXIR, celebrated
Mouth Wash.
Hamilton, March 26th, 1877,


9,44U


IV 6-1 In




.~ ~- r~ *I ..
A. .. V


A~ ~.


p t
~. 4;F~.,/~ -' b. -.


- -.. ~ .-- -


EXTRACT fronim ETEOWOLOCICAML OBSER-
VATIONS taken under the direction of the Principal
Medical Officer, Prospect, Bermuda. Above the sea
151 feet.


rate


~~.~

~
~Qce


Wind
9a.m.

o
.-. -


1878.
July22 30-078
23 30-138
24 30-102
25 30-012
26 30-099
27 30-224
28 30-240


Temperature previous
24 hours.




0 0 0 0
88-3 80-0 152-0 68-1
90-3 78-2 150-2 70-3
81'3 71-2 107- ,66-1
82-Z 71-6 114-0 66-7
88-1 71:2 150-8 66,2
90-1 75-0 146-4 69-6
91-7 75-0 152-6 65-7


--

Hamilton, July 30, 1878.

BERMUDA.

Proceedings of the Honorable Leg-
islative Council.

Friday, 26th July, 1878.-Pursuant to adjourn-
ment the House met.
Present-His Honor Josiah Rees, Chief Justice
President,
The Honorable Augustus J. Musson,
1" William B. Gosling,
James H. Trimingham,
S" Eugenius Harvey,
Joseph-H. Harvey,
James Tucker, Recr. Genl.,
S Randal E. Webster, Colonia
Secretary.
The Resolve for granting the sum of 20 to
*wards the expenses of the International Bureau o
the General Postal Union, was read the second
time.
The House went into Committee thereon.
'The Hon. J. H. Trimingham in the Chair.
The Committee rose.
The Chairman reported the Resolve without
amendment.
The House adopted the Report and the rulb
being suspended, the Resolve was read a third tim4
and passed, and ordered to be laid before His Ex
cellency the Governor by the Colonial Secretary.
Adjourned to Tuesday next, the 30th instant, a


BERMUDA.

Abstract oj the Proceedings of the Honorabh
House of Assembly.
Friday, 26th May.-The Attorney General intro
duced a Bill to continue the Vagrant Act 1869-
which was read a 1st time.
The Attorney General introduced a Bill regu.
lasting the Salaries of the Officers of the Gaols-
which was read a 1st time.
Mr. Dill moved that the Bill entitled "An Ac
to amend the Act to provide and to authorize the
erection of Sheds on the wharves of the Town o
Hamilton," be now read a 3rd time.
Mr. Fraser moved that the Bill be recommitted
for general purposes-which-was negatived.
Ayes 7-Messrs. R D Fraper, W J Frith, S C
Outerbridge, J W Pearman, J N Smith, R Tynes
W H Wilkinson.
Nays 13-Messrs. F M Cooper, R J P Darrell
T N Dill, A J Frith, S B Gray, E H Gosling, S
A Harvey, H G Hunt, J Harnett, W S Masters
S A Masters, C Peniston, T J Wadson.
The Bill was read a 3rd time.
Ayes 16. Nays 7.
The Attorney General moved an amendment to
the 4th clause-which was agreed to.
Mr. Fraser moved to strike out all after the word
Part" in the 6th line of the 5th clause-whicl
was agreed to.
Mr. Wilkinson moved that a clause be added tc
limit the operation of the Bill to the end of the
year 1880-which was agreed to.
The Bill was then passed.
The Bill to confirm certain Ordinances of the
Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of th,
Town of Hamilton, was read a 2nd time an
committed.
Mr. J. W. Pearman in the Chair.
The House resumed.
The Chairman reported the Bill which wa
adopted and ordered to be engrossed.
The consideration of the Governor's Messag
'No. 22, relating'to the Lunatic Asylum, was defer
red to the next day of meeting.
- The Bill entitled An Act to amend the Law re
ratingg to Wills," was read a 3rd time snd passed.
The Bill entitled "An Act to amend the Law
relating to the Shipping of Merchant Seamen fo
'Bermuda Vessels," which was read a 3rd time and
passed.
';The Bill to settle a salary on the Keeper an
"Messenger of the Public Offices, was read a 2n<
time and committed.
Mr. Harnett in the Chair.
The Attorney General moved the 1st clause.
Mr. Fraser moved instead that the Keeper am
Messenger of the Public Offices in the Town o
SHamilton shall in future also serve as Door Keepe
and Messenger to H. M. Council and shall receive
a salary of a year out of the Public Treasur
tibe reckoned from the 1st day of July in th
present year in lieu of all salary and allowance
heretofore made to him out of the Public Treasur
-.which was affirmed.
Ayes 15-Messrs. Speaker, F M Cooper, R J
Darrell, N J Darrell, T N Dill, R D Fraser, W
Frith, H G Hunt, S A Masters, T A Outerbridge
"S C Outerbridge, J W Pearman, R Tynes, W I
Wilkinson, T J Wadson.
Nays 5.-Messrs. S B Gray, E H Gosling, S
Harvey, J N Smith, T F J Tucker.
Mr. Fraser moved that the blank be filled up 3.
The Altorneyv General moved that the blank b
filled up 70.
Mr. Hunt moved that the blank be filled up 4(
Mr. S C Outerbridge moved that the blank b
filled up 82-which was affirmed.


Ayes 12-Messrs. R J P Darrell, N J Darrel
TN Dill, R D Fraser, W J Frith, S A Master
IT' A Outerbridge, S C Outerbridge, J W Pearman
R'Tynes, W H Wilkinson, T J Wadson.
Nays 7-'Messrs. Speaker, F M Cooper, S
Gray, S A Harvey, H G Hunt, J N Smith, T
J Tucker.
T' he House resumed.
The Chairman reported progress and obtalne
leave to sit again.
, ,The Bill entity d An Act for compensating th
families of persons killed by accidents," was read
2nd time and committed.
Mr. J W. Pearman in the Chair.
The House resumed.
The Chaihman reported the Bill and it wa
adopted by the House.
Mr. Tynes from the committee appointed to ex
amine the Accounts for Public Works and Roads
l.re4etedi a -teport.
Mr. N. J. Darrell, presented a petition fror
certain inhabitants ol Smiths and Hamilton Par
isbes praying that a piece of ground at the Flatt


Ilill be conveyed to them for building a hearse Orders:
house. Police Bill.
Adjourned to Monday next. Compensation for loss of life Bill.
Gaol Officers' Salary Bill.


e The Attorney General moved that the Resolve
,es for paying the travelling expenses of the Receiver
y General be now read a second time.
Mr. Fraser took exception to the motion on a
p point of order, that the subject had been already
j considered in the present Session-which was over-
ruled by His Honor the Speaker.
The Resolve was read a second time and com-
mitted. Mr. E. Peniston in the Chair.
A The Attorney General moved the adoption of the
Resolve.
. Mr. S. C. Outerbridge moved that it be recom-
e mended to the House that a Committee be ap-
pointed to make periodical inspections of the mo-
, ney in the Treasury Chests in the Offices of the
be Receiver General and the Assistant Receiver Gen-
eral-which was not seconded.
l, Mr. Fraser objected to the adoption of the Re-
s, solve, and the Committee divided.
, For the adoption 4-Messrs. S B Gray, E H Gos-
ling, S A Harvey, I1 G Hunt.
B Against it 21-Messrs. Speaker, F M Cooper, R
F J P Darrell, N J Darrell, T N Dill, R D Fraser,
W J Frith, A J Frith, J M Hayward, T W Mer-
cer, W S Masters, S A Masters, T A Outerbridge,
ed S C Ouderbridge, J W Pearman, C Peniston, J N
Smith, T F J Tucker, R Tynes, W H Wilkinson,
e T J Wadson.
a The House resumed.
'The Bill to increase the efficiency of the Police
Force was again committed.
i Mr. J. W. Pearman in the Chair.
s Clauses 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, were agreed to.
Mr. Dill moved an addition to the llth Clause
._ -which was agreed to.
Is) 12th, 13th and 14th Clauses agreed to.
The House resumed.
m The Chairman reported progress and obtained
l. eave to sit again.
s Adjourned to Friday next,


Vagrant Act continuing Bill.
Fraud in Shipping Produce Bill.


Monday, 29th July -Mr. Dill presented a Report
on the Accounts of the Crown Agents for Sta-
tionery, &c.
On motion of Mr. Clarence Peniston the House
went into Committee to consider the Governor's
Message No. 22, relating to the Lunatic Asylum.
Mr. J. W. Pearman in the Chair.
Mr. C. Peniston moved that it be recommended
to the House to provide for additions and improve-
ment of the Lunatic Asylum on the Plan submit-
ted by His Excellency the Governor to the House
-which was agreed to.
The House resumed and adopted the Resolution
of the Committee.
Mr. C. Penisten introduced a Resolve providing
for additions and improvements to the Lunatic
Asylum-which was read a first time.
The Attorney General introduced a Bill to con-
tinue and amend the Law for the payment of Me-
dical Witnesses-which was read a first time.
The Resolve providing for the expense of Official
Visitors to the Lunatic Asylum, was read a second
time and committed.
-Mr. Harnctt in the Chair.
The House resumed.
The Chairmah reported the Resolve, and it was
adopted and ordered to be engrossed.
The Resolve granting a Gratuity to Mrs. Cath-
erine Watson, retired Second Matron of the Luna-
tic Asylum, was read a second time and committed.
Mr. W. S. Masters in the Chair.
The Attorney General moved the adoption of the
, Resolve,
Mr. S. C. Outerbridge moved the following in-
stead :-" Whereas a Petition was sent to the Le-
gislature during its last Session by Mrs. Catherine
Watson, asking for pecuniary relief on her having
to resign her situation as Assistant Matron at the
Lunatic Asylum, whereupon a vote of Ten Pounds
was passed by this House for that purpose,*which
1 failed to receive the concurrence of the Council:
And whereas His Excellency the Governor in the
- present Session recommends her claim to the fa-
f vorable consideration of the Legislature : Resolved
d -that the Receiver General do pay to the order of.
Mrs. Catherine Watson the sum of 10 as a gratu-
ity on her resigning her place under the above cir-
cumstances'-which was agreed to.
The H[louse resumed.
t The Chairman reported the Resolve with the
blank filled up, and it was adopted and ordered to
e be engrossed.
e The four following Messages from His Excel-
- lency the Governor :-
(No. 23.)
t R. M. LAFFAN,
Major-General,
Governor and Commander-in- chief.
The Governor has honor to transmit for the in-
formation of the Honorable House of Assembly the
Report dated 17th July instant, of the Pilot Com.
missioners, accompanying their yearly account with
- the Public of Bermuda.
Mount Langton, 27th July, 1878.
(No. 24.)
SR.M. LAFFAN,
Major-General,
t Governor and Commander-in-Chief.
e The Governor has the honor to transmit for the
f information of the Honorable House of Assembly
the Report dated 17th July instant, of the Light-
d house Commissioners, together with the Accounts
and Vouchers for Lighthouse service for quarters
ending respectively 31st December 1877, 31st
, March and 30th June, 1878..
Mount Langton, 27th July, 1878.
, (No. 25.)
S R.M. LAFFAN,
' Major-General,
Governor and Commander-in-Chief.
The Governor has the honor to lay before the
o Honorable the House of Assembly the Report of the
Committee appointed to examine the Post Master
d General's Accounts for the Quarter ending the 30th
h June last.
Mount Langton, 27th July, 1878.
0 (No. 26.)
3 R.M. LAFFAN,
Major-General,
Governor and Commander-in. Chief.
e The Governor has the honor to communicate 'to
e the Honorable the House of Assembly copy of a
Letter addressed to him at his request on 9th in-
stant by the Attorney General, explaining how
owing to the delay which occurred in the receipt
here of the confirmation by the Crown of the Act
s No. 5 of 1875 he, the Attorney General, was de.-
prived of the sum of 14 I/, part of the Salary
e granted to him under that Act in commutation of
" fees of Office.
It will be seen from the Attorney General's state-
" ment that the fees of his Office had been calculated
for the purpose of commutation at 70 a year, and
' that in the year 1876 they would-had they not
r been commuted-have amounted to more than that
sum; but that owing to the accidental delay in the
Receipt of the confirmation of the Act by the Crown
d the Attorney General only received for the year
d 1876 the sum of 59 I9/ instead of the 70 granted
by the Act.
The Governor trusts the Legislature will find
means to repay to the Attorney General this sum of
d 14 1/ which wasdeducted from his salary for the
f year 1876, in consequence of an accidental delay in
r the Colonial Office,
e Mount Langton, 29th July, 1878.


of a financial company for introducing railways on
the Island. Arrangements are also being made to
lay a submarine cable to Alexandria, which will
give direct communication with England. Among
other schemes brought to the surface by the Eng-
lish occupation of Cyprus is that of- the Euphrates
Valley Railway. The Duke of Sutherland and
others are in active communication with the Gov-
ernment on the subject, and it is stated that if the
Anglo-Turkish Convention proves successful it is
probable that England will be asked to guarantee
the interest on the bonds of the proposed railway.

A British Ship-of-War has been sent from St.
Johns, Newfoundland, to La Scie, a settlement on
the northern coast of the Island, to enquire into the
circumstances of the ejection from that place in
June last--and to which we referred in a former
number-of a person named John Clance, an indus-
trious Newfoundland fisherman, by a party from a
French Ship-of-War under the direction of her
Commander, Captain Piqriorn Prudent. Clance's
intention was to cultivate the soil and to prosecute
the fishery at certain seasons; with that view he
had built a dwelling house and erected flakes, &c.
It is to be regretted that the grave question of the
right of settlement in this district of Newfoundland
1 between the British and French Governments has
never been finally settled. The French claim that
the right to fish on the shores designated by the
t treaties is exclusive. This the Newfoundlanders
have never admitted and the Imperial Government
has never sanctioned. It is quite time that a ques-
tion which has been the cause of much trouble at
different. periods, during the past sixty years or
More, should now be brought to a settlement.


CUSTOM HOUSE-HAM ILTON.
ENTERED.
July 27-Brigt. Fleetwing, Braybrooke, London ; goods
for merchants.-Agents, N. T. Butterfield & Son.
Brigt. T. H. A. Pitt, Outerbridge, Demerara; rum,
sugar and molasses to T. H. Pitt.
CLEARED.
July 23-Schr. Rockie E. Yates, Hopkins, Jackson-
ville, Florida. ;
25-Mail Steamer Canima, Liddicoat, New York; 67
packages brandy.
Schr. Annie Florence, Hutehings, Demerara; 562 bls.
and 323 boxes potatoes, 55 boxes onions.
26-Barque Eliza Barss, f1ollis, New York.
CUSTOM HOUSE--ST. GEORGE.
ENTERED.
July 22-Brig Kestrel, Ei'an Cardiff; coal to W. C.
Hyland & Co.
Schr. 'Wesley Abbott, Johnson, anchored in Murray's
Anchorage to land Captain who was sick.-Agents,
W. C. hyland & Co.
23-Schr. Maria, Ingham, Demerara; rum, sugar and
molasses to J. R. Duerden.
26-Brigt. Dante, Morrison, St. Kitts; molasses,
bound to St. Johns, Newfoundland ; short of water;
anchored in Murray's Anchora._ge.-Agent, John S.
Darrell.
CLEARED.
July 26-Whaling Barque Hadlry, Edwards, in ballast
for New Bedford.
Danish Brig Janet, Hansen, inward cargo sugar;
to Channel for orders.
27-Brigt. Dante, Morrison, St. Johns, Newfoundland.
PASSENGERS ARRIVED.
In the R. M. Steamer Beta from St. Thomas on 21st
instant :-Dr. S. Crane and Messrs. John D. Smith, A.
R. White, Henrique Jose Vancchbr.'
In the T. H. A. Pitt from Demerara Mr. William H.
Watlington.
PASSENGERS SAILED.
In the R. M. Steamer Beta on 22nd instant for Hali-
fax :-Rev. Mr. Purvis, W.M., and Mrs. Purvis, Mr.
Harley Trott and Mr. Richard Gorham and child.-
Second Cabin, Mrs. Parish, William Montegrene, and
4 Military.
In the Mail Steamer Canima, for New York, on
Thursday last :-Mrs. J. H. Trimingham, Mrs. Mark
James and Miss James, Mrs. T. A. Darrell, Miss
Loosemore, Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Middleton. Mr. and
Mrs. W. B. De Garmo, C. M. Allen, Esqr., U. S. Con-
sul,Messrs. W. DeGarmo. R. Bennett, Henrique Jose
Mancche, T. D. Trimingham., J. C. Keeney, A. R.
White, F. D. S. Nash. W. Kerrisk, J. A. Johnston,
D. G. Lane, Walter H. Jones. Second Class-Mr.
and Mrs. Ed. McCarten and 2 children, James A.
Lusher, Nicholas C. Lusher--and 5 on Deck.
In the Eliza Barss for New York, Mr. Stewart Hol-
lis.
The French Steam Corvette Alecton, Captain Charel
de Ruille, C. L. H., from Martinique, left St. Georges
on Sunday evening last, bound to Brest, France, hav-
ing obtained a supply of coal, water, &c.
The Commander and Officers expressed their grati-
fication for the hospitable entertainments by His Ex-
cellency Sir R. M. Laffan, K.C.M.G., R.E., and the
Officers of the Garrison stationed at St. Georges.
Captain Braybrook of the Brigt. Fleetwing, from
London, reports that on July 4th, in Lat. 27-4S N.,
Long. 37'38 W. spoke FrenDch War-Steamer Hamelin,
under sail only, appeared to be taking soundings.
July 21st, in Lat. 32"06 N., Long. 60-57 W. spoke
Schr. Thomas R. Spilsburg from Philadelphia for St.
Thomas.

CYPRUS, the newly ceded Territory by Turkey
to Great Britain, is an excellent Military and Naval
Station in the Eastern quarter of the Mediterra-
nean, conveniently situated in front of the mouths
of the Suez Canal. In Beeton's Dictionary of
Geography we find the following description of
this Island:-
CYPRUS, si-prus, an island of Asiatic Turkey, near
the coast of Asia Minor in the Mediterranean.-
Area, estimated at 4,200 square miles.-Dese. Fer-
tile, and nearly traversed from east to west by two
lofty chains of mountains, having between them the
valley of the Pedia. :Mount Santa Croce, a moun-
tain called Olympus by the ancients, is considered
to be the culminating point of Cyprus, being about
8,000 feet above the level of the sea.-Pro. Corn,
wine, fruits, cheese, cotton, wool, salt, madder,
hemp, timber and colocynth. The corn is of ex-
cellent quality; but wine is the staple product of
the island. All the valuable kinds are white, the
red being merely used as the common beverage of
the country. The apricots of Cyprus are delicious;
many varieties of the gourd and pumpkin are also
produced.- Manf. Carpets, printed cottons, and
leather, are the principal. Pop. 200,000. Lat. 350
N. Lon. between 320 and 340 40' E.-Cyprus is
thought to have obtained its name from Cyprus,
one of its early kings, though others say it was de-
rived from a certain fragrant tree or flower. It
has been celebrated as the residence of Venus, sur-
named Cypris, who was the chief deity of the island,
and to whose service many places and temples were
consecrated. The Greeks made themselves masters
of it,,and it was taken from them by the Romans.
Since 1571 it has been subject to the Turks, who
took it in that year from the Venetians. The in-
habitants were exceedingly ingenious and industrious
in former times, thoi.gh they were much given to
pleasure and dissipation, but in the present day the
misrule of the Turkish government has reduced the
bulk of the people to a condition of the utmost
wretchedness.

THE DEVELOPMENT OF CYPRUS.
LomDoN, July 14.-The Government is busy with
the details of the military and civil establishment
in the island of Cyprus.: A postmaster and other
officials for the administration of the Government
have been appointed. General Sir Garnet Wolseley
has already, it is said, under consideration a scheme


Dockyard Chapel ....................
St. George's ........ ... ........
St. D avid's............ ..............
H amilton............... ......
Sm iths..... ..... ............. ....
D evonshire...........................
Pembroke............................
Trinity..... ........... .. ....... .....
Paget .... ................. ........ .
W arwick......... ..................
Southampton ........................
Sandys ............ .............. . .
And on July 21st in the Military Chapel
Prospect ..................... )


s d.
0 0
4. 3
10 9
16 3
177 0
0 8
10 9
13 7
14 2
5 9
12 10
8 0
16 6


56 10 6

E A large and handsome Chandelier, with
twelves globes, has been lately presented to St.
James's Churdh, Sandy's Parish-the kind and
generous gift, we understand, of William C. Jones,
Esqr., of the firm of Messrs, Jones & Lough, New
York.

A YoUNG BERMUDIAN.-Under the head "Uni-
versity Intelligence," in the Dublin Freeman's
Journal of June 18, we find in the list of Candidates
who had passed the Second University Examination
in Medicine, the name of
J. W. B. Hodsdon, of Q. C. Belfast.
We congratulate Mrs. Hodsdon on her son's suc-.
cess full progress in the profession he has chosen.

SoME FINE FRUIT.-Mr. G. 0. Whitney who re-
turned from a visit to the United States by the
Mail Steamer Canima on the 21st instant, brought. us
a splendid American Water Melon of about 20 lbs.
in weight and a lot of Whortle Berries, both of
which had been preserved in ice, and at same time
several bunches of Grapes, the production of a vine
at his place in Port Royal, which had been given to
him by our late Governor His Excellency Lieut.-
General Sir J. Henry Lefroy, C.B. The melon was
delicious; of the Wortle Berry, we feared we had
forgotten the flavour, for years have elapsed since
we last saw them gathered from the bush, but their
fl.ivour was quickly'recognised." The grapes were,
to our taste, very superior in flavour, large in size
and the bunches full. We were reminded daily for
the week of Mr. Whitney's liberality.

THE BEST ONION.-Professor W. J. Beal, of the
Michigan Agricultural College, U. S., has recently
published a report of his experiments on vegetable
seed obtained from various countries. Careful
tests were made with nineteen varieties of that
"pungent and piunetratinxu manifestation of the
vegetable wild '-the onion. The Professor re-
marks that a few of the White Globe-which kept
longer without sprouting than any other kind-
were carefully set out for seed, and he offers the
suggestion that if attention was persistently given
to this quality, and only those planted for seed
which are found nearest perfect at the latest date
in Spring, the result would be the production in
due time of a race which would resist decay to
the greatest possible extent. Doubtless the care-
ful gardener might easily add thus to the native
strength which is in onion. Of Tomatoes, Little
is too small; Trophy-when the plants are started
early-is preferred for late pickings; the Conquer-
ror is rightly named for early use."

Quite a shoal of Sharks made theirappearance at
Ireland Island on one or two evenings of the past
week. On their second visit some adepts at fishing
were prepared with suitable hooks, bait and lines, to
give a reception which master shark did not contem-
plate. The shoal came and two of their number
took the bait and hooks and soon, willing hands
with much cheering, took hold of the lines and landed
the much dreaded fish high on land, where they
were soon despatched., One measured seven feet
ten iuehie, in length, and the second over six feet.
One of the several, whidh, it was thought' would
measure fourteen feet, could not be induced to take
the bait.


PROSPECT GARRISON CROQUET CLUB.
W:'itl,: permitting, there will be a meeting of the
Prospect Garrison Croquet Club on Thursday next,
Auust.1st, at. 430 p.m., when the Band of the 46th
Regiment will play the following selection :-
PROGRAMME.
Q.wuArille................. Vert Vert...............Offenbach,
Overture.....................Zampa............. Herold,
W altz ........................ n ......... ....rGung'l,
Selection................1 Crociato..............Meyerbeer,
Galop.......................Paulinen...............Faust,
Cavatina................. riele...................Bach.
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN !

TIMLIN'S NARROW.
There is a subject which it appears extremely de-
sirable to bring under the notice of His Excellency
the Governor at this time--we mean the improve-
ment of the Channel at Timlin's Narrows.
It has been generally supposed that there are 18
feet at low water in that Channel, but we believe
that accurate soundings would shew that not more
than 16 feet 6 inches can be depended upon.
There is no doubt that it is only with extreme care
and vigilance that the "Canima" can be safely
taken through this channel. That steamer has a
length of 246 feet over all-a beam of 26 feet, and
draws, when loaded, 14 feet 6 inches at least. -
Steering about S. W. to W. on approaching
Timlin's Narrows, she is met by a detached rock
and a projecting point on the starboard bow, and
by a point of the island on the -port bow, compell-
ing the pilot sharply to starboard his helm which,
when loaded deep at low water, the steamer will,
with difficulty, answer.
Probably never before&hs there been presented
to the authorities such an op- :,rtunity of impri:ovinia
this Channel as that afforded by the presence in
these Islands of the Submarine Mining Company of
the Royal Engineers; and we cannot doubt that if
His Excellency the Governor should approve of the
suggested improvement, the sanction of the Home
authorities would be obtained for the execution of
a service of such vital importance to Bermuda.
We believe that there is a sum of about 350
available for expenditure upon this work, and we
cannot but hope that some steps will before long
be taken to render Timlin's Narrows a safe and
comparatively easy channel. ",

a On July 7th, the third Sunday after Trin-
ity, a service of Thanksgiving to Almighty GoD for
the fruits of the earth, was held in the several
Churches in connection with the Church of Eng-
land in these Islands.
On that occasion Sermons were preached and
Collections made in behalf of Missions to the hea-
then, especially those carried on by the Society
for the Propagation of the Gospel in foreign parts
in Tinnevelly in South India.
We are told that in that district and its neigh-
borhood more than 16,000 natives have applied to
Bishop Caldwell for Christian instruction with a
view to baptism. For the preparation of these
catechumens seventy native catechists and ten ad-
ditional clergymen are required and are asked for.
The Society in England has made a special appeal
to the Church at large for contributions to enable it
to supply this need with as little delay as possible.
We subjoin a list of the collections in the several
Churches. The total amount, 56 10/6, was trans-
mitted to the Treasurers of the Society for the Pro-
pagation of the Gospel by the last mail to England.


I i
From the New York lWorld, July 17.
FROM SAN STEFANO TO BERLIN.
We discussed yesterday the chief features. so far
as general European interests are concerned, of the
new map of Eastern Europe drawn by the peace-
makers at Berlin. There is, however, another point
of view which must be considered, another force
which cannot be disregarded-that of the interests,
aspirations and present political passions of the Rus-
sian nation. If the Congress of Berlin had taken
place before the Tuirco-Ruissian war there would
not have been the slightest doubt possible as to the
durabilility of the international measures adopted by
it. Coming as it does after the war which has cost
the Russian people Ptreams of blood and millions of
money, it scarcely cau be expected to be as effective
'in insuring to Europe a steady and solid peace.
"I have the honor of congratulating Your Majesty
S" on the conclusion of peace. GOD has granted us
the happiness of concluding the holy work begun
"by Your Majesty, and on the anniversary of the
I "liberation of the Russian serfs Your Majesty has
"accomplished the liberation of the Sclavonic
" Christians from the Musulinan yoke."
These were the ter in i which the telegram of
the Grand Duke Nicholas announcing the conclusion
of the treaty of Sau Stefano was couched. Accord-
ing to the stipulations (f that treaty Bulgaria, inclu-
ding part of Rouinelia, with two seaports on the
JEgean, was to be declared entirely independent.
Russia receives from Turkey an indemnify of X12,-
000,000 .serling besides Kars, Bavazid. Ardahan,
Batoum and Erzeroum, wilh the adjoining territory.
Compared with the treaty of S.an Stefano, the issue
of the Berlin Congress is fbr Russia a political
failure. The Russian nation cannot but feel that
England alone has reaped rte actual fruits of a war
of which Russia has felt but the hardships :aud
sacrifices. Even the treaty of San Stefano fell short
of what public opinion in Russia expected. The
complete expulsion of the Turkish power from


IS THE OLEANDER POISONOUS.
From, the American A.griculilrist, for July.
The different varieties of the Oleander (.erium Ole-
ander), so popular as house plants in cool climates, are
in warm countries often cultivated as ornamental tre(e,
and used as hedge plants. The tree, in a suitable cli-
mate, will reach the height of 20 to 30 feet, and forms
a most b autiful object, both in its leaves and flowers.
But with all its ,ttr:ctivcness. it has the misfortune to
be highly poisonous, a quality not so likely to be
manifested when grown as a house plant, but one which
becomes of serious importance when it is in common
cultivation in the open grounds. Some months ago
one of our correspondents in Bermuda, where Olean.-
der hedges are very common, wrote to ask if the tree
could poison the herbage around it, as he had found
animals that grazed near the Oleander hedge were fre-
quently made seriously ill-a trouble which might be
readily caused by a few fallen leaves. L-ter accotuisi
come from another British Colony, New Southl Wale.,
of the death of six cows at Sydney; the animals were
were led upon era., recently cut from a lawn on
which the Oleander grew, and its leaves became
mingled with the fodder.,
It is quite likely that the poisonous principle is more
active in climates which will allow the plant to grow
continuously in the open air: -till, while we do not
remember to have heard any casualty from house plants
it is well to know of the danger and be on guard
a~finst it. St. Louis, Mo., may almost be called the
Ci~v of Oleanders; such is their abundance, that it
would seem that every house has one or more bushes,
andl the markets are gay with them. We should ex-
p ct accidents here, if any where, from the plant. A
cnpe is recorded in Europe. in which fatal results fol-
lowed eating meat in which a skewer of Oleander
wood had been used.
[Hundreds of cattle have died in. Bermuda from
thl'ir eating freely of grass grown under the Oleander
tree. The poison known to be contained in the leaves
o' the Oleander is Hydrosyanic acid.-Ed. R. G.]

HAMILTON, BERMUDA, July 26th, 1878.
DEAR MR. EDITOR,-I would like to crave a small
space in your valuable paper, to make a few re-
marks in regard to a very pleasant entertainment
participated in, on the evening of Tuesday last the
23rd instant. The occasion was that of the closing
of the dancing classes lately held by Mr. W. B.
DeGarmo in these Islands. The principal number
present, consisted of the afternoon and. evening
classes held at Hamilton, with a few members of
the classes in Somerset and Smiths Parish. The
evening being very warm, was rather unfavorable
to pleasant dancing, but the amusement was kept
up by the "young folks" very energetically, they
seeming to be bent on having a good time," in
spite of the hot weather. The ex-eri.ises of the
evening were opened with a Waltz, which was fol-
lowed by several figures of the German," which
were very graceful and interesting, particularly the
Searf Figure." The Norwegian Lancers, Polkas,
Mazurkas, Quadrilles followed each other in suc-
cession, and dancing was kept up with great vivac-
ity until quarter to twelve, when the March"
formed a conclusion to the evening's entertainment.
Quite a number of visitors from the different parts
of the Island were present. The whole may be
considered to have been a complete succes-, nud our
sincere thanks are due to Mr. DeGarmo, for the
great care and attention he has given and the ef-
forts he has made to render his classes both amus-
ing and beneficial to the pupils. We trust that it
will not be long before he again visits Bermuda
where he may always be assured of a hearty wel-
come. Mr. DeGarmo left yesterday in the "Cani.
ma." May he have a safe and pleasant voyage
home.
Yours most respectfully,
ONE OF THE PUPILS.

For tI/e Royal Gazette.
SOMERSET, July 27, 1878.
MR. EDIToR,-Your article, in your last issue,
uppn the Potatoe, is good. A few more words ad-
ded thereto will make it complete.
When all the eyes are taken out of the tuber, ex-
cepting at the nose end, take a chip off the bottom
end of the tuber; plant it nose down; the sprouts
will come up all around the tuber; the first three
joints of the sprouts is where the root starts from,
and new tubers form, and they are then right in
the middle of their fodder (uianure,) at once to feed
upon. Taking the chip off the bottom end is to
quicken the decay of the old-seed, after the young
roots have got to work from the sprouts. When-
ever the old seed keeps sound and does not decay
the quantity and quality of the potatoes pl)roduced
are very inferior. Potatoes always rise in the
ground as they grow. I have known some kinds to
throw themselves completely out of the ground. If
I had manure in the condition I should like it to
be, I would put my manure on the top ofthepota-
toe; that is, plant the potato firs-t and place the
manure afterwards, and then the roots and pota-
toes would be in the midst of their fodder all the
time. I am supposing that the planter will use
sound, mature seed. There are in this section
some men who get their potatoes Uip early before they.
are ripe, and when the price comes down low they
house them, and when planting time comes round
they plant these potatoes that are not half matured,
I have talked to them, but with a wise shake of the
head and cocked a little upon one side, they guessed
they would answer. Let them rip.
| I am, Mr. Editor,
I Yours most respectfully,
JAMES PILLING,
at J. F. Burrows, Esq.









Europe; the dismantling of ,all the forts on the
Bo:;pborns and the Dardanelles with Constantinople
a free city controlled by an European international
c'umi-sion--uehb was the solution of the Eastern
Qiie.-tion (bat itlI- Russian people, without distinction
of class or party, expected.
If 'be treaty of San Stefano fell short of this
mark, the decisions of the Congress are obviously
such as to arouse a permanent indignation and ill-
feeling in Russia. All Russian correspondents agree
in deser ing the present state of affairs in the
Russiann capital na highly critical. Public discontent
has ri.en to a pitch unprecedented in Russian history.
Revolutionary pamphlets and newspapers are circu-
lated in open defiance of the spies of the secret
police. In these publications the representatives of
Russia at the Congress are denounced as traitors and
cowards; the Czar himself as well as the autocratic
system of Govermueint. is held responsible for the
shame and dishonor now cast upon Russia, and the
nation ie called upon to rise and to shake off a yoke
it has already borne too long.
The most remark.lble feature of this movement is
that it is not confined to the o-,. called Nihilist' classes.
The langunpe hS-ld in tho r'!ea:,t salons of the capital
is not less violent than wera the Socialist diatribes of
Lavroffor Outine. Even in the army, among the
officers, a general feeling of dtscontent prevails,
which, eombini'd with the fact that many officers of
the line have long ago been secret adepts in the most
advanced radical doctrines, renders the support
which the Government can eventually find in its
bayonets highly doubtful- Berlin may yet become
the Sedan of the victor of San Stefano.
The Russian Governmefit has thus, by its weak-
ness and irresolution. evoked the very spectre the
fear of which has led it on from*'San Stefano to
Berlin-the spectre of revolution. It is not to be
denied that the Emperor Alexander has, in the eyes
of his people, missed a splendid opportunity of beC-
coming a great man. If after the victories before
Plevna he had given to the campaign a more decisive
character by marching straight on to Constantinople
Sand Gallipoli; if at the same time, in defiance of
English threats, he had appealed directly to the
Russian people for money and men by calling a
national assembly of representatives and awarding a
free constitutional government, it would have had no
worse a chance abroad and a far better chance at
home. A nation exalted by the enthusiasm of vic-
tory and liberty combined would have proved a force
equal to more sacrifices, to a longer and more diffi-
cult war, and Alexander II would have deserved
that surname of "liberator," which a few servile
Russian writers are even now inclined to confer on
him.
As matters stand, however, the Russian people
are justified in thinking that they have reaped from
the war nothing but humiliation. In the very fact
'that the separate convention between Russia and
Turkey had to be submttted to the ratification of an
European congress, whereas the Anglo-Turkish
treaty concerning Cyprus was not so submitted,
there lies a humiliation which cannot be but keenly
felt in Russia. The restrictions concerning the for.
tifications of Batoum, which render the new acqui-
sitions in Asia practically valueless, constitute another
point which will deeply wound Russian pride. Such
national humiliations are not easily forgotten. If
the people render their own Government in the
first. place responsible for them, they are on the
other hand not likely to forget that traditional foe
whose successful policy has inflicted on them these
humiliations.
Thus out of the decisions of the present congress
there arises the germ of future difficulties. The
peace of 1878 is in all probability but a truce.
Whatever events may arise in the internal political
life of Russia, she is left with every incitement to
l seize on the first occasion to take a revenge on Eng-
lIanvur e1-'ictory of Berlin."
THE WAR IN SOUTH AFRICA.
LONDON, July 13.-The Cape Town Standard
and Mail, in summing up the results of the war with
the natives in South Africa, which is now ended,
says: Only a few small parties of the enemy
remain, atid it will not be long before they will be
disposed of. Congabele, Stock, Umfanta, Tini, and
other chiefs have been taken prisoners; Sandilli,
Dutwana, and Seyolo have been killed ; Dimba has
surrendered, and the only man of influence who is
s'ill at liberty is Kreli. The loss of life on the side
of the insurgents has been much more severe than
the natives had experienced in any previous out-
break, and it may be said that their power as a peo-
ple has been utterly destroyed."
MONTREAL, July 13.-Everything passed off
quietly last night, and this morning the troops from
outside the city are being sent to their homes. The
Orange Young Britons had a procession between 9
and 10 o'clock last night in the western suburbs.
They were not molested.
The Orangemen arrested yesterday will come up
for preliminary examination at the Police Court on
the 18th, on a charge of being members of an illegal
society.
It is understood that the Dominion Government
has appointed Hon. Edward Barren Chandler as
Lieut.-Governor of New Brunswiek in place of Hon.
S. L. Tilley, resigned.
RAISING THE "EURYDICE."-The British naval
and training ship Eurydice, which capsized on the
24th March last on the south coast of the Isle of


~Wi~LbY. ~A. ____________________________ k


Wight, has been lifted and moved 180 feet into
Sundown Bay. The process of raising the ship will
be resumed on the next fine day.
There are rumors in England of a new creation
of Ipeers. to include Sir Stafflord Northcote, Mr.
Henry Chaplin, the turfman and M. P., and Mr.
Berentord Hope, Lord Salisbury's brother-in-law.
The discovery has just been made that Bishop Ra-
velles and othei French missionaries aye held confined
in the capital of Corea and are in danger of death. A
*call has been made for their rescue.
The New Zealand Government according to a
recent despatch, has offered the sum of $25,000, or
$50 a ton for .the first 500 tons of beetroot sugar
Sqdiiduced in either of the two large islands.
... --Die educational institutions of New Zealand are
magnificently endowed with lands which ultimately
i may make them .very wealthy. Fully 600,000
S acres are altogether set apart for this purpose.


Despatches, from Fiji give an account of a great
earthquake at Tanna, New Hebrides, which raised
the land along the shore, and harbor about twenty
feet. Millions of fish were throw up and destroyed.
The correspondent of the Western Morning Neios
at Zanzibar wciten that the slave trade is largely on
the increase since the withdrawal of the cruisers,
thus leaving two thousand miles of coast unwatched,
The exorbitant charge of a Fontainebleau hotel at
which the Shah and his suite dined and slept has
been much talked of. The bill sent in amounted to
$2,840, and ultimately $1,800 was paid. The fol-
lowing items are given as a sample: Flowers, $300;
20 chickens, $80; 1 cigar $1; 4 rooms, $40; 2
boxes cigarettes, $10; 12 peaches, $24; 1 melon,
$12.
A political concession, most important in principle,
has lately been granted to the natives in India by the
Imperial Government. A memorial was presented
by certain Parsees, requesting permission to form a
Volunteer corps. To this the Viceroy replied.that
though he deemed it undesirable to permit separate
1 corps, nevertheless, if any natives, Parsees or others,
understanding the English language, inclined to
3 adopt. the uniform, and willing and able to perform
the duties of the position, desired to be enrolled
' among the European members of volunteer corps,
he would be glad to see them so enrolled.


iBIRTH, at St. Georges on Tuesday last, the WIFE Postponed Sale.
of Henry H. Gilbert, E.ir., of a SON.
.......... in Sandy's Parish, on 26th July, the WIFE of '
Mr. T. C. Rance, of a SON. The Sale of the Remaining Effects
........., at Shelly Bay on 23rd instant, MRS. JABEZ OF
OUTERBRIDGE, of a SON.,OF
MARRIED, at St. John's Church, Pembroke, on Brinade MRaor ek
Thursday last, the 25th instant, by the Rev. Mark Brigade Major,
James, Rector of Pembroke and Devonshire, MR. JOHN Advertised for Friday last was Postponed,
HENRY RICHARDSON to Miss ARISHA ADAMS. till 12 o'clock,
.......... at the B. M. E. Place of Worship, Hamilton, To
on 25th inst., by the Revd. R. Miller MR. JONES W. To-morrow W ednesday,
PLACE.to ANNA LOUISA, eldest daughter of Mr. Fran-
cis Butterfield. 31st Instant,
SWhen it will take place at .LOLA, near Pros-
DIED at St. Georges on the 21st of July, MR. SAM- pet.
UEL J. BASHAM, aged 55 years; leaving a widow and The Articles Comprisein part:-
eight children to mourn their loss. __ RON BEDSTEADS Rocking CHAIR
... Cane Seat CHAIRS
FUR NIT U RE SA LTE. Chair BED, with Cushions
WHAT-NOT and BASKET TABLES
Boot RACK and STAND
WE HAVE BEEN INSTRUCTED Looking GLASSES Foot STOOLS
TO SELL, Door MATS Cocoa Nut MATTING
SA Oil Floor CLOTHS
At Publt C AuctUon BEDS PILLOWS BOLSTERS
AT AN EA LYDATEBLANKETS, single and double-
AT AN EARLY DATE, PICTURES Bedroom CROCKERY
At OLIVE ILL CUPBOARD Meat SAFE
S, REFRIGERATOR
THE RESIDENCE OF THE White Handled KNIVES, Carvers
E S9 T l sB CROCKERY, in variety
Holt. R F i T ,. CLASSWARE, Consisting of
Colonial Secretary, Water BOTTLES, cut and plain
THE WHOLE OF HIS Finger GLASSES TUMBLERS
i-"0" I Wine GLASSES DECANTERS, &c.
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE Preserve GLASSES
LAMPS CANDLESTICKS
Cre STAND!


Ox., Ox., M;.
Full particulars and day of Sale given in a
future advertisement. I
B. W. WALKER & CO., 1


Auctioneers.
Hamilton, July 29th, 1878.

NOTICE.

Postponement of Sale.

The SALE of the EFFECTS of the late
,. W. A ADI 7 S,
Advertised for THIS DAY is POSTPONED
until further notice.
W. J. HENEY,
Auctioneer.


Hamilton,


30th July, 1878.


Notice.

The Auction Sale of

PR PE TY
Belonging to FELIX SMITH of Sandy's
Parish, Advertised to take place on THURS-
DAY, I st August,


Cruet STAND "
Large Lot of Kitchen UTENSILS
ALSO,
I Comfortable CARRIAGE
1 Set of Single HARNESS
BRIDLES ROLLERS
Horse CLOTHING Head STALL
Chaff Cutting MACHINE
Horse COLLAR
SPURS BRUSHES, &c.


And at same time.
2 PICTURES, Oil 1 CHAIR
1 Wire MATTRESS 1 Small CARPET
2 Small Spirit LAMPS
1 Large Spirit LAMP, with Saucepans
1 Green Sofa BEDSTEAD
1 Tin Foot BATH
B. W, WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, July 30th, 1878.

AUCTION SALE.

WE WILL SELL,

AT PUBLIC AUCTION,
Under the. 1k ig Shed,
At 12 o'clock,


Is Postponed. On Thursday next,
I Tl\ AT T-.1 f% 11^ 1*"y -r 7t T'


JUOHIN FOWL&
29th July, 1878.

JUST RECEIVED,
all lz D3'MnAIRA .
Ex Brigantine T. H. /. Pitt,'
pHNS. Bright MOLASSES
B!s. Vacuum Pan and Muscovado SUGAR
Sweet POTATOES per 100 lbs.
Bags CxH \RCOAL and FIREWOOD per M

ALSO ON HAND,
B LS. FLOUR and Corn ME1L
Bags CORN and BiRAN
Tubs and Tins of BUTTER
Tins LARD Boxes STARCH
CANDLES SOAP OATS
LUMBER &c.
CHEAP FOR CASI.


THOSE.


H. PITT.


Front Street, Hlamilton,
30th July, 1878.

Wanted to Purchase,
250 Barrels

UT A T SU E L
OTATO ES,
Please apply to
J. R. DUERDEN,
St. Georges.
July 29, 1878.

LOS ,


ON


SATURDAY Evening last,
A GRE EN


BB AZSILIAN PARROT,
With a few links of brass chain attached
to one foot
Any Person returning same to the under-
signed will be suitably rewarded.
DOUGLAS HOLLIS,
Hamilton, July 30, 1878.-lpd


The death of "Christopher North's" -eldest
daughter, and widow of Professor Ferrier, the
idealist of St. Andrews, dissolves a very interesting
link between the present and the last two genera-
tions of Scottish literature. She was born at Elle.
ray, Cumberland, in 1813 and had a store of
interesting reminiscences of her father's friends,
Wordsworth, Hogg, DeQuincey and Lockhart. In
1838 she married her cousin, James Frederick
Ferrier, from 1845 to the time of his death in 1864
Professor of Moral Philosophy at St. Andrews. She
was the inheritor to a large extent of her father's
splendid physical and mental gifts, and a queen in
St. Andrews, at once admired for her wit, her elo-
quence, her personal charms, and dreaded for her
free speech, her powers of ridicule and her wither-
ing mimicry. The breakdown of her fine constitu-
tion was similar to that of her father's. Being struck
with paralysis in 1874, she never quite recovered
and succumbed to another unexpected shock. She
leaves two sons and three daughters. One of her
sons is the author of Mottiscliffe" and one of her
.daughters'is the wife of Sir Alexander Grant, Bart.
Principal of Edinburgh University.


1st August.
20 RLS. S. F. FLOUR
U 5 Barrels Rye FLOUR
25 Bags BRAN 10 Tubs BUTTER
20 Tins Corned BEEF, 10 lbs. each
10 Half Barrels PORK
5 Barrels No. I MACKEREL
15 Half and Qrtr. Bls. MACKEREL
10 Kits MACKEREL
25 Dozen BLACKING
20 Bags CHARCOAL
5 Boxes TOBACCO, 12s
SHOULDERS COCOA
14 Bales Compressed HAY
Lot of Fancy GOODS
ALSO,
5 Hhds. Younger's Edinburgh ALE
AND,


V Y A -T I N,
To-morrow Wednesday
31st instant,
POSITIVELY THE LAST SALI
*It She C i .:'ef.,
THIS MONTH,
At 12 o'clock,


SELL,


GENERAL ASSORTMENT OF


Advertised for Sale last Wednesday but was
unavoidably postponed, viz.,
CORN HAY SUGAR TEA
(8 casks ALE and PORTER without re-
serve)
Laundry and Fancy SOAPS Wash BOARDS
Washing POWDER Lamp CHIMNEYS
Step LADDERS Kegs NAILS
Men's CLOTHING Felt HATS
BOOTS and SHOES
FURNITURE-A very nice Bedroom Set, new
and complete 2 LOUNGES and some
other pieces 4 Set Bed SPITINGS, &c.
1 New HARNESS 1 WAGGON
And a few
More Young PIGS ,
Of a Superior Breed.
3t 2 o'clock, Sharp,
I will offer that PROPERTY known as
WADE'S GrEIE-Eq
For Particulars see Advertisement.
JOHN HARNETT.
A .lt4.io.ti ,-.


Hamilton, July 30th, 1878.

Sotice.


A / Iespectable Lady or Gentleman can Rent
a fine large Airy 1B1EDROOM (furnished
or unfNrnished) with access.to Drawing Room.
Also, the use of the Furniture in the Drawing
Room ; the use of Stove in Kitchen, or a se-
p rate Kitchen and iaii.; Room-with a private
Family in a p'easantly Situalel Dwelling, about
twenty minutes walk on the Pitt's Bay Road.
For further Prli.'! ;rs apply at the Royal
Gazette" Offi-e.
I amilton, 30th July, 1678.


Good Hews for
Weather.


A RROWROOT SAGO
Corn ST~aRI
Corn FLOUR Oat ME %L,
Crushed White Wil ',AT
MACCARONI


the [lot


HOMIN Y


WVheaton GilIT~S


Also per nas, CANIMA,"


DATES FIGS PRUNES
And a few Ferris's Celebrated Trade
ilAMS
3t FRED A. WHITE'
Family Grocer, Queen
Hamilton, July 30th, 1878.-1


Mark

S,
Street.


SFrom London.
P HILLIP'- ATLAS
Mathematical INSTRUMENTS
Peg TOPS Gum ACACIA
Ede's POLIS[I
GUM in bottle, with Top and Brush
Blue and Red INK
And usual Supply of S 'T[ONIERY, by the
"Fleetwing," at the Royal Gazette" Sta-
tionery Store.
iHamilton, July 301h, 1878.


1 good Draught IUI

H O R SE, Notice to Impocters of
True to Collar and a steady able worker. | ;-
T11 I 7 1 T &0 ; f 1.


B. W. WALKER &C UO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, July 29th, 1878.

For Rent,

Three Tenements
Near the Government Stores, Hamilton.
Apply to
Mr. Al. S. HUN T,
Hamilton.
29th July, 1878.

Eight Pence each.
Mlavor4s .' Carpenter's SPELL.
IVf0S,
At the Royal Gazette" Stationery Store.
Hamilton, July 30Lh, 1878.

For Demerara.

L S SC01HOONER


rl


INGHAM, Master,
Will Sail for the above Port'
(Demerara),
On or about the
G61h i4UG UST,
TO RETURN.
And will take Freight either way.
Please apply to
J. R. DUERDEN,
St. Georges,
or, R.H. DUERDEN.
SIlamilton.
July 29, 1878, -


|THUE Months of June, July, Angust and qep
" tember are the only of the Year dur-
ing which the Board of Public Works will
permit KEROSENE to come by the New
York Mail Steamer. Persons desiring to im-
port are asked to -pec'-.11y notice this.
TRI{OTT & COX,
Agents.
Hamilton, July 23rd, 1873.-3 3p


The Genuine Teneriffe

ONION KJEED,
RE) AND WtlITiE.
rfl[IE Subscriber has received Notice of the
B Shinpm ,t of the above A article, and it is
expected tl arrive here on the 6th SEP-
TEMBER next.
TI Engagement List still open for a limited
quantity.
W. E. TALBOT.
Hamilton, July 22, 1878.-2 3rd. p.

1O 'I' C ItU.A


TIHE B
"T. H..


RI CT
A-.


Pittl


WILL RETURN DIRECT

To Demerara,
Should sufficient Freight offer.
Parties wishing to 1ernga' Freight by her
will please make early application.
- If sufficient inducement offtr she will sail
the 3ATUd August.DA
the 3rd August.


Apply to
T
Front St., ilamilton,
July 30, 1878.


-HOS. PITT.


Notice to Stone Cutters.

TENDERS will be received at the COLONt-
AL S URVEYOR's Office until

FRIDAY,
The 2nd Proximo,
From Persons desirous of Tendering for the
Supply of the following quantities of
Building Stone,
(Of the best quality)
To be delivered at Mount Langton.
12 Inch Stone... .. .... .. 3000
6 Inch ... ..........1,300
.Parties Tendering may Tender for. the whole
Or any quantity.


PHILIP NESS,
Colonial Surveyor.


-. ,a'rJIamilton, J uly 29jth, 1878. -


sto -ve'--,


o. 23 Front


SI -ect, for


Rent>.


Lately occupied by Messrs. B. W. WALKER
& CO.,
Suitable for any Business.
ALSO,


On the Seconi Floor.
Tenders for the above sop'rateiy, will be re-
ceived by the Undersigned until
To-morrow, Wednesday,
The 31st Instanf, At 4 P. M.,
When the highest if otherwise approved of will
be atcepterd.

ALSO,
The Property known as


Will be Let on Reasonable Terms, if applied for
immediately.
This FA-\H M contains from 80 to 100 Acres
of Land, the greater portion of which is Arable
Lanr is well :Manured, and possesses many ad-
v ,li- .-o.:venient Bays with roads thereto for
collecting Seaweed, &c.
A Fine

A Two Story Baro, several small Buildings,
Three Tanks of Water, a good Well, with Force
Puwnp, also a very Superior Bricked Lime
Kiln, with plenty of fac in the Quarries near
at hand, &C., &c.
Apply to
SAMUEL A,. MASTERS,
26 Front Street, Hamilton.
July 30th, 1878.-I1

Defaced ostago Stamps.

a)ERSONS having any of the POSTAGE
STA MPS as below described, will hear
of a Purchaser on ..p'ie'ii. at the Bermuda
Royal Gazette" Office.
BRITISII GJUIANA-
Issue of 1850-Circular-different colors,
different values.
2nd Issue of 1850-Rectangular.
I-.e of 356-Oblong.
1862-Type printed
1853--I&d, Blue
ST. LUCIA-1859-Green and Blue
TIINIDAD-for 1854-6-8 -different colors bear-


ing no value.
iARBADOES AND JAMAICA.-5/ Stamps.
ST. D)OMIAGo Stamps for 1862-5, 1874.
BRITrrsH iONDURAS-
ST. THOMAS-Orange and Chocolate color
DoMI!NICA.
TURKS' ISLANDS.

.ClarCJlnc- t etiers.
John Adams, Thos Jas Adams, Sarah 0 Adderley,
W Y Brind, Mrs Richard Butterfield, Sophia Bur-
gess, Sarah Butterfield, Wm 1 Bell, D Burrows,
Louis Bambargh, William Brown, Miss Clerk,
Wilson Cameroi, Clara L M Cutter, Miquel Veira
Cabeca, Antonio da Costa, Clara Darrell, William
Dill, Silveira Duarte, .1 J Friswell, William Fitch,
G F Gonvaze, J D Hollis, W Harley, Mrs Alphonso
Ho!is, Elizabeth J Harford, 0 P Jemette, Silveira
de Seza L, wes, Rebecca Morris, Wm T Masters
(Mason), Richard Munroe, Miss Lena OWerbridge,
i Wm Parson, Jos W Robinson, Silveira da Roza
Thoema S Reid, S H Robinson, Virgil Ritch, Mrs
Mary Swan, Catherine Swan, Secretary Lodge 481,
Amelius Smith, Elizabeth Simons (East W-arvick),
William A Searl, John !1 S nith, A Swan, H Silva,
Francisco de Suzi, Alien W C Steele, Beaner Swar,
SRobert Tucker, Mis Thirst Tucker, Mrs N T Veiey,
Maiy Virgil, John N W.iivnri!i', .Robert White,
Charles Williams, Mrs Gejrge 0 Whitney.
Post Office, Hamilton, July 29, 1878.

UNCLAIMED LETTERS IN, THE POST OF
FICE, ST. GEORGE, .9th! July, 1878.
W Albuoy, F G Boggs, Johiy Bashamn J R
Duerdecr, J Darrell, H Ii Gilbert, Mrs Hoare,
Jolhn H.gty, Julia Hii:nrs, Ruth ,,ss.y, Jose
Mariante, it D Piudden,,A G Richardson, John Rl,
-Swains6o, ''rs Mary Swan, John J S'nith.


I W ILL


oll r-r -11 Ir I n-11 4


I


DA fte,"W-A-t.


Y F


0


I


I





J~ij~~
~


~V'& 1' 'A T7 'lln


'st.ub. The i\, a.. 1iMu! ic\touls Cdated by
former victories were determined to do or die, and
their play fully realized their intentions. Their
elding and all round play was excellent, Lieut.
Beauchamp playing a capital inning of 44 during
which his partner, Lieut. Hollway, ably backed him
up with a most carefully put together 18. Lieut.
Eden was in good form with the ball. In the
losers Corpl. Baldwin's 43 not out was well worthy
of notice. Score : -
OFFICERS.


1lu tiexpenses o0 [fi euIei'Ia oHU ie- i.
'General Postal Union, were brought up' fi
House of Assembly and severally read a fir
The rule as to several readings of Bills a
solutions on the same day having been di
with by unanimous consent, the Resolve fo
ing the sum of 76 16/ for defraying the e
of restoring and binding Ancient Records
Islands-was read the second time.
The House went into Committee thereon
The Honble Win. H. Gosling in the chai
T.e Committee rose.
The Chairman reported th( Resolve
amendment.
The House adopted the Report.
The rule having been again ll-.'wnl
Resolve was read the third time and pass
ordered to be laid before Hlis Excellency tl
ernor by the Colonial Secretary.
The following Message from His Excelle
Governor was presented by the Colonial Sec
(No. 18)
R. M. LAFFAN,
Major-General,
Governor and Commander-in- Chief.
The Governor has the honrr to inform t
orablethe Legislative Council that in aDesp
15, dated Downing Street, 28th February,I
Secretary of State for the Colonies has e
the satisfaction and the interest with which
perused the Report of the Medical Superir
of the Bermuda Lunatic Asylum na:pu1L?,
Journals of the IHonorable House of Assen
the year 1876, and has conveyed his opin
the condition of the Asylum is on the wh
creditable to Dr. Hinson.
The Secretary of State, however, consid
matter for regret that it should be in thb
one man by his had example to propagate
of mischievous idleness amongst the inma
thinks that some means should be taken fo
ing that evil.
The Secretary of State also calls attention
fact that the absence of an adequate prop
separate accommodation in the Hospital,
absence of sufficient control by night over
tients who for want of separate accommoda
kept in association, might result at any t
serious catastrophe.
The Board of Works having been requ
the Governor to suggest a remedy for the e
the dangers pointed out by the Secretary of S
prepared a Plan and Estimate shewing
separate accommodation which is neces
carrying out the Secretary of State's views
recommendation of the Medical Superinte
to the separate treatment of patients may
economically provided. The estimate am
200
Two of the Visitors to the Asylum,
have moreover reported to the Governor th
vision wall is very much required on the m
This suggestion points to the best and
means of remedying the evil pointed ou
first portion of the Secretary of State's D
The Governor is informed by the Colonial
that this division wall may be built on
side for the purpose of separating such cas'
referred to by the Secretary of State for a
80.
The Governor trusts that notwithstand
service not having been included in the
Estimate owing to the want of the necessa
nation when these Estimates were being p
the Legislature will still find means to pro
sum of 2S0 which is required to carry o
very necessary improvements in the Luna
lum, as they are really necessary for the
proper management of that Institution.
Mount Langton, 22nd July, 1878.
Adjourned to Friday next, the 26th in
11-30.

CRICKET.
OFFICERS 46TH REGIMENT vs. PEM
GRAMMAR SCHOOL.
Played on the Prospect Ground 16th
"The Officers were too much for their you
ponents in the long run though they fell
the 1st innings. Mr. Clay showed capital
his 15 not out, bothhe and Goslingbowlin;
form. Whatever the issue the day was a
holiday for all.
/1-w__n-,Dc! A

1st Innings.
Lt. Ashby, c. Butterfield, b. Clay
Eden, b. Clay
Beauchamp, b. Gosling
Young, b. Clay
Hollway, b. Gosling.
Crozier, not out


2nd In


c.
C


" Morris, c. Butterfield, 6b. Gosling 0
" Harvey, b. Clay 0 no
" Morrison, b. Gosling 1 no
" Cardern, c. and b. Clay 1 b.
I" Dumaresq, b. Gosling 0 b.
Extras 2
Total 35

PIMBEOKE GPAMMAR SCHOOL.


1st Innings. 2nd 1
C. Darrell, c. Young, b. Eden 1 c. Youn
H. Butterfield, c. .111ni,, b.
Hollway 1 c. Eden;
G. Gosling, b. Beauchamp, b.
Eden 0 l.b.w., b
* C. Clay, Esqr., not out 15 not out
R. Tricker, c. Young, b.
Hollway 5 b. Holl
W. Walker, c. Hollway, b.
Eden 4 b6 Holl
E. Darrell, c. Eden, b. Holl-
way 3 b. Edei
T. Darrell, c. Hollway, b.
Eden 3 c. Eden
T.-ButterfiEld, c. Carden, b.
Hollway 1 c. Ashb
C. Tucker, b. Hollway 0 c. and
H.T. Butterfield, b. Hollway 3 c. and
Extras 6

Total 42

OFFICERS vs. NON-COMMISSIO1
CERS 46TH REGIMENT
This the return match between the
and Dingy Dell elevens was played on


n


,1

Iv
'V


w


min,


b. B



way


thb
rom the
st timre..
nd Re-
ispensed
r grant-
7xpenves
of these

r,

without

with the
,ed, and
he Gov-

acy the
eretary:




he Hon-
atch No.
1878, the
expressed
h he had
ntendent
.1 to the
mhlv for


1st Innings.
Lt. Ashby, c. Street, b. Bald-
win
Eden, b Hart
Young, c. Cull, b. Baldwin

Beauchamp, b. Baldwin
Hollway, 6. Baldwin
Morris, b. Baldwin
Harvey, b. Hart
Morrison, not out
Dumaresq, b. Baldwin
Carden, run out
Crozier, b. Baldwin
Extras


2nd Innings.

8 c. and b. Hart 2
12 run out 9
9 c. Biddlecombe,
b. Hart 0
7 c. Hart, b. Mere-
dith 44
15 c. Hart, b. Street 18
2 run out 14
2 b. Baldwin 3
7 b.Hart 0
0 c. and b. Hart 0
2 c. and b. Mere-
dith 0
0 not out 0
11 22


Total 75 Total 112


N. C. 0's.
1st Innings.
Cpl. Biddlecombe, c. Harvey,
b. Eden 4
Sgt. Cull, c. Young, b. Hollway 0

Murray, c. Ashby, b. Eden 1

Dr.-Maj. Meredith, c. Young, b.
Hollway 3
Cr.-. gt. Street, b. Eden 12
Cpl. Baldwin, not out 43
P.-M~ast.-Sgt. Hart, c. Ashby,
b. Eden 6
Cpl. Studdert, c. Beauchamp,
b. Eden 0

Keating, b. Young 5
Sg't. Doyle, run out 3
Corpl. Start, c. Crozier, b. Holl-


way


5
Extras 7


2nd Innings.

b. Morris
c. Young, b.
Eden
st. Ashby, b.
Morris ]

run out
not out
c. and 6. Eden

run out

c. Young, b.
Eden
c. and b. Eden
b. Eden
b. Eden


Total 89 Total 49


ion that INoCULATroN.-Putting aside vague traditions of
ole very the antiquity of this method in China and In Hin-
dustan, it is certain that we learned it from the
ders it a Turks, among whom it was in use at the very be-
power of ginning of the last century and perhaps somewhat
a spirit earlier. In 1713, Dr. Emmanuel Timoni, an Ox.
rates, and ford graduate who had settled in Constantinople,
r lessen- wrote to Dr. Woodward, in London, giving him
an account of the new process, and testifying to its
)n to the success. This account was communicated to the
portion of Royal Society, and published in its Transactions the
and the following year. In 1715 Mr. Kennedy, an English
Sthe pa- surgeon who had travelled in Turkey, gave similar
action are information to the English public in his Essay on
ime in a External Remedies; and in the Philosophical Tran-
sactions for 1716 you may see a notice of the same
ested by process as described by M. Pylarini, the Venetian
vils and Ceonul at Smyrna. Strange to say, these state-
3tate, has wents v, ere neglected, or bad no practical result.
how the We owe the actual introduction of the practice of
sary for inoculation to the gord sense and courage of an
and the English lady, whose lively letters kave taken their
ndent as permanent place in our country's literature. Lady
be most Mary Wortley Montagu, the wife of our Ambassa-
iounts to dor at the Ottoman Court, writes thus from Adria-
nople in the year 1718 : "The small-pox, so fatal
however, and so general among us, is here entirely harmless
bat a di- by the invention of engrafting, which is the term
iale side. they give it. Every year thousands undergo the
cheapest operation, and the French Ambassador says pleas.
t in the an ly that they take the small-pox here by way of
)espatchb. diversion, as they take the waters in other countries.
Surveyor There is no example of any one who has died in it,
the male and you may believe I am well satisfied of the safe-
es as that ty ot this experiment, since I intend to try it on my
sum of dear little son. I am patriot enough to take pains
to bring this useful invention into fashion in Eng.
dirg this land." In fact, she recommended it by her owE
e annual example. The first person inoculated with the
ry infor- smallpox in England was her daughter. Then the
prepared, child of a physician, Dr. Keith, who had visited
ovide the Miss Wortley; afterward some. felons condemned
)ut those to death, and who were pardoned on condition o:
atic Asy- their submission to the experiment, and at length
safe and two daughters of the Princess of Wales-namely, the
Princesses Amelia and Caroline. But the practice(
was not thoroughly established, nor properly appre.
distant, at elated bythe British public, until the middle of the
century. The efficacy of inoculation insaving the
lives of individuals aud preventing deformity waQ
signally great. The mortality in the natural small
[BROKE pox was estimated at one in five. It is really high.
er. Mr. Marson inflrred from the records of the
Small-pox Hospital that the natural small-pox de.
instant. stroyed about one-third of all whom it attacked
thful op- )Dr Gregory says the average number of deaths.a
short in that hospital was only 3 in 1,009." The Nationa
form for Vaccine Board speaks decidedly of "1 in 300" at
g in good the proportion of the inoculated that will surely
pleasant die" from the operation. The true value of inocu.
nation, upon the whole, cannot even be considered
equivocal. To all individuals doomed to hav
nings. small-pox its advantages were indeed great and
obvious--o the community at large it was a griev.
ous evil. By carrying the virus and the disease
into every village throughout the length and breadth
of land, the practice of inoculation multiplied th<
foci and enlarged the sphere of contagion, insured
'alker, b. the disease to all who were subjected to the opera.
sling 0 tion, and diminished to all who were not the chance
of escaping it. In truth, the total mortality wav
out 5 greatly increased by the process. Subsequently t(
out 1 the discovery and establishment of vaccination, o
lay 6 which I am presently to speak, inoculation became
osling, 4 unjustifiable, except under very special circumstan.
5 ces. That special circumstances might and may
arise to warrant the operation, take the following
Total 21 instance which Prof. Gregory, of Edinburgh, was
in the habit of relating on the authority of a nava
surgeon. Small-pox was introduced among the
?gs. crew of a man-of-war in a tropical climate, where
.Eden 0 no vaccine matter could be procured. The men
were almost all unprotected by vaccination. Six.
[ollway 4 teen of them took the disease in the natural way
and nine of these, or more than one-half, died. 0
ollway 0 8363 who were inoculated, under the disadvantage
4 of a hot climate and no preparation, not one perish
ed.-Sir Thomas Watson in Nineteenth Century.
2


A 5 note of the Bank of England remains in
way 0 circulation only 72 days; then it retires" into
0 some miser's coffers, and is long out of sight. A
10 note stays 77 days; 20, 57 days; 30, 19
,b. Hollway days; 40, 14 days; 50, 39 days; 100, 28 days
ol200, 13 days; ,(00, 11 days. A century some-
6. E times elapses before some of these notes are again
y, b. Eden presented at the bank. On the 27th of September,
b. Eden 2 1846, a 50 note was handed over the counter,
1 bearing date Jan. 20, 1743. American bank-notes
do nol stay away from home for such long periods;
Total 13 if they did, many of them would look in vain for
the banks that issued them when they returned.
NED OFFI- The death of the Episcopal Bishop of Cork has
r. been quickly followed by that of the Dean of Cork,
e Muggleton the very Rev. Achilles Daunt, D. D. Dr. Daunt
the 19th in- died on June 17, after a short illness.


T!. WORK DONE AT BERLIN.
From the New York World
Lord Beaconsfield returning to London will deserve
the enthusiastic reception he is to receive. In a few
brief months, by the adoption of a policy which well
may dazzle and surprise those who had less carefully
weighed the exhaustion of Russia, the resources of
England and the temper of her people and the
ambitions and tendencies of Continental nations,
he has rehabilitated England as an European power
and given her a position and prestige such as she has
not enjoyed since the days of Pitt. All this has
been accomplished without the firing of a shot or a
drop in the price of consols. It has not been a game
of "bluff," for he has simply known and "backed"
the value of his hand. He had in his favor that ex-
haustion of Russia and that wealth and endurance of
England upon which THE WORLD has repeatedly
insisted; the jealousy of Austria and the disinclina-
tion of Germany to see Russia profit too largely by
the war which, so cruelly straining the victor, has
insured Germany's security for many years to come ;
the dread on the part of every sovereign in Europe
of a general war, and finally, the Socialist panic.
This last can hardly have failed to be a potent agent,
when we reflect how recent are the Hodel, Nobiling
and Vera Sassulitch incidents," and that England
alone of the nations'of Europe, can face a Socialist
crisis with the conviction that her constitution and
social system afford the necessary safety-valves for
the prevention of a disastrous explosion.
The English Premier's policy has been sich as
was to be expected of the man who declared that
Britain was an Oriental nation, and of the chief of a
Party which has combated persistently the views of
Bright and of Goldwin Smith. After striking an
impartial balance one must incline to the belief that
the importation of the Indian troops has advantaged
) England. It has flattered native pride, soothed the
Mahometan population which sympathised with the
Sultan and was prepared to resent the abandonment
6 of his cause by England, and proved that in any
future crisis Great Britain may find in Inia a help
and net a peril. The acquisition of Cyprus is a
natural sequence of the purchase of the Khedive's
Suez Canal shares in November, 1875, and an assur-
ance that England's present policy is not that of the
cession of protectorates or the alienation of colonists,
While ample evidence has been evoked that in the
0 event of war Canada and Australia would contribute
largely and loyally to the support of the Empire. As
nothing succeeds like success, it will not be surprising
Sif at the general election which will soon take place,
6 the Conservatives achieve such a victory over the
- divided and downcast Liberals as shall secure them
in power for many years to come.
The work of the congress has been done rapidly
f and earnestly. To reverse the mot applied to the
. great Congress of Vienna, it has moved but not
danced. The spirit of its members has been that of
its President. Prince Bismarck, who, when Mehemit
Ali declared that he had no instructions about the
Austrian occupation of Bosnia, answered, Try and
get them, land make haste about it, for if you
will keep on raising difficulties, I'm off to Kissingen."
How long their work will last is a question for time
e to decide. The system established in Germany by
the Congress of Westphalia in 1648 endured till the
close of the next century; the Holland whose inde-
pendence was recognized at Nimeguen just two
centuries ago still exists, and the work of the diplo-
. mats and princes who met at Vienna in 1815 was
e not materially impaired till 1859. In these days of
secret treaties and aspirations of races it is hazard-
ous work predicting how long any condition of
things will continue, how it will be changed and to
what it will give place, but there is no present reason
for a disturbance of the situation established by the
r Treaty of Berlin. The principles involved may be
again invoked and carried to further conclusions in
Sthe same general direction, but not necessarily in
this generation. Sick as the Sick Man may be, how
many centuries did it take his predecessors of the
SByzantine Empire to die ?
That Russia would have to abate largely the preten-
sions made in the treaty of San Stefano was inevitable.
As she did in 1829, when Diebitsch with his shadow
of an army crossed the Balkans and terrified the
Sultan into concluding a peace, so did she in 1878 ;
Sbut the circumstances outside, and especially in
' England, were different. Russia again becomes a
Danubian power and secures an extension of terri-
tory and an increase of prestige. The Bulgarians
1 have made a long step towards independence, secu-
" ring the administration of their own affairs under, in
e all human probability, the capable and patriotic
Prince Emmanuel Vogorides, the candidacy of the
e Prince of Battenburg being scarcely within the spirit
of article 3 of the treaty. Roumania becomes inde-
1 pendent, as also do Serbia and Montenegro: facts
f which should go to insure peace at the East, for
Their people can no longer have any object in con-
e spring or revolting against their late Suzerain.
e Montenegro relatively profits most by the treaty, but
she has well earned her independence, and the Aus-
e trians may be trusted to keep "the Czar's spoiled
e child." Prince Nikita, in check hereafter. The
s Roumanians gain but little, as the Dobrudscha will
not make them forget the loss of Bessarabia, but the
principality brought it upon herself. It was in the
e power of Roumania to prevent the war by declaring
her neutrality, protesting against the Russian occu-
pation and appealing to the signatories of the treaty
t of Paris. She chose rather to cast in her lot with
l the invader, and thus found herself stopped from
s pleading the provisions of that same treaty of 1856
y when Russia insisted on the retrocession of Bessa-
rabia. Serbia gains her independence, and little
1 more; her conduct throughout the whole struggle
3 not having been of a kind to make any one regret
I the smallness of its reward. Turkey is given the
last chance by which she may yet profit. Her situa-
e tion has been relieved of many difficulties. It is


h certain that she has attempted many reforms during
e the last thirty years, and accomplished some of them;
d it is as certain that she may in the future accomplish
- more, with the assistance of Europe-perhaps under
e a change of dynasty which would replace the weak
s Abdul Hameds and Mourads by a dictator like Mid-
o hat Pasha, at least under a change of administration
f which would devolve upon a real minister the power
e now swayed unworthily.
. On the whole it is a good month's work that has
y been done at Berlin.
g
s BISMARCK'S ANXIETY FOR PEACE.
1 The Berlin correspondent of the London Times,
e writing under date of July 3, gives the following as
e the language of Prince Bismarck in reply to a re-
n mark that Europe was convinced that he earnestly
- desired peace:.,
, "I wished for peace, and contributed as much as
f possible to it as soon as I could clearly see my way
e -that is to say, from the time of Count Schouva-
- loffs first visit to me at Fiirstenburg. I sincerely
respected this man for having left London courage-
ously to tell his master the truth, and who on ar.
riving at St. Petersburg incurred the risk of dis-
grace and exile if not successful in fulfilling his pa-
trioticand humanitarian mission. Despitejmy feeble
9 health, despite the imperious commands of my pby.
sicians, I did not hesitate to undergo the fatigue
imposed on me as President of the Congress; but
it duty calls me to bear these fatigues in the inter-
n ests of peace, it does not go the length of bidding
' me do so if peace is not likely to result from our
' deliberations. England has here achieved a mag-
nificent success. She has made Bulgaria end at
; the foot of the Balkans; she has restored to Tur-
key the 2Egean Sea; she has covered Constantino-
ple by the Balkans, and the question of the Straits
will be settled to her satisfaction. But it must be
remembered that Russia was victorious, and that
serious account must be taken of the concessions
she has already made. I do not wish to recall my


cmnparis, n of ihe haleo and the elephant. Eng-
land has doubtless proved by the preparations she
has already made that she might become a military i
power, that she might sustain a war lasting several
years. But herein consists our sole interest, which
is that of peace, and which guides our efforts. A
war between two great powers like England and,
Russia would grievously affect the whole of Europe
paralyze all interests, and menace every one. Thel
danger is that despite all efforts the conflict would'
become general, for no one knows the incidents
which might arise during a prolonged struggle, not
to mention that universal commerce would be har-
assed and the paths of the ocean become uncertain.
I say this because I am now convinced that we
shall sign peace. After seeing the Bulgarian ques-,
tion settled I was certain we should have peace.'
On this question I saw the English would go to'
war; and when, on Friday, the 21st of June,,
the negotiations between England and Russia broke
down I hastened to the plenipotentiaries of both
powers, and caused negotiations to be renewed oni
the subject of the withdrawal of the troops. Nei-'
ther the English nor the Russians rendered justice
to the brave and patriotic efforts of their represen-,
tatives. The English ought not to forget that they
have attained a great success without war and with-5
out spending the blood and money which a great'
war would have cost them. Count Schouvaloff
certainly does his best, and I cannot but admire:
him in the.congress on seeing him hold up against
all, and not permit himself to be too closely ap-1
preached, but it must be remembered that there
may be limits for his desire for peace, and that at;
a given moment he might find himself au pied dui
mur, and~that more concessions must not be demand-
edol him than thoseto which he is already pledged."'




FA tILY GROCER,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
English and American Preserved


Nos. 10 and 12 Queen Street,
lamilton, Bermuda. '
N. B.-Ships' Stores Supplied at Lowest
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February 18th, 1878.-12 m


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WYOMING sails July 23, at 11 a.m.
The above Steamers are built expressly for
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The U. S. Mail Steamer Canima" from Ber.
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WILLIAMS & GUION,


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1878. 1


J. Al i 0 l'Si

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celebrated for nearly a century pasi, is of the very
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dJLMdJNdCK--JULY, AUG. 187T--


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