Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00324
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00324
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text

"TH


N


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


No. 31-Vo' L. STATE SUPER VIAS ANTZQUAS. 2 i per Ann
Salon Berm da, T I Joly S,7..

.s.aimion. Bermmuda, iuesda/y, J*Iy 23, JS7S. : ...

needLaOdro


SIndependent Order of
Good Templars.

NOTICE E.

THE Sisters of SUCCESS LODGE,
No. 9, beg to inform the Public that they
will give a
4,romenabte C concert,
IN lTHE
GOOD TE1IMPLAR'S HALL,
Warwick,
ON' WEDNESDAY,
The 24th instant.
N.lH.-Should the weather be unfavorable ou
24th the Concert will take place on following
Evening.


Admission 6d.
MRS. MARY JANE
Warwick, July 15, 1878.-2


F O R


RYAN.


'Selz E


A Valuable L 0 7

9h And House,
Near the Eastern entrance to the Town of
Hlamilton, Dopposite the, Military Police Station.
Bounded East on House of the late Wm. Pear-
man, and West on House of Mrs. Stewart;
No ih, on Union Road, and South on Hlamilton
Ilarbour.-For particulars apply to
FREDK. A. HINJSON.
Hamilton, July 16th,-1878.-2

NOTICE!

To Dealers'in Dr Goods

The Large Stock of


AT


STHE STORE
Oft he Late -
renry Trimingham, Esqr,,
SIs Now
OFFEP rD :),Po, AILE,
At a liberal discount in amounts of Twenty
Pounds and upwards.
These Goods having been taken great care of
and a large portion being of recent importations,
offer an inducement to those who wish to add
to their Stock.
Sale will commence
TO-MORROW, 1'th Inst.,
And continue to the end of the month.
DANIEL TRIMINGHAM,
Executor.
IHamilton, July 16, 1878.-3

N "
T HEE -Managers of the "Union
Sports, Soutlhampton," intend holding a
similar meetingg to that of 20th August, 1874,
comprising

tor1se Racing, &c.,
About the beginning of September next,
Should sufficient inducement be held out.
Particulars will be duly made known.
G. B. FUBLER,
Secretary.
Southampton, July 15, 1878.
Notice.
ALL Persons having Claims against the Es-
tate of the late JOHN WILLIAM AD-
KIN., deceased, are requested to forward their
Accounts to me, not later, than the 31st Instant.
MARY ANN ADKINS,
Administratrix.
July 16, 1878.-3

Take Notice!

TllER SUBSCRIBER begs to inform those
who are Indebted to him to come forward
and pay their respective Amounts on or before the
alst day of July, instant, otherwise their Ac-
counts will be placed, without fail,. in legal
hands for collection.
A. R. THOMPSON.
Hamilton, July 13, 1878.

Wm.0 James HIeney


BROILER
AND
. Commission gent,
HA11ILTON, BERMUDA.


REWARD.


Fifty


Dollar


(50 DOLLARS)
IE WARD will be given for information
that will lead to the Conviction of the
Party or Parties WHO STOLiE from ;he
Lands of Mount Langton, on 30th June last,
Twelve Young Turkeys,
About two Months old.
AND,
One IHundred Dollars
(100 DOLLARS)
Reward will be given for such information as
will Convict the Party or Parties who purchased
or received the said TURKEYS knowing them
to have been Stolen.
Hamilton, 10th July, 1878.


10 Reward.

1lIE above Reward will be given to any
Person or Persons who will give such
information as will lead to the Conviction of the
Party or Parties who, on the night of Sunday or
the morning of Monday last, did enter my
Grounds known as Hall's Farm," next North
of the Pembroke Church and destroyed a num-
ber of MELONS and Melon VINES.
GEORGE W. THOMPSON.
Hamilton, July 9th, 1878.-3

Lost,


A few weeks since, a half grown
T JIB B Y C T,
Bob tail, with four white feet, (answers to the
name of STOCKINGS").
Any Person returning or giving any informa-
tion respecting same at the METHOPOLITAIH"
HOTEL, Hlanuilton, will be suitably rewarded.
lQueen Street, July 16tlh, 1878.

o twice.
A LL Dl-lMANDS against the Estate of WIL-
S LIAM THOMAS ROBINSON, late of
Devonshire Parish, Stone Mason, deceased are
requested to be forwarded to MR. ROBERT
WHITr, Pembroke, on or before the 31st day of
July, Instant.
All Persons INDEBTED to the said Estate
are required to make PAYMENT by the above
date.
ROBERT WHITE,
Executor.
MARY A. ROBINSON,
Executrix.
1st July, 1878.

Notice.


r TUE Undersigned requests that all Persons
having received their ACCOUNTS from
him to 31st May ultimo, will please arrange
same.
The Subscriber begs to acquaint some of
those that have allowed their Accounts to re-
main unsettled for a length of time, that the
next reminder they receive will be from a legal
quarter.
F. W. VOSSMER.
Reid St., Hamilton, June 3rd, 1878.

Money to be Lent,
On approved Mortgage Securities.
SApply to
MR. S. BROWNLOW GRAY,
Hamilton.
June 10, 1878.

The Bermuda Ci-
gar Factory.
rprHE Undersigned having received a lot of
1 HAVANA TOBACCO via New York
has commenced
C( gaa i n
And will be pleased to Supply parties requir-
ing same. Quality guaranteed and no Cabbage.
The Subscriber is willing to give Instructions
in CIGAR MAKING to one or two Young
Men who are desirous of making themselves
generally useful at the business. Terms made
known on application to
T. SHCHEZ.
Hamilton, June 18th, 1878.

sg-ed5Sf )W v ^Y k. ivff \ v yW


On hand from last Importation.
2 fine Horses,
Suitable for Heavy Draft. Height j15 & 15-2.
THEO. OUTERBRIDGE,
ameilon, July 187*V. S.
Hamilton, July i, 1878.*


Great


Reduction
Prices.


in


j A MS at weight when opened 74d..
SHOULDERS 54d.
PORK 6d., nice small pieces LARD 8d.
Pastry FLOUR STAR CHES in variety
Fresh BISCUIITS in ever Canima"
OATM.KAL, very cheap
HOMINY BARLEY SA\MP
TE AS COFF EE, quite a variety
SENNA SALTS MANNA
GUM CAMPIIHOR Tinct. MYRRH
Double Ext. of LEMON and VAN ILL \
Also, variety of Patent JIlED1-
CINES
Rheumatic LINIMENT, &c.


J. C. KEENEY,
R.eid.St., Hamilton.


June 24, 1878,


SSTOREAI ADDJ9I1iNIMG6
Undersigned's Grocery,
100TS SIIOES SLI'PP'EiIS
Harness MATERIAL
Wood SCrVEWS T 1C.CKS'
Cut NAILS
A great Variety.of LAMPS and Lamp Fixtures'
A lot of Handsome PItNTS
Heavy TICKING and SilKETIN(G"
CALICO CAMIBRIG and.1 G.INGIIAM
Styles
White and Brown COT ONS, 3d. to 61, yard
BASKETS BROOM S Tin WARE
And American NOTIONSin great Variety.
J. C. KEENEY,
Reid Street, Hamilton
Hamrnilton, June 24, 1878.


Sugar!S Sugar!!
Ex. ROVER ,)
From D1e'Aaem1a ua,
Yellow VaC1umln-pan- ii Barrel.h
White Vacuum-pan do
Muscovado, in Barrels
At Low Rates for CASH.
S. S. INGHAM.
Hamilton, 25th February, 1878.

NOTICE,
To all whom it may Concern.

T HE Undersigned intending to
Close Business, respectfully requests all
Persons who are Indebted to him to pay their
respective Amounts on or before the 31st of
May next. All unsettled Accounts after that,
date, unless satisfactory arrangement be made
for the same, WILL, WITHOUT FAIL, be
placed in legal hands for collection.
All Accounts against the Subscriber are re-
quested to be rendered not later than 1st of
June, for adjustment.
BERMUDA PRODUCE purchased
throughout the Season, at Market prices.
JOHN HARNETT.
Hamilton, 9th April, 1878.


oci


z


-J
0
0L


PRz tVA M

BOARDING H HOUSE
Morth of Trinity Church,
HAMILTON, BERMUDA,


PITCH PINE
L U Vi B E I.


Ix^pects to Receive,
A CHOICE' C I'.ll";G3OF. 0-F THI


El' E


In Assorted Sizes,
Scantling and Flooring,
On or about 1st JULY.
ALSO
O V HA ND,
From late Importations,
WHITE PINE


Ra
_ . .

OF ALL
The above wil be Sold
customers.


KINDS.
at low rates to CASH

S. S. INGHAM.


4th June, 1878..

A Hare Chance of Spec-
ulation.
I have been favored with Instruc-
tions to Sell,
4 Ver'y IalIeable Properly


Known as
Wade's Green,
At the Caicos Islands.


This desirable Freehold consists of about
1,'00 acres of Land, a Large Dwelling, three
Out tlotise-, and quite a number of Fruit and
other Trees. .bmuio'ne half of the Land is not'
only Arable, but very productive, (the other por-
ionis good Grazing I.and), the whole of it has"
a good enclosure and will be sold at a very low
figure, and on acconmoidatifig terms.
For further particulars apply to
JOHN HARNETT,
Agent.
Hamilton, May 6, 1878.



POWER & FRITH,
Barristers-at-law, dc.
'[1HE Subscribers have this day entered into
Co-partnership as
Attorneys, Solicitors, Notaries,
ac..
The business will be conducted under the style
and firm of
POWER & FRITH.
OFFICES-166 Hollis Street, over the offices
of Messrs. Almon & Mackintosh.
L. G. POWER,
J. HARVEY FRITH.
Ilalifax, Ist. Feby, 178.

ify.rL *Y. W CEW


Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
English and American Preservel


Nos. 10 and 12 Queen Street,
Hamilton, liermud:i.
N. B.-Ships' Stores Supplied at Lowest
Prices.
February 18th, 1878.-12 m

W. 0. F. BAS 0 ME
M.D.,


DE NTIS'T,
REID STREET, HAMILTON,
Has Received a supply of
lowing


EAST,
the fol-


PR E Pl d TIO.S
FOR THE TEETH
Put up by the well known Dentists Messrs. GA
BRIEL, Ludg:dte lilI, London.
SEDADENT, or Cure for Toothache
CORALITE TOOTH PASTE, for Cleansing
and Improving the Teeth
ROYAL DENT'i'RICE, gives the Teeth i
pearl-like whiteness
WHITE GUTTA P'ERCIHA EN I\M L, for
Stopping decayed Teeth
OSTEO-ENAMtEL STOPPING, warranted to
remain white and firm as the Tooth itself
ODONTALGIQUE ELIXIR, celebrated
aMouth Wash.
Hamilton, March 26th, 1877.


Solonial Secretary's Office,
\ JULY 15TH, 1878.
T THE following ACTS have been passed by
the Legislature of Bermuda during thq
present Session, viz:
No. 2.-An Act for the better Auditing of the
Public Accounts.
(In force to December 31, 1881.) :
No. 3.-An Act to consolidate the Laws re-
lating to Vaccination.
(In force indefinitely.)
No. 4.-An Act to provide for the appoint-
ment of Official Marine Surveyors.
(In force for three years from date of assent.)
R. E. WEBSTER,
3 Colonial Secretary.

N V A COTIA
Stam .Marble 4* Gran-
ite WORKS,
3r 6 x ,
Argyle Street, opposite St. Paul's Church.
J ONUMENTS, iHEADSTONES
S Tomb TABLETS.
Grave MARKS in polished Granite or Marble
Maib!e 1antel Regi-ter GA'ATES, &c., &c.
GEORGE A $ANFORD,
Proprietor.
i)esigns and Prices mnay be obtained from
W.T. JAMES, Esqr., Front St., Ianilton
Bermuda. 6m




GUION LINE.

United States Mail Steamers.


CALLING AT QUEENSTOWN,
LEAVE NEW YO!tK
SA VWAXW W T U VA SUX.X
%IONTANA sails' July o, ai 6 a.m.
\WISCON.IN sails Jtul3 9, at Noon.
NEVADA sails July 16, at 6 a.m.
WYOMING sails July 23, at 11 a.m.
The above Steamers are built expressly for
the Trade, have five watertight bulkheads, and
carry experienced Officers, Surgeons and Stew-
ardesses. The Saloon Accommodations are un-
surpassed by any Atlautic Steamers, and the
State Rooms are on main deck opening into the
saloon, thus securing that great comfort in
ocean travel, perf ct ventilation and light.
Smoking Roo:11, Bath Room and Piano ou
each Steamner.
The U. S. Mail Steamer "Cauima" from Her.
muda, Thursdays, generally arrives at New York
on ;iondays, and Passengers' baggage can be
transferred direct to the Liverpool Steamer sail-
ag next day.


New York,


WILLIAMS & GUION,
Agents,
29 Broadway, New York.
June 17, 1878.


w -Z

z1 7


S .0
V-I0


-Z-1


Da t


9.8l

IN/






T'heod ore Outerbridge,


V~TZL~P~7 2~o~.1


Reid Street,


HAMILTON.
West of "Royal Gazette" Office,


Office Hours-10 to 12 aud I to
-Will Visit St. Georges Tuesdays 2
days.
y. Orders Promptly Attended to.
Hamilton, October 26tb, 1876.


4,
and teri.


lb


7
'411M.E.U4,






JDA IIOi(AL (GAZET-f.-S


EXTRACT from METEOROLOGICAL OBSER-
VATIONS taken under the direction of the Principal
Medical Officer, Prospect, Bermuda. Above the sea
151 feet.


Date



Julyl5
16
17
S19
20
'21


30-018

30-1Z9

30,132


Wind
Sa.m.

t-40


sw
sw
NW
w
sw


Temperature previous
24 hours.


0.


86-9
85-9
86-9
84"1
85'I
86-3
88-6


S.
#.g
0
75-0
73-0
75-2
73-0
75-C
74-8
75*4


o
148-8
145-60
154-8
144-4
149-1
144-4
150-6


0


0


Rain.

Inch.


67-5 0-38
68-5 0-00
67-3 0-05
63-3 0-03
67-1 0-00
65-1 0-00)
66-1 0-02
Total 0-48,


uudtit oapt (Mt.

S lamillon, July 23, 1878.

CUSTOM HOUSE-hIAMILTON.
ENTERED.
July 16-Scehr. Rockie E. Yates, Hopkins, Jackson-
ville, Florida ; 12"2.574 fee-t pitch pine lumber and 100
bdls laths, to S. S. TIeham.
17-Gernman Barque iurenn.w, Panct. Cardiff; 630
tons coal for government.-Agents. N. T. Butter-
field & Son.
22-.M nil Steamer Canima, Liddicoat, New York; as-
sorted cargo.-Agents Trott & Cox.
CLEARED.
SJuly 20-Barque Gratitude, McDonald, Bull River,
South Carolina.
CUSTOM IIOUSE-ST. GEORGE.
ENTERED.
July 22-Royal Mail Steamer Beta, Shaw, St. Thomas ;
Mails, &c.-Agent J. M. Hayward.
Barqne Eliza Barss, Hollis, New York; cattle and
hay, to Trott & Cox.
(> CLEARED.
July 22-Royal Mail Steamer Beta, Shaw, Halifax ;
Mails, &c.
MOVEMENTS OF VESSELS IN PORT OF ST. GEORGE.
Barque Hadley awaiting orders."
Danish Brig Jut f ready for sea.
PASSENGERS ARRIVED.
In.the Mail Steamer Canima on Sunday last from
NeW York -Mrs. Samuel C. Outerbridge and two
children, Miss McNeill, Mrs. A. Jennings, Mrs. Turn-
bull. Miss Steele, F. M. Cooper, Esq., M.C.P., Captain
W. .Lanton. Jr., Messrs. Geo. 0. Whitney, W. G.
Smith, R. P. Atkins. 2nd Cabin-Ellen Seon, Capt.
hvatt and servant, Capt. J. H. Cooper. Deck-J. F.
Smith.
SP. PASSENGERS SAILED.
In the R. M. Steamer Beta, yesterday for Halifax,
Mr. Richard Gorham and Daughter.
The Blaney Brothers and the Satellite, were up at
London for Bermuda on 5th inst. The latter to leave
20th instant.
The Canima brought English Mails to the 7th instant.

THE UKE OV oEDINBURGH'S CHALLENGE CuP.-It
will be noticed by our advertising Columns that
the annual contest of the Royal Bermuda Yachts,
for. the abovo',Cup, will take place in the Great
Sound on Tuesday the 6th August next.

TOrPEDO EXPERIMENTS..--An Act having passed
the Legislature of these Islands authorising the
* War Department to carry on warlike experiments
on the coasts of these Ila'nds, it will be observed,
by a notice inserted in another column by Colonel
Morrison, Commanding Royal Engineer, that from
the 29th instant till the 3rd September, the wa-
ter space inside the Ship Channel, between Fort
Cunningham and the Military Hospital at St.
George, will be'used for the purpose contemplated
by the said Act, and cautions masters of vessels,
pilots, mariners, boatmen and others concerned
against coming within the water space occupied for
these operations, as they will incur some danger.

DEXTER v. SOLDIER.
Last. Thursday afternoon the race course at Shelly
Bay was again, the rendezvous for a numerous and
eager crowd of spectators who had gathered to wit-
ness a challenge match between the two above-
named well-known and venerable racers. The trial
was to be run in three heats of a quarter mile each,
had forty-five minutes law between each, the win-
ner of two out of the three securing a purse of 15.
The challenge had originated from the dead heat
ranby these horses for the Planters' Stakes at the
late Bermuda Hunt Meeting, and as both horses
*had a large field of backers, great became the ex-
excitement when the starting hour approached.
Shortly, before the appointed time "Soldier" ap-
peared on the ground, looking very fit indeed and
in better condition, we thought, than when he last
appeared in public. However, Dexter" did not
keep his antagonist waiting long, and both nags
moved slowly round to the post. The black horse
seemed rather too fat to be considered in A 1 con-
dition, and by the gingerly way he put his near
fore-leg to the ground, knowing ones gently wagged
their sagacious heads and closed their left eyelid
in a very significant manner, as much as to say
"there's 4 screw loose somewhere."
Mr. Winter was Starter, and we believe that Drs.
Sinolair and Tucker acted as Judges. Both horses
got away well together and showed neck and neck
in rounding the northwestern and northeastern cor-
ners of. the course, but on coming on to the home
stretch for the first time'' Soldier" got well to the
front, "Dexter's" jock having even thus early in
the race begun to use his "flail" pretty heavily, but
evidently to no purpose, as it only seemed to spoil
the temper of his horse, who commenced galloping
very short. During the last quarter both horses
seemed to tire considerably, but "Soldier" had
kepit his position and won easily by about four
lengths." The forty-five minutes having elapsed,
the horses were again got away together and came
along at a rattling-pace, "Dexter" (whose veteran
joints seemed, t get looser as he warmed to his
work) forged slowly ahead, but his jockey steering
very widely round, the first rise after passing the
Judge's stand, Mr. Keith Smith 19st no time in
seizing the chance thus offered, and very cleverly
pushed "Soldier'a" head on to "Dexter's" off quar-
ter, and, by a little "hand and heel" work, cut him
out of the inside. Little could be seen of the
horses from the Stand as they worked along the
western side of the course, but as they came round


the 'lower bend and on to the straight for home,
1 Dexter" came well away from the Somerset horse
and won easily. Great was the surprise of Sol-
dier's" backers to see his jockey sitting all doubled
up and doing nothing to push "Soldier" for a fin-
ish, but their surprise soon gave place to sorrow
and 'egret when they heard that Mr. Keith Smith
was taken seriously ill and would be totally unable
to appear in the third heat. Great enthusiasm pre-
vailed and the interest waxed keener every instant
as those interested pecuniarHy '() discussed the
chances of Soldier" appearing with another and
heavier jockey, but as this* could not be allowed,
"Dexter" only had to walk 6ver" the third heat,
to take the purse. Dr. Park B., Tucker, that in-
veterate sportsman, rode a friendly race bn his aele-
brated "Lady Gray", against' Mr. Reid Mercer's.
Old Jack," wLich ttermnatedin a victory for the
feather weight, but the masterly manner in which
the Doctor set down and handled the ribbons to
finish shows that' he h+as lost but little of nis old
cunning in the pigskin.


suits of business she has lost her influence as a
great Power. In this crisis she has left her attitude
of repose or indifference, and come to the front with
force and effect. It is no wonder, then, if they
prepared in London an immense reception for the
remarkable man to whom chiefly the credit of these
late achievements is due. Less stately and formal
than the pageants with which Rome greeted her
returning conquerors, the demonstrations of popular
enthusiasm toward Lord Beaconsfield are more gen-
eral and spontaneous, and are limited only by his
own desires and the suddeness of the movement
which gave little time for preparation. What
graver and better considered estimate of his labors
may do, is to be seen; but for the present at least,
the public and his party are with him, and he may
enjoy without stint all the favor and flattery of a
conspicuous success.

Inspector General of Hospitals and Fleets James
Jenkins, M.D., C. B., has been, in accordance with
the provisions of H. M. Order in Council of Feby.
4, placed on the Retired List of that Rank.

An Inquisition was held at Turtle Bay, War-
Wick Parish on 16th inst., before C. C. Keane, Esqr.,
Coroner, on view of the body of Stracham Lewis
Eve, who was found in the water of that Bay on the
morning of same day.-Verdict, "found drowned."

The vigor with which the British Government is
establishing its authority in Cyprus must soon se-
cure that island an honest and progressive admin-
istration, which will encourage trade and stimulate
agriculture. American commerce should benefit
by this revival, since it will enjoy greater freedom
and security under the British flag than it could
under that ol the Porte. The commanding position
S.hich Cyprus occupies in the Levant makes It suit-
able as a trading station, whence goods may be
distributed to the markets of Syria and Asia
Minor. The readiness with which Greeks hastened
to the island when they learned of the contem-
plated transfer is significant, and indicates that it
may again become a great mart.


THE BERLIN CONGRESS. 1
The h-l-bois of the Congress are concluded and
the Treaty signed. Peace, which a few months
ago was in such great peril, is now deemed secure
for years. At the close of the Congress Prince
Bismarck congratulated its members and assured
them that it had been a success, and that its deli-
berations had been of great importance to Europe.
At the last meeting, as at the first, the plenipoten-
tiaries appeared in full dress. Prince Gortschakoff
had to be borne into the room, and Lord Bea-
consfield, who was recovering from an attack of
gout, which had interrupted his attendance at the
meetings of the Congress, had to lean heavily on a
stick in walking. As soon as the Treaty was
signed the members of the Congress left Berlin,
and the occasion so imposing in its character, so
fraught with consequences to Europe and the East,
is now a thing of the past. The Treaty, number-
ing over sixty articles, is very much what it was
expected to be. After the publication of the
Schoualoff memorandum its terms could no longer
be held secret, and no great change has been made
by the Congress in the adjustment preliminarily
agreed to by England and Russia, the chief con-
testants. The reluctance of Turkey to agree to its
provisions was overcome. Indeed there was no
help for the Porte. With its old and most trusted
ally in accord with all its jealous neighbours, it
had no alternative but to agree to the terms im-
posed upon it.
A communication, however, was made to the
Congress as significant as any of the points it con-
sidered and decided. This was that an alliance for
defensive and protective purposes had been entered
into between England and Turkey, and that the
latter power had ceded to the former the large and
important island of Cyprus in the Mediterranean.
This was Lord Beaconsfield's great feat, and was
the protectorate over Turkey which the London
ministerial papers had been hinting at. The scheme
was not considered to come within the scope of the
Congress; it had been arranged and agreed upon
before the Congress met, and was communicated as
an accomplished fact at the close of its sessions.
It excited great interest and for a time seemed
likely to incur the opposition of the powers, and
more particularly of France and Italy. But it was
made clear that the British did not falter in their
purpose, and were prepared to insist upon the out-
side treaty they had made. Sir Garnet Wolseley
was at once appointed Governor of Cyprus, and
ordered to take command, and troops were sent from
Malta to meet and follow him. This acquisition of
England will more certainly secure the command
'of the Suez Canal and of the road to her Eastern
possessions. It will be fortified, garrisoned and
improved, and no doubt is to become, what its size
and position fit it for, the most important and con-
trolling possession in the Levant. The hostility
first excited by its cession to England soon subsid-
ed, and means were used to allay the disquiet of
France and Italy. Russia made no sign or protest
against it. Indeed, she claims, or it is claimed for
her, that the present arrangement is nearly what
she proposed before the Crimean war, and which,
being then rejected by England and France, made
that war inevitable. A dismemberment and read-
justment of Turkey in Europe, and a cession of
Egypt to England, was a part of the scheme she
then proposed for disposing of the sick man"
among the governments, and these results are sub.
stantially what have been reached and are implied
by the action of the Congress and the cession of
Cyprus. However this may be, Russia, and finally
all the powers deliberating at Berlin, acquiesced in
the Treaty announced to have been made between
England and Turkey.
In England the excitement has also been, and
still is, very great. At first opinion and comment
seemed somewhat bewildered. What responsibilities
were to come with the protectorate of Turkey, for
that is what it amounts to, could not easily be fore-
seen or predicted. It was felt, however, that the
embarrassments in this respect might be great and
the possibilities of trouble, though shadowy, or per-
haps, because shadowy, seemed portentous. Some
disposition, too, was shown to criticise the course of
Lord Beaconsfield. In these days of parliamentary
checks and power, it is not usual to see a Premier
doing so much and telling so little. Just as the
troops were sent to Malta before Parliament heard
of any intention to do so, this Treaty was concluded,
and concluded under circumstances which make
ratification a certainty, without the legislature, and
it is asserted without all the members of the Cab-
inet, hearing of it. To assume the protectorate of
a country, to acquire an island one hundred and
' fifty miles by fifty, with two hundred thousand in-
habitants, was thought to be too great a personal
prerogative for any Minister. But all these doubts
are subsiding, and public feeling is settling down
or rising up to general satisfaction, if not exulta-
tion. The growth or renewal of English power in
the East is dear to all her traditions. That power
has been acquired and held by marvellous genius
and courage; and no page of history is more at-
tractive than that which tells of the men and the
deeds, the heroes who conquered and the heroes
who endured, that English supremacy in that far
land might be established and maintained. The
nation cannot resist the pleasure of believing that
new agencies and guarantees for the continuance of
this supremacy have been secured [by the present
treaty. And even if mistaken in this, one thing is
sure, that the course of England before and at the
Berlin Congress, has once more given her a first
position among the first Powers of Europe. There
will be no longer any disposition at home or abroad
to sneer at England, and to assert that in the pur-


Against the Austrians.-Belgrade telegrams,
which, however, are colored by prejudice, continue
to report excitement in Bosnia against the Austri-
,ans. A Times despatch from Belgrade says the
beys have proposed in council that the Governor
of Bosnia should expel the Austrian Consul.
Austria Preparing to Move.-General Phillipovich
is now in Vienna receiving final instructions in
regard to the occupation of the Turkish provinces.

Declines Parliamentary Candidacy.--Right Hon.
George J. Goschen, liberal member of Parliament
from the city of London, has published a letter
saying that in view of the probability of an early
general election it has become necessary for him
to consider what course he would pursue. He
has decided not to contest the city, as his known
objection to the extention of the county franchise
makes him not the strongest possible liberal can-
didate.
Death of an Italian Poet.-A despatch from Ve-
rona reports that Signor Aleardi, the poet and
member of the Italian Senate, is dead.
A French Deputy Dead. -M. Pierre Durand, radi-
cal member of the Chamber of Deputies for Lyons,
is dead.
Bismarck's Movemerts.-Brince Bismarck has ar-
rived at Kissingen.
Romas Consistory -Padre San Felice, of the
Benedictine Order, was proconized to the See of
Naples at the Consistory held last Monday.

LORD SALISBURY'S EXPLANATION.
'What was Gained for Turkey -and Europe at Berlin
-Russian Power Pressed Back from the Capital.
LONDON, July 17.-Lord Salisbury, in-his official
despatch from Berlin of 13th inst. to the Ministers
in London, which is now published, quotes the fol-
lowing from his circular of the 1st of April: The
separate and nddividual operation of the clauses of
the San Stefano treaty, whether defensible or not,


Vry Late from the United States
and Europe.
The Mail Steamer Canima, Captain Liddicoat,
anchored in Grassy Bay on Sunday evening and
came into Hamilton Harbour early yesterday morn-
ing. She left New York at 4 p.m., of the 18th
inst.
Gold in New York on 18tb, 1001tlhs.
Shares Delaware and Hudson 581.
We have to kindly thank Captain Liddecoat, 1st'
Officer Mr. Mitchell, 2nd Officer Mr. Astwood, and
2nd Engineer Mr. Miller of the Canima, and other
friends for files of New York paneis up to the
morning of the 18th instant.
The weather in the United States.particularly to
the Westward, has been excessively oppressive.
At St. Louis on the 16th there were 145 cases of
sunstroke.
At Toronto, Canada, on the 17tb, the Thermo-
meter ranged from 900 to 103.
The heat was extending to the Eastward.
The Thermometer in Broadway, New York, on
the 18th stood at 104 in the shade.

Great satisfaction was felt in New York on the
17th in consequence of the reported safety of the
Steamer Iontana, in which Colonel and Mrs. Gor-
don and Family and Major Creek and others from
Bermuda were passengers from New York to Eng-
land. An accident to her machinery, had reduced
her speed to six knots per hour. She reached
Queenstown on the 17th where she landed her
mails and passengers.
She broke her main crank on the 8th.
A ship load of arms and cartridges, worth over
$1,000,000, was about to leave New Haven in a
British Steamer for Constantinople.

I The French Corvette Alecton, Captain Charil de
Ruillie, C. L. H., from Martinique bound to Brest,
France, arrived at St. Georges on Sunday last for a
supply of coal. The A. will proceed on her voyage on
Saturday next.
The U. S. S. Saratoga, Lt.-Commander R. D.
Evans, which we reported in our last issue as hav-
ing arrived on Sunday the 14th inst., sailed from
Murray's Anchorage on Sunday morning last,
bound for Newport, U.S.
The Commander and Officers of the ship were
most hospitably entertained by His Excellency,
Genl. Sir R. M. Laffan, K.C.M.G., R.E., Governor
and Commander-in-Chief, &c., also by the Com-
manding Officers, and the Officers of the Royal
Artillery, Royal Engineers, and XIXth (the
Princess of Wales's Own) Regt., and have left Ber-
muda, highly pleased with their visit, and grateful
for the kindness shewn them.
The Crew were allowed "liberty" in St. Georges,
and conducted themselves very satisfactorily.

We subjoin a list of the names of the Officers of
the ship.
U. S. S. SARATOGA," 13 Guns,
Lieut.-Comdr. R. D. Evans, Commanding.
Lieut. R. M. Berry, Executive Officer.
W. M. Wood, Navigator.
Master H. L. Green, '
G. F. W. Holman, (
C. W. Bartlett, Deck Officers.
P. Busbee, |
W. H. Slack,
P. A. Surgeon, A. F. Magruder.
Asst. Paymaster, J. N. Speel.
1st Lieut., M. C. Goodrell, U. S. M. C.
Pay Clerk, C. A. Gibson.
Boatswain, I. T. Choate.
Gunner, J. G. Foster.
Carpenter, E. H. Hay,
Sailmaker, J. S. Franklin.
The crew consists of 98 men and 120 boys.
Displacement, 1024. Tonnage, 754.
This vessul is employed by the U. S. Govern-
ment to train boys as seamen for the U. S. Navy.

The Latest News from Europe.
LONDON, July 18.-A Constantinople despatch says
the Russians near the Gulf of Saros, fired upon an un-
armed boat from a British man-of-war, which came in
search of some sailors who had been detained within
the Russian lines. The Russians continued to fire,
although the Englishmen hoisted a white flag.
Reported at Constantinople.-The Times' Constan-
tinople despatch says Admiral Commeratl has sent a
lieutenant to Constantinople to report the firing on
the British boat by the Russians near the Gull of Sa-
ros.
Ovations to Beaconsfield.-All accounts agree that
Tuesday's reception of the plenipotentiares was mag-
nificent. Lord Beaconsfield waited upon the Queen
at Windsor yesterday, the Queen having countermand-
ed the preparations for her departure for Osborne in
order to receive the Earl. There will be renewal of
Tuesday's ovations at Paddington and Windsor. The
Mayor and corporation of Windsor will present an ad-
dress.
Critical Relations between Italy and Austria-Fears
of an Attack on the British Ambassy in Rome.
SLONDON, July 18-6 A.M.-The Telegraph's
Vienna-correspondent says the latest advices from
Italy show that the situation is most critical.
The Ministers have telegraphed to King Hum-
bert to return to Rome from Turin immediately.
One account says a hostile demonstration against
the British Embassy is apprehended. The Min-
isters are discussing the expediency of sending a
squadron to the Levant. The resignation of Count
Corti as Prime Minister is regarded as certain.


It is found that the eyes at the top of the potato
produce a much more vigorous offspring than those
in the lower part.
The best plan of all is to plant the tubers whole,
cutting out nevertheless, all the eyes except those
in the top part.
The whole potato from which the lower eyes
have been cut produced 111 tons per acre.
From tubers divided vertically only five tons were
produced per acre.
From potatoes planted whole, seven and half tons.
From potatoes horizontally divided, 91 tons.
Other things being equal, it is considered the
whole potato will always produce more than
halves, however cut.

AUSTRALIAN NOTES.,-SAN FRANCISCO, July 17.
-Advices by the steamer Zealandia, from Sydney
via Honolulu, state that the "typhus" which
is raging at Sydney is attributed to bad water
and sewerage.
Sufficient rain has fallen in New South Wales to
warrant expectation of a fair crop.
About the middle of June a severe storm occur-
red at Melbourne and along the coast. The streets
of Melbourne were flooded, Garria River overflow-
ed its banks, and considerable minor damage to
shipping is reported.

800 Mennonites, owners of small farms in
Southern Russia on their way to Kansas, ar-
rived at New York on the 17th instant. These
people are leaving their homes in order to escape
conscription in the Russian army.
Absolutely latest item about Lord Beaconsfield at
Berlin : Seeing a poor devil picking up cigar-ends to
supply himself with tobacco, the Earl gave him a gold
.piece with which to buy something better. But the
man had a narrow escape, for the ever-.vigilant police
arrested him for begging, and were loth to release
him.


is not that which should engage the most earnest
attention of the signatory powers. Their combinpld
effect, in addition to the results upon the Greek
populations, and upon the balance of maritime
power, which have been already pointed out, is to
depress almost to the point of entire subjection the
political independence of the Government of Con-
stantinople. It cannot be otherwise than a matter
of extreme solicitude that that Government should |
be so closely pressed by the political outposts of a I
greatly superior power that its independent action,
or even existence, is almost impossible." "To these
three cardinal objections," says the present circu-
lar, "the Congress of Berlin has supplied an entire
remedy. The Greek populations no longer fall
within the boundaries of the autonomous Slav
Principality, and all Russian influence has been re-
moved to a distance from the shores of the ,Egean
Sea. The same territorial arrangements have the
effect of attaining the essential aim which, in their
recent negotiations, her Majesty's Government have
had in view-the independent existence and action
of the Government of Constantinople. The political
outposts of Russian power have been pushed back
to the region beyond the Balkans, and its opportu-
nities for establishing influence in the reduced Bul-
garia have been materially diminished. The Sul-
tan's dominions have been provided with a defen-
sible frontier, far removed from his capital. The
interposition of the Austrian power between the
two independent Slav States, while it withdraws
from him no territory of strategical or financial
value, offers him a security against renewed aggres-
sion on their part, which no other possible arrange-
ment could have furnished. Rich and extensive
provinces have been restored to his rule, at the same
time that careful provision against future misgov-
ernment has been made which will, it may be hoped,
assure their loyalty, and prevent a recurrence of
the calamities which have brought the Ottoman
power to the verge of ruin. Arrangements of a
different kind, but having the same end in view,
have provided for the Asiatic dominions of the
Sultan security for the present and the hope of pros-
perity and stability in the future."

DISCONTENT WITH THE RESULT.
Italian Jealousy of Austria's gain by the Treaty-Ef-
forts to Divert Popular Comment- Greek Dissatis-
faction.
LONDON, July 17.-Radical agitation in Italy
against Austria's gains at Berlin, and in favor of
acquisition of the Trentino, &c., is becoming so
prominent that the Government is apprehensive of
its effect on Austrian susceptibilities. The mani-
festo published in the Diritto, the Ministerial jour-
nal declaring that the Anglo-Turkish convention
causes us much anxiety, and opportunity will not
be wanting to set forth quietly and at length
the grounds of our distrust and repugnance
is an attempt to t'irn public attention from the dan-
gerous subject of Austria's success to that of the
English acquisition of Cyprus, the discussion of
which is not likely to make any trouble, especially
as the manifesto declares that Italy could not at
Berlin, and cannot elsewhere, attempt to hinder the
British action which all the other powers accepted.
It is not believed that a war with Greece will re-
sult from the angry, disappointed feeling of the
Greeks at the Berlin treaty, but it is thought that
the boundary question can only be settled upon the
intervention of the Powers. M. Delyannis, the
Greek Envoy to Berlin, who is now in London, may
be able to arrange a method for bringing the ques-
tion to a settlement through British influence. The
Greeks are maintaining a state of insurrection and
anarchy in Thessaly and Epirius, fearing that paci-
fication there would enable the Turks to indefinite-
ly postpone a compliance with the directions of the
Treaty of Berlin. The Ambassadors of the powers
are delaying the dispatch of Turkish troops and
iron-clads to the Greek coast, pending the efforts
to set diplomacy in motion.
BUCHAREST, July 17.-The session of the Cham-
bers closed to-day. Prince Charles, in his Message
says Roumania will observe such attitude as will
show that she deserved better of the Berlin Con-
gress.
LONDON, July 18.-The Standard's Vienna dis-
patch says the Italian Ambassador before leaving
Vienna, whence he was recalled in consequence of
his reports respecting Austrian criticisms on the
agitation for the annexation of the Tyrol to Italy,
said he would do his utmost to remove misunder-
standings. He hoped for Austria's co-operation,
which Count Andrassy promised. A diplomatic
note is expected from Italy satisfactorily explain-
ing the attitude of the Italian Government during
the recent Radical manifestations relative to the
Tyrol.
A special to the Times from Rome says that at
Macerata and Ravenna demonstrations have been
made in favor of the annexation of the Tyrol to It-
aly. Other demonstrations are preparing at Genoa,
Florence, and Bologna. The Annexationists are
about to establish a weekly organ.

POTATO PLANTING-SOMETHING WORTH KNOWING.
A french journal describes the results of some ex-
periments recently conducted by Scientific Menain
Germany relative to the cultivation of the Potatoe,
from which we gather:-
The vigor of the Potatoe plant is always in di-
rect proportion to the weight of the tuber used for
sets-a theory which certainly finds some support
in common sense considering that the young shoots
draw their sole nourishment from the seed potato.
There is a great variety in the productive power,
not only of the different tubers, but also of the dif-
ferent eyes in the same potato.


A Supplement of Five
Columns accompanies this issue of
,VIe Pr ithe "Gazette." It contains:
The Proceedings of the Hon. Legislative Coun-
cil of the 19th instant,
The Proceedings of the Hon. House of Assem-
bly on the 19th and 22nd instant,
A Brilliant and Important Speech of Lord Duff.
erin,
Valuable Communication on the subject of the
destruction of the Gruper" Fish,
West India News, &c.

BR ilMA, U1)

BY ORDER OF THE WORSHIPFUL
THE JUSTICES OF T1HE PEACE,
rp HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that HER
I' MAJESTY'S next (GENER L COURT OF
QUARTER SESSIONS of the PEACE for
these Islands, will be holden

ONTNHU1S)AV NEXT,
The 25th Instant,
AT THE COURT HOUSE, Hamilton,
At 10 o'clock in the forenoon.

W. J. HENEY,
Clerk of the Peaces.
Hamilton, July 2h,d, 1878.

B. Y Club.


SDuke


FOR THE


of Edinburgh's Challenge Cup,
Will take place in the


GREAT SOUND,
ON



August 6th,


Under the


It. B. Y. C. Regulations.


Start at 1'0 P.M.
Entries close on Friday, August 2nd, 1878.
C. WILKINSON,

Hamilton, July 20, 1878. Secy. to ailig Uo.


Final Notice.

pERSONS INDEBTED) to the late Firm of
V S. S. INGHAM & CO, 'are requested
to call at the Office of Undersignod and
Settle their respective ACCOUN rS as no further
indulgence can be given.
ACCOUNTS remaining unpaid or not Satist.
factorily arranged on or before 20th Iuguas
next, will be placed in legal hands for Collec-
tion.
S. S. JAGItI/J I.
July 22nd, 1878.

Pitch Pine Lumber.

The Undersigned has Received a
very Choice CA RGO of


Ex Schr. Rockie E Yates"
From Jacksonville, FloriJa,
Consisting of the usual assortment of
DRESSED FLOORING-1 & li x 6,.
DRESS PLANK, Square edge-1 & lI x 12,
AND,
SCANTLING of various sizes.
E:j J TERMS LOW FOR CAS I.
S. S. INGHJ 1M.
22nd July, 1878.

Notice.

ALL Persons having CLAIM' against the
late HENRY 1I'I% IllN ,HAM, Esqr.,
of Paget Parish, are requested to send the same
to the Subscriber on or before the first day of
September next, and all INDEBTED to the
Estate will please make PAYMENT by that
time.
DANIEL TRIMINGHAM,
Executor.
Hamilton, Jany. 22nd July, 1878.-3

For Charter or Freight
to Halifax, JV.S.

The Brigt.



NOW DUE.
Apply to
N. T. BUTTERFI EmL! & SON.
Ilamilton, July 22, 1878.-1


I


In addition to the troopships Himalaya, Orontes,
and Tamar, now on their way to Malta, the Admir-
alty have ordered H.M.S. Simoom to leave Devon-
port for that island on the 10th instant.

The Reverend William Richardson, Presbyterian
Minister, died at New York soon after he landed from
the Canima on her last trip hence.

BIRTH, at Roseblanche, Nfld., on the 3rd instant,
the WIFE of the Rev. F. Skinno.r, ofa DAUGHTER.

MAR RIE D, at St. Barnabas, July 6th, by the Rev.
Mr. Williams, W. T. H TUCKER, Esqr.. of Custer
County, Neb., to CECELIA ANN, second daughter of
Wm. S. Masters, Esqr., M. 0. P. of Bermuda.-
Omaha, Nebraska, Herald, July 9.

DIED, in Pembroke Parish on 16th inst., Mr. THO-
MAS J. CARBERRY, a native of the East Indies, aged 37
years.-Dublin and East India papers please copy.
........., in Southampton Parishl. on Thursday last,
18th inst., Capt. JOSEPH EDWARD INGHAM, aged 74
years; leaving a widow, 3 children, grand children, and
many relatives and friends to lament their loss.
.......... at the Island of Jersey on the 18th ulffmo,
f taff Surgeon Major ATKINSON, M.D. Dr. Atkinson
Served with the 53rd Regiment in' this command in
1872, when he made many sincere friends.


I


0 rip


I





IERMITDA ROYAL GAZETTE


BY AUCTION,
To-morrow, Wednesday,


24th Instant, 12 o'clock,
AT TRi sV 0UD STAWNY,
I WILL SELL,
BRAN CORN and HAY
Barn els V P and Grocery SUGAR
Half Chests and Smaller Pkgs. Oolong TEA
8 Casks ALE and PORTER (without reserve)
20 Gross Lamp CHIMNEYS
Step LADDERS Wash BOARDS
Kegs NAILS, assorted sizes
FURNITURE, New and Second hand
Boxes SOAP Fancy PIPES
A Lot of Felt HATS
BOOTS and SHOES
Ready Made CLOTHING
Carpet and Floor CLOTH, &c., &c.
ALSO,
A few more of the same sort of that Superior
Breed of
POuing PfIGS.
Together with whatever else may be offered
at the Sale.
JOHN HARNETT,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, July 23rd, 1878.

Notice.

BY AUCTION

On Thursday,
The 25th Instant, At 12 o'clock, M.
Under the Big Shed,
80 BARRELS S. FLOUR
5 Barrels Rye FLOUR
5 Half Barrels Extra BEEF
10 Half Barrels Extra PORK
20 Tubs Family BUTTER
20 Tins Corned BEEF, 10 lbs. each
60 SHOULDERS and HAMS
15 Barrels Bass ALE
60 Dozen Cream and Breakfast COCOA
60 Dozen BLACKING 20 Bags CORN
20 BIs. Hlf. Bls. and Qrts. MACKEREL
30 Tins Black and Whortle BERRIES
2 Cases 10 Gross each, MATCHES
10 Bales HAY
A Lot of Fancy GOODS
4 Lot of PRINTS and MUSLINS
A Lot of Summer HATS 1 Barrel Waste OIL
And a Lot of other GOODS that will appear
at the Sale.
ALSO,
A very Superior
ERBER UDA1 ICOW.
7 Months in Calf, gives 10 quarts when flush.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneerea
Hamilton, July 22nd, 1878.

Notice.

We have been Instructed to Sell,

At Public Auction,
At 12 o'clock,
ON FRIDAY NEXT,
26th Instant,
AT "ROLIA," NEAR PROSPECT,

THE REMAINING EFFECTS
Of Capt. E. S. CREEK,
Brigade Major,
COMPRISING IN PART:-


Dinner Service,
ware, 40c., ic,


Glass-


B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auetioneersa
Hamilton, July 22, 1878.

The Genuine Teneriffe

ONION SEED,
RED) AND WHITE.
71'HE Subscriber has received Notice of the
., Shipment of the above Article, and it is
expected to arrive here on the 6th SEP-
TEMBER next.
0:7' Engagement List still open for a limited
quantity.
quantity.W. E. TA LBOT.

Hamilton, July 22, J878.-2 3rd. p. *
Colonist copy.


'For Sale.

,About 1000 Bushels

Hard Stone Lime,
Principally burnt with Cedar Wood.
Orders left with A. J. Hopsi)oN,JEsqr., Ham-
ilton, will be promptly attended to.
JOHN T., STONE,
evonshire
July 23rd, 1878.-tf.

Tor Sale, A
THE YACH1T


Including SPARS, SAILS, BALLAST, &e .
For particulars apply to
LT. WILKINSON, R E.,
Boaz.
Boaz, July 22nd, 1878.


VII


A

!^


I a
1


auction.


Tuesday
30th Instant,
t the Metropolitan
Queen Street, At I
n Instructed
V AUCT1


New York Mail Steamer. X Notice to Mariners, &c.


SThe Steam Ship
uel "Canima,"
Hotel, Captain LIIDICOAT,
qoon, Will leave hence for New York
to Sell At -I P.M.,

[~~ J- ^ '^ ^i^y^^ ntaKgf i-^ -^msiar H^r^- XH^


ALL THE HOUSEHOLD
FUR N IT UR E,
lar Fixings, &c.,
Of the Late
MR. I. W. AD mINS,
Comprising
DRAWING Room, Parlor & Bed
Room FURNITURE
Kitchen UTENSILS
Pantry and Bar REQUISITES.
ALSO,
Soda Water JM I C H I JV E,
(if not previously Sold).
ALL WITHOUT RESFER.VE.
W. J. HE.NEY,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, 22nd July, 1878.


A Rare Chance of
Speculation.

1 have been favored with Instruc-
tions to Sell,
By Public Auction,
On Wednesday Vext,
31st Instant,
*I thle Od( Stanfd,
THAT VALUABLE
PROPERTY,
Known as WADE'S GREEN, at the Caicos
Islands.
This desirable FREEHOLD consists of about
1 800 ACRES of LAND,
-I A Large
^ DWELLING HOUSEg
AND
Three OUT HOUSES.


-7
And quite a number of Brasilitta, Yellow
Wood and Fruit Trees.
Above one-half of the LAND is not only
arable, but very productive, the other portion
is good Grazing Land, the whole of it 'has a
good Enclosure.
JOHN HARNETT.
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, July 23, 1878.

AUCTION.


I am Instructed to Sell,
AT PUBLIC AUCTION,
ON THE PREMISES,
On Thursday 1st August,
At i2 o'clock.
COTTAGE,
With One Acre of LAND,
More or Less.
The Property of MR. FELIX SMITH.
The above Cottage contains Six Rooms, Kitchen
and Tank, and is Situated near Harman's Bay,
Sandy's Parish.
JO F FO WLE.
Sandy's Parish, 22nd July, 1878.

Second annuall Meeting
OF TH E
Hamilton
CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION
T HE Members of the Hamilton
Co-operative Association are requested to
meet at the Temperance Hall, at 7-30 p.m., on
5th Proximo.
By order,
WM. H. T. JOELL,
Secretary H. A. C.
P.S.-All claims, of whatever nature, outstand-
ing against the Association, must be presented
for adjustment, at or prior to the meeting
hereinbefore mentioned.


Hamilton, July 22, 1878.-2


Secy. H. A. C.


For Sale.

3 HORSES,

3 8 BOX CARTS,
1 DRAY, I Sliding Seat Caleche

CARRIAGE ,
1 Single Caleche CARRIAGE,
Convertible as a Double.
ALSO,
That well-known fast Trotting Gray Mare

With Single HARNESS,
AND,
BUGGY CARRIAGE, complete.


Apply to


July 21, 1878.


E. CRAWLEY,
Somerset.


25th Instant,
To leave thence for return 1st JAu
gust.
All MAILS close at the Pust Office at 1l
a.m., 25th
Parcels and Specie List close at 6 p.m. on
Wednesday 24th
Freight will be received until 6 p. m., Wed-
nesday 24th, and Bills of Lading signed until
10 a.m., 25th instant.
Passengers Stage will Ibe removed at 12'30
p.m., 25th inst.
Warehouse to be cleared 27th instant.
TRQTT 4 COX,


Hamilton,Bermuda,
23rd 'July, 1878.


Agents.


Colonist copy,


THE BERMUDA LIBRARY,
3RD JULY, 1878.
Tl HE following BOOKS belonging to the
1 EBermuda Library are reported as missing,
and any persons having any of them in their
possession are requested to return them into
the Library not later than the 31st July in-
stant :-


Arago, on Thunder and Lightning
Bainbridge, The Conservatory
Beck, The Mineralogy of the State of
New York
Bell, On Colonial Administration
Borcke, Confederate War-Vol. 2
Bronte, Wuthering Heights
Carpenter, Popular Readings-Vol. 1
Chalmers, Bridgewater Treatise, As-
tronomy-Vol. 1
Doolittle, Social Life of the Chinese
Duncan, The Dispensary
Edwards, The West landies
Featherstonhaugh, On the American
North Eastern Boundary
Fincham, On the Laying down of
Ships
Goldsmith, History of Rome-Vol. 1
Hadden, Book-keeping
Hamerton, Arboriculture
Haven, Archeology of the United
States
Hawthorn, The Scarlet Letter
Horsburgh, On Winds
Hartwig, the Subterranean World
Huc, Voyage in Tartary and Thibot
Kirwan, Letters on Popery
Lee, Taxidermy
Legendre
Lloyd's Sketches of Bermuda
Lyell's Lectures on Geology
Mahon (Lord), History of England-
Vols. 3 and 4
Mudge & Colby, Survey of the Boun-
dary of British America
Oliphant, Russian Shores of the Black
Sea
Parry, Second West India Voyage
On the Conduct of British
Seamen
Piddington, On Storms
Porter (Jane), Seaward's Narrative
of his Shipwreck
Radcliff (Mrs.),Mysteries of Udolpho
Reid (Sir Win.), Atlas of Storms
Roberts, Mollusca
Rollin, Belles Lettres
Sims, On Asphaltic Mastic
Smiles, School Days of Eminent Men
Sparkes, Life of Charles II.
Stow, Philosophy of History
Thackeray, The Great Hoggarty Dia-
mond
Vanbrugh, Dramatic Works
Wise, Analysis of 100 Voyages
Whewell, On Tides-2 Vols.
Yates, The New Brunswick Boundary
Aboriginal Monuments of the State of
New York
Algiers and the Arabs
Atlas of Constructive Geography
Catalogue of the London Exhibition
of 1851
Court Kalendar, 1847, 1832
Geographic de Virgil
History of the French Republic
Medical Almanack 1849
Nautical Almanack 1868
Natural History of the World


Date when as-
certained to
have been last
in the Library
April 1863

Feb. 28, 1878
Sept. 18,1872
Febry. 1874
July 17, 1876

Nov. 21, 1877
March, 1876


Feb. 10, 1875
Sept. 25, 1862


June 4, 1867
Feb. 12, 1878
Septr., 1866
May, 1872


July, 1857


October, 1856
March, 1868
July, 1861

October, 1868
July, 1876
Novr., 1872

June, 1877


Jany., 1877
April, 1867


March, 1876


The above Books are mostly in the ordinary
binding ;of the Bermuda Library, and all of
them are marked as belonging to the Library
either inside or outside, or both.
By order of the Trustees,
S. BROWNLOW GRAY,
Honorary Secretary,
3 p-9 & 23 Jy.


New York Mail Steamer.

Notice to Importers of


(rFHE Months of June, July, August and Sep-
3 tember are the only of the Year dur.
ing which the Board of Public Works will
permit KEROSENE to come by the New
York Mail Steamer. Persons desiring to im-w
port are asked to specially notice this.
TROTT & COX,
Agents.
Hamilton, July 23rd, 1878.-3 3p
"Colonist" copy 3 times 3rd page.

Notice.

T HIS is to give Notice that I will not be
Responsible for any DEBTS Contracted
by my WIFE ISABELLA LOT%1Olt, a.
Woman of Cl. )ur.
LE WIS LOTMORE.
Warwick, July 23rd, 1878.-1 pd


M ASTERS OF VESSELS, Pilots, Mariners,
I Boatmen, and others concerned, are
hereby informed that pursuant to An Act
passed during this present Session of Parlia-
ment entitled, Act No. 5 of 1878, An Act to
authorise the War Department to carry on
Warlike Experiments on the Coasts of these
Islands-the Commanding Royal Engineer and
the Officers and men under his orders will oc-
cupy from the 29th July, instant, till the 30th
September next, the water space inside the Ship
Channel between Fort Cunningham and the Mili-
tary Itospital at St. Georges, for the purpose of
practising therein TORPEDO EXPERIMENTS, and
vessels and boats coming within this water
space will be liable to come into collision with
sunken obstruction and incur some danger.
The water space thus occupied will be marked
by Red Buoys at either extremity, and all par-
ties are warned against entering upon the re-
served space.
W. L. MORRISON,
Colonel, R.E., and C.R.E.
Prospect, 22nd July, 1878.
Colonist please copy once.

To Mariners.

Colonial Secretary's Office,
IJuLY 22ND, 1878.
THE following NOTICE is hereby published
Sfor the information of Mariners.
By His Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER,
1 Colonial Secretary.


Cape


of Good Hope-
South Coast.


NOTICE TO MARINERS.
IT is hereby notified that a Light Tower is
being built about Two Hundred to Three
Hundred yards within the pitch of a low point
(Seal Point), situated one-and three quarter
miles westward of Cape St. Francis, to be
hereafter called "Cape St. Francis Light-
house."
The Tower is a cylindrical stone structure,
ninety-one feet high, with Keeper's Quarters
attached at base, and is situated in latitude 340
22' 30' south, and longitude 240 50' 20 east of
Greenwich. It is intended to display a second
order Holophotal Revolving White Light,
flashing at intervals of Twenty seconds, with
focal plane one hundred and one-and-a-half
feet above the base of the Tower, and one hun-
dred and eighteen feet above the level of high
water.
The light will be visible in clear weather
about sixteen and three-quarter sea miles
from the deck of a vessel fifteen feet above the
sea. It will command the coast uninterrupt-
edly to the westward, but will be cut off to
the eastward by Cape St. Francis on the line
N. 530 E. true, or would not be visible from
the eastward on a bearing more southerly than
S. 530 W. true.
The nearest existing lights are Cape Recif,
about forty-five miles to the eastward; and
Mossel.Bay (Cape St. Blaize), about one hun-
dred and thirty-three miles to the westward.
The Tower will probably be ready for the
reception of the Lenticular about January,
1878, and the light may probably be exhibited
some time between 1st March and 30th April,
1878, of which due and precise notice will be
given.
JAMES FFORDE,
Chief Inspector of Public Works.
Public Works Office, Cape Town,
17th July, 1877.

GOVERNMENT NOTICE.-No. 348, 1878.
Office of the Commissioner of Crown Lands
and Public Works, 29th April, 1878.
TITH reference to the above Notice, it is
now hereby further notified that the
tower is in all respects completed and ready for
the reception of the apparatus; that a frac-
ture having occurred to certain portions of the
latter during transport, the expected exhibi-
tion of the light was unavoidably delayed.
Mariners and others are now informed that
the light will almost certainly be exhibited
about on and after the 15th June, next, 1878;
and that the tower already is a conspicuous
available day mark.
JOHN LAING,
Commissioner of Crown Lands
and Public Works.

14 Queen Street, -Hamilton,
Between the Stores of Messrs. F. A.
WHITE & E. B. JONES.



P a i n t e r,
Dealer in PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
GLASS, PUTTY, BRUSHES,
Jl&c., &c.
July 15, 1878.-12 m.


4







I


0-I


C



.0
0





I3
i-


I

.*.







Imp>


IN
42.
00
-4-5


I


An
140


Colonial Secretary's Office,
JULY 22ND, 1878.
Audit Board.
HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.
has been pleased to appoint the following
Gentlemen to form the Audit Board, under
the provisions of Act No. 2 of 1878.
SAMUEL A. HARVEY, ESQR.,
_Chairman.
MORRIS A. M. FRITH, ESQR.
THOMAS N, DILL, ESQn..
By Hit Excellencys Command,
R. WEBSTER,
1 Colonial Secretary.

Colon ad Secretary's Oflce,
JULY 22ND, 1878.
THE following Acts have been passed by
the Legislature of Bermuda during the
present Session.
No. 5.-An Act to authorise the War Depart-
ment to carry on Warlike experiments on
the Coast of these Islands.
No. 6.-An Act further to amend the Act to
make provision for the erection of a Light-
house on St. David's Island.
By His Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER,
3 Colonial Secretary.

NOTICE.

TENDERS will be received at the
COLONIAL SRTVEYOR'S OFI~fCE until


The 27th instant,


from Persons desirous of Tendering for any of
the following Work, viz :-
1WOU1'T &WVOTOW.
1.-Building Stables and Grooms quarters
over.
2.-Converting Stable into quarters for Non
Commissioned Officers and Men on Signal
Post.
3.-Constructing Verandah to Western wing
of Government House.
4.-Building Room to North Gate Lodge.'
5.-Colouring Walls and lime-washing tho
Roof of Government House and outbuilding
attached thereto (the Roof to have two coats
of lime-wash), and all cracks and defects in
the Roof to be well raked out and pointed
with Portland Cement Mortar before wash,
ing. Walls to be scraped" and pointed, if
required, before washing ...
6.-External painting of all wood-work, -in-
cluding the whole of ,the new work which
has been done, or may be done, during the
current year, (the old- work -,to be well
scraped and pumiced before painting,)4the
new work to be painted three coats, and-old
work two coats, of such colours as shall be
directed.
7.-Internal painting of New Work in three
rooms, including repairs to Walls where
necessary, (new work to have thre6 coata
and old work two coats,) of such colors as
shall be directed.
Parties tendering, may tender for the whole
or any part of the work.
Item No. 1, Stable and Grooms quarters
may be tendered for a whole .or for theMason
and Carpenters work separately.
The Contractor to find all materials for Aho
foregoing work (unless otherwise ordered)
which are to be of the beat quality of their
several kinds. .
The COLONIAL SURVEYOR does not bind
himself to accept the lowest or any tender.
Plans and Specifications and all further in.,
formation can be obtained on application at
the Colonial Surveyor's Office.
Pembroke arsh Drainage
8.--Tenders will also be received for widening
deepening and clearing Canal and ditches,
Persons wishing to tender are requested to,
state the price per yard lineal.


Hamilton, July 22, 18


PHILIP NESS,
Colonial Surovyr.


i .


Uuclainmed Letters.
S G Adams, Alexandinia Ledge, Sarah 0 Adder-
ly, John Adams, Jane Albuoy, Laura A ButterfieTd,
Wm Blackman, W Y Brand, Wm Brown, Mrs
Richard Butterfield, L'uis Bambigh, D Burrows,
John Cox, W Card, Anton'o de Costs, Miquel
Vieira Cabecca, Edward Dickinsin, Silveira Duarte,
W B DeGarmo, E Dallas, Miss DaCosta, John
Emanuelson, Manuel Forrera, Wm Fitch, 3 F Gon.
vaze, W Harley, J B Hurdley,J D Hollis, (C F Jones,
Alice Joell, Mrs Nathan Jackson, Silveira Lewis Rich
Munro, Wm P Masters, ElizT Newman, Geo Oak-
ley, J D Outerbridge, Temrno Ou'erbridge, DrT H
Outerbridge, Clara Peniston, Wm Parsons, James
D Perenchidf, Silveira da Roza, Frances R Ranes,
Ashton Robinson, Thomasi S Reid, S H Robinson,
Virgil Ritch, H D Smith, Elizabeth Simm6ns, Hen-.
ry H Smith, Thomas Saih ((ltatnass .Maker), Fran-
cisco le Souza, Allen VW C Steelp, Beaner Swa,
C H Smith, Edward j Smith, Wm A Searl, Miss
Sims, Dr S A Smith, Jeremiah Swan, Catherine
Swan, Mrs Joseph Swan, John H Smith, ASwan,
H Silva, Ruthann Tucker, Clarissa Tucker, Benja..
min T Trott, Wm Trott, Mrs Thirst Tucker, Joa-.
quim Vieria, Mlary Virgil, Byron S WVood, Mary
Ward (care of Wm Fisk), Miss Washington, Chas
Williams, Georg.- C White, Mrs George 0 Whitney,
John R White, Richard Wilson. Benjamin A White-
ly. Mrs John Yates (North Side.)
Post Office, Hamilton, July 22, 1878.
MAILS FOR ENGLAND, United States, and
Dominion of Canada, per Steamer Canima," close
at the Post Office, Hamilton, ON THURSDAY
NEXT, at ten, a.m. Correspondence received it
the Forenoon Mails will be in time.
UNCLAIMED LETTERS IN THE POST OF.
FICE, ST. GEORGE, 22nd July, 1878.
J A Atwood, F G Boggs, Alfred Burch, Isaac J
Burch, Stephen Bassett, WmV P Casey, J C E
D'Esterre, Achill Dolard, 11i T Hayward, gjizabeth
P Jones, Henry Ligh'bourne, T W Lighibourne
Jose Mariante, R D Prudden, Roht Packwood, Jog
Paynter, Isaac Robinson, Mr Spindle, Marywi',n
John J Smith, George Syminds, Richerd Smith,
Louisa Trott, TJ Ted lings, James F Talbot, Juseph
E Talbot, Richard Trott, William Taylor, Daniel
Trott, Thomas E Trott.


N1






ER~~~~~ 14 ID iY LtA i"V


i.L. l Wil 5 1 }

Proceedings (.f the Honorable lc Lg-
islative Council.
Ti, tayS. 16th July, 1878.-Pursuant to adjourn-
nment ibe House met.
Present-His Honor Josiah Rees, Chief Justice,
I President,
The Honorable Augustus J. Musson,
William H. Gosling,
James H. Trimingham,
<" Eugenius Harvey,
Joseph H. Harvey,
James Tucker, Recr. Genl.,
Randal E. Webster, Colonial
Secretary.
A'Bill entitled An Act to authorise the War
Department to carry on warlike experiments on the
ccasts of these Islands,"
And
A Resolve for encouraging the cultivation of
Tobacco, were brought up from the House of As-
sembly and severally read a first time.
The Hon. J. H. Trimingham moved that the rule
as to several readings of Bills and Resolutions on
the same day be dispensed with, and that the Bill
entitled An Act to authorise the War Depart-
ment to carry on warlike experiments on the coasts
of these Islands" be now read the second time-
which was agreed to.
The Bill was then read the second time.
The House went into Committee thereon.
The Hon. J. H. Trimingham in the Chair.
The Committee rose.
The Chairman reported the Bill without amend-
ment.
The House adopted the Report.
The Hen. J. H. Triminghanm moved that the
standing rule be again dispensed with, and that the
Bill be read the third time-which was agreed to.
The Bill was then read the third time and passed,
and ordered to be laid before His Excellency the
Governor by the Colonial Secretary.
The following Message was brought up from the
House of Assembly:-
Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Legislative Coun-
cll;
We are directed by the House of Assembly to
acquaint your Honorable House that the Assembly
have appointed Samuel A. Harvey, Thomas F. J.
Tucker, and William J. Frith, Esquires, to act
with the Committee appointed by your Honorable
House to confer with the Corporation of Hamilton
for the purpose expressed in the Message of the
Assembly of the 8th inst., respecting certain Lots
in front of the Public Buildings.
Sessions' House, 12th July, 1878.
The Bill intituled "An Act for compensating the
Families of Persons killed by Accidents," was read
the third time, passed, and ordered to be sent to the
Honble. House of Assembly, and the same be de-
livered by the Colonial Secretary.
The Resolve granting the sum of 5,872 14/8 to
the order of the Board of Works for Public Build-
ings, Roads and other Public Works, was read the
third time, passed, and ordered to be laid before
His Excellency the Governor by the Colonial Se-
cretary.
The Bill entitled An Act further to amend the
Act to make provision for the erection of a Light
House on St. David's Island," was read the third
time and passed, and ordered to be laid before His
Excellency the Governor by the Colonial Secretary.
Adjourned to Friday next, the 19th instant, at

For the Bermuda Royal Gazette.

PEMBROKE CHURCH.
"Let all things be done decently and in order."
One of the most striking things to a stranger when
he attends Church, is the manner of celebrating
the.Holy Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. As a
. general rule in the Churches in'Bermuda great de-
corum and solemnity are observed, but I regret to
have to remark that there is one that sometimes,
and particularly of late forms an exception. Now
if there is any time and place in this world when
we all meet upon a-effect equality it is around the
Lord's Table at Communion the rich and the
poor-the old and the young-male and female-
the halt and the blind-the gentle and the simple,
without respect to race, all are alike in God's sight.
Then why such ambition as is exhibited in that
Church to be amongst the first to partake of the
Sacred Elements ? It has more the appearance of
pride, both worldly and spiritual, than a desire for
the spiritual food! It seems strange to those who
have witnessed abroad large congregations partak-
ing of this rite in the most orderly and becoming
-manner impressing you with the effects of vital re-
ligion, to see how several persons thrust themselves
forward (minors as well as seniors, squeezing through
the centre of a narrow aisle already crowded with
two columns, in order to get ahead of those col-
umns who are patiently awaiting their turn, thus
causing them to wait much longer. Is this doing
as they would like to be done by? Why does not
the Rector or the Wardens take means to amend
and alter this course, whereby many, and some.-
times invalids, are inconvenienced by being pressed,
and the females having their dresses discommoded
anid trampled upon, whilst their minds aud thoughts
are being diverted from their proper channels?
Surely the Pastor should have influence enough
with his flock to induce them to observe a more res-


pectful and becoming demeanor. Those who are
last to approach set an example worthy of imita-
tion by many who precede them, for they go up
slowly and seriously as if fully impressed with the
solemnity of the rite, and feeling themselves to be
in GoD's sight. The proper course should be to go
up on one side of the aisle, and down on the other,
leaving the centre always open.
COMMUNICANT.
July 17, 1878.

WEDDING ANNIVERSARIES.
Fashion has established a custom, of late years
ofecelebrating certain anniversaries of the marriage,
thbse being named as follows:
The celebration at the expiration of the first year
.is'balled the cotton wedding: at two years comes
the paper; at three the leather; at the close of five
years comes the wooden; at the seventh annivers-
ary the friends meet together at the woolen; and at
teft comes the tin. At twelve years the silk and
fine linen; at fifteen the crystal wedding. At
twenty the friends gather with their china, and at
twenty-five the married couple that have been true
to their vows for a quarter of a century are reward-
ed with silver gifts. From this time forward the
tokens of esteem become rapidly more valuable.
When the thirtieth anniversary is reached they are
presented with pearls; at the fortieth anniversary
comes the rubies; and at the fiftieth comes the
glorious golden wedding. Beyond that time the
aged couple are allowed to enjoy their many gifts
in peace. If, however, by any possibility they reach
their seventy-fifth anniversary, they are presented
with the rarest gifts to be obtained, at the celebra-
lion.of their diamond wedding.
In issuing the invitation for celebrating these an.
niversaries, it is customary to print them on a em-
blematical of the occasion. Thus thin wood, lea-
ther, cloth, tin-loll, silk, silver and gold paper, and
other materials are brought into use.
Of course, those who accept such invitations and
partake of the hospitality of the host and hostess,
art expected to contributed the collection of gifts
that will grace the occasion.


CRICKET.

MUGGLETONS (OFFICERS 46TH) VS. BAND.
On Wednesday, 10th, the Muggletons were again
in the field pitted against their Band, and this time
they managed the game better, winning it after a
somewhat tough struggle; the most notable features
of the game being the bowling of Lieuts. Young
and Eden, the former in the 2nd innings at a most
critical time, when Messrs. Sullivan and Payne
were well set, obtaining 4 consecutive wickets.'
Lieut. Ashby batted in good form, and was up to
his usual style behind the wicket. For the Band
Privates Payne and Sullivan did good service.
OFFICEBS.,


1st iwi ngs.
Lt. Ashby, run out
" Eden, c. Sullivan, b.
Lane
Beauchamp, b.Sullivai
Morris, b. Sullivan
Hollway, c. Sullivan.
b. Doyle
Young, b. Payne
Crozier, c. Harrington
b. Sullivan
Carden, c b. Sullivai
Steele, not out
Harvey, b. Payne
Falls, absent
Extras......
Total..
BA
1st Innings.
Pte. Cushan, b. Lt. Holl.
way
Dmr. Barham, c. b. Lt
Eden

Bte. Hickey, b. Lt. Eden
Sergt. Murray, st. Lt
Ashby, b. Lt. Eden
Pte. Payne, not out
Clarke, c. Lt. Ho:
way, b. Lt. Eden
Sullivan, b Lt. Ede
Lane, b Lt. Hollwa:
Doyle, b Lt. Hollwa
Harrington, c. 1 2
Lt. Eden
Pte. Chandler, st. Lt. Asl
I by, b. Lt. Eden
' Extras.....

Total.


2nd Innings. ,
24 b. Payne 20

8 c. Murray, b. Chand-
ler 0
nl b. Clark 24
4 b. Payne 9
10 b. Clarke 1
5 l.b.w., b. Clark 0

0 not out 0
n 3 run out 0
2 b. Clarke 1


0 b. Payne
- absent
10 Extr


2nd In


8 b. Lt. Youn
0 c. Lt. Ashb
Young
4 c. Lt. Edei
Young

0 b. Lt. Eden
0 c. Lt. Steel
Morris
I-
5 c. Lt. Steel
Hollway
4 b. Lt. Holl
4 b. Lt. YouI
r 0 not out:
2 c. Lt. Beau
Lt. Holl

2 b. Lt. Your
14 Exti


ROVAL ENGINEERS (PROSPECT) VS, 46TH
(12 a side.)
The above match was played at P
Saturday the 13th, and when stu
drawn owing to a- heavy squall, stoo'
greatly in favor of the 46th Regt., chief
the fine batting of Pte. Clarke, and bow
Riordan. The" 'Pompon Rouges" were
to ado their utmost as their excelled
showed.
46TH REGT.
Lt. Ashby, b. Connors...... ........
" Eden, b. Connors............
Corpl. Baldwin, c. i b. Risk..........
Lt. Beauchamp, b. Risk...............
Sergt. Hart, c. Lt. Bor, b. Risk........
Pte. Sullivan, b. Connors...... 0..
Snell, c. Lt. Bor, b. Risk .......
Clarke, c. Everall, b. Bailey.......
Lt. Young, c. Lt. Bor, b. Bailey........
Dr.-Maj. Meredith, st. Willard, b. Baile
Pte. Riordan, b. Lt. Bor..............
Osborne, not out..... ............
Extra


RoYAI ENGINEERS.


1st. Innings.
Lt. Bor, c. b. Riordan
Qr.-Mstr.-Sergt. Bailey,
b. Riordan 1
Corpl. Risk, run out
Blanchflower, c.
Lt. Young, b. Riordan
Lt. Hellard, b. Hart
Sap. Connors, c. Osborne,
b. Riordan

Everall, b. Hart
Corpl. Thompson, c. Rior-
dan, b. Hart
Sap. Hay, c. Meredith, b.
Riordan
Davis, c.Sb. Riordan
Merritt, not out
Willard, c. Clarke, b.
Riordan


Extras.....4


2nd li
6 c. Lt. Eden
dan
.4 run out
0 c. Lt. Ashb
dan

1 C. Snell, b.
1 b. Riordan

0 c. Riordan
Eden
1 not out
0I
I did not I
2
0)
0 not out


Total..30


WAR IN ILLINOIS.


Desperate Fighting between the Two City Governments
of East St. Louis.
EAST ST. Louis, ILL., June 30.--The doTQble
barrelled municipal government of East St. Louis
resulted in a fight to-day between the metropolitan
police, who represent one faction, and Mayor
Bowman, who is at the head of another. The
questions as to which of the two governments is
legitimate are pending in the Supreme Court of
Illinois. Meantime for a month the Metropolitans
have guarded the headquarters of one faction in the
engine house, while Bowman and a large force of
deputy marshals have held possession of the market
House. The Metropolitans claim that Bowman,
who was Secretary of the International Committee
of the Commune in London years ago, has obtained
his ascendancy and perpetuated his government by
means of a mob element which has been recruited
from tramps and city roughs. They claim he is in
sympathy with the Communists, and is supported by
them. This afternoon Mayor Bowman, taking
advantage of an opportunity when the guard of
Metropolitans had been reduced to five, made an
attack on the engine house with his full force of
deputies, numbering in the neighborhood of fifty
men. The Metropolitans, however, had the doors
strongly barricaded and were posted in the upper
atory, and the loaded guns being arranged along the
walls they were able to pour out a steady and
murderous fire. The attacking deputies held their
ground for a quarter of an hour, emptying their
revolvers over and over again. They' finally
retreated without having dislodged the Metropoli-
tans, and having lost two men, James Conners and
Patrick Neville, who were shot dead. Nearly every
other man in the attacking party was wounded more
or less severely. The windows' and front of the
engine house were riddled with bullets, but none of
the Metropolitans were dangerously wounded. In-
tense excitement prevails and the streets are
crowded. The crowds seems to be about equally
divided, and both sides claim to be the legitimate
government of the city.


PETER TIlE GREAT-HIS LAST WILL AND
TESTIMENT.
'In the name of the most holy and indivisible
Trinity, we, Peter, the Great, unto all our descend-
ants and successors to the throne and government
of the Russian nation. The all Powerful, from
hbom we hold our life and our throne, after having
revealed unto us His wishes and intentions, and af-
ter being our support, permit us to look upon Rus-
Pia as called upon to establish her rule over all
Europe.
This idea is based upon the fact that all the na-
tions of this portion of the globe are fast approach-
ing a state of utter decrepitude. From this it results
that they can be easily conquered by a new race of
people when it has attained full power and strength.
We look upon our invasions of the west and east
as a decree of Divine Providence, which has already
once regenerated the Roman Empire by an invasion
bt barbarians.
The emigration of men from the north is like the
inundation of the Nile, which at certain seasons en-
riches with its waters the arid plains of Egypt. We
found Russia a small rivulet-we leave itgan im-
mense river. Our successors will make of it an
ocean destined' to fertilize the whole of Europe if
they knew how to guide its waves. We leave them,
then, the following instructions, which we earnestly
recommend to their constant meditation :


3 1. To keep the Russian nation in constant war-
fare in order always to have good soldiers. Peace
as...... 10 must only be permitted to recruit the finances. To
recruit the army, choose the moment most favorable
Total..68 for attack. Thus peace will advance your projects
of war, and war those of peace for obtaining the en-
largement and prosperity of Russia.
nings. 2. Draw unto you, by all possible means, from
the civilized nations of Europe, captains during
g 0 war and learned men during peace, so that Russia
benefit by the advantage of other nations.
)y, b' Lt. 8. Take care to mix in the affairs of all Europe,
5 and in particular of Germany, which, being the
n, b. "Lt. nearest nation to you, deserves your chief attention.
0 4. Divide Poland by raising up continual disor-
ders and jealousies within its bosom. Gain over its
0 rulers with gold, influence, and corrupt the Diet in
e, b. Lt. order to have a voice in the election of the kings,
12 make partisans and protect them if neighboring
powers raise objections and opposition, surmount
e, b. Lt. the obstacle by striking up discord within their
7 countries.
way 36 5. Take all you can from Sweden, and to effect
ng 0 this, isolate her from Denmark, and vice versa.. Be
0 careful to rouse their jealousy.
6, Marry Russian princes with German princess-
champ, b. es. Multiply these alliances until these interests,
way 4 and by the increase of our influence, attach Ger-
many to our cause.
ng 0 7. Seek the alliance with England on account of
ras ......10 our commerce, as being the country most useful for
the development of our navy, merchants &c.,"
Total..74 and for the exchange of our produce against her
gold. Keep up continued communication with her
REGIKENT, merchants and sailors, so that ours may acquire ex-
perience in commerce and navigation.
8. Constantly extend yourselves along the shores
respect, on of the Baltic and the borders of the Empire.
mpas were 9. Do all in your power to approach closely Con-
ly owias under, g stantinople and India. Remember that he who
ly owing to rules over these countries is the real sovereign of
ling of Pte. the world. Keep up continued wars with Turkey
determined and with Persia. Establish dockyards in the Black
t fielding Sea. Gradually obtain the command of this sea, as
well as of the Baltic. This is necessary for the en-
'tire success of our projects. Hasten the fall of Per-
.. 1 sia. Open for yourselves a route toward the Persia
....... 0 Gulf. Re-establish as much as possible by means
... .... 12 of Syria the ancient commerce of the Levant, and
........ 6 then advance towards India. Once there you will
........ 5 not require English gold.
..... 0 10. Carefully seek the alliance of Austria. Make
........ 12 ber believe that you will second her in her projects
.. ....... 35 for dominion over Germany, and secretly stir up the
...... 10 jealousy of other princes against her, and manage
y...... .. 9 so that each be disposed to claim the assistance of
......... 0 Russia, and exercise over each a sort 61o protection
........ 5 which will lead the way to future dominion over
ras...... 11 them.
-- 11. Make Austria drive the Turks out of Europe,
Total.. 106 and neutralize her jealousy by offering to her a por-
tion of your conquests, which you will further on
take back.
inning 12. Above all, recall around you the schismatic
, b. Rior- Greeks who-are spread over Hungary and Poland;
0 become their centre and support, as universal dom-
inion over them by a kind of sacerdotal rule-au-
0 tocratic sacerdotal. By this you will have many
y, b. Rior- friends among your enemies.
6 13. Sweden dismembered, Persia conquered, Po-
land subjugated, Turkey beaten, our armies united,
Sullivan 5 the Black and Baltic Seas guarded by our own ves-
14 sels, prepare separately and secretly, first, the Court
of Versailles, then that of Vienna, to share the Em-
b. Lt. pire of the Universe with Russia. If one accept,
2 flatter her ambition and amour-prop and make
2 use of one to crush the other by engaging them in
war. The result cannot be doubtful; Russia will
be possessed of the whole of the East and a great
portion of Europe.
bat. 14. If, what is not probable, both should refuse
the offer of Russia, raise a quarrel between them,
and one that will ruin both. Then Russia, profit-
ing by this decisive movement, will inundate Ger-
3 many with the troops which she will have assem-
bled before hand. At the same time, two fleets,
full of soldiers, will have the Baltic and Black Seas,
Total.. 32 will advance along the Mediterranean and the
ocean, keeping France in check with one and Ger-
many with the other. And these two countries
conquered, the remainder of Europe will fall nnder
our yoke. Thus can Europe be subjugated.


A LUCKY OCEAN STEAMER.-The Cunard steamer
Russia," Captain Cook, which sailed from New York
on 4th instant,' on reaching Liverpool will have
completed her 100th round trip. The Russia" is an
iron steamer. She was built in Glasgow, and put on
the line in June, 1867. Being the only opened-deck-
ed steamship on the line, she is much liked by old
travellers. The Russia" is a three-decked, barque-
rigged vessel, drawing 21 feet of water, light, and reg-
isters 2960 tons burthen. Her length is 358 feet,
beam 43 feet, and depth of hold 27 feet. During the
199 trips she has made across the Atlantic the Rus-
sia" has never met with an accident. She has passed
through storms of the severest character, yet has never
lost even a boat, and the small craft that to-day hang
from the davits on either side of her saloon deck are
the same that were hung in the same places when she
was fitted for sea for her initiatory trip from Liverpool
to New York.
WHAT SMOKING DOES FOR BOYS.
A certain doctor, struck with the large number
of boys under fifteen years of age whom he ob-
served smoking, was led to inquire into the effect
the habit had upon the general health. He took
for his purpose thirty-eight boys, aged from nine
to fifteen, and carefully examined them ; in twenty-
seven of them he discovered injurious traces of the
habit. In twenty-two there were various disorders
of the circulation and digestion, palpitation of the
heart, and more or less marked taste for strong
drink. In twelve there were frequent bleeding of
the nose, ten had disturbed sleep, and twelve had
slight ulceration of the mucous membrane of tho
mouth, which disappeared on-ceasing from the use
of tobacco for some days. The doctor treated them
all for weakness, but with little effect until the
smoking was discontinued, when health and
strength was soon restored. Now, this is no *old
wife's tale,' as these facts are given unler the au-
thority of the British Medical Journal.


AWFUL HOLOCAUST.
Particulars of the Great Fire at Tientsin Ch(',i,-
Terrible Scenes of Agony and Death-1400 People
Burned.
The particulars of the great fire at Tientsin,
China, are horrible. The number of refugees who
have been collecting at this point has been augment-
ing by daily additions until the aggregate was vari-
ously estimated at anywhere from fifty to one hun-
dred and fifty thousand. A few weeks since an ad-
ditional soup dispensary was opened on a piece of
vacant ground known as the Flowei Garden of the
Kiang family. When this relief depot was establish-
ed, the whole premises were surrounded with a strong
fence of reeds and millet stalks, plastered with mud.
As the place was to be occupied only by women and
children, the greatest care was taken that all com-
munication between the inside and outside be pre-
vented. The alley on the westside was fenced up at
its north end, and the only gate of the soup yard was
at the south end of the same alley-a gate about six
feet wide. About 10 o'clock, on a bitter cold morn-
ing, 'an alarm was given that a fire had broken out
in this relief yard, roofed with inflammable mats, and
crowded with human beings. Crowds of people be-
gan to gather on all sides of the yard, and tear down
the strong fence. The moment that communication
was established between the inside and outside a
considerable number of outsiders leaped into that
part of the inclosure forming the alley to attempt to
rescue those who were still struggling to escape.
The scene within was awful. The long sheds had
already melted into smoke and ashes, and only the
poles were still burning-not the poles alone, for be-
neath stretched long lines of something only indis-
tinctly seen, and which, between the gusts of flame
and smoke, could be recognized as heads, arms and
bodies of human beings, all huddled within the limits
of their former compartments, and just as they were
caught by the fiery sirocco. Not one in twenty had
time to move'a yard before they were met by flames
and suffocated where they chanced to be. In front
of the locked gate a large number of poor wretches
were caught and imprisoned by the flames. Their
wadded or skin garments caught fire, and could
neither be taken off nor extinguished-scores of
poor women were reduced to a condition too horrible
to be described-absolutely roasted on one side, and
utterly helpless to escape.
The greater part of those who were burned must
have perished instantly. Within five minutes of the
time the fire broke out it is probable that those who
failed to escape were suffocated in the flames. Long
after every scrap of mat and wood had been consu-
med the bodies oi the victims continued to burn
and smoulder. The corpses were most of them re-
duced literally to cinders, utterly beyond recogni-
tion. Many of the survivors on the day of the fire
and the three following days, while the bodies were
being taken out, wandered about uttering the most
piteous lamentations, striving to discover their chil-
ren; husbands came to institute a hopeless search
for their wives. Nothing was left upon the ground
but hundreds of horribly mutilated corpses, frag-
ments of half-burned clothes and broken pottery. It
is definitely ascertained that the number who perish.
ed in somewhat more than 1400.

NARROW ESCAPE OF THE POLYNESIAN." The
SPolynesian," which took the Wimbledon team to
England, had a narrow escape from a collision with
an iceberg when passing through the Straits of Bellisle.
A passenger thus describes the occurrence:
"We were awakened by a noise on deck, the en-
gine was stopped, reversed a minute and then came a
bump, a crash, and a grinding sound, the vessel roll-
ing at a great rate. We hurried on deck in time to
see a large iceberg floating astern.-The night was
foggy and the vessel was almost on it before it was
seen. On seeing it the engines were at once stopped
and the vessel brought round hard to starboard so that
the vessel did not strike the berge bow on, nor yet at
full speed. The steamer had, however, about ten tons
of ice piled on deck in the forecastle, besides having a
little breakage about the bow. The "Poly" of her
name was carried away, so that she is now the Ne-
sian." The boats were all cut loose ready for a stam-
pede, but fortunately they were not needed."


The will of the late Sir Francis Henry Goldsmid,
whose recent death by a railroad accident in Eng-
land has put the whole Jewish community. into
mourning, has just been made public. The dead
baronet leaves 25,000 to'the University College
of London, which he assisted in founding, and
which until recently was the only university in
England that had no religious tests, and was open
alike to Jews and Gentiles. He leaves 25,000 al-
so to the University College Hospital, of which he
was the treasurer, and 10,000 to the Reformed
Jewish Synagogue, of which he was one of the ori.
ginal founders. His entailed estates, valued at
100,000 a year, pass to his nephew, Sir John
Goldsmid, M.P. The bulk of his personal property,
valued at 500,000, is left to Sir Francis's sister,
Mrs. Nathaniel Monteflore, with remainder to her
two sons. Dowager Lady Goldsmid is left the
houses in London and at Circeuster, and an annu-
ity of 8,000. The legacies to charitable, educa.
tional and religious institutions amount to the
large sum of 75,000, or $375,000. A number of
prominent Jews in England are making prepara-
tions for the erection of a monument to the memory
of Sir Francis, and subscriptions for that purpose
are being offered from all sources, Jewish and
Christian alike.

How TO CURE A BONE FELON.-Of all tha
painful things can there be any so excruciating-
ly painful as a bone felon ? We know of none
that flesh is heir to, and, as this malady is
quite frequent and the subject of much con-
sideration we give the latest recipe for its cure,
which is given by that high authority, the Lon-
don Lancet:-As soon as the pulsation is felt,
put directly over the spot a 'fly blister, .about
the size of your thumb nail, and let it-remain
for six hours, at the expiration of which time,
directly under the surface of the blister may
be seen the felon, which can be instantly tak-
en out with the point of a needle or a lan-
cet.
EAR-ACHE.-The Journal of Health gives the fol-
lowing; "There is scarcely any ache to which
children are subject, so hard to bear and difficult
to cure as the ear-ache. But there is a remedy,
never known to fail. Take a bit of cotton batting,
put upon it a pinch of black pepper, gather it up
and tie it, dip in sweet oil, and insert into the ear.
Put a flannel bandage over the head to keep it
warm. It will give immediate relief.

otectiou agai.v vi F Si
%T THE MOST MODERATE RATES
Can be obtained from the
SPH(ENIX INSURANCE COMPANY
of London,
One of the longest Established and Wealthiest
Offices in Great Britain.

Through the BRANCH OFFICE in these
Islands, a Saving is effected to the Insured
of the Stamp Duty, a very considerable item.
RISKS taken both on REAL and PERSONAhL
PROPERTY for 3, 6 or 12 months.
No FE'ES and no CHARGE for Policies.
N. A. BUTTERFIELD,
A : Agent.
Jamilton, Sektember 9th, 1`53.


J. & E. Atkinson's

SPE.R FITMEIRY.
celebrated for nearly a ce'ifury past, is of tihe vary
best English manufacture. For its purity and great
excellence it has obtained the following
EXHIBITION PRIZE MEDALS,
LONDON, 1862. PARIS, 1867. COBDOVA, 187.2;
LIMA, 1872. VIEsNA, 1873.
PHILADELPHIA 1876.

3tkinson's Choice Perfumes for
THE HANDKERCHIEF,
White Rose, Frangipanne, Ylang Ylang, Stephano.
tis, Opopanax, Jockey Club, Ess. Bouquet,
Trevol, Magnolia, Jasmin, Wood Vio-
let.
And all other odours, of the finest quality only.

ATKINSON'S
Celebrated Eau de Cologne
is strongly recommended, being more lasting and
fragrant than the German kinds.

ATKINSON'S
OLD BROWN WINDSOR SOAP
celebrated for so many years, continues to be made
a- heretofore. It is strongly Perfumed, and will be
fand very durable in use.
I--iII-I
ATKINSON'S BEARS' GREASE, COLD
C rEAM, SACHET POWDERS, TRANSP R-
ENT GLYCERINE SOAP, ROSE TOILET
POWDER, TOILET VINEGAR, VELOUTINE
WHITE ROSE TOOTH PASTE,
and other specialties and general articles of Perfu.
mrry may be obtained of all dealers throughout
World, and of the Manufacturers,
M A 1TZIT1O^,
*24, OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, W.

PRICE LIST FREE ON APPLICATION.

CAUTION.-Messrs. J. & E. ATKINSON manu-
facture their articles of one and the best quality
only. Purchasers are cautioned to avoid counter.
feits by observing that each article is labelled with
the Firm's Trade Mark, a White Rose on a
Golden Lyre;" printed in seven colours.
ESTABLISHED 1799.
April 11, 1876-12m If


~CO)


~~'1a


"Eau" of Dr. IMoltz for
HAIR DYE.
F' HIS WATER is of an entirely vegetable
composition, and its use is quite inof-
fensive.
Thanks to this peculiar quality which gives it
no rival, DR. IloLTz's Hair Dye has not the
-disadvantage of the other preparations which
give to the hair an unnaturally vulgar color.
Guided by his medical knowledge and his
great chemical experiences, DR. HOLTZ has
succeeded in the discovery of plants, which give
the richest balsamic dyeing and curative essen.
ces, and it is by this study that he succeeded to
compound a dye which may be styled as the
Regenerator by excellence of the chevelure.
GENERAL WAREHOUSE, IN PARIS,
La Correspondance Parisienne,
4 Rue de la Tacherie, 4.,

W. 0. F. BASCOIME),M.D.,
; F.A.A., D.S.,
REID STREET, HAMILTON.
EAST END.


,ALMJ1NATCK-JULY, 1878.


SUN.

ris. sets.

5 13 6 59
5 14 6 58
5 15 6 57
5 15 6 57
5 16 6 56
5 17 6 55
5 18 6 54


U2 3 1
924 C.
925 3
926 4
927 5
928 5
929 6


ide.


REMARKS.



Magdalene

Quarter Court

St. Anne
6th after Trinity
Nw Mn.5h21mp.x,


TuE BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE is published
every Tuesday by DONALD M'PHEE LEE,
Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent
SMajesty,
AT HIS OFFICE,
Northwest Corner of Reid and Burnaby Streets,
Hamilton,
where Blanks, Hand-bills, &c., will be
printed at the shortest notice.-Agent
at St. Georges for the Royal Gaetlle,
JAIMES TIms, Esqr.,Poat Master General.


Es







L ~?ricudP!oyal


Gazsv~ te,


k
Ail'


UP(Y! ii


~. '' ~ C'>
5) 1


_ _ .-_ _- -_--_ - --ZPM -


Proceedings of the Honor-able Lte -
islanive Ccun5cii3.

Friday, 19th July, 1878.-Pursuant to adjourn-
ment the House met.
Present-His Honor Josiah Rees, Chief Justice,
President,
The Honorable Augustus J. Musson,
"< William H. Gosling.
James H. TrImingham,
Eugeniu" Harvey,
Joseph H. Harvey,
James Tucker, R'cr. Genl.,
Randal E. Webster, Colonial
Secretary.
Adjourned to Tuesday next, the 23rd instant, at
11-0.

BER IITU A.

Abstract oj the Proceedings of the Honorable
House of Assem blhy.
Fridoyl. 19th July.- Mr. S. C. Outerbridge intro-
duced a Bill to provide a stipend for the Minister
of the Free Church of England in the Parish of St.
George-which was read a 1st time.
)'h Attorney General introduced a Bill to amend
t4janw relating to ejectment suits-which was
read a 1st time.
The Bill to .rant greater facilities to the Corpor-
ation of Hamilton for the collection of shed dues-
was read the 2nd time and committed.
Mr. W. S. Masters in the Chair.
Mr. Dill moved the 1st clause.
Mr. Wilkinson moved to insert after the word
'.rates" in the 1st line, the words "which in future
shall not exceed one penny per barrel and on
other packages in that proportion"--which was ne-
gatived.
Ayes 10-Messrs. R D Fraser, A J Frith, W J
Frilb. S A Masters, T W Mercer, J W Pearman,
T J Pearman, J N Smith, R Tynes, W H Wilkin-
son.
Nays 12-Messrs. Speaker, R J P Darrell, N J
Darrell, T N Dill, S B Gray, E H Gosling, H G
Hunt, S A Harvey, J Harnett, T D Middleton, S
C Outerbridge, C Peniston, T F J Tucker.
The 1st clause was then agreed to.
Mr. Dill moved the 2nd clause-which was affirm-
ed.
Ayes 12-Messrs. Speaker, R J P Darrell, N J
Darrell, T N Dill, A J Frith, S B Gray, E H Gos-
ling, J Harnett, S A Harvey, H G Hunt, S A Mas-
ters, C Peniston.
Nays 10--Messrs. R D Fraser, W J Frith, T D
Middleton, T W Mercer, S C Outerbridge, J W
Peniman, T J Pearman, J N Smith, T F J Tucker,
R Tvnes.
fr. Dill moved the 3rd clause-which was affirm-
ed. Ayes 18. Nays 10.
The 4th clause was agreed to.
TLe 51h clause was affirmed. Ayes 15. NayslO.
TLe Gilt clause was negatived. Ayes 12. Nays 13.
The 71h clnusewas affirmed. Ayesl3. Nays12.
The House resumed.
The Chairman reported the Bill.
Mr. Dill moved that it be recommitted to fill up
the blanks in the 3rd clause-which was agreed to.
The Bill was recommitted.
Mr. W. S. Masters in the Chair.
The Ho use resumed.
The Chairman reported the Bill wih the blanks
filled up,.and it was adopted and ordered to l;e ec-
gros-ed.
Mr. Fraser gave notice that on the 3rd reading
of tLe Bill he will move a recommittal for general
purposes.
The Attorney General gave notice that on the 3rd
reading he will move certain verbal amendments to
the 4th clause.
Mr. Dill gave notice of his intention on the 3rd
reading to move to reinsert the 6th clause marked
No. 6 in the printed copy which was struck out to-
day in Committee.
The Resolve for paying the costs of binding an-
cient records was read a 3rd time and passed.
The Resolve for paying the sum of 20 towards
expenses of Central Bureau of Postal Union, was
read a 3rd time and passed.
A Bill brought up from the Legislative Council
entitled "An Act for compensating the families of
persons killed by accidents"-which was read by its
title.
The Attorney General introduced the three fol-
lowing Resolves :-which were severally read a 1st
time.
Providing for the travelling expenses of official
visitors to the Lunatic Asylum.
Providing a gratuity to Mrs Catherine Watson,.
Providing for the travelling expenses of the Re-
ceiver General incurred in the public service.
Mr. R. J. P. Darrell presented a list of Quarter-
ly Accounts to 30th June, 1878.
Mr. R. J. P. Darrell presented a Report on ex-
pired and expiring Laws.
Adjourned to Monday next.

Monday. 22niid Ju'ly.-The Bill to increase the effi-
ciency of the Police Force, was again committed.
Mr. J. W. Pearman in the Chair,.
The Attorney General moved "that the Commit-
tee rise for the purpose of getting clauses introduced
into the Bill to extend the Police Force to the whole
Colony and to increase the number of the Force for
that purpose."
After considerable discussion the Attorney Gen-
eral with leave withdrew his motion.


The Attorney General moved the second clause
-which was nfflirmd. Ayes 9. Nays 5.
The thi d clause was agreed to.
The fourth clause was negative.
Ayes 10-Messis. T N Dill, R D Fraser, W J
Frith, S B Gray, E H Gosling, S A Harvey, J
Barnett, T D Middleton, S A Masters, C Peniston.
Nays 12-Messrs. Speaker, R J P Darrell,'J
Fowle, A J Frith, H G Hunt, T W Mercer, W
S ,.sters, T A Outerbridge, J N Smith, T F J
- T Wr, W H Wilkinson, T J Wadson.
*T House resumed.
The Chairman reported progress and obtained
leave to sit again.
A Message from His Excellency the Governor:
(No. 22.)
R. M. LAFFAN,
Major-General,
Corernor and Commander-in-Chief.
The Governor has the honor to inform the Hon-
orable House of Assembly that in a Despatch No.
15, dated Downing Street, 28th February, 1878, the
Secretary of State for the Colonies has expressed
the satisfaction and the interest with which he had
perused the Report of the Medical Superintendent
Sof the Bermuda Lunatic Asylum appended to the
Journals of the Honorable House of Assembly for
the year 1876, and has conveyed his opinion that
the condition of the Asylum is on the whole very
creditable to Dr. Hinson.
The Secretary of State, however, considers it a
matter for regret:that it should be in the power of
one man by his bad example to propagate a spirit
of mischievous idleness amongst the inmates, and
thinks that some means should be taken for lessen-
ing that evil.
The Secretary of Siate also calls attention to the
fact that the absence -of an adequate proportion of
separate accommodation in the Hospital, and the
absence of sufficient control by night over the pa-
tients who for want oI separate accommodation are
kept in association, night result at any time in a
serious catastrophe.


The Board of Works having been requested by 1
the Governor to suggest a remedy for the evils and e
the dangers pointed out by the Seci efErv of State, has s
prepared a Plan and Estimate shewing how the
separate accommodation which is necessary for i
carrying out the Secretary of State's views and the r
recommendation of the Medical Superintendent as
to the separate treatment of patients may be most
economically provided. The estimate amounts to i
200.
'Two of the Visitors to the Asylum, however, i
have moreover reported to the Governor that a di-
vision wall is very much required on the male side.
This suggestion points to the best and cheapest
means of remedying the evil pointed out in the
first portion of the Secretary of State's Despatch.
The Governor is informed by the Colonial Surveyor
that this division wall may be built on the male
side for the purpose of separating such cases as that
referred to by the Secretary of State for a sum of
30.
The Governor trusts that notwithstanding this
service not having been included in the annual
Estimate owing to the want of the necessary infor-
mation when these Estimates were being prepared,
the Legislature will still find means to provide the
sum of 230 which is required to carry out these
very necessary improvements in the Lunatic Asy-
lum, as they are really necessary for the safe and
proper management, of that Institution.
Mount Langton, 22nd July, 1878.
The Bill to amend the Law relating to the ship-
ping of Merchant Seamen in Bermuda Vessels,
was read a second time and committed.
Mr. Harnett in the Chair.
The House resumed.
The Chairman reported the Bill and it was adopt-
ed and ordered to be engrossed.
The Bill to amend the Act No. 21,1869, relating
to the Salaries of the Officers of the Gaols, was read
a second time and committed.
Mr. Masters in the Chair.
The House resumed.
The Chairman reported progress and obtained
leavetlto sit again.
The Resolve for paying for Stationery supplied
by the Crown Agents for the Colonial Secretary's
and Receiver General's Offices, was read a second
time and committed.
Mr. T. F. J. Tucker in the Chair.
The House resumed.
The Chairman reported progress and obtained
leave to sit again.
Ordered, that Mr. Dill and Mr. Mercer be a com-
mittee to audit the Crown Agents' Accounts.
Adjourned to Friday next.
Orders :-
Collection of Shed Dues Bill.
Corporation Ordinances Bill.
Governor's Message No. 22 relating to Lunatic
Asylum.
Wills Act Amendment Bill.
Bermuda Seamen's Bill.
Public Office Messenger's Salary Bill.
Compensation for loss of life Bill.
Visitors to Lunatic Asylum expenses Resolve.
Gratuity to Mrs. Catherine Watson Resolve.
Receiver General's travelling expenses Resolve.

ANOTHER BRILLIANT SPEECH BY THE
GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF CANADA.
Not long since we published a telegraphic report of
the grand military display in Montreal on the Queen's
Birthday, including a synopsis of the Governor-Gen-
eral's speech on the occasion. The following is a full
report of the speech :-
GENTLEMEN,-I thank you most heartily for the
cordial manner in which you have drunk my health.
I should have felt I had lost one of the pleasures to
which my office legitimately entitles me had 1 been
compelled to leave Canada without taking part in such
a celebration as the present. During the whole term
of my office I have never had an opportunity of see-
ing myself surrounded by the representatives of our
Canadian forces. It is true I have had the good for-
tune to come into individual contact with most of the
distinguished officers of the Dominion, but until now I
have never seen them gathered around me in their
corporate capacity. On my arrival in Ottawa six
years ago one of my first duties was to assist at a re-
view in Kingston, but since then until to-day I have
never had a-chance of seeing any large body of troops
assembled in the field. My experience of the mili-
tary tenue of Canada has been confined to guards of
honor. (Laughter). These I have seen in a greater
number of places than the sovereign of the greatest
military nation in the world, and, though a civilian, I
am sure I have acquired as good an eye for criticizing
their special and peculiar formation as my friend the
Lieutenant-General himself. Last year I endeavored
to collect under my roof as many officers of our na-
tional army as I could lay my hands on, but an unfor-
tunate accident prevented me receiving my guests in
person. The spectacle, however, I have witnessed
this morning, the scene which now meets my view,
more than repays me for my previous disappointments.
Anything more admirably arranged, more gratifying
to the pride of Canadians and to all the friends of
Canada, than'the performance of the morning can-
not be well coaceived. From first to last everything
has passed off to my entire satisfaction, and I now beg
to tender my best thanks-and I render this acknow-
ledgment not only on my own behalf, but on behalf
of my fellowmen of the country at large-to the
Lieutenant-General who has planned, to the military
authorities who have organized, aud to the officers
and men who at great personal sacrifice and inconve-
nience have executed and carried out the triumphant
celebration with which we have this morning saluted


the birthday of our Most Gracious Majesty the Queen.
[Cheers.] It is not for me to indicate even by praise
the professional excellences of the manoeuvres. That
pleasureable task will be performed in due time by a
more competent authority. But there is one charac-
teristic of to-day's performance, at all events, which
must have attracted everyone's attention, that is the
magnificent appearances, the patriotic enthusiasm, the
spirited alacrity, the loyal sentiments which have been
exhibited by each and all of the regiments that have
paraded before us. Though I should be very far from
wishing to depreciate the effects of training and dis-
cipline in producing fficiencv, we must all admit-
even the greatest martinets amongst us-such a spirit
of patriotism, such a joyous, such an exuberant alac-
rity in the performance of their military duties as
have been exhibited by our soldiers is the first step
towards the formation of victorious .battalions. Hap-
pily the prospect of the Dominion being required to
array itself in defence of its homes and liberties is re-
mote. We have but one nation for our immediate
neighbour, and with that nation we are united by long
tradition, by a community of interests, and by a con-
tinued interchange of courtesies, in an indissoluble
friendship (loud cheors) while those foreigners who
under any unhappy circumstances might attempt to
assault us are remote, and separated from our short
by leagues of sea. It is true of late there have been
heard a few vague and probably exaggerated rumors
of a certain amount of Celtic effervescence (loud
laughter) along our southern frontier, but I cannot
believe that such an unpardonable crime as a second
filibustering attack upon the sacred peace of Canada
can be in contemplation. I never have, and never
will, speak harshly or disrespectfully of my Irish
countrymen, however wrong I may consider their
opinions or misguided their conduct. (Cheers). It is
not by harsh or violent language we shall win them
back to a friendlier frame of mind. Undoubtedly in
past days Ireland has suffered ill-treatment and injus.
tice, but for generations England has strained every,
nerve to make reparation for those ancient wrongs.
(Applause). However disposed, therefore, we may be
to make allowance for the circumstances which may


have generated these inimical passions, if they take
effect in outrage and murder, if the peaceful home-
steads of Canada are to be ravaged by bands of ma-
rauders, who can have no possible quarrel with their
inhabitants, such violence, which outrages every law
recognized by civilized mankind, must be suppressed
with the most unmitigated firmness. (Hear, hear).
But, as I said before, I cannot bring myself to believe
in the possibility ofso great a wrong. Among my
various progresses through the country I have come
into contact with hundreds and hundreds of kindly
Irishmen labouring in the field, the forest, by the
river-side, or in the mines. Never did I meet one
who did not give me a hearty welcome, both as a fel-
fellow-countryman and as the representative of the
Queen. (Loud cheers). Happily for Canada, those
Irishmen are sown broadcast through the land, and are
intimately associated with their fellow-citizens of
French, English and Scotch descent. They are con-
tented, prosperous and loyal. Yet it is these Irish
homes, where the kindliness, the hospitality, the wiles,
the mirth of old Ireland lives again under such happy
auspices, which are to be involved together with their
British and French neighbours in these unnatural
hostilities, What cause of quarrel has the invader
with the people of Canada which their own Irish fel-
low-citizens could not themselves allege had they a
mind to do so ? Nor are the Irish the only commu-
nity of persons within our borders who might if they
chose translate historical wrongs into actual warfare.
Half the-population of Glengarry, I believe, fled to
this country, if not from Culloden, at all events from
their Highland homes, to avoid the tyranny of him
whom they called a usurper, whose descendant now sets
upon the throne. (Hear, hear). Yet where is there
to be found a more loyal people in the world than the
people of Glengarry ? (Hear, hear). In consider-
ing, therefore, the possible occasions on which we may
have to rely upon the valour of our gallant troops, I
repel with horror fhom my thoughts the idea that they
should (ever be called upon to shed the blood of even
the most inconsiderate or irreconcilable of our Irish
fellow-countrymen. (Loud cheers). And, gentle-
men, if this cloud- or rather phantasmal exhalation
-be dispersed along our southern boundary, what is
there behind it in that direction but illimitable sun-
shine and the prospect of perpetual peace ? (Ap-
plause). It is true even so we are still liable to inva-
sion, and to-day we have witnessed how soldier-like
and martial is the array of our southern neighbours.
(Laughter). But if they have forced the bulwarks of
our land, if they have penetrated to the heart of our
richest city, if they have established themselves with-
in the precincts of our camp, it has only been to give
us a fresh proof of the kindly feelings entertained for
us by themselves and their fellbw-countrymen in the
States-(cheers)-perhaps to lay siege to the hearts of
our young ladies-(loud laughter)-and to join with
us in doing honour to our Gracious Queen. (Hear,
hear). In the name, then, of all those who are pre-
sent of the volunteer army of Canada, of the people
of Canada, I bid them welcome." And inasmuch as it
is the habit of every polite Government to extend to
deeds of military daring substantinl rewards, I hereby
promise to every American soldier-citizen who is now
present, lor shall hereafter' take part in our re-
views, a free-grant farm within the Arctic Circle the
day he takes the oath of allegiance. (Laughter). But
though we have thus disposed in the most satisfactory
manner of all possible foes within the circle of our
immediate vision, it is not the less necessary on that
account that we should take those precautions which
every nation since the world began has found requis-
ite for its safety. (Hear, hear). Let us learn a les-
ion from the fate of the aboriginal inhabitants of this
very continent. We read in the pages of Prescott
how happy and careless were their lives, how destitute
of fear, as they sported and slept berieath the umbra-
geous shelter of their tropical groves. War with
them had ceased to be an imaginable contingency.
Every foe' had disappeared from the limits of their
world, yet suddenly, unexpectedly coming from where
none knew, there stood' upon their shores steel-c!adl
men armed with the thunderbolts of death, and in a
few short years that harmless, flower-crowned people
were annihilated, their altars, cities and temples laid
waste and desolate. Happily the repitition of such a
catastrophe in our case is impossible, but for all that
a war cloud seems to be gathering in Europe which
may involve the entire Empire in its dreadful shadow.
As members of that Empire, as men of British des-
cent, as subjects of Queen Victoria, it may be neces-
sary for us to face the responsibilities which our na-
tionality entails. You. have seen by the papers the
precautions the Government has taken to protect that
-happily for us-restricted portion of our seaboard
which is within reach of an enemy's assault. But I
am proud to think that the spirit of Canadian patriot-
ism has not confined itself merely to these exertions.
Almost every mail has brought either to me or the
Prime Minister or the Minister of Militia the most
enthusiastic offers to serve in the Queen's armies
abroad in the event of foreign war. (Loud cheers).
These offers have represented not merely the enthu-
siasm of individuals, but of whole regiments and bri-
gades of men. (Renewed cheers). It has been my
duty to transmit them to the Home Government and
to the foot of the Throne, and I should be failing in
my duty if I negketed to tell you that they have been
duly appreciated, not only by the Que.en's Ministers,
but by the Queen herself. (Prolonged cheering). It
will undoubtedly require a great deal of consideration
to determine to what extent and in what manner ad-
vantage could be taken of such noble self-devotion.
Happily the time has not yet arrived-and I trust to
God it may never do so-for giving practical effect to
the suggestions which have been received. But I feel
that I could not have a better opportunity of record-
ing and emphasizing facts so indicative of the martial
and loyal spirit of the ,Canadian people as those I have
indicated. No, gentlemen, God grant that many a
long year may pass before the note of warlike pre-
paration rings through the quiet hamlets, the sunlit


fields and prosperous cities of Canada. But should
the evil day arrive, let it find us prepared and ready
to do our duty. (Cheers). It is not by undisciplined
levies, however enthusiastic, that the homes and lib.
erties of a country can be guarded. Every day war
Sis becoming a more complicated science, the problems
of which can only be successfully dealt with by Iighly
organized battalions and trained and scientific officers.
(Hear, hear). Above all, remember things are not
with you as they were a few years ago. British Noith
America is no longer a congeries of discontented Pro-
vinces destitute of any strong bond of sympathy or
mutual attachment. You are no longer colonists or
provincials. You are the defenders and guardians of
half a continent, of a land of unbounded promise.
(Renewed cheers). That alone should make men and
soldiers of you all. Life would scarcely be worth liv-
ing unless it gave us something for whose sake it was
worth while to die. Outside our domestic circle there
are not many things that come up to that standard of
value, but one of those you possess-a country of your
own. And never should a Canadian forget, no matter
what his station in life, what his origin or special en-
vironments, that in this broad Dominion he has that
which it is worth while both to live for and to die for.
(Loud and long-continued cheering).
*g*
MONTREAL, July 17.-Two bottles of whiskey mixed
with opium were found last evening within the lines of
the camp of the Fifth Fusileers, on St. Helen's Island,
and placed close to where the sbntry was on guard at
the entrance. Dr. Baker Edwards made an analysis
of the contents of the bottles and found a large quan-
tity of some narcotic drug in the liquor It is supposed
the object was to drug the sentries and steal their arms.
The affair is being investigated.
MoNTREAL, July 17.-In Bonaparte street to-day
the house of Joseph Duhamel was set ongfire through
the curtains of a bed igniting froni the tapers sur-
rounding the corpse of Duhamel's daughter. The
corpse was saved with difficulty.


To the Edil.-r of the Royal Gazette.
MR. EDITOu,-Believing from the liberal generoL- -
ity evidenced in your editorial columns that your
valuable paper is open to the pul'li,'-ati.-un of any mat-
ter that may possibly tend to the welfare of our Is-
lands, I am induced to req'iuest you will kindly al-:
low me a small space to call attention to the im-
mense annual destruction of the fish, known as the
" Hamlet Grouper," which must necessarily end in
its ultimate extermination. Every year during the
latter part of June and early, in July these valuable
fish repair in immense numbers to certain localities
on our southern and southeastern coasts, to deposit
their eggs; and just as certain as the season arrives
for them to do so, just as regularly are they met by
the tempting bait of from one hundred and fifty to
three hundred fishermen, it being a common occur-
rence to see from fifteen to twenty boats on each of
the "fishing grounds," of which I believe there are
four. These boats formerly captured from one hun-
dred to one hundred and fifty fish each per day, the
catch of many exceeding two hundred; the present
season the quantity captured by any one boat on
any one occasion I have understood has not exceeded
one hundred, whilst the capture of many of the
boats has not averaged more than. six or eight for
each trip. The whole capture not being half so
many as was captured in the season of 1876,nor one
quarter so many as was captured during any one
season prior to 1874. This decrease in the catch
together with the general scarcity of the fish at
other seasons, as compared with its former abun-
dance, must certainly be held as a proof of the ra-
pidity with which the stock is being destroyed, and
undoubtedly this rapid diminution must be attribu-
ted solely to the capture of the fish whilst procreant.
It is estimated that the roe of one of these fish con-
tain from 150,000 to250,000eggs, but assuming the
former number, viz., 150,000 to be a fair average,
and the catch of each season for the past ten years
to have equalled 4,000 fish, we have the stupendous
numbers of 600,000,000 eggs that have been annually
destroyed, or 6,000,000,000 during ten years. If a
deduction of twenty-five per cent is made from this
immense sum, for loss from natural and other con-
sequences there'wouldyet remain4,500,000,000 fishto
come to maturity, which, taken at an average of 10
lbs. each (some of them weighing upwards of 70 or
80 lbs.) there would now be swimming in our
waters 40,500,000,000 lbs. or rather more than 18,-
080,357 tons of these fish or a sufficient number
(exclusive of their progeny) in excess of the present.
quantity to load 36,1660 vessels of 500 tons each. In
nearly every other civilised country where fishing
is carried on to any extent, the fisheries are protected
by Laws more or less stringent, and applicable to
the requirements of their several localities. As I
believe there is no Law on our Statute Book for the
protection of fish, or the encouragement of their
propagation, would it not be well for the Legisla-
ture to give the matter some consideration before a
total excision is completed, which without'Legisla-
tion on the matter must be the ultimate result.
Already the demand for our fish for our own con-
sumption is much in excess of the supply. I firmly
believe that the scarcity of the other species of fish
with which our waters once abounded, has been
brought about by the same mode of destruction
that has been practised with the Grouper." '
Trusting Mr. Editor I have not fre.pa4i.led too
far on your valuable space, and sincerely Lor.inq
this will meet favourable attention from "the
powers that be,"
I remain, Sir,
Thankfully yours,


20th July, 1878.

From the West Indies a:3,, [?. 'a raa

The Royal Mail Steamer Beta, Captain Shawe,
arrived at St. George's at noon on Sunday last from
St. Thomas. We are indebted to Captain Shaw
and other friends for files of papers; our usual ex-
change files have also come to hand.
BARBADOS.-'This Island's papers of the 9th inst.
mention the death in England of Mrs. Strahan,
the wife of the Gvernor. whither she had just
gone for the benefit of sher health. The sad
event had thrown a gloom over the community.
The House of Assembly after voting an address of
condolence to the Governor on the occasion adjourn-
ed further proceedings in token of the public sym-
pathy in the affliction of the Governor. A like course.
was adopted by the Board of Councll. ,
Governor Strahan had received instructions to re-
turn to England, and was to leave Barbados for that
purpose on the 10th. General Farren, in command
of the Troops, will carry on the Administration until
the end of the month, when Mr.|Dundas, the Gover-
nor of St. Vincent, who is expected from England,
will act. It is not stated for what purpose the
Secretary of State seeks an interview with Governor
Strahan.
Mr. Whitehall, in speaking in the House of As-
sembly in favour of the address of condolence to the
Governor, said:
The Hon. and learned member (Mr. Carrington)
has very appropriately and adequately given expres-
sion to the deep feeling by which the House and the
Colony are moved, but I must be allowed to add a
few remarks, for I think that the great calamity
which has fallen on-our-Governor requires that there
should be a general voice of sympathy. (Hear.) It
has been but a short time since His Excellency
returned from England with his young wife, who at
once won our hearts by those graces of person and
manner to which my learned friend has paid for us
a fitting tribute, and it seems as if it were but yes-
terday when she left us,-alas! never to be seen
by her husband again. As husbands, as we all are,
Sir, We can fully sympathise in this cruel bereave-
ment. Sir, it has been the misfortune of this House
to have been placed, by the policy which was
entrusted to him, in a position of antagonism to His
Excellency; but that antagonism was purely politi-
cal. That antagonism was as painful to us as it
was no doubt displeasing to him. And however'
much the House might have been divided in opinion
as to the particular scheme it was his duty to propose
to us, there is .but one opinion as to the manner in
which His Excellency endeavored to carry it into
effect (hear, hear;) and I, do not know a better
word to describe His Excellency's conduct towards
us than his own word, namely, "straightforward."
(Hear, hear.) In spite of an unpopular policy, His
Excellency by means of this straightforward course,
has made himself the most popular Governor we
have had for some time. He will leave us to-mor-
row, but he will be accompanied by our deep respect
and sympathy. (Cheers.)

Captain Elibank Murray, of the Sapphire, is, we
believe, to be congratulated on having brought the
Samoan Government to reason by the seizure of a
vessel belonging to the islands. There was some
reason to fear that this measure, adopted as it was
towards a small Power with whom it is our inter-
est to maintain friendly relations, might have had
an untoward effect, and have created ill-feeling.
The balance of the indemnity has, however, been
paid by the Government, and thus the troublesome
matter to which the action of the Barracouta gave
rise has been amicably settled. We believe we are
in some measure indebted to the friendly offices of
the American Consul for this happy issue out of our
diffllculty.-Army and Navy Gazette.

We hear that the English gunmakers at the Paris
Exhibition have secured a large sbare of gold and
silver medals and other rewards. Mr. Millaisand
Mr. Herkomer get two out of the five gold medals
signed as to painters.


JOHN BRINSMEAD & SONS'
e GOLD MEDAL

PIANOFORTES
WERE AWARDED
THE GRAND MEDAL op HONOUR AND DIPLOMA
OF MERIT, Philadelphia, 1876.
THE GOLD MEDAL. Paris, IS,-o.
THE HIGHEST AWA'I?,"-TEu GRAND DIPLOMA
OF HONOUR, Paris, JS74.
THE MEDAL OF HONOUR, Paris, 1867.
THE PRIZE MEDAL, London, i862.
THE DIPLOMA OF EXTRAORDINARY MERIT,
Netherlands International E'hibiti-,n, ir69. etc.
OHN BRINSM EAD and SON S'
PATENT
PERFECT CHECK REPEATER ACTION PIANOS.
Patented i86f21868, i",-r, and 137.5, in
GREAT BRITAIN,- AUSTRIA,
PRUSSIA, ITALY,
FRANCE, BELGIUM.
AND AMERICA.
ILBE RT I. BA U E R'S Prize Medal,
Drawing-Room ORGANS,
Fr:nm s guns to 3ooguins.
On the three years System.
TOH N BRIN S M EAD and SONS'


GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
with the Patent PerfectCheck
Repeater Action.


", I have examined Messrs.
BRINSMEAD & SONS' New
Chcck Actiou as applied to
SIR JULES BENEDICT. their Pianos, and consider
it a m.-..t ingenious and val-
uable invention, which can-
not fail tomeetv. ithsuccess."


OH N BRIT


SYDNEY SMITH.



JOHN BRI


NS M\ EAD and SON S'
GOLO MiEDAL PIANOS
with th.P I'atent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
On tl.c Three Years S) stem.
"I have much pleasLrs in
teiilying to thegreat excel-
lence of T.les.rs. JOHN
BRINSMEAD SONS' Piano-
fortes. Their'Perfect Check
v k-cater" prduicesi touch
that is anht'clt' t c t,'. iLo1 ,
and which is unsurpa -sed by
an\ other maker, native or
foreign."
NS'. EAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
withthe tentt Perlect Check
Repe.iter Action.
on the t h'ree Years S>stem.


'I have much pla.iIre in
testifying t., the c tc:,:n.c :\ ,.f
TM essrs. Ui.; :I1'- r i SE L N.''tS :'
B RICHARDS. New Patent CckAction
BRi Y RICHARDS, i ,,.r i iiano,:rte.i, v. which I
c:t.n'tler ar vry CL" er and
u o. l. intenti.i-n, ai. likely
t to be extensively adopted.'
SOH N BRINSMEAD A and SONS'
SHORT IRON OGVAND PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect: .ec !: Re,;.a'eer Action.
"Where all the pianos go to seems somewhat of a
mystery. for a really good instrument will last a i,.:time;
and vet every year thousands are made by each of it,,- ieat
London Manufacturers, while ti e numbers ma.. ntih-
two hundred or mdre smaller firms must r'p :c..... nor-
mous numberinthe courseofeach year. Ihe r.ci,.- nents
made in Ensii:h pianos have caused thi, tl I;,c to
increase, urtil one pianoforte r' .'.,.[I, aft.r Lnother
has been built to supply t',- cr-.- id. lema',. (-n. of the
largest of these, lately r:.- .M.:- I i:. :- .
& SONS', of Wigmore -tI.: L. I. nv in acre of
ground in the Gratton-road, Keni.:h-t.:'.-n. .ti ..l intended
1o accommodate 300 workmen: hete \\.-r.r il.-. ne can
supply 3,000 pianos annually, and there are at lea'.t three
: .-.. i..rie. in L'-.ndon .:.p.l.le of ma!.ing an equal
immber."-li. ii 'i. L .'.' ':.
O HI N BI R I N S M A.\D and SON S'
C 6OLL) MEDAL PIANOS,
",'. h th .,tent FPe lect Chr.Lck Repeater Action.
[ -, r.i.r.E. ici:. Cir-i, r izrro.v, Esq.
Hlafrp I I., t h. ; 'i l .
I -i. at i,le-i'-uie in ct rti:/, in to the fine, tich, and
.crful t.,nc of ML-ris. J-:.HN BrINistE.D) : iONs', Pianos,
to h. trc.tt t: pr.:.emircit they have su.ceeded in
As a Prf:- or ..f the Ha-p, 1I can safely add that the
,.,ow tones ,,f their -hort iron GolA Medal Giands blend
harmingly v.ith the Instrument I proicss, and form a
clicious ensci.t-Le.

JOHN BRINGS MEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Action Repeater.
From Professor W. KUHE.
*" It gives me the Agreatest pleasure to state that I con-
sider the the instrument manufrctur':d by you to be most
excellent in tone, touch, and quality of material. I
part: ,j.rlv admire your Piin's with" the Patent Check
Repeitcr AJtion and new Grand C.b.r tr!L:i.n, being a
wonderful improvement upon th old ternmn ; in my
,pini"o:: your hrm having been succe--.-'u in i resting as
I,',1 a tul.h to the Cottage Pii:n.:.! -.t .s that usually
.A ....idc.-l to the Grand. All tho.: I I,%c .o n have
_iJvei the greatest :.iti;facti:'n to the r,-rchaerrs.
OHN BRINGS M E.:\f) ndi SONS' ;
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Feri'ect C hek lep.eaticr Action.
From Professor H rT.: PAFrENr-iECK.
I have great pleasure in t.'f iing t, ti- c...--ence of
your instruments. Your newly patent.,J sE. t-'-i "the
Perfect Check Repeater Action," uhen .ppihc.l > these
Pianos, greatly increases their valu.e, and I1 h:ie r' doubt
that these valuable imprt.mentt ill e-:cite general
attention a',d admiration."
JOHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDL.AL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Aeti.:.n.
From Mr. BOYTON SMITH.
"I have much pleasu e in bear ng teitim.-.nv to the
perfection of Messrs. J. Pi.is r.rE r, & SoNs-" Nevw Piano-
forte Action, i.hth, por pr. mTtThes in rep-etiion, and
general excellence in touci, :crpai an\vt irg .: the kind I
rave yet seen, whilst the e ,trm. ir plcilty ,-.c' ti., mechan-
'im by which u -h imninr,-Tr,: r.oults3 are attai,,d is an
additional r e..m m' c liat i..
JOH N B -RINN S EtAD and SON S'
J GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Per.-ct Check Repeater Action.
Prom FREDERICK Gu;-';. \ 'It:, Chevelier de Li.:uro,
!'xaminer-General .t the .1 ret Bourbonnic .Sctty 11 the
Royal ..ia,,&,.-. / f :, .1 'i, at .'ap'ic'.. iH a'.,,: ry
M eA m bt ..' r .? .,/ 1, I ..,. at ',',ic. I "t',t ,, 'i :.,
formally Director-General of adii .tlaI, I t."
for both Infantry and Cavalry *.l tcf L ine I,
the Army of II' ,.' t aSt,:e .
I have much pleasure in t, tift"irg to the e.ce'i'nce of
yonr upright and h.:irn.'tital Grin-..l Pjan :.:rt: s, t:-hey are
_. 'p., erectt in t,,,ch ,and tin.-
fCOHN B R I N S MNI E A D and SONS'-
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
with' the Patent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
On the Three \'cars System.
Receive the greatest appri,-
1 HE. S .\Tr.'Rr',"' bation everywhere of musi-
cians and manufacturers "
JOHN BRINSM EAD and SONS'
PATENT "PERFECT
CHECK RE PE AFTER
AC T IO N" Pianofortes of
every d.'crirftion, manufac-
tured expressly "or India and
extreme climates.
OH N BRINGS \.I EAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS
\Vith the Patent I erf-:ct Ch-ek Repeater A.ti.un.
a be obtained c.f all the principal music -.i-lers.
OHN BRI N SM EA D and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the P.tent Perfect Cli.Lue Repeater Acti.on,
lFrom '3guins. to 5s.'.uins.
TOHN BRI)NSMiEAD AND SO1S'I

PIANOFORTES,
GUARANTEED FOR FIVE YEARS.
*,* Illustrated Price Lists and Descriptionswith Opiniuoi9
of the London Pmels and Musical Profeastion. forwaid-ed
Post Free upon application.
18, WIGMORE STREET, LONDON, W.
MANIUFACTORY,
THE '*BRINSMEAD WORKS," GRAFlO-BOAD,
KENTIaH TOWN, N.W.


Ii


23,


O ..




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