Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00309
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00309
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text








BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


No.15.-Vol. Li. STATE SUPER VIAS ANTIQUES. 24sper. An


IfHansilltos, Bermuda, Tuesday, 1dpril 9, 187S.


For the Bermuda Royal Gazette.
HORTICULTURE.
STHE PLUM.
This is a pleasant and useful fruit, which every house-
keeper will have if she can get it. Plums flourish
best in rather a damp, but not heavy soil. They may
be planted at the distance of 10 or 12 feet a part. The
.ground should be well manured and kept free from
weeds. They are raised from seed in the first place, and
then.these seedlings are taken up in the fall of the year,
and the roots, according to length, are cut in two or three
p pieces, of from 3 to 4 inches long. and grafted. When
hie scions are put into the roots, both are wrapt round
by small twine saturated with melted grafting wax, they
are then tied up in bundles of 25 or 50; then they are
laid into a box flat down in the first place; sawdust is
played on the bottom of the box then a layer of
grafts, then another layer of sawdust and so on, until
the number that is wanted, is completed. This work is
done from November to January, and by April the
scions and roots have united and nicely calloused over.
In April they are planted out with a dibble, the same
as if you were planting out Cabbage, in rows 3 feet
from row to row, and one foot in the row. After one
year's growth in the spring, cut the shoot back within
18 inches from the ground; when the shoot that remains
sends out its shoots rub all off leaving only three or
four at the top of the shoot which will give one leader
and three side shoots. In July with thumb and finger
pinch out the leader of each side shoot, but not the lead-
er. In the fall of the year when the leaves are off,
shorten back the leader again; cut one-fourth of the
summers growth off. By this treatment you will have
a uniform and well balanced tree, in a pyramid shape.
The plants can stand in the nursery rows, two or three
years before their removal to their final places ; this is
at the growers option. The Plum is subject to what is
called the 'black knot, supposed to be created by an
insect puncturing the bark. The best remedy for this
that I have found, is to cut these black knots off to the
wood and dress the wound over with shalac. The next
best remedy that I know of is, as the insect early in a
morning is comparatively helpless, to put a sheet under
the tree and give the tree a good strong jar, and they
Will drop off. When insects drop, they instantly fold
themselves up as closely as possible and appear like
small dead buds or scales that fall with them, so that,
to secure them, the gatherings in the sheet should be
burned.
Upon a small scale I prefer budding of all stone
fruits. It is safer but not so expeditious. In exten-
sive nursuries they prefer grafting, because it is work
that can be done when no other work can be performed,
and enables the nursery man to keep his men together,
for it is no pleasant matter for a nursery man to have
green hands every spring. '
t The varieties of Plums that I would plant in Ber-
muda, are as follows :-
Purple Bradshaw, Yellow Hulings Superb,
Goliath, Fulton,
SLombard, Jefferson,
Ponds Seedling, Washington,
Purple Gage, Columbia.
Diaper,
Sharps Emperor. .
CHERRIES.
Cherries require a drier soil than the Plum, a gravel-
ly loam suits it best. What I have said about the
treatment of the Plum, excepting the soil, will suit the
cherry in all respects. The sorts that I would recom.
mend for Bermuda are:--
Black Tartarian, Red Cleveland,
Eagle Caroline,
Knight's Early, Burs Seedling,
Cumberland's Seedling, Downton.
+' JAMES PILLING,
March 30, 1878 J. F. Burrows, Esqr., Somerset.
i For the Bermuda Royal Gazette.
DISESTABLISHMENT.
The entering wedge towards Disestablishment and
the Voluntary principle" in the Government of
our Church I find the following in my papers re-
cently received, which I think indicates the direc-
tion in which the Church in England is drifting.
Whilst the Clergy are not the Church it cannot be
denied that they form a leading influence in it.
"PROPOSED CHANGES I LEGISIATION.-The Bishop
of Carlisle intends to propose the following resolu-
tions at the next meeting of the Convocation of the
Province of York: 1. "That in the judgment of
this convocation the time has arrived when it has
become necessary that the principles of legislation
upon matters affecting the spiritual affairs and
interests of the Church of England should be re-
viewed and rearranged. 2. That while this convo-
cation freely acknowledges that the absolute power
of legislation upon all matters affecting the subjects
of the Queen resides in parliament and the crown
and that in many matters connected with the Church
that power may be wisely and rightly exercised,
_here are also others in which the relegation of
all legislation to parliament and the crown must
have the effect either of hindering changes
altogether, or of introducing changes at the ex-
pense of engendering a sense of wrong in the minds
of many of the most attached and faithful members
of the Church. 3. That the difficulty to which re-
fereneo has been madb in the proceeding resolution
might be obviated by some such scheme as the fol-
lowing: a. 'Canons and constitutions for the in-
ternal government of the Church of England to be
'st debated and approved in the Convocations of
Canterbury and York, and to be accepted by both
obnvoeations. b. Canons and constitutions so ap-
pmoved by the convocations of the clergy to be laid
before the Queen. c. Canons and constitutions thus
laid before the Queen to be further laid by Her
Majesty's command if she should be so advised, upon
the table of each House of Parliament. d. If with-
in a limited time to be defined, by statute, no ad-
dress be passed by either house, praying Her Ma-
jesty to withhold her royal sanction, the canons
mand constitutions thus laid before Parliament


t havethe force of law, and to be transmitted by
Her Majesty's command to the Archbishops of
CaSterbury and York for promulgation in their
respective provinces.'"
The- Convocation of Canterbury met on Tues.
day the 12th February, the Primate in the Chair.
On Wednesday the Upper House occupied itself
chiefly with discussing a scheme for a fuller and
more uniform representation of the Clergy in con-
vocation, and some rules for electing proctors. On
Thursday in the Lower House a report on ecclesi-
astical law was adopted providing that convocation
might frame canons to be, by permission of the
Queen in Council, laid before Parliament, when, if
not objected to, they might, by royal license, be-
come a law. On the following day the Upper
House took up the report on ecclesiastical law of
the Lower House, and recommended that the docu.
ment referred to should be put in the form of a
draft bill and submitted to parliament. Both
Houses adjourned to the 14th May.
.. CHURCHMAN.


For the Royal Gazette.
THE VELOCIPEDE ONCE MORE.
MR. EDITOR,-As this subject is now becoming
personal and tiresome to the general reader it is about
time for it to be disposed of, and as the Police Magis-
trate and the Constables at St. Georges have failed to
bring it to a satisfactory issue, even with the aid of
His Excellency the Governor and the Attorney Gene-
ral, it is presumptive evidence that the boys can manage
Velocipede matters better than adults. I therefore
beg to suggest the following compromise as a mode of
final settlement, viz. :-Let the Magistrate, the Con-
stable, the Editor of the "Colonist," and the two
young culprits, provide themselves with Velocipedes,
and have a race-" the Meet" to be on the Market
Square, and the finish" in the Park, and let the first
two that are in determine the future course to be observed
respecting these machines, and to avoid dispute let your
correspondents Justice" and Judge" act as Umpires,
the former taking position on the Square, and the lat-
ter in the Park, and my word for it those harmless
wheels will roll on smoothly thenceforward, and all
this tumult cease. I once read a moral, never to
quarrel with a lady, a lawyer, or an Editor, for they al-
ways had the advantage."
SPORT.
Hamilton, April 3rd, 1878.

Heney's auctionn .iart.

On Friday Next,
April 12th, at 11 o'clock, A.M.,
And each succeeding Friday until further notice,
1 Will St! by election,
In Front of my Office, Queen Street,
SUCH MISCELLANEOUS

MERCHANDISE,
As may appear for Sale on that day.'
Goods received up to 10 o'clock, a.m., on
each Friday, and prompt returns every Saturday.
W. J. HEJNE Y,


Hamilton, April 9, 1878.-5


Auctioneer.


For Sale,
EX "CANIMA."
CORN BRAN Corn MEAL
OATMEAL Oil MEAL FLOUR
Pearl BARLEY B. E. PEAS
Pure MUSTARD PEPPER and VINEGAR
S LMOIN LOBSTER HOMINY
MILK JEI.LIES, all kinds
TEA COFFEE SUGAR SOAPS
STARCH BLUEING CANDLES
Stove POLISH BLACKING
Whiting, Washing SOl)A POTATOES
CARROTS ONIONS, &c.
Fire Test 150 Deg Kerosene OIL, 1/4 single
Gallon
Superior Winter Whale OIL, 4 Gallon
HAMS BACON BUTTER'
REFRIGERATORS lee COOLERS
Picknic BASKETS Ice CUTTERS
TONGS and PICKS Rock SALT
Soft SOAP, for tIarnesses, &c., &c.
Apply at the ICE HOUSE,
I East Broadway.
WANTED,
One Second Hand Small
COOKING STOVE.
G W. CASTNER.
Hamilton, 1st April, 1878.-2

GOLD DRAFTS!
AT SIGHT,
On New York.
Apply to
S. S. INGHA M.
Hamilton, let April, 1878.

Just Received,
Per dAJIM3,
A Small Quantity of Choice
TOBICC 0 SEED.
As the supply is limited, persons wishing to
purchase had better call early at 46 and 47
Front Street, Hamilton, where will be found
the best assortment of CIGARS,, CIGAR-
ETTES and TOBACCO in Bermuda.
H. A. GRANTHAM.
Hamilton, April 2, 1878.
Royal Gazette Stationery Store.
JUST RECEIVED
BY THE
CARRIE DINGLE,"
FROM .LONTDON.
HALF, One and Two qr. Foolscap Account
BOOKS
Half, One and Two qr. Foolscap BOOKS, ruled
faint only
Exercise BOOKS, various sizes and thicknesses
Lead V'ENCILS, Drawing, Common, Carpen-
ter, blue, green and red
SCISSORS, and Scissor SHIARPENERS
PUZZLES, PAPER and PENKNIVES
J and other PENS
Pencil point PROTECTORS
Sealing WAX, red and black, Hat RAILS
Fancy BOXES, Peg TOPS
Cricket BATS, BALLS, SPIKES, &c.
Hamilton, March 26, 1878.


NAVY


CONTRACTS.


Bermuda Dock Yard.
T ENDERS in duplicate, will be received at
my Office until noon of


15th April next,
For the Supply of the undermentioned
TII COLES.
For Her Majesty's Service,
Viz:-
SU GAAR.
(Common Brown.)
For three years commencing on 1st July, 1878.
Probable quantity required, 50,000 lbs. per
annum.
I The Sugar, which must be thoroughly drain-
ed, is to be delivered on the Wharf at Her
Majesty's Victualling Yard, and to be subject
to the approval of a Board of Officers.
The Tenders to state the price per 100 lbs.
avoirdupois, and to enclose a sample.


VEGETABLES.
For three years commencing on 1st July, 1878.
Probable quantity required, 100,000 lbs. per
annum, deliverable on board Her Majesty's
Ships, in such quantities as may be ordered by
the Paymasters thereof.
The Tenders to state the price per 100 lbs.
avoirdupois.

For one year commencing on lst May next.
Probable quantity required 600 gallons, in
such quantities as may be ordered from time
to time by the Naval Storekeeper.
Tenders to state the price per Imperial gal-
lon, delivered, on the wharf at Hamilton, by
Tenderers residing in that Town, and at the
Dockyard by Tenderers from other parts of
the Island.


Separate


Tenders to be sent in for
afl A A .7


Tenders for Sugar and for Vegetables to be
signed by two responsible persons, engaging
to become bound with the Tenderer, in the
sum undermentioned, for the due fulfilment of
the Contract.
For Sugar................ 500.
For Vegetables............ 300.
The Lowest Tenders, for Vegetable and Ke-
rosene, if otherwise satisfactory, will be ac-
cepted; that for Sugar will be submitted for
the consideration of the SUPERINTENDENT OF
VICTUALLING at the Admiralty, London.
Further particulars may be obtained on ap-
plication at my Office.


30th March, 1878.


A. VIZARD.
Naval Storekeeper.


For Sale,
,At the familton Hotel Stables,

Carriages, Horses,
Ilarnesses, &c.

ALSO,
ONE CHICKERING'S PIANO
(' ne Florence Sewing MACHINE
One Cooking STOVE
Four Barrels Soft SOAP
Fishing POLES CROCKERY
One SOFA Rocking CHAIRS
Cot BEDSTEADS Hair MATTRESSES
Lot of Door and Window SASHES
Four Patent Night COMMODES.
Apply at the Hamilton Hotel.
Hamilton, March 25, 1878.

NOVA SCOTIA
Steam .Marble 4 Gran-
ite WORKS,
H L I F d X,
Argyle Street, opposite St. Paul's Church.
M ONUMENTS, HEADSTONES
Tomb TABLETS
Grave MARKS in polished Granite or Marble
Marble Mantel Register GRATES, &c., &c.
GEORGE A. SANFORD,
Proprietor.
Designs and Prices may be obtained from
W. T. JAMES, Esqr., Front St., Hamilton,
Bermuda. 6m


For Rent.
That very Desirable and
niently Situated


Conve-


j Dwelling HO USE,
In Reid Street, Hamilton, known as STONE
HAVEN," with Stables, Coach House, &c.


Apply to


MR. M. S. HUNT.


January 29th, 1878.


i Sugar! Sugar!!
Ex. ROVER,"
From Denimer ana,
Yellow Vacuum-pan-in Barrels
White Vacuum-pan do
M uscovado, in Barrels
At Low Rates for C ASH.
S. S. ING HAM.
Hiamilton, 25th February, 1878.

JAS. A. JUDGE,
COMMISSION DEALER
IN FRUIT AND PRODUCE,
46 4. 48 lBroad Jv. West, Wash-
ington Market, JV.Y.
j'1p lE Undersigned represents this Season in
Bermuda the above house. Consignments
of PRODUC E solicited, for which he can as-
sure highest market rates aid prompt returns.


JAM ES


March 26, 1878.-tf


A. EMILIUS OUTERBRIDGE.


H. BUTLER,
15 Front Street.


JOHN S. SOOTT.


1. Em ilius Outerbridge

Shipping and Commission
SERC & ANTS
No. 29 BROADWAY,
Agents for NEW YORK.
Quebec & Gulf Ports S. S. Co.,
New York and West India Division.
Jany. 7, 1878.

P E R S 0 N S desirous of Con-
signing

PRODUCE,
TO
.1essrs. o .s iddleton 4O CO.,
NEW YORK,
Will please call upon MR. SAMUEL A. MAS-
TERS, Front Street, who will attend to the
Shipment of their goods, as heretofore.
Hamilton, Feby. 12th, 1878.-3 m


R. II. MILLER.


G. W. SPENCER.


Miller & Spencer,
306 Washington Street,
NEW YORK.
All persons desirous of shipping to the above
address will be afforded every accommodation
by applying to our Agent,
THEO. OUTERBRIDGE,
Reid Street, Hamilton.
Bermuda, January 28, 1878.

R. W. Hayward 4F Co.,
General Shipping and
Commission Ierchanits,
52 EXCHANGE PL\CE,
New York.
CONSIGNMENTS OF


Solicited to above address and forwarded free of
Consul's Certificate.
Highest Market Rates guaranteed, and Re-
turns promptly made.
Cash payable in Bermuda or New York at
Shipper's option.
F. D. S. NASH,
61 Front Street.
Hamilton, February 25, 1878-tf

Bermuda Produce.

FARMERS and Shippers desirous of Con-
F signing PRODUCE to
Mlessrs. MILLER 4, SPENCER,
Or to Wm. A. COVERT,
New York,
Will be afforded every accommodation, during
the coming season, by
H. C. OUTERBRIDGE,
Front Street, Hamilton.
March 4th, 1878.

W. 0. F. BASCOME, M.D.,
r,.A.A., D.S.,
REID STREET, HAMILTON.
EAST END.



PRIVATE
BOARDING H USE
North of Trinity Church,
HAMILTON, BERMUDA.


The Subscriber
Has JustL Received,
Per Str. *' Canima,",


A New Supply of Ladies',
and Childrens'


pi Boots &


Gents'


Shoes,


For Sale at LOWEST CASH PRICES.
At 46 & 47 Front Street.
A. GRAN'HAM.


Hamilton, March 25, 1878.-3
NEW YORK,
FEBY., 1878.
To Farmers and Shippers of

BERMUDA PRODUCE.
j AVING had several years experience in this
line of business, I desire to continue in
the same during the coming Crop Season, and
respectfully solicit any consignments you may
forward to this Market. I will endeavourto
realize the highest Market pric-s, render Sales
and Remiltances promptly.
MR. THO.S. H. PITT,
Of Hamilton, Rcrmulda,
Will attend to receiving and invoicing all Con-
signments for me, and will give all information
necessary for benefit of Shippers.
I remain, your, &c.,
M. F. JUDGE,
With Messrs. O'Connor & Judge,
42 & 43 Vesey Street,
5m New York,

Bermuda Produce.


Farmers and Shippers
to Consign


desirous


To T. X. Ervoy Sons,
West Washington Marker,
NEW YORK,
Will have every facility afforded them during
the coming Season, by
W. J. HENEY,
Office, Queen Street, Hamilton.
M arch 18th, 1878.-tf.



FAMILY Y GR 01CER
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
English and American Preserved


Nos. 10 and 12 Queen Street,
ltamiltot, Bermuda.
N. B.-Ships' Stores Supplied at Lowest
Prices.
February 18th, 1878.-12 m

For Sale,
A Handsome Walnut Wood


BY CHAPPELL & CO., LONDON,
Good Tone, has stood the climate well,
PRICE 385.
To be seen at the DEPUTY-.INSPECTOR-GENER-
AL's Residence, R. N. Hospital, Ireland Island.
March 15, 1878.-tf

Notice.
ALONZO PENISTON has made arrange.
ments for obtaining a quantity of the
GENUINE RED AND WHITE TENERIFFE


Which he expects to receive in September next.
Persons can engage same by applying to
the Subscriber or to
JOHN ZUILL, Somerset.
A. J. HODSDON, Hamilton.
W. 0. NORTH, Bailey's Bay.
The Undersigned will also take this opportu-
nity of informing his Friends and the Public
generally, that he is now prepared to give his
personal attention to the Consignment of
PRODUCE OE,
To M1essrs. T. H3. Bock & Co.,
OF NEW YORK,
And will assure all that he will do :every thing
in his power to promote the welfare of those
that favor him with Consignmente-.
3 LONZO PENISTO.N.
Hamilton, Jany. Et2nJ, 1878.

Wanted,
A GOOD COOK.
Apply to


March 5, 1878.


DR. SINCLAIR,
Mount Hill, Pembroke,


I


1


I




t,7ilAYI7"
f' rI -r,
-?;- 7 4VY' -


_______ -~ ~ur ~ --- -.' ~ -.--- ~- -- A ~~-~'-


EXTRACT from N'ETEOROLCO(ICAT, OBSER-
VATIONS taken under the dir.-,-tin ,fC I .-Principal
Medical Officer, Prospect, Bermuda. Above the sea
151 feet.


Date


1878.
Ap. 1


29-902
29-741
29-843
29-5563
29-347
29-535
29-571


Wind
9a.m.


. 4


Temperature previous
24 hours.

e 5 g
%.s O .
a~s -~ a gs


0
71-9
68-1
67-1
70-1
67-1
67-7


0
58-5
60"8
59.5
51.1
61-0
55-7
54-1


o0
136"6 -
140-1
134-]
120-2
140-2
132-8
132-6


0o
34-0 0-01
52-6 0-00
37-0 0-54
45-8 1-02
53-2 0-24
46-8 0-49
43-2 0-03
Total 2-33


Remarks-The Barometer has been very low through-
ont the week. and there have been indications of some
very heavy storms in the neighbourhood, especially
on Friday evening last, when the Barometer fell
suddenly nearly a quarter of an inch. viz., from 29-340
to 29-162, and remained so for 4 hours. Weather
has been very rough during the week.


* m ia Al A t.


Hamilton, Jpril 9, 1878.

Court of General Assize.
EASTER TERM.
The Honorable JosIAH REES, Chief Justice, and the
Honorable EUGENIUS HARVEY and JAMES H.
TnRIMINGHiA, Assisting Justices, presiding.
The following Indictments were laid before the
Grand Jury by S. BEOWNLow GRAY, Esqr., Attor-
ney General:-
The Queen ag. Annie Campbell. Murder. True
Bill. The Jury finding the prisoner to be insane,
the Court ordered the finding of the Jury to be
recorded, and the prisoner to be kept in strict
custody until the pleasure of the Governor be
known.
The Queen ag. James Martin. Felonious Wound-
ing. True Bill. Pleaded not guilty. Tried and
found guilty. Sentenced to be imprisoned in H.
M. Gaol at Hamilton for 18 calendar months, and
during such imprisonment to be kept at hard
labour except on the days excepted by law and
except on every Wednesday and Friday, and on
every such Wednesday and Friday to be kept in
solitary confinement and fed on bread and water
only instead of the usual Gaol allowance.
The Queen ag. Eugenius Anthony Burgess. Ag-
gravated assault. True Bill. Tried and found
guilty. Sentenced to be imprisoned in H. M.
Gaol at Hamilton for 6 calendar months, and
during such imprisonment to be kept at hard la-
bour except on the days excepted by law and ex-
cept on every Wednesday and Friday and on
every such Wednesday and Friday to be kept
in solitary confinement and fed on bread and
water only instead of the usual Gaol allowance.
The Queen ag. David Benjamin Burchal, Elizabeth
Olivia Burchal, George Edward Burchal, and
Martha Jane Burchal. Aggravated assault.
True Bill. Tried and acquitted.
The Queen aq. Charles Seymour Wilson. Bur-
glary. True Bill. Tried and found guilty. Sen-
tenced to be imprisoned in H. M. Gaol at Ham-
ilton for 9 calendar months, and during such im-
prisonment to be kept at hard labour except on
the days excepted by law and except on every
Wednesday and Friday, and on every such Wed-
nesday and Friday to be kept in solitary confine-
ment and fed on bread and water only instead
of the usual Gaol allowance.
The Queen ag. Henry William James Skeeters and
William O'Reilly Douglas. Shooting with in-
tent to murder. True Bill. The Jury not hav-.
ing agreed on a verdict after being out until 12
o'clock on Saturday night, was discharged.
Robinson vs. Young. Indebitatus. Verdict for
SPlaintiff.
Castuer vs. Oakley. Indebitatus with set off.
The Jury not being able to agree on a verdict,
was discharged.
The Court adjourned to 10 o'clock this morning.

CUSTOM HOUSE-HAMILTON.
CLEARED.
April 2-Brigt. Glance, Hill, Martitiique; 200 empty
casks.
3--Barque N. M. Haven, Uhrick, Matanzas.
4-Mail Steamer Canima, Liddicoat, New York; 415
boxes beets, 119 boxes onions, 239 bls. and 2 boxes
potatoes, 2,889 boxes tomatoes.
5-Barque Eliza Barss, Hollis, New York.
CUSTOM HOUSE-ST. GEORGE.
ENTERED.
SApril M. Steer Beta, Saw, St. Thomas;
Mails, &c.-A-gent. J. M. Hayward.
Barque Eliza Bars.s, Hollis, New York; cattle, &c., to
Trott & Cox.
CLEARED.
April 3-R. M. Str. Beta, Shaw, Halilax'; TMails, &c.
MOVEMENTS OF VESSELS PORT OF ST., G1OiRGE.
Barques.
Monarchy, Pierce. reloading.
Veronica Madre, Muratorio, chartered to take part, car-
'go corn sold at Auction last week to New York-
nearly ready for sea. '
Brigs.
Timei, Tomasich, discharging.
Clara 4" Agnes, Gagnion, sold last Saturday to H. 0.
Outerbridge for 24.
Tropic Bird, Myers, refitting.
Schooners.
Zi-.-le M. Stewart, Perkins, ready for sea.
Uncle Tom, Nyers, refitting,
PASSENGERS ARRIVED.
In the Royal Mail Steamer Beta on Tuesday last
from St. Thomas:-Mr. and Mrs. Mayfield, Miss
Moirrow, Miss Knight, Master Morrow, NMaster Slay-
ter, Capt. and Mrs. Gilliatt and child, Rev. Mr. Cox,
(Baptist Minister.)
PASSENGERS SAILED.
In the Royal Mail Steamer Beta on Wednesdy last,
for Halifax :-Mrs. Gilliatt and child, Miss Knight,
Miss Archibald, Masters Morrow and Slayter, Major
Wilkinson, Asst. Comn. Genl., and Gunner, R. N.
-2nd Cabin-3 Naval Passengers. Deck-l Military
In the Mail Steamer Canima, on Thursday last, for
New York-Lady Laffan, Miss Laura Laffan and maid


servant, Revd. Dr. Gallaher, Mrs. D. A. and Miss
Smith, Mrs. S. C. Outerbridge, Misses M. and Winnie
Outerbridge, Mrs. and Miss Smith, Mrs. Baker, Mr.
and Mrs. G. W. Nix and Miss Nix, Miss Huntley,
Miss Larcom, Miss Stephens. Messrs. W. J. Boggs,
T. C, Furnam, H. E. Parker, Hubbard, Striker,
C. L. Stephens, Clifford L. Middleton, W. Wiman, H.
C. Soden, John Gordon. and Capt. T. Marquand. 2nd
Cabin-:A. Ganion, Mrs. Oakes. Deck-J. Linahan,
C. Morrison, W. Phillips, G. Oakes.
gW The Barque Eliza Barss will leave this morn-
ing, or first favorable wind, for New York.
A Schooner was to leave New York for Bermuda to
the address of S. S. Ingham, to-day.
H. M. S. Blanche will leave for Jamaica soon after
the arrival of H. M. S. Argus, now hourly expected
irom Barbados.
A SAILOR DRowNED.-The Master of the British
Brigantine Magenta, of Windsor, Nova Scotia, which
vessel arrived here to-day from Bermuda, reports that
Hans Johnsen, a Swede, aged 23 years, fell off the bow
of the Magenta shortly after leaving Bermuda, and,
despite every effort to save him, was drownrd. John-,
sen shipped af A. B. in the Magenta at Bermuda on
the 4th inst,--8. Tho9mW Times, Marc4h 87,


ol-ir Geoyge Gilb'.." t Fe *tB -A.


This celebrated Architect, who has just passed
away from the active stage of life, has left behind
him an enduring name and fame, identified, as he
has been with many of the leading architectural
monuments of the day. The age in which we live
I has been, one of marvellous progress in every way.
The progress made in arihiteih-ire- has been quite
equal to that accomplished in the other arts, and this
latter part of the nineteenth century shows a taste,
a correctness of style, and an adaptability to pur-
pose, such as preceding times cannot equal. The
architecture of a country is one of its most inter-
esting studies, and to the traveller it is one of the most
profitable diversions, to mark its chara,-teri'ti,.- and
institute comparisons. It is an ennobling study,
and one which commends itself at once to the great
bulk of mankind. Thie revival of architecture has
been simultaneous with an improved public taste, and
it certainly has conduced to increased comforts, and
induced a more rational system of living. If the
gigantic structures of our day savour a good deal
of the utilitarian nece-fs.arily, they have also incor-
porated in them much that is Architecturally com-
mendable. And, we believe, the time is coming
when, with greater variety of material, and a more
accurate study of style, we shall possess, in even
our ordinary buildings, a greater accuracy and har-
mony. To those who have noted, even cursorily,
the proLress made there will appear to have been
great strides. We need not go far back to discover
the low ebb to which taste had reached in architec-
turo. The eii'- enth century, with its debased ar-
chitecture, affected the standard of the early part
of the nineteenth century. Compare the churches,
chapels, schools, meeting- houses, halls, and houses
which then found favour with those ererte. during
the last quarter of a century, and you will observe a
great gulf between them. Tortured materials have
been relieved of their stiffness and unfitness, the
desecrated gems of past times, rich in details of al-
most imperishable merit in design, have been res-
cued from the oblivion to which they had li--n u on-
demned. The great expansion of national growth
has called for a large increase in buildings of all
kinds, on which the architectural spirit of the age
has impressed itself. Terraces crown our sea side
resorts, and our inland retreats boast of many neat
and comfortable structures. Crowded cities have
been opened out and immensely improved, and
pleasant suburbs have sprung up of a high order of
merit. And, without the revival in architecture, the
present period with all its great wealth could not
have accomplished all this.
One of the great leaders in this architectural re-
vival was Sir George Gilbert Scott, who laboured
with an energetic zeal in promoting accurate prin-
e oiples, and in festering good taste. He has been
one of the chief schoolmasters of the day in educa-
ting public taste in arechit ectuire. Through his pu-
pils and his writings, and the general interest which
a man of his stamp naturally awakens, the princi-
ples which he has supported find favour even in dis-
tant localities in the simplest structures.
SThe parish churches and cathedrals of England
are confessedly of an attractive character. The
waste and decay, which marked too many of them
forty years ago, attested a want of appreciation of
their architectural value. Many of the cities have
lost their importance, and shipping and manufac-
turing places occupy, as a rule, other centres.
Hence there seemed no. urgent reason to alter or
improve existing structures, means were not easily
obtained for an object that had seemingly no prac-
tical import. But, gradually, there stole over the
minds of ardent ecclesiastics and zealous church-
men, a feeling of admiration for the venerable
structures of our forefathers, and of commiseration
for the crumbling piles, so piously raised by past
generations. Time and neglect had told severely
on all our cathedrals and churches; what little re-
storing had been attempted was in the worst style,
covering up, or smearing the finest details. Zeal
and liberality were at hand, but what were these
without a guiding genius to direct their energies ?
SThe work of restoring our cathedrals and parish
churches was a great undertaking, however viewed.
It required ability and much patience, and Sir Geo.
Gilbert Scott was one of a select few who enthusi-
astically entered into the work, and carried it out
. as a sort of deductive science. So that, not only
have zeal and capital been haniuled in a
masterly way, but also with the strictest regard to
architectural science. The styles of different peri-
ods of architecture have been minutely. examined,
in working out these great restorations of dilapida-
ted biMldings, and a practical museum obtained, il-
lustrative of architectural progress, and available
forfuture de.si.'ns. A double benefit has thus been
conferred on the country by those extensive and
expensive works of restoration, the preserving
structures, owing to their merits of design and the
high purposes for which they had been set apart,
and the obtaining a imoro correct system for the
large number of new buildings which the increas-
ing demands of the people have required. So won-
derful has been the re-action in the public taste
that, if it should by any possibility be attempted to
erect a structure in the best style of the eighteenth

century, it would meet with very general condem-
nation. Look, for example, at the Non-Conformist
churches which have been build t of late years, and
you will observe a general regard paid to principles
of ecclesiasti.al architecture, the neglect of whi.:1.
was usually aimed at in former times. A diver-
gence in architecture, as well as in. doctrine, was
sought for, and against thessebase innovations in
style the noble ecclesiastical edifices of the land
raised, in their majestic isolation, no mean protest.
-We have been called back again by their availing
protestations. Again they stand forth, in their re-


.newed vigour, as monuments of the piety and ar-
chitecture of past g-enerations, and of the wealth,
intelligence and, piety of the present day. Nay,
more, theyklraw us to the days that have passed
and serve as links between generations, and in that
view, they are grandly national. As respects our
great cathedrals, this work of restoration has ex-
te:nded their use beyond that of their cm iginal pur-
pose. No longer are the services confined to the
choir-a small portion of the whole-but special ser-
vices are heldin the nave anud t hiepeople haveti he l:.ce-
fit of the best talent of the day to tlh-ir uL'eri-stn,,l ig,
the ways of Godliness. The house, in every sense,
has been swept and garnished. This architectural
restoration has unquestionably elevated the tone of
the whole nation, and we may justly consider a
man like Sir George Gilbert Scott as a true refor-
mer. Our national heritages have been preserved
to us, and their preservation has given excellent
models, which have readily been followed in meet-
ing the large requisition lately made for buildings
of all sorts and descriptions. While practical use
has thus been well served, true art has, even in the
simplest matters, been more followed, and public
taste almost unconsciously educated to a high pitch.
Sir Geo. Gilbert Scott, R.A., was born at Gawcott
near Buckingham in 1811, his father being the in-
cumbent. His grandfather, the Rev. Thomas Scott,
is well known for his Commentary on the Bible."
Scott, as a boy, had a taste for sketching old
churches, and had a natural liking for their study,
which he afterwards carried so successfully to a
high pitch. His early practice did not afford him
much scope for the indulgence of his special genius.
The Martyrs' Memorial at Oxford in 1841 was about
the first thing that brought Scott prominently for-
ward, and from this time his reputation was in the
ascendant. The actual work which he has accom-
plished has been very great, as the visitor to the
several cities and towns of the United Kingdom
will readily find. A biography of Scott will be
fanud an interesting volume of many pages, and
we may look forward to its publication with inter-


t


future day,' HIl:ubami:.s will possess one of the finest
public 1 iiillin :is on the Continent. The Cathedral
of St. John's, Newfoundland, was designed by Scott,
the plans* being pmI)',>lar by Mr. William Hay, in
Scott's office in London, who w'ui-t out t., St John's
to superintend the work, ani. aft.:rwairs visited
Bermuda with Bishop Feild to carry out Trinity
Church. During a subsequent r: sli: ne in Canada,
Mr. Hay endeavoured to carry out those principles
of eLur:-ih naritectui:, wlhich Sr-,it was ze.lously
advocating at home. So that, from the Labrador
through the backwoods of Ca.:na, some of Scott's
Inspiration may be found. The Cathedral at St.
John's, even in its nnfh.i,,Mb-d state, is one of the
boldest and purest designed churches in the West-
ern world. Scott was an active man among Eng-
lish architects, whose genius has directly and indi-
rectly influenced the architecture of other countries.
'Scott was enthusiastic among the founders of the
Royal Architectural MuvIeuiru, to which he has
written a short guide. We will now make a few
brief extracts from it, preferring to use his own
words to giving their meaning in substance.
"This institution was founded in 1852 by a
small number of zealous architects and art ama-
teurs, with the object of supplying a deficiency
long felt, which may be thus defined,--that, though
architects themselves may travel from place to
place, and study the ornamentation of each great
production of the architecture of the Middle Ages
or of classic antiquity, such is not the case with
those art workmen to whose hands must be com-
mitted the actual execution of the most artistic
parts of our modern work."
"The working drawings of architects are suffi-
cient to explain to the workman the mere mechani-
cal.parts of an architectural design; but no draw-
ing, however exact, or graphic, is sufficient to ex-
plain the carved f. li 'a &c., with which the archi-
tect'may desire to relieve his work-, unless to a
workman whose mind and eye are ale-ady familiarm-
ized and trained by the study of the best works of


est, .,iii.i', as it is sure to do, from the hand of
some :,- 'nli t l.t friend. In 1852 Scott was (-l'.t':-1
an A. ..'-in -.f .I.i- royal Academy. In conjunc-
tion will Mr. SyJli.-y Smirke he temporarily un-
dertook the architectural lectures at the Academy.
In 1860 Scott was.- 1 tel ; u Ai.'l,:-ni"i.:n. In 1849
Scott succeeded Mr. Tilr,-e offii:--l aii.:1itect to the
Dean and Chapter of Westminster. Through him
and the liberal administration of Dean Stoii.aiy, the
Abbey has been rendered more free and attractive
to the millions of visitors to London, who pay their
homage to this f:nnois and most national of Eng-.
lish monasteries."
Last year, Dean Smith of Canterbury advocated
certain improvements in the choir of the cathedral,
which gave rie to a discussion on the prudence of
restorations. Sc'.ott, with a frankness that did him
credit and such as might have been expected from
him, admitted that he, in common with others, had
committed errors, but more of jiudgmer'nt than of
heart. The difficulties besetting them were very
great, and the wonder was that their success
had been so good. He was of opinion that his
critics put to the same work might not perhaps
come out so well. And then comes the old qu,-tiou
which practice has, we think, rightly -stftll in the
affirmative, whether it is well to save old buildings
from crumbling ruin. The visitor to. Killarney
finds a charm in the ruins of Mutvkro-' Abbey, the
visitor to Southampton enjoys a walk through Net-
ley Abbey, the St. Mary's Priory at York has a pe-
culiar charm about it, the frequenter of the English
lakes delights in Furness Abbey, Holyrood Chapel,
Melrose Abbey and Dryburgh Abbey have fascina-
tions for the visitor who seeks the bold scenery of
Scotland. And, great as our hankering is after
such as these, so luxuriantly clothed with mantles
of ivy and with .nt't:-ly yews and oaks that feed on
the ashes of a ii,:h past, yet after all we should la-
ment to see our old churches and cathedrals so
ruined, and with them the edge of piety severely
blunted. Only those who have taken a little trou-
ble to examine the works of restoring our ancient
buildings can have any correct idea of the laborious
study involved in it. The history of the building
is considered, the general principles then in vogue
are either known or studied out. Careful search is
made, certain parts are found broken, certain parts
are wanting altogether. Now the rule has been to
retain all that is old as far as possible, and to re-
place with new work only what is rt ally requisite,
modelling after the fragments which may wholly
or in part supply the models, or working from a
drawing made in accordance with the style of the
existing parts. A few unimportant variations have
been made to accord with present conveniences of
use, but, as a rule, the new works have been as
faithful, as it is possible to have made them. In the
restorations at Durham Cathedral the capitals of
the pillars were found encrusted with wash which
the mason chiselled out as if carving anew. In
such a case it was a matter of care in exquisite
work. The east 'end of the Chapel of All Soul's
College, Oxford, was found a few years ago it- have
had a rich reredos covered up by an inside partition
where was the Altar Piece of Raphael Mengs
"Noli me Tangere (something similar to it is to be
seen in one of the li.,-Lt s of the stained glass window
of Pembroke Parish Church.) The scene presented
to view was an incongruous mass of ruined brackets
and .broken figures. In 1875 E. C. Geflowski, un-
der the direction of Sir George Gilbert Scott, ably
completed this restoration, Lord Bathurst gener-
ously defraying the cost of 7,000. There are few
works which exhibit such punctilious care as this
and the effect is pleasing as a whole, though pur-
posely wanting in uniform finish, in order to shew the
old work and even the wash which smeared parts of
it. The whole wall is a collection of figures of kings,
ecclesiastics and warriors, the College of All Souls
having been f, ,i:-,: in 1437 by Archbishop Clii-
chel, "to offer jp prayers for the good estate of
* Henry VI. and oT the founder during their lives ;
and for the souls not only of the King and the
Archbishop after their diK'-ae, but of all subjects
who had fallen in the war with France, and of all
faithful deceased."
By far the best modern building in Oxford, and
considered by many one of Scott's best efforts, is
the Chapel of Exeter College, resembling the fa-
mous Sainte Chapelle at Paris, and unfortunately
also in its confined site-at a cost of some 17,000.
The new chapel of St. John's College, Cambridge,
in the style of architecture which '.:--.rail-J about
A. D. 1280, commonly called English Decora:,1.l, is
one of Scott's happy designs, at a cost of .'.3,,(nii.
St. Mary's Cathedral Church, in Edinburgh, still in
course of erection, is Scott's design. Ely, Worces-
ter, Hereford, Lichfield, Ripon, Salisbury, St. Da-
vid's, &c., may be mentioned amorng the works of
cathedral r,-torati.,ii which Scott personally under-
took. It was owing to the liberality of the Earl of
Dudley chiefly that the restorations at W'or:-c.ster
have been carried out. When 15,000 was still
wanted to complete necessary works, Earl Dudley
offered 5,000 on condition that the city and county
should raise the 1 ,al:nc within three years. Within
three ibnls 11,000 was rai-:-i1 byl piill,, subscrip-
tion. We notiec this as an instance of the i unergy
w ith w hi'h tlh :. > w ,rks of r :.t.,:,rati':,n w ere uuii:r-
takei. Among Sc-ott.'s secular works are the For-
eign Office aud Indian Office, Kelham Hall, Not-
tinghamshire ; Waltar Hioue, Warwic:-klishiri: ; Ha-
fodmeus House, North Wales; Lee Priory, Kent;
the Town Hall at Preston; the Infirmary at Leeds,
and Columbia Market, Bethnal .Green, London,
built at the expense of Lady Burdett-Coutts for
200,000. The Albert M[mn.r;al at South Ken.-
sington, from Scott's design, is unique-Salviati
has had too much of his own way with the mosaics.
The Church of St. Nicholas in Hamburg is a bold
production of Scott's. Should his accepted d'.-sign
for the Hotel de Ville there be carried out at some


ward there' is a softening of earlier vigour; a re-
fining down of the strength of earlier effort, an
interval of exquisite but less sOVre Leity whi-.h,
though it cannot for a mnoimenut be called th' :- or-
nmenr-.ment, may yet blIe Tviewed as the preltird- of
decline." It should also I.:.- .,::.i.':illy
mentioned that, chiefly through the' kiui:lni:s of
Mr. Ruskin, we have an excellent colleft.iou of asts
from medieval carvings at Venice and Verona. "
- Nor are we limited to Euiropeau art of any-age:;
for, thanks to Sir: Bartle Free?, we have a ~very
valuable series of original carvings in stone from
the ruins of one of the auc-,:unt capitals of India,
situated in the great desert of Rajpootana of the
date of about 1100 A. D. works of very remarkable
beauty and interest." *
"The good. e f'.-.t. of the Museum in the imprbve-,
ment in the practice of the arts it illustrates, can
hardly be overestimated, an institution
which has been at once the result of such long and
unwearied labour, and the cause of such incalcul-
able'benefits to the arts which they (our architects
and lovers of architectural art) practice or favour."
The part wlii,-h Sir George Gilbrt S-ott. took in
this good work was unceasing, from its inception to
his lamented death, cabled among our latest news
from St. Thomas and New York. It is told of
Scott that, going through the Escorial pile,"he was
struck with the iron work, and seeing nothing in the
Guide Book, or hearing nothingmfrom his intelligent
Guide, told him to draw attention hereafter to the
beauty of the iron gates. An enthusiastic student,
endued with discriminating powers, his works bear
on their face a stamp, which will be duly aipi'.,.i-
ated in Old England for many a long day.

LONDON, March 27,-An explosion occurred to-
day in the Opedall colliery in North Staffordshire.
Five -,,is',s are b-:,,y been recovered. Thirty
perso:.e are still iti the pit, and it is feared they
are all dead.
Epizooty has broken out at Hamilton,Ont;


I :-ii,,ls. As, then, they cannot (as a rule) tink: tle'
!v,.:kian to the best objects for his study, the
ftoi .l is of the Architectural Museumta i-t,-rmiunel
to ,ling tIjg- '*-thir casts or other representations of
those objects and to place them within easy reach
of the workman."
"The obj',:-t was at its first starting enthusiasti-
cally supported and encouraged. Some quaint but
picturesque premises were taken in Canon Row,
WAVt-,inum-ter, which were soon supplied with an
excellent collection of casts and other objects
from the finest remains in England, France
and other countries. Objects came in to overflow-
ing in gifts, purchases and loans, and many from
relations of, deceased architects who were glad to
find a resting place for the collections left on their
hands; while large sums were systematically ex-
pended in having casts made expressly for the
Museum."
" M"any may still rmiminl-er the conv'ersnzionu-s
held in that quaint old building where were
brought together numbers of the most talented
and most earnest-minded men in .the kingdloni,
too many of them now deceased, nuionm whom
may be mentioned the late Earl de Grey, who was
president. Bishop Wilberforce, Professor Cockerell,
NMr. MIurii-i-, Sir Francis Scott, &c.; and among
those still living may be named Mr. Ruskin, who
was a great benefactor of the Museum, and who
then gave several heart-stirring lectures, as did also
many others whom we need not now enumerate."
The days when the Museum was housed in this
picturesque cock-loft were, in fact, the days of the
greatest and mosteare--t vitality of the institution.
The lectures were crow,'i'ld; the couver-:azion,-s
overflowed with earnest visitors; and nuon of te?
early prom,.ter.s of the undertaking can even.now
remember this "upper chamber" but with feelings
of renewed and nmlau-hriolyv enthusiasm."
The Museum was removed for a short time to
the South Kensington Museum, from which it was
again removed to a modest brick structure built by
subscription at 18 Tufton Streit, Dean's Yard,
Westminster, where the vi-iti.r will find "a com-
plete illustration of the carving and ,the-r arts of
the middle ages,'and, though in a less degree, those
of el ..,i. antiquity."
"When we come to the later Norman work the
circumstances are whollycli';ivn.'ed. Thliu had com-
menced that earnest striving after min-re refinuE and
artistic architecture, which never flagged till the
beautiful pointed style of the 13th and 14th ce:-ntu-
ries had been gene-rrated'." *
It is, however, when we reach the period of
the great transition that the riches of the collection
begin to develop thlem;elvet. -If the more advan-
ced Romanesque was the dawn of rii 'l-ival nart, the
transition was the bursting forth of it.s early SUN-
SHINE. Here, at length, was a thorough awakening
from the semi-barbarous lethargy of the dark ages.
If the sleepers of long centuries of darnk s- had
(according to the old fable,) turned, in the 11th
century, from their left side to their rik-ht, now, to-
wards the end of the 12th century, they had finally
risen from their slumbers, and, like giants refreshed,
;had set themselves vigorously to work in go.ne rating
a new civilization. N'thlini, can be more inutri.:-
tive or more interesting' tlian to trace the evid,-ui:.s
of this new ph ase of artistic vigour and enthusiasm.
The very workmanship passes almost suddenly from
comparative rudeness into a degree of refuinmeunt
which our modern masons find it next to iip,:'.ibule to
imitate; while carved ornamentation, wall paint-
ing, glass painting, illuminated manuscripts, jew-
elry [and goldsmith's work, iron and brass work,
ivory carving, enamel and mosaic work, and almost
every form of decorative art almost suddenly leapt
to a degree of perfection, which for ages had not been
approalhed, and which, if after times -xc,::di-i1 ii
the technicalities of art, has never been surpassed in
intrinsic vigour; more, perhaps, may be learned
from the study of this period of earnest, enuthui.in-tici
pressing forward and straining after perfection thani
even from the works in which higher technical skill
had been attained; and the works of this time
may therefore be specially co'mmn nd,.d to the
student."
"These later specimens of the true conven-
tional Early English foliage which, though not al-
ways so vigorous as its earlier creations, are at tim 6es
so perfectly astounding in the subtle skill they d is
play, and are often so charming, and so absolutely
artistic, that one is tempted, while contemplating
their beauties, to believe that no- ge equallc-1 this
-the third quarter of the 13th cent ury-in the ex-
quisite beauty of its productions; nor nqedwe com-
plain if the same person is found to ob-uillate bet.
ween the phases of these glorious early styles-now
giving the palm to this and now to tlhat-as lik
feelings are wrought to delicious enthusiasm by re-
velling in the delights which each i a its turn in-
spires. It may be that we feel boun I in our revival
to adhere to one phase of architects as a nucleus
yet let us not be so straight-laced as to focus our
eye and our admiration exclusively on one precise
chronological variety of its a,-compa L ying ornamen-
tation; but let us gather into the jiase while we
revive sui.h varieties, at least as are clearly of its
own family, though they may chance to differ a
little in the precise period of their birth. That
onei'ldednei:'s whi,:-h refuses to admire more than one
shade of beauty at a tim?, nay be s,-.verely corre,:t
in principle, but surely it -exa rerates correctness
into a cold hearted pelautty." *
"From 1175 to 1275 were the ltal:-you days of
early medieval art. During this period ift had ad-
vanced with almost miraculous vigour c6niquering
and to conquer" Its productions were more won-
derful in many respects than those of any age; of the
world's progress. Parallel '(in spirit not unlike
though in the letter so differeni't'i to: the glorious pe-
riod of Greemk r'nt from thle repullse of the Persiau
invasions to the Pelooiunesi.un War. Hencefor-


boat for the purpose, it was aliedged, of visitingg
some co1mrbddes at Whale Bay.. F the forenoon
they landed at tbhe Dock, in Devonshire Parish, and
proceeded to thel Camp at Prospect. They left
thete soou after sunset ; then visited Fort Hamil-
ton, and eventually left the Dock in their boat at
Salbout half past nine at night to go home.' A4
thes6 men have not returned to Boaz and as noth.
ing has been heard of them since, there is too
niudh reason to fear that they have met a
watery grave; particularly as.the boat t.heywere in
drifted ash:.rr, bottom up, at the Crawl, and' a cap
belong-i' to cue of the men was found therein.

;LEMONS A CURE FOR CONSUMPTION.
A c.'orrespondent of an English medical journal
furriish-s the following, receipt as .a new cure for
consumption :-Put aidgoen whole lemons in cold
water and boil until s6ft; but. not too soft, roll and
squeeze until all the juice is extracted, sweeten the
juice enough to be palatable, use as many as a
dozen a day. Should they cause pain or looseness
of the bowels lessen the quantity, use five or six a
day until better, then begin and use a dozen a day
again. By the time you have used five or six
dozdn you will begin to .ain strength and have
appetite. Of course as you get better you need
not use so m&ny. Follow these directions and we
know that you will 'never regret if there is any
help for you. Only keep it up faithfully.-We
know of two casns where ;,n:th ot the patients where
given up iy the physicians, and where in the last
stages of corisiiilpiion yet both were cured by
using lemons atiroCding to the direction we have
st 'it. Onu- ]a,' in p:i ticular, was bed ridden
and very low; had tried- evely thing that money
could procure, but all in vain, when to please a
friend she finally coisrinted to use the lemons.
She began to, use them February, and in April,
she weighed 100 pounds. She is a well woman
StI-day, and likely to live as long as any of us-
Nassau Telegraph,


CROQUET CLUB, PROSPECT.
Weather permitting, there will be a meeting of the
Prospect Garrison Croquet Club, on Friday next,
April 12th, at 3.30 p.m., when the Band of the 46th
Regt. will play the following Selection :-
PROGRAMME.
Me ,.h..................Prince Auther..............H. Heuvel.
Overture.................Semiramide ..................Rossini,
\V;iItz ............... ....Casino TI :e................... Gun 'l.
Selection.......Reminiscenc(s rf .V1,. 14'.e ....... Godfrey.
Russian Dance .........Pas des Patenieurs.........Glinka.
Galop...................... Gung'L
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.

RESIGNATION OF EARL DERBY.
We give to-day the substance of Lord Derby's ex-
planation to the House of Lords of his resignation as
,'rn-ii Secretary. His Lordship assigns as a reason
Ihe callin-" out of the Reserves decided on by the Cabi-
net, ini which lie cannot concur, not seeing its urgency,
and doubting its expediency in the interests of peace.
It is n.i4faet,,rv. however,' ito find that. Lbrd Derby
supports the Cabinet in its other acts, so that by his
resignation the foreign policy of tlie Government is by
Sno means weakened. Lord Derby has been to Russia
the most forbearing Cabinet Minister that has ever
held a piirtfolio in a Briti h Ministry, and his resigna-
ti,,n imst be taken to imply that British and Russian
interests are at the present moment not to be recon-
'ciled ; and, if this -*upposition be correct., the defection
'of Lord Derby at the present crisis is opportune, Rus-
sian diploni'aey must now fairly be faced, backed, as
Lord Beac-orsfinld says, with, if necessary, armed force,
to restore the disturbance of power in the Mediterra-
nean. Englard is a pence-loving county ; but, if her
rights are trampled on and her wishes impudently de-
fled, then will the iai tinil qualities resident in our race
boldly come out, where their existence is not s.itpected,
and exact by comnilulsion 'wha argument and persuasion
,iiuil not attain. We sincerely hope a peaceful solu-
tion of the present. ditl'culties may be found. If the
course of Eniland is decided. Russian contumrcy will
encounter severe difficulties in indulging itself. Her
pr -,'ent tiiiancial resources will soon dry up, and how
Rus-ia iu to act finairially crippled in her struggle
%% ithI Turkey, it is not easy to see. If an armed pre-
pin at ion '-liuld lo e e:ti ued by Russia and England,
and a war should result, Ihe e,,ntest will assuredly be
gigantic and bitter; but, we think, in such a case
Enzlanrd will receive supporting quarters not generally
ant i'ipa(ed. Russia's ambitions course has not given
Satisfaction to her allies, and the present morality of
Hite Turkish Adminiistration is justly suspicious.
In Earl Derby the. Cabinet had a most active and
able minister, not capable 'of being influenced by any
momentary impulse. His Lordship during the last
two years e.'|e>iallv hls given most assiduous attention
to his ofl-c-iil duties; -and if his policy has not been
ofli'iuatively iti imipliani,' it has at all events proved
'what is almost equally valuable, that the traditional
diplomacy of Russia cannot be reasoned with but must
be coerced either by tIe conteniplation of superior
force, or Iby the wretched results of defeat in an armed
encounter. That ia the stern meaning of Derby's re-
Signati',n. the iinterpreiOiiion which is evidently put upon
it by Lord Beaconsfield who seems to have accepted that
unwelcome conclusion sQmge time ago. All Beacons.
fie-ld's forei-ight. and deternlinatijn arie called for at the
;present moment, and we triui Iis energies may be sus-
Stained in the ]ir.enit cmergeucy. ...

Lady'Laffan and Miss Laura Laffan--the wife and
daughter of our esteemed Governor--were passengers by
Sthe Mail Steamer Caniiima., hihli left here on Thursday
' last for New York, eni, ioute for England. 0'
Tuesday Lady Laffhn-liell a "Farewell Reception" at.
Government House, Mouint Langtin., which was most
numerously attended by Ladies and Gentlemen from
all part s ofthle Island-ea:h of the various departments,
army, naval and civil, being fully represented. The
large attkudance oun his occasion to bid Lady Laf-
fan farew'-ll and every -good wish, evinced the high
estimation in which Her-Ladyship is held, though she
has been but a short, imne amnonrg uif sWe fear the
passage of the Ca, ima to New York has been any-
Sthin but pleasant, judging by the stormy weather
which has prevailed here ever since her departure.

V ISIT OF TAE MARQUIS OF AILSA TO BERMUDA.-
The Most Honorable the Marquis of Ailsa, in his steani
yacht J3fav.., of the Royal Yacht Squadron, anchored
at Grassy Bay on Friday lasl, in 5 daysfr6m Havana.
The Marquis, who is a Lieutenant of the: Royal Naval
Reserve, and coninnd.s his vae-ht, is aeconpanied; we
under tand, by Capt. E. B. ozle, Yr. R. Staples, and
Mr. C. D. Cobhiam. Thoe J. is 400 tons burlthen and has
r a crew of 24 enii ; she is a beautiful looking craft, neat
in the.extreme, and filed up in a handsome and most
cmf.:ii table .style. After leaving England on her
present cruise, she visited Lisbon, Madeira, the Cape
de Verdes, then Antigua, St. Kitts, Guadaloupe, Do.
Sminica, Martinique, Barbados, Trinidad, Jamaica, and
last Havana. .
Since the vacating of Trinity Church by the Revd.
S V. J. Wood, in August last, the living has remained
vacant, the services being performed in the mor.nitg
Sand afternoon by the Rev. Mr. Jones, and i.n the evdh-'
ing by. the Rev. Mr. James, Rector of Pembroke 'and
SDevonshire, andRRev. Mr. Goodwin, Garrison Chap-
lain. i The Rev. Mr. Louighi Rector ot Paget and War.
Sick, has apreaqhed on Wednesday evenings during
SLent. on the words uttered by CIrjis't on the Cro's. On
Sunday evening last Rev. Mr. Goodwin, who has been
Sgeneru~.ly aisisting t h resident clergy, delivered an
ae disaurse on Zaccheus and Chigst. We hope the
Authorities may soon be a'ble to procure an efficient in.
cumbent. We regret to learn that thle financial re'
1 sources are falling off, liut, the electricity of a new
minister will doubtless bring them up to a health
condition'. Th'erequisitio. mandle on the present stat
of elery' in public .services and parish work, is vei:y
great, and the need of i:ore assistance is apparent.

-On the morning, of the 31st ultimo, two Sapper.
respectively named William Fassnadge, 28.th.'C0
p.ny R.E., and. MathewO'Rielley, 12th Company;
R. E., accompaunled by Gunner Braiden,. of the
Royal Artillery, left Bo:,az Island in a small row


"'Y", Al"




BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE


I, Sq....~... V -.- -- -- -


One Day Later from England.
4'he Beta brought telegram reports from Eng-
land via New York, two hours later than previous-
ly received, and the Eliza Barss some four hours
laler, contained in papers of the 29th, which will
be found in the Supplementary Sheet.
We were kindly favored on Wednesday last by a
gentleman in St. George, with a copy of the New
York Tribune of the 29th, ult., brought by the
Eliza Bares, and by Mr. Steward Smith, of the E.
B., with a file of the Herald of the 28th.
HALIFAX, N. S., March 21.-Both branches of
"Te Local Legislature adjourned to-day till Satur-
day, owing to the funeral of General Haley taking
place to morrow. The National Societies will take
part in the funeral. Col. Elgee, of the Royal Ar-
tillery, senior officer in this garrison, is now in com-
mand of the troops.
A cablegram was received to-day from the Duke
of Cambridge expressing his regret at the death of
General Haley.
.Hon. Rol,. Boak has been appointed President
of the Legislative Council, rendered vacant by the
death of.Hon John Creighton.
THE LATE COLONEL DENISON.
Lieut.-Col. Richard Lippincott Denison, after an
illness of a week's duration, died at four o'clock
yesterday afternoon at his residence, Dover Court,
in, this city.
Colonel Denison was the head of one of the old-
est Canadian families. His paternal grandfather
came to Canada in 1792, on the establishment of
the Province of Upper Canada, and moved to To-
ronto in 1796., when the town of York was laid out.
Through his maternal grandfather, Captain Richard
Lippincott, he was the representative of a noted
United Empire Loyalist.-Toronto Paper, Mar. 26.

From the West Indies and Deme-
S*: rara.
The Royal Mail Steamer Beta, Captain Shaw, ar-
rived at St. George's from St. Thomas on Tuesday
last, and left on the following day for Halifax.
We received our usual exchange files from St. Tho-
mas, &c., but they do not supply us with any news
of moment.
We fear the new arrangement of the Mail Steam-
ers not to leave St. Thomas till Saturday, will
prevent our receiving any news she may bring in
time for our issue of the Tuesday following.
KiNGSTON, March 21.-The Civil Service Com-
mission appointed by the Governor to inquire into
the working of the several public departments, still
continues its sittings under the presidency of the
Chief Justice, and startling disclosures are being
made rom day to day. There was $250,000 a year
expended in one department, which kept no books
of accounts. The only departments which gave
satisfactory accounts were the General Post Office
aind the Pisons.
'The Baltimore Guano Company have paid the in-
demnity demanded by the British Government for
trespass on the Morant Keys. They have also
leased the Keys, and are actively engaged now in
gathering guano and turtles.
Troops and war material are being got in readi-
nesa fori transport to England. The white troops
are ready to leave. The war material is to go by
the steamer Mersey, now loading.
'Connuodnme Lyons, A.D.C., hauled down his Broad
t as Commodore of the Second Class at Port
al, Jamaica, on the 12th ult., and relinquished his
command, after three years' service. :Hon. Captain
W. J. Ward,- A.D.C., the new Commodore, hoisted
his Broad Pendant on board H. M. S. Urgent on same
day and was salftited by the ships-of-war at Port Royal.
DEMERARA.-Two fine lively manatees, or sea-
cows (to call them by their popular name) were
caught in the river at Wakenham a few days ago
by two black men, and have been brought to town
to be sold, the larger of the two is a remarkably
good specimen, measuring nine feet in length, two
in breadth, and at least one in thickness; and
must weigh between three and four hundred
pounds.& Some time ago a large 'cow' was shot on
the| West Bank and in a lew hours the whole of
theflesh was bought up" by eager purchasers at six-
teen cents a pound. The manatee is supposed to
be the mermaid of fiction.-Royal Gazette, Febru-
ary 23.
Captain Petitot, of the French Barque Tamari, who
left here in January of last year for New York, was I
washed overboard and drowned from that vessel on the '
7th January last, on a voyage from New York to Bor-
deaax. His loss isl regretted by many friends in Ber-
muda.
Tom Fat,. a young Chinamnian, who pleaded guilty at
the. Old Bailey, London, to f.rginr' the name of his
matter, Lord'Charles Bere.sfoid, thereby defraudin
him ofabout l,4'0. has been sentenced to five years'
penal servitude.-r-[Fat was with Lrd Charles Beres-
foird whet here as a Lieutenant of the Flagship Bdllk-
'ojqhon in 1875,]-Ed. Br. R G.
THi NEW SILVER DOLLAa, is the latest thing out
in America. The Herald describes it as follows:-
"The new dollar bears a strong resemblance to
a biggest pumpkin or best soft L soap medal awarded
at a country fair, or it might be taken for a genu-
ine dollar in the last stages of consumption. The
head Qf the Goddess o( Liberty on one side lacks
distinctness and finish, and although the face is a
handsome one it has a brazen look, as if determin-
ed'by a show of impudence to conceal a conviction
that it ought to be ashamed of its company. The
eagle on the other side is a mean, shabby-looking


bidd, that might very well pass for one of ith three
famous crows, celebrated in song, before they alight-
ed on the bare backbone of the dead horse "only
three weeks slain" and found a meal. The wings
Vtise perpendicularly over the head, in the position
assumed by a bird when badly frightened, giving
one the idea that the poor eagle is in terror at the
thought that somebody is coming to rob her neat.
A more outrageous caricature of the bird of free-
dom was never attempted."
(From The St. Thomas Lloyds.")
The Allegmeine Zietung states that the necessary
preparations have been made for assembling, upon
the despatch of telegraphic orders, a squadron of
German men-of-war on the west coast of Nicaragua,
should that State 'refuse to give the satisfaction
demanded by the German government for the in-
euilt recently offered to its Chargu Affaires. The
squadron will consist of the new iron spar-decked
Io6tmete' Leipzig, launched in 1875, of 3,925 tons
displacement, and armed with 12 guns-at present
on the voyage to Montevideo; the flushed-decked
wooden corvette Adraine, of 1,692 tons, and carfy-
ing+ six guns, fitted out for Australia: the flush
decked wooden corvette Medusa, of 1,183 tons, and
armed with nine gins, ,at the present moment on
the coast of Brazil, and the large wooden spar-
decked corvette Elizabeth, of 2,468 tons, and carry-
ing eighteen guns, now cruising in Japanese weatefs.
The Bay of Papagayo, on the west coast of Nac-
aragua, is named as the place of rendezvous, and
the squadron, if assembled, will be under the orders
of Capt. von Wickede, captain of the Elizabeth.
THE KAFFIR WAR NEARLY OVER.
CpAs TowN, March 12.-Sir Bartle Frere, Gov-
ernor of Cape Colony, thinks that the Caffir war is
virtually over.
The Eteamer Bermuda, from New York for La Gu-
ayra, arrived at St. Thomas on 27th ult.


Ig Sir A. Cooper Key, K.C.B., F.R.S., shifted
his Flag from the Fore to the Main, on board the
I Bellerophon on the 1st instant, on promotion to the
Rank of Admiral. Was saluted with 17 guns from
H. M. S. Terror.

!..FS A Supplementary sheet ac-
.*Z companies this No. of the Gazette. It
contains Lord Derby's explanation
for designing Office, &c., and the latest Euro-
pean and other news.
BIRTH, at Astwood's Cottage, Warwick, on Satur-
day last, 6th instant, MRs. EDWIN J. ASTWOOD, bf a
DAUGHTER..
DIED, at his residence, at Grand Cay, Turks' Is-
lands, on Saturday, the 2nd March, ultimo, after a
lonw and painful illness, which was borne in a truly
Christian spirit, HENRY W. WHITNEY, Esquire, in
the 52nd year of his age. Mr. Whitney has for nearly
30 years filled several responsible offices, and continued
in the performance of his duties to within a few months
of his death. He was well and favourably known in
his native community, and has creditably reared a
large family of children, who, together with their be-
reaved mother, now sadly mourn their loss.-(Com.)
........, in Warwick Parish, on the 2nd inst., Miss
FRANCES B. INGHAM, in her 80th year.

BOOKS.

THE SALE OF BOOKS
By authority of His Excellency the
GENERAL COMMANDING,
Will be Continued at our Stores, at 12 o'clock,
This Day, Tuesday,
The 9th Instant.
There remain about 500 Volumes'
comprising a great many Valuable Books.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,


Hamilton, April 9th, 1


To-morrow,
10th Instant,
AT" T 0W "-


Auctioneers.
878.

DT I0 N,
Wednesday,
At 12 o'clock,
. "S I A L,


15 B LS. Extra Family FLOUR
5 Barrels Superfine RYE
5 Barrels Bright Grocery SUGAR
40 Bags good CORN
10 Boxes Prime FISH, 30 lbs. each
Half and Qrtr. Barrels Salt MACKEREL
Boxes SOAP and STARCH
Tins Prime BUTTER and LARD
5 Half Chests Oolong TEA (a Superb ar-
ticle)
About 100 lbs. Oolong TEA, in smaller pack-
ages
Wrapping PAPER and Kegs NAILS, assort-
ed sizes
10,000 CIGARS
2 Gross Fancy PIPES 150 Boxes FIGS
10 Gross Toilet SOAPS
10 Reams Note PAPER
10 M. ENVELOPES BUCKETS
BROOMS BASKETS TUBS
&c., &c.


JOHN HARNETT,
Auctioneer.


Hamilton, 9th April, 1878.
P. S.-If foul weather To-morrow, then
first fair day after. J. H.

NOTICE,
To all whom it may Concern.

"HE Undersigned intending to
Close Business, respectfully requests all
Persons who are Indebted to him to pay their
respective Amounts on or before the 31st of
May r.ext. All unsettled Accounts after that
date, unless satisfactory arrangement be made
for the same, WILL, WITHOUT FAIL, be
placed in legal hands for collection.
All Accounts against the Subscriber are re-
(iquested to be rendered not later than 1st of
June, for adjustment.
BERMUDA PRODUCE purchased
throughout the Season, at Market prices.
JOHN tlARNETT.
Hamilton, 9th April, 1878.

For Sale,
A Handsome Walnut Wood


BY CHAPPELL & CO., LONDON,
Good Tone, has stood the climate well.
To be seen at the DEPUTY-INSPECTOR-GENER-
AL'S Residence, R. N. Hospital, Ireland Island.


-I EA~


ALSO,
A FINI

Cow &


Auction


Sale.


AT PU'LC AUCTION,
8 der thie '''i Shedq
At 12 o'clock,
On Thursday next,
11th Instant,
10 RUMS CODFISH
50 HAMS
25 SHOULDERS 10 Bls. Bright SUGAR
10 Bls. MEAL 15 Kegs and Tubs BUTTER
50 Reams Tomato PAPER
5 Half Chests TEA 20 Bags OATS
10 Bales HAY 20 Bags BRAN
10 Bags CHARCOAL
10 Kegs NAILS, various sizes
10 Boxes SOAP BROOMS BUCKETS
ALSO,
The Yacht


With MAINSAIL, 2 JIBS, SPIN-
NAKER, Racing MAST, BOWSPRIT and
BOOM, 900 Lbs. Lead BALLAST, 3 Tons
Iron BALLAST
The Superior qualities of the above Yacht
are well known, having won several races: a
rare chance is therefore offered of obtaining a
first class sailer.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, April 9th, 1878.


TION,
cc"-:D


In good order and under instruc-
tions,
IT PFISM ISTOR3,

On Thursday next,
11th instant, At Noon,
3 TIERCES FISH
About 750 lbs. each
12 Tierces FISH, about 450 lbs. each
1 Qrtr. Drum FISH, 112 lbs.
1 Box FISH, 100 lbs.
ROBT. E. N. BOGGS,


St. Georges, April 8, 1878.

LUMBER.


Auctionmer.


WII1TE PIA E, Clear and Cured
1, 11, l, 2 and 3 Inch
WHITE PINE-Shelving & Par-
tition BOARDS, 12 to 16 feet lengths,
Planed 10 and 12 inches wide
P it c Pine,


Of the Undermentioned sizes, Viz :-
SCANTLING- 4 x 5, 4
3x6, 2j x5, 2jx6, 2x 6, lj
2 x 5, 3 x 9, 3 x 3.
FLOORING-I and 14 inch.
CEDAR SHINGLES,
Ceiling L3 THS,


x 4,
x 3,


At Low Rates,
For Sale by
S. S. INGHAM.
Hamilton, 8th April, 1878.-2 ins,
Gazette only.

EXPECTED
Per S. S. Canima,
On the 15th inst.,


Cart Wheels, .xles, apaf
Sets Harness,
Suitable for Donkeys, which will be Sold


rl


Cheap for CASH.


Apri


Also, on Hand,
Fine DONKEYS.
THEO. J. LIGHTBOURN,
Front Street, Hlamilton.


18, 1878.-2


THE TOBACCO SEEI),
GRANTHAM offers for Sale, is Pure
Seed of the best quality.
At the sign of the Big Cigar," 46 & 4
Street.-l


Mr. WM. B.


ileifer.


Apiil 8, 1878.-tf

Notice
To Growers and Owners

OF BERMUDA, PRDUC E.
IN consequence of the great increase in ship-
ments of Produce to New Yolk since the
season of 1874, we d-eem it necessary to give
notice, that we are ready to give our personal
attention as usual to all Shipments of Bermuda
Produce for New York made through us, but
without being responsible for the net proceeds
until paid to our order in New York, which will
be given to the New York Consignees for Sale,
by each vessel transporting a shipment.
When necessary to order Specie in return for
any shipment it will be insured at the expense
of the Owners interested, and Owners will
clearly understand that all the dangers of trans-
port are borne by Ct.em.
TROTT 4 COX.
Hamuilo.i, B rmuda, to 30th J une
Febiu.y 9, 1878. to 30th June 3p


Dega(


H. A.
I havana

7 Front


ino,


WVOULD respectfully announce that in re-
sponse to highly encouraging letters
from Friends and Patrons in Bermuda, he will
again visit these Islands Professionally and or.
ganize


Classes


in Dancing


and I


Deportment
In the Different Parishes,
The Terms will be for 24 Lessons, 2 10/.
Mr. )ecgarmo will leave New York on the
Steamer '. L' 'nin;i," Thursday, April 25th and
will open the lassess about May 1st.
Subscribers will please leave their Names at
the Office of the Royal Gazette."
April Ist, 1878.-3 3p.


Notice.


A GR AND
Pocai fa oss If-ssm rna


Will be Given
BY THE
Band 46th Regiment,
IN THE

II AM EIrLTON,

22nd April, 1878,

THE CELEBRATED

Will assist.
m Particulars in next issue.
April 8, 1878.

I. O. G. T.


HTIE Members of Eureka
No. 20, of 1. 0. G. T., intend
Celebrate their


Lodge,
(D.V.,) to


Iirb ,OuterTarHE
ON TIHE


WALSSINo :N PZ7 OOZON,
And respectfully invite Sister Lodges to
participate with them.
The Members will convene at ODD FELLOWS'
[HALL, at 10 A.M., Regale and proceed to the
Wesleyan Chapel, where IDivine Service will be
held bythe Rev. W. C. BRoWNF. After Service,
a Collection will be taken up. The Order will
then re-form and march to the Town Hall,
where Temperance Addresses will he delivered
by Bros. R. WASSON, G. WV. C.; W. IR AN,
late of the Sons of Temperance, N. S. ; J.
SMIrm, G. V. C. T.,; W. C. BRowNE, P. (.
W. C. T.,
By Order of the Committee.
St. Georges, April 9, 1878.-2

PROM ENIA 0E RRT
TIIERE WILL BE

IN THE
TOWN HA[L,
ON

The 23rd Instant,
By the Members of EUREKA LODGE,No. 20, '
1. 0. G. T.
Proceeds in aid of the Building Fund.
Tickets 6d., to be had at the Door.
Doors open at 7 P.M.
By Order of the Committee.


St. Georges, April 9th, 1878.-2

Something New.

For Sale and on Exhibition, a large assortment
of lPRAN's World renowned


ALSO,
Easter, Scripture, Birthday, Visiting and
Advertising


S. A YOUNG,
Sole Agent for L. PRANG & Co., in Bermuda.
ALSO, A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
DRY and FANCY


At No. 1 West Front Street.
April 9th, 1878.-3 pd

Not ice.
To Farmers and Shippers of

Bermuda Produce,
Consignments to *
Messrs. E. P. LOOMIS C0o.,
92 Barclay Street,
NEW YORK,
Are solicited by the Undersigned who will re-
ceive and forward same.
Returns made Promptly.
B. W. WALKER & CO.
Hamilton, March 4th, 1878.-to May 31 3p.

NOTICE.
To Importers from Barbados.
,rO Importers from Barbados.


TIlE SCHOONER
'dnnie Florence,'
FRITH, Master,


WILL LEAVE
BARBADOS
For this Port,


r 1il1L unuers-igueu win pay niaes. l iarkU A 1 -
Rates for About 1st May,
B ermn uda produce And will take Freight at customary Rates.
Put p in approved Orders forwarded by Mail leaving here
Put up in approved manner for Ship;na t to 20tlh Inst., will reach Ba!bados in time for
New York. above Vessel.


JJNO. F. BURROWS.
Hamilton, 2nd April, 1878.-4 33.


B. W. WALKER Co.
fIamnilton, April 8' 1878,-2 3p


Colonial Secretary's Ofice,
BERMUDA, April 8, 1878.
HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR
Shas been requested by the Secretary of
State for the Colonies to publish for general
information the following copy of an extract
from the "London Gazette" of Tuesday,
February 19th, 1878.
By His Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER,
Colonial Secretary.
FOREIGN OFFICE,
FEBRUARY 16TH1, 1878.
NOTICE has been given by the Hawaiian
LI Government to terminate Articles.4, 5,
and 6 of the Treaty of July 10, 1851, between
Great Britain and the Sandwich Islands. In
consequence of this notice these Articles will
expire on the 3rd of July next.


NAVY


CONTRACTS.


THE "Test" of the Kerosene re-
S- quired for H. M. Service, as per Adver-
tisement dated 30th ult., is 120.
A. VIZARD,
Naval Storekeeper.
6th April, 1878.
p For Advertisement see 3rd column 1st
page of this Gazette.

H/anted,


BY the Naval Captain Superin-
S tendent, an experienced

COOK.


Apply at "T11 E COTTAGE,"
Ireland Island.


April 9th, 1878.



10AZ.

ewV TWICE .
THE
Theatrical Performance
AT THE ABOVE THEATRE,
Advertised Jor the Ilth, 12th and
13th of d/prdl,
IS UNAVOIDABLY

POSTPONED,
UNTIL THE
25th, 26th and 27th
Of same Month.
April 8, 1878.

The Undersigned Offers,
By Recent Arrivals,


3dt Low


Rates for Cash,


Heavy HLA1CK OATS
AND
LEFine FooD T OutersA,
Fine Food for Hunters,


Barrels bright SUGAR
Bls. Table POTATOLS Sacks
Goldleaf and Black TOBACCO
Kerosene OIL


Anthracite COAL,
from the Wharf

JOHN F.


E. f. RICE


very Cheap

&c.
BURROWS.


Hamilton, April 2, 1878.-2 3p

Notice
To Farmers and Others.

THE UN.DERSIG NED,
IWould Respectfully Solicit Consignments of0
Bermuda Produce,
Throughout the present Crop Season.
Feeling confident that his long experience and
thorough acquaintance with the iuttsiness will
enable him to give every satisfaction.
MlR. W. T. JAMES,
42 Front Street, Hamiltoi,
Will receive and forward Consignments free of
charge.
Account Sales and Cash returns promptly made.
WILLIAM PEACOCK'
58, 60 & 62 Centre Row, W. Washington.
Market, New York.
February 4, 1878.-3m. 3p.

Unclaimed Letters.
Mrs Altcombe, Garcia Augusta, Mary Jane Ad-
ams, Eugenia E Adams, Thos Adam,, ;3r Byniles,
Roza Bittacurte, Bernhend Carlson, Alico Cox, Mrs
James Cox, Henry Darreil, Spinalla Dina, R -H
Duerden, Mrs Mary F Eve,, Marshal Gilbert, W.J
Harvey, F T Hamilton, R.N., 3M8s Sanah Henry,
Thomas IH Howland, C P Jemmeti, Mrs'Mingo
Jones, Wm Lightbourn, (Boatman), Jose de M11dei.
ros, Vietia Maciel, Manguret M 'Marsh, R1becca
Morris, Joze Mariante Para, W S oll inlson, James
J Smith, George Spencer, Sr., James Fulton Smit],
Souza Sequeira, Win A Scaerls, Mr Sinis (Stew-
ard), Miss Siddons, W C Sinunonads, Miss Elizibelh
Simmonk, (Somerset), Ann Seymour, R Sanders,
(Spanish Point), John E Tavten, George Trott, John
B Voisey, George Woodman, W 1H Williams,
(Hamilton), R E Willeck, Charles Williams.
Post Office, Hamnil!oo, April 8, 1878.
UNCLAIMED LEI'rrT!{S IN THE POST OF-
FICE, ST. GEORGE, h Ap.1ril, 1878
Mrs Anderson, Wm .\Abu-.y, Fedk Barren, Alex-
ander Black, J W Brown, B BnIchafl, Mrs Blrrel,
Zilpha Burrows, Fredk Fl.:,dr.s, Capt John Long,
Colin McVicar, Mis D .icKay, na m MLCa.lan,
Harry McMilian, .lAnone Spinmdle, eij: F I'ill
Joht H mith, Susan T rult, Mrs E E Thomas, F
G Virtue, Mairuel D Vicra,


BYAUCU
WILL 3 I


%VN-17


-NINIln


4


1 8, 1878.--2


I


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&I





FRM1JDA 'ROYAL GAZETR


WEST INDIES.
PAI nADrs.-Since the failure of the Govermrwcnt
In 5a t1e ~FPI ortirs of that Bill. has voluir.aiilv come for-
waid to take charge of the measure of theExeculive
in the House of Assembly, and in this way supplies
the want which the Government felt in having no
one to support their measures by argument. Mr.
Brandford Griffith, Auditor-General, has obtained
three months leave of absence. Mr. Fleming, the
rew Attorney-General, has arrived from Jamaica,
where he wasa District Court Judge. The weather
has been very favourable for reaping. The barque
" Mary Ann Johnson," with a cargo of coal, was
wrecked off the coast on the 28th February.
TuINTDAD.-The Stores were closed during the
celebration of a solemn Requiem and Grand Mass,
for the repose of the Soul of the late Pope. His
Excellency the Governor, Mr. Irving, and most of
the Officials were present.
NEvis.-Grave irregularities have been discover-
ed in the Treasury Department, two clerks have
been dismissed in consequence, and the Treasurer
is likely to be transferred to Dominica.
ST. LUCIA.-The Governor, Mr. Des Voux, left
the island on the 1st of March for the Feeji islands,
where be has been appointed Governor. The wea-
ther has been good for crop operations, but bad for
the young plants.
HAYTI.-General Tannis who attempted to revolt
and carry arms against the Government of Presi-
dent Canal, has fled and secreted himself in the Li-
berian Consulate. He will not come out because
be says the populace will assassinate him on his
way to the vessel, as they did Septimus Ramean.
The populace are loyal to the Government and the
President is humane.

FROM "'BRIEF," MARCH 8.
The terms of peace virtually amount, as every
one knew they must, to the extinction of Tur-
key either as a European or an Asiatic power.
The vastness of the war indemnity insisted on ren-
dered territorial cession certain, and the creation of
a new kingdom in Bulgaria alone reduces the Porte
to political insignificance in Europe. It is true
that Russia has not pressed for the ironclad fleet;
but Turkey henceforth will be a more helpless vas-
sal than even Persia, and, perhaps, Russia has be-
come more truly mistress of the ironclads than she
would have done by insisting on their surrender.
Russia has fully studied dramatic effect in clos-
ing the peace negotiations which appear to have
been signed on the double anniversary of the Em-
peror Alexander's accession to the throne and that
also of the declaration of freedom to the serfs.
There is yet another event which rendered it really
a treble anniversary,for Sunday last, when peace was
finally concluded between Russia and Turkey, was
the anniversary of the terrible day when, twenty-
three years ago, the Czar Nicholas died broken-
hearted at the losses of the Crimean War. In the
fall of Plevna Sebastopol was, indeed, avenged.
There are many ways of keeping one's word be-
sides the only one recognized by truth and honour.
The Czar promised not to annex a foot of European
territory, and it is claimed for him that he has ob-
served the obligation. He has, indeed, seized the
Dobrudscha, but this has been given to Roumania.
Bulgaria, however, remains. It is annexed to Rus-
sia ; that is true, certainly, but the Czar has all the
same appointed Russian officials to carry out a
Russian code of laws, decreeing that Russian shall
be the language of the ruling classes, and that a
Russian army shall occupy the province. We do
not particularly pity the Bulgars, but merely wish
to show how successfully Russian arms are second-
ed by Russian duplicity-or diplomacy, as it is
politely called.
Moderation and mercy should be the conspicuous
graces of every supreme triumph. We must not,
however(, expect much from the still half-savage
Muscovites. General Gourko has hanged a num-
ber of Polish doctors at Sofia, who were simply
members of the Turkish medical staff. The men
were hanged because they were Poles. Such acts,
and they are only too numerous, fix upon the mili-
tary glory of the Russians the indelible marks of a
brutality scarcely known among the Red Indians
and common enly to Ashantees.
War and Pestilence are near relatives. They are
proving so in Russia just now, where a kind of ty-
phus-plague is raging with a deadly virulence.
The mortality is described as fearful, and not only
extends to all South Russia, but even reaches to
St. Petersburg It is attributed to the reckless
way in which the captured Turks have been con-
voyed about without the observance of the most
cowrmon sanitary precautions, and now thousands
both of the conquerors and the vanquished have
perished miserably.
The Sultan and the Czar have exchanged con-
gratulations telegraphically, and generally there
are symptoms that between St. Petersburg and the
Porte, the long-drawn-out negotiations have ended
in a cordial understanding. This fact, slight
though it be, gives colour to the assertions of those
who so confidently tell us that the reason why Rus-
sia forebore from occupying Constantinople is sim-r
ply because Turkey is henceforth to be the faithful
vassal of the Czar. Some evidence of this is fur-
nished by the fact that the Porte has sanctioned the
stay of the Russian troops at San Stefano, so long
as the British Fleet remains in the Sea of Marmora.
In round numbers we pay about fifteen millions
and a half for our existing army of less than half a


million of men. The principal defect appears to
be the fact that the great mass of the rank and file
are so young. As Mr. Hardy pointed out, that is a
result of the short service system, and an army of
what some contemptuously term boys" must be
submitted to, unless the nation chooses to revert to
long service and a certain pension. The fruits of
that system may be studied at Chelsea, and also in
the brightest episode of our military history.
Undoubtedly, at the present juncture, there was
something singularly appropriate in appointing
Lord Bury Under-Secretary for War, identified as
his lordship is with the great Volunteer movement.
By birth and traditions a Liberal, Lord Bury is a
desertertfrom the Gladstone camp, and thereby lost
his seat in the Lower House. He now sits in the
Upper House as Lord Ashford, and belongs to the
party of action who desire peace, but would unhes-
itatingly invoke war to defend any real British in-
terest. The appointment is generally approved.
After a severe fight, the French Senate has adop-
ted the Colportage Bill, brought in by the Govern-
ment, by 164 votes to 95, having rejected by a
smaller majority an amendment moved by M. de
Ravignan, of the Right, the effect of which would
have been to neutralise the other clauses of the Bill.
The primary object of the Bill is to restrain the
Government from suspending arbitrarily the sale of
books or newspapers, by licensed hawkers. This is
the thin end of the Liberal wedge, and shows con-
clusively that true Liberalism has won a decided
advance in the France of to-day.
There can be no doubt but that popular repre-
sentative government is entirely unsuited for the
present military regime of the German Empire.
Prince Bismarck has now admitted that he desires
to make the tax on tobacco a strict Government
monopoly. This alone would, of course, render the
State in a great measure financially independent.
Great, however, was the storm this candid ex-
position of his policy awoke, and Prince Bis-
marck must seek an increased revenue in some
other way. Meanwhile, he is said to hate a Parlia-
liprent more than ever,


THE OLDEST MAN IN THE WORLD.
A merchant of St. Louis who recently returned
fiorn a tour of South America has given an account
af remsiknle old main he saw in the city of Tul-
cn, Chili, whose name is Felix Rojas, and who has
undoubtedly reached the age of 137 years. Rojas
was born in 1740, and at an early age entered the
army, holding the position of sergeant-major in a
Spanish line regiment. When Carlos the third is-
sued the historic mandate expelling the Jesuits,
Rojas took charge of two of the members of the or-
der and carried them from Linares to Santiago.
He served forty-eight years in the Chilian armies,
and is thoroughly conversant with the minutest de-
tails of Chilian history for the last century and a
half. Up to one year ago Rojas was remarkably
vigorous for one of his venerable age, though for
ten years he has been carried about in a portable
chair, in charge of two servants. For a year he
has been failing rapidly, and now seldom leaves his
house, his physicians prescribing absolute quiet as
the only means of prolonging his life. Occasional-
ly be may be seen in his chair in front of his resi-
dence, and the passers-by pay him the greatest re-
spect. He smokes a pipe, and has used tobacco
steadily for 120 years. His eyes are quite weak
now, but he has never used spectacles, and is gen-
erally able to read large print. He is not a large
man, being scarcely five feet five inches in height,
and never weighed over 150. He is remarkably
well proportioned, his head being unusually large
and finely shaped.
Singular to relate, Rojas has lived to this ripe
old age in defiance of many vicissitudes and habits
that are universally believed to abbreviate a man's
term of life. From the age of twenty till he was
seventy, he was a habitual drinker, and for a long
period of that time such a confirmed tippler that
his health was seriously affected, and it was believ-
ed that he could not survive long. In 1780 he fought
a bloodless duel with a brother-soldier, and ten
years later, in a similar encounter with another an-
tagonist, he was so desperately wounded that it was
two years before he fully recovered. At one time
he suffered a double fracture of his right leg by a
caisson-wagon running over it. He was also
wounded twice while fighting in battle. He has
had the yellow fever and has been repeatedly pros-
trated by other malarial fevers that prevail in all
parts of South America. It seems so remarkable
that one should be preserved to such an extraordin-
ary age after passing through so many exciting ad.,
ventures and accidents by field and flood. Rojas
is the son of a Spanish nobleman who fled his
country for a political offence and settled in Chill
under an assumed name. The son lived almost
half a century before he found out the true history
of his father, and upon the discovery he made a
trip to Spain and succeeded in obtaining from the
government the title and possession of valuable
property which had been confiscated. This is the
only voyage Rojas has ever made away from his na-
tive country. The venerable old man has ample
means, and is surrounded by a numerous line of
descendants, consisting of children, grandchildren,
great-great, and great-great-great-grandchildren.
-Frank Leslie's Illustrated Paper.


When Andrew Jackson received Count Bertrand
at the Hermitage, the Frenchman ran up to the
American, and throwing his arms around him, ex-
claimed: A second Napoleon! A second Napo-
leon!" No," replied Jackson, "not a second
Napoleon. Napoleon stood alone the man of his
times, and it will be 500 years before the earth pro-
duces his equal."
FINE DREss.-The persons whose clothes are
extremely fine I am too apt to consider as not being
possessed of any superiority of fortune, but resem-
bling those Indians who are found to wear all the
gold they have in the world in a bob at the nose.-
Goldsmith.


W.u. F. BASC 0 ME
M.D,
DENTIST,
REID STREET, HAMILTON, EAST,
Has Received a supply of the fole
lowing


PIREPRHJ -TIOAS
FOR THE TEETH
Put up by the well known Dentists Messrs. GA-
BRIEL, Ludgate Hill, London.
SEDADENT, or Cure for Toothache
CORALITE TOOTH PASTE, for Cleansing
and Improving the Teeth
ROYAL DENTIFRICE, gives the Teeth a
pearl-like whiteness
W\VITE GUTTA PERCiHA ENAMEL, for
Stopping decayed Teeth
OSTEO-ENAMEL STOPPING, warranted to
remain white and firm as the Tooth itself
ODONTALGIQUE ELIXIR, celebrated
Mouth Wash.
Hamilton, March 26th, 1877.

Win.James Hleney,


BROKER
AND


Commission
HAMILWON,


Blgent,
BERMUDA.


Comfortable Lodging
For either a Single Gentleman or
a Lady, can be obtained in Church Street, in
this Town. Board can also be obtained if re-


For Reference apply at the Office of
Royal Gazette."
January 28, 1878.


For Rent,
In this Town,


FTo All whom it may

concern.
I HER itEBY give Notice that I have been
appointed AGENT AND ATTORNEY for
the Board of Underwriters of New Orleans, and
will from this Date, represent the Interests of
thelfollowing Companies, Vizt :-
New Orleans Mutual Insurance Company,
Crescent do. do. do.
Merchants do. do. do.
Sun do. do. do.
Union Insurance Company,
Hope do. do.
Hibernia do. do.
Factors and Traders Insurance Company,
Tentonia Insurance Company,
New Orleans Insurance Association,
Peoples' Insurance Company,
Mechanics and Traders Insurance Company.
W. C. HYLJ.ND,
Agent for the several Boards of Under-
writers for Nei York, Boston,
Baltimore and Philadelphia, &c., &c., &c.
St. George's, Bermuda,
21st January, 1878.




POWER & FRITH,
Darristers-at-Law, &c.
THtIE Subscribers have this day entered into
Co-partnership as
Attorneys, Solicitors, Notaries,
ac.
The business will be conducted under the style
and firm of
POWEI & FiRITH,
OFFICES-166 Hollis Street, over the offices
of Messrs. Almon & Mackintosh.
L. G. POWER,
J. HARVEY FRITH.
Halifax, 1st Feby., 1678.


I am constantly Receiving
Fromn the New York MInarket,
FRESH SUPPLIES OF
GROCERPi3 PROVISIONSA
ALSO, ON HAND,
CUT NAILS
Of all sizes,
AND,
Five Barrels of Well-sprung
Garnet Seed POTATOES.
Superior White Seed CORN
For Sale,
Terms Reasonable, by
J. C. KEENEY.
Hamilton, February 19, 1878.

Mr. Robert Bedingfield,

aixi bvmit4


Animals and Birds of all
tions STUFFED.
SMITHS HIILL,
Of3 Orders may be left at the
" Royal Gazette."
February 12th, 1878.


Descrip-

HAMILTON.
Office of the


Theodore Outerbridre,

HAMILTON.
Reid Street, \Vest of "Royal Gazette" Office.
Office Hours-10 to 12 and I to 4.
Will Visit St. Georges, Tuesdays and Fri-
days.
Orders Promptly Attended to.
Hamilton, October 26th, 1876.




NEW BOOKSa
At the Royal Gazette" Stationery Store,
A Choice Selection of Childrens'


Just Received by the Carrie Dingle" from
London.
Hamilton, March 26, 1878.


The Standard of
the World.


Notice.

BOOTS, SHOES & SLIPPERS,
Cheap and Durable,
Fancy PRINTS and SHEETING,
American Novelties,
LAMPS and Patent BURNERS,
Lamps Repaired,
Tin PLATES Jelly PANS Coffee POTS
The Improved Little JNight Lamp.,
ISAAC N.JONES,
Five Doors West of "Gazette" Office,
Mr. Jas. Richardson's Store.
Hamilton, February 19th, 1878.



1011 LlPErPOOL,
CALLING AT QUEENSTOWN,
Carrying the United States Mail
from New York
ON TUES DAY.
Steamships
NEVADA sails March 26, at Noon.
ID)AiHO sails April 2, at 4 p.m.
WYOMING sails April 9, at 10 a.m.
WISCONSIN sails April 16, at 4 p.m
MONTANA sails April 23, at 10 a.m.
NEVADA sails April 30, at 3 p.m.
IDAHO sails May 7, at 9 a.m.
The above Steamers are built expressly for
the Trade, have five watertight bulkheads, and
carry experienced Officers, Surgeons and Stew-
ardesses. The Saloon Accommodations are un-
surpassed by any Atlantic Steamers, and the
State Rooms are on main deck opening into the
Saloon, thus securing that great comfort in
ocean travel, perfect ventilation and light.
The U. S. Mail Steamer Canima" from Ber.
muda, Thursdays, generally arrives at New York
on Monday, and Passengers' baggage can be
transferred direct to the Liverpool Steamer sail-
ing next day.
WILLIAMS & GUION,
Agents,
29 Broadway, New York.
New York, March 14, 1878.

',T THE MOST MODERATE RATES
Can be obtained from the
PHOENIX INSURANCE COMIPA NY
of London,
One of the longest Established and Wealthiest
Offices in Great Britain.

Through the BRANCH OFFICE in these
Islands, a Saving is effected to the Insured
of the Stamp Duty, a very considerable item.
RISKS taken both on REAL and PERSONAL
PROPERTY for 3, 6 or 12 months.
No FEES and no CHARGE for Policies.
N. A. BUTTE FIELD,
Agent.


tiamilton,


September 9th, 1856.


0UIV






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P ew
CO o p
-01p -1P., OF -

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A Comfortable and Conveniently Situated
Two Story
Dwelling HlOUSE,
Furnished or Unfurnished,
Apply at the "Royal Gazette" Office.
Hlamilton, March 12th, 1878.


Notice.


PERSONS having CLAIMS against the
Undersigned to 31st December, 1877, will
please render them at once for Settlement.
Those Persons who have received their AC-
COUNTS to 31st December 1877, would do
well to call and arrange them, as delay with
many will cause expense.
D. M'PHEE LEE.
Hamilton, Match 19th, 1878,


SCALE S
Adapted to the Standard of all Nations, Packed
ready for Shipping.
World's Fair, London 1851
World's Fair, New York 1853
World's Fair, Paris 1867
World's Fair, Vienna 1873
World's Fair, Santiago, (Chili) 1875
World's Fair, Philadelphia 1876
World's Fair, Sydney, Australia, 1877
IIANCOCK'S INSPIRATORS
The best Feeder known for Stationary, Marine,
and Locomotive Boilers, &c.,) also
Oscillating Pump Co.'s Pump.
FAIRBANK'S & CO., N. Y.
October 16th, 1877.-6m


to4


rS i
r. s.

-" ^
c/a14



.'
\j t liii
2 ^^8'



^1


*l~s~r


" Eau" of Dr. Holtz for
HAIR DYE.

VfHIS WATER is of an entirely vegetable
composition, and its use is quite inof-
fensive.
Thanks to this peculiar quality which gives it
no rival, D)R. lloLrz's Hair Dye has not the
disadvantage of the other preparations which
give to the hair an unnaturally vulgar color,
Guided by his medical knowledge and his
great chemical experiences, DR. HOLTZ has
succeeded in the discovery of plants, which give
the richest balsamic dyeing and curative espse-"
ces, and it is by this study that he succeeded to
compound a dye which may be styled as the
Regenerator by excellence of the chevelure.
GENERAL WAREHOUSE. IN PARIs,
La Correspondance Parisienne.
4 Rue de la Tacherie, 4.

J. & E. Atkinson's

PER FITMER1Y.,
celebrated for nearly a century past, is of the very
best English manufacture. For its purity and great
excellence it has obtained the following
EXHIBITION PRIZE MEDALS,
LONDON, 1862. PARIS, 1867. COBDOVA, 1872.
LIMA, 1872. VIEsNA, 1873.
PHILADELPHIA 1876.

dtkinson s Choice Perfumes for
THE HANDKERCHIEF,
White Rose, Frangipanne, Yang Ylang, Stephano-
tis, Opopanax, Jockey Club, Ess. Bouquet,
Trevol, Magnolia, Ji'min, Wood Vio-
let.
And all other odours, of the finest quality only.

ATKINSON'S
Celebrated Eatu de Cologne
is strongly recommended, being more lasting and
fragrant than the German kinds.

ATKI NSO N'S
OLD BROWN WINDSORSOAP
celebrated for so many years, continues to be made
as heretofore. It is strongly Perfumed, and will be
found very durable in use.
ATKINSON'S BEARS' GREASE, COLD
CREAM, SACHET POWDERS, TRANSPAR.
ENT GLYCERINE SOAP, ROSE TOILET
POWDER, TOILET VINEGAR, VELOUTINE,
WHITE ROSE TOOTH PASTE,
and other specialties and general articles of Perfuo
mery may be obtained of all dealers throughout the
World, and of the Manufacturers,
'. & ATEITSOT
24, OLD BOND STREET, LONDON,,W.
PRICE LIST FREE ON APPLICATION.
CAUTION.-Messrs. J. & E. ATKINSON manun
facture their articles of one and the best quality
only. Purchasers are cautioned to avoid coartea.
feits by observing that each article is labelled with
the Firm's Trade Mark, *"a White Rose on a
Golden Lyre;" printed in seven colours.
ESTABLISHED 1799.
April 11, 1876-12m If




Z. C OS leg z
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Among the one hundred and twenty-four ships
struck off the English register recently was one
built in 1756, and another launched in 1788.
A TURKISH BELIEF.-That the holy Russian
eagle is a bird of prayI--Judy.

JILM.A.N'JICK-APRIL, 1878.


ris.

Tu 541
We 5 40
Th 5 39
Fri 5 37
Sat 5 36

LMo 5 35


sets.

6 21
6 22
6 23
6 23
6 24
6 25
6 25


Ft. Qr.I Oh 35m AM


Palm Sunday


Tim BCERUDA ROYAL GAZETTE is published
every Tuesday by DONALUI M'PHEE LEE,
Prir(ei to the Queen's Most Excellent
M ajesty,
AT HIS OFFICE,
North-west Corner of Reid and Burnaby Streets,
Hamilton,
where Blanks, Hand-bills, &a., will be
printed at the shortest notice.-Agent
at St. Georges for the Royal Gazeltte,
JAMES THIES, Esqr., Post Master General.


R w:k


J;, -r --t
--? Du


tim


nod
ON'd
P-4






Supplement to Bermuda


Royal Gazette, April 9.





From the New- York Tribune, March 29.
ENGLAND ON THE EVE OF WAR.

LORD DERBY RETIRES FROM THE CA-
BINET.
About 48,000 Troops in the Reserves to be Called Out
-All hope of a Congress abandoned.
LONDON, March 29.
In the House of Lords yesterday afternoon, Lord
Derby announced that he bad resigned, because
the Government had decided to call out the reser-
ves, a measure which he did not deem `prudent in
the interests of peace, nor necessary for the safety
of the country." Lord Derby said however he did
not consider the course of the Government as ne-
cessarily tending to bring about war. Lord Bea-
consfield observed that as there was no hope of
" rectifying the disturbed balance of power in the
Mediterranean" by means of a Congress, the Gov-
ernment had resolved to avail itself of the services
of the reserve forces. In the House of Commons
the Secretary of State for War said the first class
of the army reserve, about 13,000 strong, and the
militia reserve, which numbers about 25,000, are
to be called out. More of the reserve forces are
also to be summoned to arms, but the militia will
not be asked to do duty unless the regulars are sent
abroad. In St. Petersburg the hostility to England
is very strong.
Lord Derby Resigns because the Reserves are to be
Called--The Premier intimates that England will
henceforth rely only on armed force.
LONDON, March 28.-The House of Lords was
very crowded this afternoon. Many members of
the Lower House were present. Lord Derby en-
tered soon after 5 o'clock and took a seat below the
gangway, instead of on the Treasury bench. He
rose almost immediately and announced his resig-
nation as Secretary for Foreign Affairs, which he
said had been accepted by the Queen, and he only
continued to hold office until the appointment of
his successor. Lord Derby said further:
Lord Derby's Explanation.-He regretted that
under the circumstances it would not be justifiable
for him to follow the customary course of explain-
ing in detail the difference which led him to resign.
The Cabinet had arrived at certain conclusions of a
grave and important character in which he was not
able to concur. To prevent needless alarm, he
,would say that he did not consider those measures
as necessarily tending to bring about war. He
gave the Cabinet credit for sincerely desiring
European peace, but he could not regard the mea-
sures which have now been resolved upon as prudent,.
in the interests of peace nor necessary for the safety
of thecountry. When the concurrenceof Parliament
is asked for the measures of which he had spoken,
he would vindicate his opinions. He would state,
however, that he did not dissent from the Cabinet's
view of the conditions upon which Europe ought to
go into the Congress. He lamented the obstacles
to the meeting of the Congress, but the fault did
not rest with the Government of this country.
The Premier's Statement.-Lord Beaconsfield said
that he would willingly remain from noticing the
reasons which had influenced Lord Derby to re-
sign, un:il a period when those reasons might be
legitimately considered by the House. He con-
cluded as follows:
So much mischief might occur from unnecessary
mystery that it was his duty to say that in conse-
quence of the belief of the Government that the
Congress would not be held and that the hopes of
rectifying the disturbed balance of power in the
Mediterranean by means of a Congress, seeming to
have altogether ceased, it was the duty of the Min-
isters to consider what steps should be taken to
prevent the impending mischiefs. They had, there-
fore, advised Her Majesty to avail herself of the
services of her reserve forces. A message to that
effect would be laid before Parliament. Lord Bea-
consfield deeply deplored that he would not have
the support of Lord Derby when he submitted the
measures on which the Cabinet had resolved to
Parliament. He had felt of late that the political
ties between Lord Derby and himself must soon
terminate, but he had believed that it would be in
a very different and more natural manner, namely,
that he (Lord Beaconsfield) would disappear from
the scene, while Lord Derby would remain to take
the leading part in public affairs. He was sus-
tained at the present moment by the confidence
that the policy of the Government recommended to
Her Majesty would tend to the maintenance of her
Empire, the freedom of Europe, and the greatness
and security of the country. [Cheers.]
The Opposition, in the absence of definite infor-
mation, abstained from raising any discussion for
the present.
The Forces that are to be called out.-In the House
of Commons to-night the Hon. Gathorne Hardy,
Secretary of State for War, replying to various
questions, said : "It is necessary to call out the
first class of the army reserve, numbering about
13,000, and the militia reserve, which is between
25,000 and 26,000. The Queen's message to that
effect would be presented, probably on Monday.
This would be followed by a proclamation calling
out such of the reserve forces as might be requir-
ed." Mr. Hardy pointed out that this is not the
embodiment of the militia, which would not take
place until it was necessary to send regulars a-
'broad.
Russia Continues Obstinate.-In the House of
Commons, this afternoon, Sir Stafford Northeote,
Chancellor of the Exchequer, in reply to an in-
quiry put by Lord Hartington, the leader of the
Liberals, said:


The correspondence in the recent negotiations
will be all on the table this evening. Russia's re-
ply was received yesterday. She adheres to her
previous declaration, and explains that the point
of leaving full liberty of appreciation and action to
the Powers, leaves every Power at full liberty to
raise such question as it thinks fit to discuss, and
reserved to Russia liberty to accept or not such
discussion.

LORD DERBY'S CAREER.
The Political Services of the Ex-Foreign MinSter.
Edward Henry Smith-Stanley, fifteenth Earl of
Derby, was born at Knowsley Park, the family
seat in Lancashire on July 21, 1826. He was edu-
cated at Rigby and Cambridge, and at both rival-
led the brilliant scholarship of his distinguished
father at Eton and Cambridge. During his uni-
versity career, with the purpose of fitting himself
for public life he devoted especial attention to
questions involved in the science of government.
Soon after he left Cambridge in 1848, having failed
of an election to Parliament from Lancashire, he
made a tour of Canada, the United States and the
West Indies, and while still absent was returned
to Parliament from Lynn Regis, in the seat which
Lord G. Bentinck's death had made vacant. He
was in India in 1852 when his father, in the4orm-
ation of his first Cabinet, made him Under-Secre-
tary for Foreign Affairs. In 1855 he declined the
Secretaryship of the Colonies offered him by fiord
Palmerston, but in-1858 accepted that place / his
father's second administration, and soon t I.r-
wards succeeded Lord Ellenborough as President
of the Board of Control for Indian Affairs. Dur-
ing his Secretaryship the Indian mutiny was
quelled, and the control of Indian affairs transfer-
red from the Company to the Crown. He remain-
ed apart from public life during the opposition of
his party, but on the formation of a new ministry
by his father in June, 1866, he became Secretary
for Foreign Affairs, in which position he remained
until February, 1868, when Mr. Gladstone succeed-


ed his father as Prime Minister. In April, 1869,
he was installed as Lord Rector of the University
of Glasgow, and six months later, on the death of
his father, took his seat in the House of Lords as
Earl of Derby. When Disraeli formed a Conser-
vative Cabinet, in 1874, he again became head of
the Foreign Office, from which position he yester-
day resigned.
Lord Derby's vacillating policy toward the East-
ern question, alternately approved and condemned
by his party, is fresh in the recollection of all.
His most positive step and that which was at the
time regarded his greatest diplomatic triumph was
his refusal to sign the Berlin Memorandum in May,
1876. As the assent of all the Christian Powers of
Europe was essential, this refusal nullified the de-
liberations of Bismarck, Gortsclikoff and Andras-
sy and in effect made a war between Russia and
Turkey inevitable.

THE RUSSIAN OCCUPATION.
Mussulmans to be Protected.--CONSTANTINOPLE,
Thursday, March 28.-The Russians have issued
a Proclamation inviting Mussulmans to return to
their homes in Bulgaria, and warning the Bulga-
rians to preserve tranquility. Two transports with
Russian troops have left for Odessa.
LONDON, Thursday, March 28.-The Times prints
a despatch from Rustchuk, saying: The feeling
of dislike between the Russians and Romanians is
increasing daily.-The latter contrive all kinds of
annoyance, especially to civilians carrying Rus-
sian passports. The Roumanians have also es-
tablished duties amounting to 15 per cent on all
provisions brought here from Giurgevo."
RUSSIA AND TURKEY ALLIES.
LONDON, Friday, March 29.-The Standard has
the following telegram from Constantinople: It
is thought that Safvet Pasha will request England
to withdraw her fleet, as Russia and Turkey are
now allies."
ITALY LIKELY TO FAVOR RUSSIA.
LONDON, Thursday, March 28.-" The change in
the Italian Cabinet," a Pera telegram to The Daily
Telegraph says, "is not considered a favorable one
for Turkey. Count Corti (but recently Italian
Minister at Constantinople and now Minister of
Foreign Affairs in the new Italian Cabinet) was
an ally of General Ignatieff, and his strong pro-
Russian. No doubt is felt that his efforts at Rome
will be in the same direction, with the object of
lending the support of the country to the Russian
policy."

AUSTRALIAN AFFAIRS.
SAN FRANCISCO, March 27.-The Steamer Selan-
dia brings news that the parliamentary deadlock
continues in Victoria. The Government is still
able to pay public creditors without an appropria-
tion. The I imperial authorities decline to interfere;
the Legislature must fight its own battles. The
home authorities leave it to the Governor's discre-
tion to enforce the resolutions of the Assembly in
reference to the payment of moneys voted by that
body. The question is to be first submitted to Par-
liament.
Business in Melbourne continues very dull and
complaints are everywhere rife. A number of large
houses and employers of labor have reduced the
number of their hands. Owing to the unsettled
state of European affairs, steps are being taken to
strengthen the defensive position at the entrance
to the harbor of Melbourne.

NEW CALEDONIA IN DISTRESS.
SAN FRANCISCO, March 27.-According to ad-
vices from New Caledonia, the commercial disas-
ters at Numea, the capital of the colony, continue.
The Society Fonciere is now insolvent, which adds
greatly to the general ruin resulting from bank
failures. All mining works are stopped. The
Treasurer of Transportation embizzkIed 14,000
francs. When the crime was* discovered, the un-
happy man bung himself. The local government
is not instructed to pay bank liabilities.

ENGLAND, SAMOA, AND THE UNITED
STATES.
WASHINGTON, March 27.-A letter from Samoa
dated Jany. 18, last, from a trustworthy source'
says that Sir Arthur Gordon, the Governor of the'
English colony of Fiji, wrote to the Samoan Gov-
ernment informing it he would be there during the
first week in February, and offering his advice in
the formation of an independent Government.
The Government of Samoa replied declining his
advice, and requesting him not to come, as the
people were satisfied with their present Govern-
ment, and expected friendly recognition by the
Government of the United States. It is the opin-
ion of the gentleman who received this letter that
the rumor that England had taken possession of
the islands had its origin in this correspondence
between Sir Arthur Gordon and the Samoan Gov-
ernment. The latter has before now received offi-
cial information of the ratification of the treaty be-
tween it and this Government. Mr. Mamea, the
Ambassador to the United States to negotiate the
treaty, will, together with his counsel and adviser,
Mr. Colmessnil, leave in a few days for Samoa, via
Panama, where they will embark on the United
States corvette Adams for Samoa. The Samoan
Government will have an agent in this country to
represent its interests.

THE BAHAMAS.-His Excellency Governor Rob-
inson, in his opening speech to the Legislature, com-
plimented them on the improvement in the general
condition of the Colony, and in the prospective short-
ness and unburdensomeness of the Session. The
trade-returns he said showed a perceptible improve-


ment. Agriculture is improving. The people are
quiet and contented, and gradually advancing to-
wards a higher state of culture and civilization
The Colonial Exchequer no longer exhibits the un-
satisfactory balance sheet, which for so many years
has been the cause of much complaining and grumb.
ling. On the whole, the present condition of the
Colony is satisfactory, and its prospects are hopeful.

COLONIAL MARRIAGES.-The London Daily News
says:-The present law, as-Mr. Knatchbull-Hu-
gessen said, wounds Colonists in a point on which
their susceptibilities are most likely to be acute. It
throws a doubt over marriages which they have
made legal with the assent of the crown. The Bill
has been carefully drawn so as to avoid any charge
of giving facilities to people at home to go out and
contract marriages in opposition to the law of this
country. We may leave to lawyers the settlement
of the question whether domicile is the easiest
thing to prove, as Mr. Forsyth said, or the very
hardest, as the Solicitor-General maintained, be-
cause no difficulty could arise in the case of actual
colonists. No doubt the best solution of the whole
question would be the repeal of the Act of 1835, and
the legalisation of these marriages in England.
Their legalisation can only be a mere question of
time.
The Daily Despatch says :-An Australian mar.
ries his deceased wife's sister. The validity of his
marriage is unquestioned by his fellow colonists.
He brings his wife and children over to this coun-
try, where they have family connections. But the
moment he sets foot in England his wife is branded
with shame, and his children are, to a certain ex-
tent, illegitimised. If they inherit personal proper-
ty, such as leasehold houses or furniture, it is true,
their legitimacy holds good; but if they should
happen to inherit a freehold house, or piece of land
the law pronounces them illegitimate. Can any-
thing more ridiculous be imagined ?




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