Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00307
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00307
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text
'TIIE


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


c. 13.---Vo.l. STATE SUPER VIAS ANTIQUES. 24s per Ann,


HIIa iltUon u e .- t -..i., "/ March -6,. &S7-8.


S For the Bermuda Royal Gazette. sharpness, would have done the same. We were going '
to hope that if at any time he may need legal advice,
THE CHU RCH QUSTION SETTLED 1e w'tuldl pay for it honestly as we have done, and not
;~ TE cHUt. QUSION ETT1LED. attempt to get it by sharp practice, but we check our-
THn MYSTERY SOLVED-THE VOLUNTARY SYS- selves. The Lawyer is in little danger.
S TEM" TOTHRESCUE! Thanking you kindly for the space afforded me,
MR. EDITOR.--Upon a careful review of the nguii- I remain, Sir, yours,
ments propounded 1by o:ur corrppondent Parishioner" JUDGE.
thev seem to resolve thenmelves into this:
All we have to do is. to obtain from individu-
als'the amount requiiird lo supply what the Le.ilatIinro For the Bermuda Royal Gazette.
may not in future grant for the Clergy; and whatever -
we can towards securing the occasional services of a: AUX ARMES.-March 1, 1878.
Bishop from abroad ; and should there happen to be The Lion of Britain is rising at last from his lair,
any little deficiency get the Church Soei-ty to make His mane he has given a shake,
ib u s Cr c Yr s hein modern times And the Bear and the Eagle had better beware
It Churches and Church Yards have in modern.times
been enlarged, or rebuilt, or refurnished, or ornamen How the bones of the Turkey they take.
ted, what but. "'Voluntary Contribution's" paid the England has long in apathy lain
principal part. of the cost independently of the Estab- Desiros lof peace for the world,
llhment P It is true that in ancient times "in seve- Desirous of peace for t world,
ral instances (as Parishioner" remarks) we have had But now that the Bear is growling again
substantial assistance from the Colonial Legislature," The Cross of St. -:.ge is unfurled.
but have we the slightest reason to expect they will The war cloud is surging from the East to the West,
ever repeat such aid under the Establishment P .I think Old Dizzy is showing his hand,
we have proof to the contrary ? .W With Britons all ready the bravest and best
What. are the various. advantages of encourage~mienl Aainst the fierce Cossacks to stand.
advice and ail that we mayn reanai.ly hope to enij,.y as AD
ihee.ofoie" under the E'1tablishmrnt, that one may not Hark! list! to a sound now borne on the air
eo4,eet to ehjoy without it? Is the "decision of the 'Tis the voice of Old England, but now its a roar
Imperial Goverument. not to nominate a n,:ces"or to .To gather the brave, to challenge the Bear
Bishop Feild one of them, or af earnest of them ? (See And raise the flag our ancestors bore.
Report .of the Church Society for 1877 p. p. 1.) Is it
to be'supposed that the Mother Church in England aifd The brave sons of Britain are now to be heard,
its Sicieties will refuse us all aid upon application, They will dare all, that brave men should dare,
with the as uranee that after having done our utmost to For the hofior of England now is their word
sustain our several Parish Churches we need some as- Let Gladstones and Russians beware.
sialtnce from theim ? Surely not, for under our new
constitutitution we shall still be the "Church of England Away ,with the Conference, let Derby cease
iu Bermuda" ; we do not intend lo establish an antagon- Exchanging with the 'Offs any notes,
istie Church. As they seem to love war, rather than peace
So far from Disestablishment having the effect stated' We will speak with our cannons good throats.
b Parihioer" of severing the Bond of Union e-Nowassureasourfleetinthe Dardanelles lay,
tween ourselves assa Church, its legitimate effect will be / ow as sure as our fleet in the Dardanelles lay,
to unite us more closely together in common interests ; And by the words of Nelson when dying,
but we must make up our minds at the outset to aban- The conduct of Russia Britain will pay
don s.-lfiliness, for the-effect of the Voluntary System With powder and shell for her lying.
in its integrity is to open the heart, and to keep it open B. R. S.
f6r chrlitian love and sympathy to flow in. Religion is ...,_---------- ___
an affair df the heart, and not a power to be procured as
cheaply as possible. GOD says give me thine heart." fo Sale
'," Parishioner" advises that we remain in connex-
ion with the State Government under which we live,"
but what will that be worth five years hence when the
Clergy Bill expires? Better lookout for ourselves in A Foul Oared Sliding Seat IRa-
the m'eantim6e,and it would be strange indeed it that cing
laudable effort should have the effect on the Mother
Church of "sliu(tiing up her bowels of compassion" u A .
against us!
It can't be such a dreadful thing for us to contem-
plate n Bishop being in charge of Trinity Church if it Also, T'll H BOAT HOUS E,
was discussed thliree years ago. Sometimes "Pewhold-
era" like other men, upon reconsideration, change their (Property of Pembroke Rowing Club.)
minds, and adapt, themselves to circumstances. Such ro be Sold together or seperately.
things have bd& done and may be dne ._,nin.
A th ) the ,ow 'tole Ch rrb. S.,itv,." the Sixth Can be seen at any time o.n Albuoy's Point by
Resolution of that Society as published under date of applying to
19th July, '76, contemplated its dissolution at no dis-
tant day, and therefore made provision accordingly for A R. H \1 O PSON,
the "transfer of all its'property andfufids," so the blow Quieet St Hamilton.
is not likely to be very detrimental. M-TTPqrp March 18th, 1878.-2


GUEST.
March i6, 1878.

To the Editor qf the Royal Gazette.
ST. GEORGES, BERMUDA, March 15, 1873.
.M; EDTTron,-Pardon me for troubling you again,
but were I to remain silent your numerous readers
would be very apt to accept the Colonist's statement of
the velocipede question as being truthful.
"We know that we are wrong in this affair."-Editor
of, Colonist.
We are. very glad to find the editor of the Colonist
humbly confessing his errors, and we have no doubt
that when his constitutional infirmities and the mis-
takes into which they lead him are perceived, he feels
sorrow, and perhaps even poignant regret; but he should
have made his confession pure and simple, without seek-
ing to;extenuate his mistake by untruthfully claiming
that. the powers that be are in the same error. The
only." power" who is on the side of the Colonist is the
Police Magistrate, who, though of feeble mind, is of
stubborn temper, and who scoffs at the opinion of the
At torney General as old Judge hermand used to scoff
at law-books and Acts of Parliament, saying "I feel
m'y law here, my lairds, here"-striking his heart. It.
sounds& strange to our' ears to hear the Police Magis-
trate shy "Mr. Gray's opinion has no weight with me
whatever." It is an extraordinary thing in any eoun-
trw to find a Magistrate so determined to be wrong
as to fly in the face of the first law officer of the Crown
--the authorized exponent of the law, and indeed the
very man who framed the law and carried it through
the fotuse. Mr. Gray will not feel very much compli-
niented. .There appears all the more force in all this
when one finds that the law itself makes no mention of
or allusion to 'play-carts or velocipedes. (See Police
Act, of 1875, No. 23). But we challenge any man to
find anything in the above law to authorize a Police
lMagistrate to convict a child of an offence for doing
what George Inglis and Thomas Boyle are said, in the
evidence taken at the Police Court, to have done; and
we consider that parents whose children are thus drag-
ged'into unpleasant notoriety and reprimanded, or fined,
have a right and good reason to complain. George
Inglis was seen by the policeman, as he thought, about
to run a race in his play-cart. The policeman told him
to go home. He went home crying, and the next day
he is brought before the Police Court charged with
vi'olatir'g a law which has really no existence, and re-
primanded. Thomas Boyle is on his way home from
the Park on his velocipede. He, too, is 'met by the
policeman and told to go home. He went. and the
next day finds himself summoned before the Police
Magistrate and fined 5/ with costs 14/, in all 19/.
.If these things are done in the Police Office without
l -and we have the opinion of the Attorney General
to back us up,, where is the Police'Magistrate to stop P
He may vex and irritate every citizen with whom he
may have some private pique, and there is no redress.-
Ift-here is a law which prevents children using play-
carts and velocipedes, let us know it, and tke people of
St. George's will be found ready to obeytuch a law,
even though they consider it an unnecessary restraint
irfthis little townr But their complaint is that chil-
dren havo been punished and parents vexed without
law, and that the Police Magistrate and the editor of
the Colonist owe an apology to the parents and the
community.
One word more. We have charged the Colonist *
with seeking to uphold oppression and with stirring up
strife between two races that desire to live in peace.
We have a heavier charge still. In referring to the
opinion of Mr. Gray, Attorney General, he uses these
remarkable words-" for which (the opinion) a number
of persons paid eight dollars, when they might have
obtained it free of charge had they been sharp enough."
This, is the first .time we were ever advised by the press
to cheat the lawyer,' if we could, and we hope, in the
interests of morality, is the last time we shall see such
a sugrgestion. in print. Surely this is too unblushing !
Sir, we wanted an opinion, and we paid for it honestly,
We hope that tle editor of the Colonist, notwithstanding
his senseless and immoral sneer at our apparent lack of


New addvertisement.



Per 1" N. M. Haven," and Sir. Caiima,"
Will Le Iteceived this Week.
BONELESS BACON, a new Article for
Breaklifast
PRUN ES and D \TES
ALMONDI)S FI!),, EliTS WA LNUT S
BI CUl'l'S of every description
Inspection !oli cited at
FRE 1) A. WhITEI''S
Family Grocery,
Nos. 10 & 12 Queen street.
March 19th, 1878.-*

Carman, 'Iisweltl 4 Co.,
lHa1litiax, Novai Scoti!a,
WHOLESALE IMPORITERS OF
FL[OU I, MIEA L, 'IE \, SU-
GAiTS, POl K, B1,EF, HlAMS, BACON,
BUTT R, LA D, Cii ES1, E
TOBACCO, BEANS, PEAS, FISH, OILS,
&c., &c.
Consignments of
Bermuda P O E01 CEC
Solicited.
Prompt returns made in Cash or trade.
References;
Ilamilton-J. B. iiE YL, ESQR.
St. Georges-W. T. ROBEITS, ESQ.
March 19th, 1878.-3

Bei' muda Produce.


Farmers


and Shippers


desirous


to Consign


To T. .M. (IV oy SoAs1S
West Washington Market,
NEW YORR,
Will have every facility afforded them during
the coming Season, by
W. J. HENEY,
Office, Queen Street, Hamilton.
March 18th, 1878.--tf.






North of Trinity Church,
HAMILTON, r IRMUDA,


TENDERS FOR MAKING

T W0 1 I -- T C ` T
:For use in the Factory in H. M.
Dockyard,
Will be received at the Office of the NA-
VAL STOREKEEPER up to- noon of


The 2,St.h inst.
AXLE and BOXES will be sulppl,.-,d from
th,:e Dockyard.
SAny further information 'required can be
obtained on application to the SUPERINTEND-
IVNG ENGiINEEIR.


March 15,. 1878.-2


A. VIZARD,
Storekeeper.


For Sale,
A Handsome Walnut Wood


BY CHAPPELL & CO., LONDON,
Good To,e, has stood the climate well.
PRICE 35.
To be seen at the DEPU'TY-N.ISPCTOR-E-NEn-
AL'S Residence, R. N. Hospital, Ireland Island.
March 15, 1878.-tf


Sugar Sugar !!1
Ex. ROVER,


FW-11


Yellow Vacuumi-pan--in Barrels
White Vacuum-pan do
Muscovado, in Barrels
At Low Rates for C %SH.
S. S. INGHAM.
I amilton, 25th Febt ary, 1.878,.

,
Notice.


Cheap amid Durable,
Fancy P [NTS and S IE!-y ING,
Amer'ican Novelties,
LA 'lPS and Patent BURN ERS,
Lamps Repaired,
Tin PLATES Jelly PANS Coffee POTS
The Improved Little .Night Lamp.
ISAAC N. JONES,
Five Doors West of "Gazette" Office,
Mr. Jas. Richardson's Store.
Hamilton, February 19th, 1878.


I am constantly Receiving
From lihe New York
FRESH SUPPLIES OF


C~O?~iJ~& PROVISION&1


CUT


ALSO, ON HAND,
N Al LS
Of all sizes,
AND,


Five Barrels of Well-sprung
Garnet Seed POTATOES.
Superior Whitt. ,eed CORN
.For Sale,
Terms Reasonable, by
J. C. KEENEY.
Hlamilton, Februiry 19, 1878.


2W

POWER & FRITH,
Barristers-at-taw, &sc.
THIE Subscribers have this day entered into
Co-partnership as
Attorneys, Solicitors, Notaries,
&c.
The business will be conducted under the style
and firm of
&8FRITH.
OFFICES-16H liollis Street, over the offices
of Messrs. Almon & Mackintosh.
L. G. POWER,
J. IHARVEY FRIFII.
Ilalifax, Ist Fcby., -78.



F M 1 LY T 0 E
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
English and American Preserved


Nos. 10 and 12 Queen Stieet,
IHamilton, Bermuda.
N. B.-Ships' Stores Supplied at Lowest
Prices.
February 18th, 1878,-12 m


Notice.
I.!, Persons having CLIMS against AN-
'THlONY BURGESS HILL, late of lam.
ilton Parish, deceased, will present the same to
the Subscribers on or befnoe the first day oj April
next, and all Persons IN 1)EBTEl) to the Es-
tate, will please make laymnent by th't ti ne
\'M. WIIITNEY,
SAMI. A. MASTERS,
S. Executors.
January 14, 1878.
NE W YORK,
FEBY., 1873.
To Farmers and Shippers of
E D r 00uCE,

j AVING had several years experience in thWs
line of business, I desire to continue in
the same during the coming Crop Season, and
respectfully solicit any consignments you may
forward to this Market. I will endeavour to
re-dize the highest Market pric.,s, render Sales
and Remittances ','. iiptly.
MR. TIHO '. R. PITT,
Of H amilton, Hermu:Ia,
Will attend to receiving and invoicing allCon-
signments for me, and will give all information
necessary for benefit of Shippers.


I remain, your, &c.,
M. F. JUDGE,
With Messrs. O'Connor & Judge,
42 & 43 Vesey Street,
New Yoik.


W. Hiayward ,4


General Shil
Comn'ission
52 EXCHAN


CONSIGNMIE


Co,


ppinm and
HIrrchants,
;GE PL \CE,
New York.
NTS OF


Solicited to above address and forwarded free of
Consul's Certificate.
Highest Market t iate at4~e, and Re-
turns promptly made.
Cash payable in Bermuda or New York at
Shipper's option
F. D. D.. NASH,
61 Front Stieet.
I lamilton, February 25, 1878-tf

Bermuda Produce.

.IR\lIERS and Shippdrs desirous of Con-
signi.g PROIUCG to
Alessrs. J [L L ER 4 SP ENCCER,
Or to Wm A. COVERT,
New York,
\Wi!l be afforded every accommodation, during
the coming sb.-:i-, by
H. C. OUTIER.BIUII)GE,
Front Street, Ilamilton
March 4th, 1 73.
It. 1I. MtLLEV. G. W. SPE:NCnR.

M miller & Spencer,
306 Washington Street,
NEW YORK.
All persons desirous of shipping to the above
address will be afforded every accommodation
by applying to our Agent,
THEO. OULTERBRIDGE,
Reid Street, Hamilton.
Bermuda, January 2R, 1878.


P E Il S 0 N S desirous of
signing

"PR DUCE,-
TO


,MFidIdleo o
NEW YORK,


Con-


& Co.,


Will please call upon AR. SASMUEL A. MAS-
I'ERS, 1Front Street, who will attend to the
Shipment of their goods, as heretofore.
Ilamilton, Feby. 12th, 1878.-3m


A. EMILIus OUTERBRIDGE.


.ie


JOHN S. SCOTT


Emilius Outerbridge
6 Co.,
Shipping and Commission
1ERCIIANTS,
No. 29 BROADWAY,
Agents for NEW YORK.


Quebec & Gulf Ports S. S. Co.,
New York and West India Division.
Jany. 7, 1878

For Rent,


In this Town,
A Comfortable and Conveniently
I'wot, w ,Storr


Situated


wcweinUSg 14u'T ,
Furnished or Unfurtnis'ed,
Apply at the Royal Gazette" Office.
Ihumilton, March 12th, 1878,


Notice.
LO)NZO PKN1NST'()N has made arrange-
Sments for obtaining a qiantitv of the
GENUINE RE ) A N 1) Wil ITE TENERIF"FE



\W which he expects to receive in 'eplembi r nex
Ver ons cinu enm ,e the s ine by a)pp1ying to
the Suti'mribcr or t)
JOHN ZUlidL, Somerset.
A. J. J. )1)SD)N, lia'nilton..
W. ( ). N (YRTi, Bail.y's Bay. '

The Undersigne.I vill also take this opportu-
nity of infl'urming his Fii.n'dls and the Publie
gen,:rlly, ih~it he is now prepared to give his
personal attention to the CUi.igumerit of
.i U 14
To Messrs. T. 1. 0ocI-& Oo.,
OF NEW YORK,
And will ns ure all th.At he will do- every, thing
in his power to promote the welfa-e of these
t'at favor him with Consi-iwiment-z.
3 LONZO PEA ISTON.
Ilainiltoiit J, ny. -2-2111, 1878, "


N9VA AS0CTIA:


ile IVORKS,
2'J -i L I.i 1, X
Argyle Street, oposite St. Paul's Church.
O U \'EN TP.-, li ,. I)STON KS
MTS Tomb TA'lI K|S
Grave M \R KS ia. polished granitee or .MuxrbdT
Marble Mantel Register ( .\A'T' I, &c., &c.
GElORGE A .S\NFORD,
I'roprietor.
l)esigns and Prices may be obtained from
W. T. JAMES, Esqr., Front St., Hlamilton,
Bermuda. Gm



z






.. i | -









-- I
z r
4 s;s-N g Es. E-I U







S R ,, 0' a



< E4
g~p __,,.r.."_ f .( P 0


To All whom it


may


Con-


cern.
HI EREBY give Notice that I have been
appointed A(!ENT ANI) \TTORNEY for
the Board of Und,.rn liters of New Orleans, and
will from this )ate, represent the Interests of
the following Companies, Vizt, :-
New Orleans Mutual Insurance Company,
Crescent do. do. do.


Merchants do do.
Sun do. do.
Union Insurance Company,
hope do. do.
Ilibernia do. do.
Factors and riders Insurance


do.
do. -


Company,


Tentonia Insurance ('ompanIv,
New Orleans Insurance Association,
Peoples' Insirance Company,
Mechanries and Traders Insurance Corpalny.
W. C. HF Ld1JVD,
Agent for the ev. ral Boards of Under-
write-rs for New York, Boston,
Baltimore an, I'Philadelphia, &e., &e., &c.
St. George's. Bermuda,
1Ist Januiry, 1'78.
Mr. Robert Bedingfield,


Animals and Birds of all D)escrip-
tions S FUFFED).
SMIT'rIs I ILL,, HAMI .TON.
0)5s Orders may be left at the Oilico of tho
" Ioyal Gazetie." :
'"i-ruary 12th, 1378,


p


Fk


J.d


Ma I-ke


XJ b.





-r-=-- -.- ~ ~--- --WmN=W -- ._-- .... - ..... jn: ,._ ________ __________-________________


EXTRACT from METEOROLOGICAL OBSER-
VATIONS taken under the direction of the Principal
Medical Officer, Prospect, Bermuda. Above the sea
151 feet..


Date


1878.
Mr. 18
19
20
21
22
23
24


Wind
9a.m.

0 0I
*hS


29-974
29-817
30.074
30-169
30-073
30*022
29*891


Temperatur
24 he


0
67-3
66-7
67-3
65-7
67-3
65-3
68-7


0
58-2
57-1
54-5
57-5
52-3
57-7
56-1


re previous
ours.


go .o
GO Pi
0 0
119-6 42-5
104-8 50'6
134-6 44-2
136-0 46-8
127'4 34-6
127-2 46-2
108-6 44-2


Rain.

Inch.


0,72
0-47
0*02
0.00
0*00
0.00
0-67


Total 1*88


Hamilton, JMarch 26, 1878.


Colonial Secretary's Office,
MARCH 25TH, 1878.
HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR
-'olhas received Her Majesty's Warrant
appointing
His Honor Josiah Rees,
Chief Justice, to be a MEMBER OF THE CoUN-
OIL of the Bermudas or Somers' Islands.
By His Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER,
1 Colonial Secretary.

CUSTOM HOUSE-HAMILTON.
ENTERED.
March 18-Schr. F. E. Hallock, Moule, New York;
assorted cargo to B. W. Walker & Co.
23-Brigt. Carrie Dingle, Peak, London; goods for
merchants-Agents, N. T. Butterfield & Son.
CLEARED.
March 21-Mail Steamer Canima, Liddicoat, New
York ; 233 boxes beets, 4314 boxes tomatoes, 271 bls.
potatoes and 20 boxes onions.
23-Schr. 1. E. Hallock, Moule, Jacksonville.
CUSTOM HOUSE-ST. GEORGE.
ENTERED.
March 23-Royal Mail Steamer Beta, Shaw, Hali-
fax; English Mail of the 7th instant and goods
for merchants.-Agent, J. M. Hayward.
CLEARED.
March 13-Barkentine Satellite, Winier, St. Vincent.
Brigt. Eliza, Steele, Falmouth, for orders; 3798 bags
and 11,170 bushels corn.
18-Brigt. Zetland, Hicks, Malpas, England; inward
cargo wheat and corn.
German Barque Hohenzollern, Schumacher, Bremen ;
4829 barrels petroleum oil, ex barque Susan M. Dud-
man.
23-Royal Mail Steamer Beta, Shaw, St. Thomas;
mails, &c.
MOVEMENTS OF VESSELS PORT OF ST. GEORGE.
Monarchy-reloading.Barques.
Heather Bell-discharging.
Veronica Madre--balance of cargo Indian Corn
(about 20,000 bushels) to be sold at auction to-
morrow.
Brigs.
Clara & Agnes-waiting for orders.
Tropic Bird, Myers, on Marine Slip undergoing
repairs.
PASSENGERS ARRIVED.
In the R, M. Steamer Beta, from Halifax on Sat-
urday last :-Mrs. George Francklyn, 2 children,
nurse and maid, Miss Lynch, Mr. and Mrs. Ross,
Mrs. Edwards, Capt. Emerson, 19th Regt., Mr. E.
K. Jackson, 19th Regt., Capt. Forster, 46th Regt.,
Depy. Comy. Robertson, Mrs. Robertson, 3 children,
infant and nurse, Surgeon H. F. Brown, A. M. D.,
Mr. H. Mellows, A. H. C., Mr. G. Morton, Capt.
Crowell, R. M. S. "Alpha."-2nd Cabin, Mrs. Syl-
vester and three children, Sergt. Johnson, Royal
Marines.
PASSENGERS SAILED.
In the Mail Steamer Canima on Thursday last
for New York:-Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Griffin, Mrs.
C. and Miss Jane Curtis, Miss Anna B. Johnson,
Captain Ellis, Underwriters' Agent, Captain Aus-
tin, ex Schr. Uncle Tom, Messrs. Jas. F. Kilner, G.
A. Fagerberg, F. W. Brown, De Maury Gray, Wm.
W. Dudman. 2nd Cabin-Edward E. Norton,
Manuel Ferit, Antonio Jaciente.-Steerage, B. Sil-
ver, Frederick A. Thornton, and four others.
In the R. M. Steamer Beta, for St. Thomas on
Saturday last:-Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Scholey, Miss
Morrow, Miss Knight, Master Morrow, Master
Stayter.
The Brigantine A. J. Ross, of New Bedford,
Captain Hyett, on a whaling cruise-last the coast
of Greenland-arrived here on Sunday last, for re-
cruits. She has on board 250 barrels right whale oil
and 2600 lbs. bones.-Agent, John S. Darrell.

THE DELAWARE AND HUDSON CANAL COMPANY'S
REPORT FOR 1877, is not a cheering one for the
Stockholders, several of whom are residents in these
Islands; but, considering the suspension of mining
for three months during the strike in the Wyoming
District, the general stagnation of business, and the
ruinous and unnecessary competition between the
several coal producers, perhaps as satisfactory an
exhibit as could have been expected. The result of
the year's business is a loss of $1,147,332. As the
interest charged amounts to $1,157,351, the earn-
ings appear about sufficient to have met the ordin-
ary expenses without paying any interest on the
Bonded Debt. So that if the Company had no
Bonds, if all its capital had been ordinary stock, the
result of the year's operations would have in that
ease left it free of debt. The Coal Sales grossed
in1877 .... .................... ...... $ 4,638,871
1876 .$ 6,495,427
S1875 .... .... .... ..... ............$12,034,936
These figures speak for themselves, and explain
why the Company has earned nothing in 1877, but
added to its indebtedness by the amount of interest
it has had to pay on its Bonds, and the Royalties
on Leased Coal Lands which have been paid in ac-
cordance with conditions of Lease over and above
the quantity of coal it has been able to mine, be-
cause there are certain fixed charges which vary
little with the quantity of coal mined.


The Report refers to the road being constructed
to place the Hoosac tunnel in connection with the
Erie system using the Rensselaer and Saratoga and
Albany and Susquehanna Railroads, which will in-
crease the traffic on these leased roads. Reference
is made to the Coal Combination.
The experience of the last eighteen months has
impressed both managers and mine owners with
the fact that the laws of supply and demand will
not allow the one to be pressed beyond the limits of
the other, but require the two to be harmonized.
. . your managers fully appreciate the de-
pression existing in the general industries of the
country and the importance of supplying coal at
the lowest possible price consistent with a reason-
able profit to the producer and that any attempt to
force prices beyond such limits would be alike dis-
astrous to the producer and consumer." The total
Anthracite production for 1877, was 20,824,411
tons, being only 866,000 tons short of 1873 the
highest year in the trade,


MEET, 3-30 P.M., (punctually).


FINISH.


THURSDAY, .Warwick Camp... ..Eolia.

2nd AprY,. ..The Devil's Hole.. Gover

THURSDAY ....Riddle's Bay.... Prosper

TUESDAY, ) Sw. ... R. A.i
16th April ....Swing Bridge... ) Mess, S
THURSDAY, i o .
25th April }..... Spinal Ponds8....Mt. Pl

T30t SApril Whale Bay Battery..Bel Air


ment
[e.
ct Race
se.
and R. E.
t. George
,asant.

r.


The Halifax Mail'brings but little additional war
news. The arrangements for the proposed Con-
gress of the great Powers principally occupy atten-
tion. England demands that Russia shall make
an honest, straightforward statement and submit it
fully to the final judgment of the Congress. Rus-
sia seems to meet this half way, by saying that all
arrangements will be known before the Congress
meets, and that she will, as Bismarck has urged,
allow the Congress to select what it pleases for ad-
judication. Meanwhile Austria is falling into
closer alliance with England, and will doubtless go
with her in any dire emergency. Within the last
month the situation has entirely changed. "The
detestable Turk" is out of Court, and the question
is now simply whether Russian ambition, carried
thus far under a dishonest skillful diplomacy, shall
have its full reward, and existing European inter-
ests suffer in consequence. The attitude of Eng-
land is one of justice to herself and to other na-
tions also. If you will let England be called selfish
her interests, more than those of other nations, are
in the interests of a progressive civilization. It
will be remembered that England protested against
Russia going to war with Turkey as the arbiter of
the will of Europe. Consistently therewith Eng-
land insists that Russia shall not stand upon her
present successes and dictate to Europe. German
policy is decidedly pro-Russian, but it meets with
many checks from internal and other sources. The
situation is an anxious one, and in the cause of'
substantial right England is prepared to make
great sacrifices.

A NEW STEAM FIRE ENGINE FOR THE TowxN Or
HAMILTON.-The inhabitants of this Town will,
doubtless, feel great relief and pleasure in the in-
formation that the Steam Fire Engine, ordered
from London by the Corporation, has arrived by the
Carrie Dingle, now in our waters. We understand
that it is an improved patent horizontal one, manu-
factured by the well known firm of Shand, Mason
& Co., of that city. There is with the Engine a
Hose (which is a very costly item) sufficient in
length to carry the water 500 feet. It will throw
a jet of one-inch diameter 150 feet high, and de-
liver 300 gallons of water per minute. It will do
the work of several manual Engines, at not one-
hundredth part of the cost. We congratulate the
inhabitants of the Town of Hamilton on the pos-
session of such a machine for checking a fire should
such unfortunately occur in our closely built Town.
The Corporation deserves the greatest credit for
the interest thus shown in the safety of the Town
entrusted to their care.

Edward Binney, Esqr., formerly Collector of H.
M. Customs at Halifax, died suddenly at his resi-
dence on the night of the 23rd ultimo. He bad,
it seems, been In poor health for several months,
but was not considered dangerously ill. On that
night, while he was preparing for bed, he fell to the
floor and expired in a few minutes. Mr. Binney
was in his 66th year. He was an uncle of the
present Bishop of Nova Scotia.
Major General Unipcke of the 2nd Dragoons
(Scots Greys) whose death is announced in the
English papers, was the son of the late Richard
John Uniacke, formerly one of the Judges of the
Supreme Court of Nova Scotia, and grandson of the


t We are requested to state that LADY LAFFAN
will be AT HOME" to receive visitors on Tuesday
the 2nd April, from 3-30 to 6 o'clock, and that this
will be a. Farewell Reception previous to her de-
parture for England on the following Thursday,
4th April.

1W The Bermuda Hunt will meet on Tuesday
the 2nd April at the Devil's Hole, at 3-30 p.m., and
finish at Mount Langton, where Lady Laffan will
be holding her last reception this season.

PROSPECT GARRISON CROQUET CLUB.

Weather permitting, there will be a meeting of
the Prospect Garrison Croquet Club on Friday
next, March 29th, at 3.30 p.m., when the Band of
the 46th Regiment will play the following Selec.
tion:-

March........Forlorn Rope's Return...... Jacome.
Overture........... Schubert............... Suppe
Waltz........... Loved and Lost...... Waldteufel.
Selection........ Bohemian Girl.............Balfe.
Galop............ Paulinen............... Faust.
Reminiscences of Meyerbeer.............Godfrey.
GoD SAVEy THE QUEEN.

BERMUDA HUNT FIXTURE.


famous Attorney General of the same place and >***
name. He had seen considerable service in the We are sorry to observe, by a notice inserted in
Crimean campaign, and in India during the pro- another column, that Lady Laffan intends leaving
gress and final suppression of the great sepoy mu- these Islands on Thursday the 4th proximo in the
tiny. Mail Steamer Canima. On the Tuesday previously
Hon. John Creighton, President of the Legisla- herLadyship will be ATHOME" to receive visitors.
tive Council of the Province of Nova Scotia, died It will be a great gratification to the many Ladies
at his residence at Lunenberg on the 16th instant, and Gentlemen, who have been so fortunate as to
He. was a native of England, was called to make Lady Laffan's acquaintance, to be afforded
the Nova Satia bar in 1816 ; was member of the an opportunity, like the one thus offered, of taking
Assembly for 20 years, was a member of Council a farewell of her Ladyship and tendering her their
from 1859, was appointed president in 18h5. He sincere good wishes. We understand that her Lady-
was in his 84th year. The oldest member of the ship is going to England, and will return to
Legislative Council of Nova Scotia is Mr. Cutler, I Bermuda toward the fall of the year, bringing with
of Guysborougb, who was appointed in 1838 and is her, her two eldest daughters who are now at
94 years of age. school there.

To the Editor of the Royal Gazette. INDIAN NATIVE TROOPS AND THE RUSSIAN ARMY. -
iCaptain Norman, late special correspondent of the
MR. EDIToR,-Permit me to inform the public Times at the seat of war has just published a book en-
through the columns of your valuable paper, that t;tla Armona n tl,| Pnmnnan n 177" I, -.,
.el. -- _-- title d1 Armenia and tile CRm aign of 1877." In thn


His Excellency Sir Robert Laffan, K.C.M.G., has
been pleased to advise the Worshipful W. T. Rob-
erts, J.P., to return to Thomas Preston Boyle and
Albert George David Inglis, who were convicted
before him for riding their velocipedes in the
streets in this Town, the fines imposed on them by
His Worship, the same being, Thomas Preston
Boyle, 19/, and Albert George David Inglis, 30/5.
No doubt the boys will join the older folks in say-
inia. "long may His Excellency be snared to reizun


course of the work Captain Norman institutes a com.-
parison between the Russian army of the Caucasus
and our Indian native troops. He expresses his be-
lief that a battalion of native troops, organised as
they now are, would prove more than a match for any
battalion the Czar could put against them ; and, as far
as the cavalry of the army of the Caucasus is concern-
ed, our Indian irregular cavalry, I am convinced
could walk round them."


-5' 5 __ --. -- -- u--r .. _.-. __
over us." Not since the crisis of 1857, has Halifax, Nova
EQUITY. Scotia, been in a more unsatisfactory commercial
St. George, Bermuda, position. We have already chronicled the embar-
March 23rd, 1878. rassment of old leading firms, and the present Mail
brings intelligence of the suspension of Almon &
St. Patrick's Day in Halifax, N.S., was one of the Mackintosh, Bankers, Insurance and Stock Brokers,
severest days they have had this winter. The with liabilities bordering on one hundred thousand
Charitable Irish Societies walked in procession from dollars. A meeting of creditors was called for last
the Drill Shed, while the storm was beginning, to Monday.
St. Mary's Cathedral, where Mass was celebrated.
After leaving the Cathedral the Society marched in The London Irish" volunteer corps have offered
the face of a blinding snowstorm through the prin- their services to go abroad, should the government
cipal streets, and returned to the Drill Shed to desire it.
disperse. The Admiralty has bought the Brazilian iron-
The Brig John Sherwood is detained at the Quar. clad Independencia.
antine Station, New York, having yellow fever on The Royal Engineer Officers first on the list have
board. She was from Rio Janeiro. Three of her been ordered to prepare for foreign service with
crew died during the passage. field equipment,


ONON, Marh18.--The im s speial f rom S -. .. vu. rjv.,' .v u .....u .,. .lV
LONDON, March 18.-The Times' special from St. tobacco plant, we hope soon to see attention given
Petersburg says the treaty leaves a good many to its cultivation, so that the Messrs. Sanchez &
points open. It reserves the question of the straits Co's. Establishment may be kept in full operation,
for the Congress, and leaves the southern frontier and an additional valuable item thereby added to
of Bulgaria to be determined by an international our Island productions.
commission, according to the nationality of the in.
habitants. The question of the annexation of the We have been requested to say, in reference to a
port of Kavala is left to the same commission, and signal for an unknown Steamer which was made at
thus the previous difficulties on that point are Mount Langton on Friday afternoon last and after-
avoided. Lord Derby will probably receive the wards hauled down, that the error was not made by
treaty next Saturday, as a carrier for London will the Signal Director at that Station-it was copied
leave on Tuesday. from St. George.
The correspondent explains new difficulties in
regard to the Congress. He says England demands The Steamer Flamborough is to be the additional
a formal engagement that all the clauses of the steamer on the line between Bermuda and New
treaty be submitted for discussion. Russia holds York during the coming crop season. She car-
that such an engagement is quite unnecessary, that ries a larger cargo than the Canima, but her ac-
the whole treaty will be known before Congress commodation for passengers is very limited.-The
meets, and the plenipotentiaries may discuss which F. may be expected here on 22nd proximo.
clauses may be submitted for consideration. The
whole discussion turns rather on diplomatic pres- A Supplement ofFive
tige than on real interest. The feeling is, as some ent
members of the official world in St. Petersburg de- Columns accompanies this issue
clare, that England has decided on war, and is of the Gazette. It contains a let-
simply cavilling to gain time. ter from Mr. James Pilling, on Grape culture
LONDON, March 18.-A Times correspondent says in Bermuda; Communication from Justice" ;
the proposed preliminary conference is regarded as Theatricals, a Ball and a Cricket Match at
the last effort of resistance on the part of Russia. Prospect; New Ironclad; The coming Tidal
The meeting of Congress, though possibly not Wave, &c., &c.
until April 15th, may be confidently counted upon, --- -
in consequence of energetic representations. It is BIRTH, in this Town, on Sunday moving last
doubtful whether Gortschakoff will be well enough the 24th instant, the WIFE of Mr. John Barritt, of
to attend. a DAUGHTER.Mr.JohnBarrttof
A Vienna special states that Bismarck and An- ......, on 23rd Feby., at 3 Park Villas, Park
drassy consider Russia has yielded enough in Road, West Ham, London, the WIFE of Charles
offering to submit to the congress the clauses it Stuart Henry Barrow, of a SON.
may designate. ......, on the 14th Feby., at High Leigh Par-
PARIs, March 18.-There is a bare possibility of sonage, Cheshire, the WIFE of the Rev. Arthur J.
the resignation of Leon Say, and a Minsterial cri- Richardson, M.A., of a DAUGHTER.
sis, if the Chamber continue to delay in voting the
budget. DIED, at his residence, Dalkeith, Scotland, on
LONDON, March 18.-A Vienna despatch states the 12th ultimo, JOHN H. AnTON, Esqr., aged 63
that Count Andrassy, being asked in committee of years.


TALLY-HO'S JOTTINGS.

DEAR MR. EDITOR,-The Chronicles of the Ber-
muda Hunt have got sadly in arrears, so I must
make up for lost time, and relate the events of a
glAa day we had on the 5th March. It was a fa-
vorite meet and a still more favorite finish; the
Flatts being accessible to our numerous and straight
riding friends from the East End and to us Ham-
iltonians alike, and Cavendish, the home of our
honored ex-Chief Justice, is always crowded when
the Knights of the Pigskin make that the finale of
their day's ride. The pretty house, embowered in
shady lawns and handsome foliage trees, surround-
ed with a bevy of the fair sex, is a cheerful sight,
I ween, and will live in the recollection of many a
soldier who, perchance, may find his "finish," after
a wilder ride than our scurries, and to a sterner
note than our Master's horn. The field was nu-
merous and the course well chosen by a gentleman
who is so fond of timber that his intimates call him
"The C-rp-nt-r." It was all we could do to nego-
tiate thethe obstacles that came in our way, and even
that fearless one, the Flying Doctor, grew occa-
sionally so pale that tender enquiries were made as
to his health. He had "just seen a friend off by
the mail, which made him pensive," he explained;
in a few more strides he nearly saw me off. Come
up! ugly! whack! bang! By Jove! touch-and-
go over those rails. The Major on Gipsy shows us
the way (we shall lose a gallant sportsman when
he goes, which I am sorry to hear is soon); he
rides as straight as a boy of sixteen, with judg-
ment, to, as all heavy weights must. Along the
North shore we get a merry burst, with lots of
music, the Road Brigade in full view; we'll give
the grey a job to catch us. Round Prospect Course
rushes the Hunt; the old crocks recognize the scene
of former struggles, and now the goal is reached.
"Hurrah! Captain"-over we fly; capital fences
as usual, and some good riding is to be seen; espe-
cially we noted a Captain of Sappers who picked
up his horse after a very awkward peck at the
double, and showed a strong seat and quick hand.
There was an excellent and fast run from Smith's
Parish Church to the Sand Hills, but the tide was
disobliging enough to be high, and thus the final
spin along the sands was missed by the riders,
though some riders found r"spins" for them-
selves afterwards. Ahem! "No, Mrs. Tally-ho! I
assure you I rode home with a little boy who'd lost
his way-that's what made me so late." I heard,
by the by, that there as a brand-new Adjutant
nearly knocked to pieces; he'll be more careful next
time turning a corner.
Tuesday, 19th March.-There is a large gather-
ing, and fair ladies grace the scene in force. After
a short delay the sound of the horn sets us going
round what ought to be the general race-course for
Eastern parishes, and should be kept by the inhab-
itants of those parts as a public recreation ground
for an annual meeting. Why don't they do it ?
There ought to be, and indeed there is, plenty of
public spirit down in those parts, as evinced by the
Lyceum, and the entertainments there, which would
be a credit to any community. Over the hills and
far away; here's our old friend Dandy, looking
himself again, and going in good form too-rare
old horse when properly handled. Well ridden,
Misther O'Grady. But you're not the only Sapper
that can ride-" Oh! where and oh where is my
Highland laddie gone ?" My Pickwick, where art
thou P I miss thy ruddy face and Polly's whisking
tail! Always expected she'd kick me some day.
D "Don't stay long, come back soon to your own --"
but confidences are sacred, and I cannot divulge
the name even to the readers of the Bermuda Royal
Gazette. He's a good man and true, and can show
you a thing or two-riding or otherwise. But
mind what you're about, Tally-ho: stick to your
muttons The chase speeds on, the Colonel on the
chestnut shows us her heels. Confound that mare
of the Master's-how aggravatingly clever she is!
Will she never make a mistake ? apparently not;
and there's the A. D. C. making the running with
that great striding brown colt. Its a tradition ap-
parently at Mount Langton to ride well; don't we
remember the old General going as straight as a
gun-barrel with a perilously slack rein, and Eliot-
Lockhart on "Bomba" bold, and a fair lady on
"Paget" with a bonny blue eye and her heart on
the right side of the fence P And the tradition does
not seem likely to die out, I am glad to see, for our
paper-chase re-unions do much to bring and keep
people together throughout the Islands and cause
pleasant and valuable acquaintances to be made
between civil and military, which otherwise would
not have been. (Printer's Devil: I wonder if he
has heard about Mrs. T. and her Smiler.) And
now we near Bailey's Bay (no ice-creams or ele-
phants this journey)-crash! Who's that down ?
Fortunately the owner of the rails is a member of
the Hunt Committee. All right! Forrard on!
Onions to right of us, onions to left of us, grow by
the hundred. As we turn homeward again the
views are lovely, and we halt awhile to breathe our
panting steeds and admire the glorious prospect.
Its lovely. But on! Mr. Allen will think we're
never coming-so clap in your spurs and send
them along. Thunder! here's a rail! Well done,
Colonel! He'll not give a step that way (too
"Vigor"-ous for that.) Yah! Go it ye cripples!
And now the road is reached over two or three
rails and a wall, and we find ourselves at Wistowe
Lodge, where a kind "accueil" delights us all after
I a capital gallop. TALLY-HO!


H. M. S. Bellerophon," bearing the Flag of
Vice Admiral Sir A. Cooper Key, K.C.B., F.R.S.,
Commander-in-Chief of H. M. Ships and Vessels on
the North America and West India Station, was
signalled as being South of the Island last evening.
The Bellerophon" is from the West Indies. She
is accompanied by three Screw Gun Vessels.

Arrival of the English Mail of the
7th instant.
The Royal Mail Steamer Beta, Captain Shaw,
with the English Mail of the 7th instant, arrived at
St. George's on Saturday morning last, and left on
same evening for St. Thomas. The Beta left Hali-
fax at 4 p.m. of Tuesday the 19th. The Atlantic
Steamer Moravian with the English Mail, arrived at
Halifax on the morning of the 18tb.
We are in possession of our usual exchange files
from the Dominion of Canada.
His Excellency General Haly was lying in a very
dangerous condition at Halifax on the 19th instant
when the Mail Steamer Beta left that place.
The militia of Nova Scotia are anxious, should
Her Majesty's Government need their services, to
take part in any difficulty that should oecur, with
a common enemy.


Austrian delegation whether he meant to resist the
formation of new Sclav states, said that the pro-
blem was not to undo the results of the war, but to
harmonize them with the rights and interests of
Europe and Austria.
The strike and lockout of the Oldham weavers
have lasted a month. Neither side seems inclined
to yield. The strike now includes between five and
six thousand. Hundreds in other departments are
kept idle, and in consequence great distress pre-
vails.
PARIS, March 18.-General Bernout is appointed
to command the 18th army corps, head-quarters at
Bordeaux, in place of Rochebourt, transferred to
the reserve. Other important changes impend.
General Villes Borenet, commandant of the 11th
corps; General Pickard, of the 13th corps, and
General Villebois having resigned.
Leon Say's resignation of the Finance Ministry is
regarded as altogether unlikely. It is believed
the Chamber will vote the entire budget without
hesitation.
In the House of Commons, Mr. Bourke, Under
Foreign Secretary, replied to an enquiry that the
Government still thought, in view of the cause of
diplomatic relations with Mexico, the initiative for
their renewal could not come from England.
In the'House of Commons this p.m. 15th, Sir Staf-
ford Northcote stated if the mutiny bill and certain
estimates are passed, the House will rise on the 16th
or 18th of April till the 6th May for the Easter
recess.

THE NEWFOUNDLAND SEAL FISH ERY.-It was
supposed that twenty-five steamers would leave
Newfoundland for the ie fields on the 10th instant.
The outfit this season is on a larger scale than ever.
Four Dundee steamers, which are to be manned yb
Newfoundland Ifishermen, will requireat least 1,000
men.

THE FALL OF PLEVNA.
The later details of the fall of Plevna explain
clearly the circumstances of the disaster. At five
miles northeast of the town, on the left bank of the
Vid, there is a place called Gornye Etropol. On
Monday morning Osman sallied out to carry this
position, which is adjacent to the road leading to
Widdin, the only one by which he had the slighest
chance to escape. Reinforcements were hurried to
the aid of the grenadiers, who bore the brunt of the
fighting. The Russians held their ground, and Os.
man decided to retreat. But the Russo-Rouman-
ians, who held one of the Gravitza redoubts, four
miles east of the town, had meantime turned the
opportunity to account, and occupied Plevna.
Placed between two fires, the Ottoman commander
had no alternative but to surrender. He had staked
all on the attempt to break the lines east of the Vid,
and had failed. His scheme seems to have been in-
spired rather by a desire to fall with honor than
from any prospect of success. Had Osman Pasha
even burst through the Russian lines, his army
must have become disorganized and scattered be-
fore it had marched many miles from Plevna.

[Extract of a Letter from St. Johns, Newfoundland, of
January 26.]
NEW BISHop OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND.
A successor to Bishop Feild has at length been
appointed. The new. Bishop is the Rev. Llewellyn
Jones, Vicar of Little Hereford. The cause of the
delay which has occurred was the insufficient salary
provided for the support of a Bishop here. It is
said that strenuous efforts are made to bring up the
salary of the new Bishop to $4,000 per aninum,
which is certainly low enough for one who is to oc-
cupy such a post, exercise hospitality maintain a
family, and lead the way in charitable contribu-
tions. Besides all this, the Bishop will have to
bear the expenses of his visitation tours; so that it
is evident he cannot become a capitalist while here.
His diocese includes the whole of Newfoundland
(42,000 square miles), Labrador (some 700 miles in
length and of unknown breadth), and, in addition,
Bermuda. He will thus have the satisfaction of
presiding over the largest diocese in the world.
His nautical experience will be considerable, as
most of his visits will have to be made by sea; and
if at all ascetic in his leanings he will have excel-
lent opportunities of practising abstemious living
by casting himself upon the hospitalities of his
piscatorial parishioners in the outlying districts,
whose fare is hard biscuit, tea, mollasses and pork.
Sydney Smith's picture of a Newfoundland Arch-
deacon "bobbing for cod, and pocketing every tenth
fish," will not be quite realized; but the living will
not be a fat one.

CAPTAIN SAMUEL OSBORNE CROWELL, Who accom-
panies Captain Shaw in the Beta this voyage, takes
command of the Alpha, which vessel will be placed
on the route while the Beta is being docked and
overhauled. Captain Crowell is unacquainted with
Bermuda but has had experience in the West India
trade and has navigated large vessels, in which he
himself hasbeen part owner. He has had command
of the Delta for the last two years, and his promo-
tion to the Alpha shews the confidence which
Cunards repose in him.

BERMUDA MANUFACTURED SMOKEro TOBACCO.-
SANOHEZ & Co. have commenced the manufacture,
in this Town, of Smoking Tobacco, which, being of
genuine Havana growth and of pure quality, is
pronounced by connoiseurs, to be a first rate article;
it is made up in small neat purse bags of two ounces
each and labelled. As there is no question as to
t~ie n~a.rl ,nt'. n-f n'nr am1 *(*t no i.rl.iyil.t ... ,1


EUROPE.
LONDON, March 15.-In the House of Commons
to-night G. W. Smith, First Lord of the Admiralty,
introduced the Navy estimates. He stated that the
present force was ample to man every ship that
could be commissioned. He had come to the con-
clusion that it was not his duty in a time of peace,
and he hoped of continued peace, to ask for a con-
siderable increase of estimates. The House then
passed all the estimates except those for Dockyards
and stores, the consideration of which was post-
poned.
ATHENS, March 17.-Twelve thousand Turks
have landed at Volo, andt is expected will attack
Mount Pelon. It is anticipated that, if the Turks
overwhelm the insurgents, it will be difficult to re-
strain the Greek army from re-entering Thessaly.
PARIS, March 17.-Paul de Cassagnac, writing
to Pays, on the occasion of the Prince Imperial's
birthday, expresses his belief in the speedy restora-
tion of the Empire. He declares that the Imperi-
alists are ready, and will be vigilant and resolute
when the occasion presents itself. The Prince
neither intrigues nor observes a purely contempla-
tive attitude, but admits, like his father, the doc-
trine of providential intervention.
ROME, March 17.-The Pope will hold a consis.
tory on March 25. He will deliver an allocution,
and proclaim the re-establishment of Catholic Hier-
archy of Scotland, confirming the bishops appoint-
ed by Pius IX.
BERLIN, March 17.-The National Zeitung says
that Pope Leo has written to Emperor William
giving notice of his accession.
ST PETERSBURG, March 17.-The Golos states
that in accordance with the orders of the Minister
of the Interior the magistrates of St. Petersburg are
compiling lists of persons qualified to officer the
militia, which is about to be formed.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Match 17.-Strong detach-
ments patrol the streets day and night on account
of great excitement which prevails over the posting
of seditious placards.
The Turkish garrisons of Shvmla and Varna
numbering 58,000 men, besides 16,000 Egyptian
troops, are expected here.
VII-xNA, March 17.-It is said serious negotia-
tions are proceeding between Sir Henry Elliott and
Count Andrassy for an alliance between England
and Austria. If the negotiations succeed Andrassy's
position will be strengthened. If they fail a
ministerial crisis will ensue and Andrassy may
probably resign.
LONDON, March 17.-Typhus fever rages at Ad-
rianople and Philipopoli. There is much sickness
at Erzeroum and Constantinople.
ROME, March 17.-Edward D. Malet, first Secre-
tary of-the British Embassy here, will accompany
Lord Lyons to the Congress as Secretary.
LONDON, March 17.-A telegram from Constanti-
nople says Reout Pasha is empowered to request
that Varna be restored to Turkey.
here is less excitement at Government works at
Woolwich than for several weeks, but there is no
abatement of energy and no diminution of work.
Nearly all hands are at work until Light, nine or ten
o'clock at night, instead of the usual closing hour.
LONDON, March 17.-In consequence of want of
officers for the army, cadets who entered at Sand-
hurst last summer, and whose period of probation
would expire in July in ordinary circumstances,
will be passed out next month. Those wifo entered
at the beginning of the year and would complete
their course in December, will be passed out and
commissioned in July.
A large number of line commissions will also be
available for militia subalterns during the pre-
sent year.
MARSEILLES, March 17.-Marnot, Republican,
has been elected to the Chamber of Deputies, de-
feating Fluges, Radical, in consequence of some
Radical inviting votes by recording them for Clan-
qui, Communist.
A despatch from Paris says six thousand persons
are attacked with measles at Lyons.
PESTH, March 17.-Prince Bismarck has noti-
fied the Austrian Government that Russia, in con-
sequence of his intervention, has consented to sub-
mit all the peace conditions without exception to
the Congress for discussion should the Congress
make a demand to that effect.


I
I


!


I


GA Z ~





BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


Great Sale of Books.

We have been Authorised by His
Excellohny the General Commanding
TO SELL,

At Public Auction,
411 Our S stores,
At 12 o'clock,
This Day, Tuesday,
26th Instant,

899 VOLUMES
From the Officers Garrison Library, Prospect,
comprising very many interesting and Valu-
able Works, some of which are probably out
of print and not obtainable in any other way.
The above may be seen at our Stores at any
time after this date.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, March, 26th, 1878.

BY AUCTION,
To-morrow, Wednesday,
"h ': 27th inst., 12 o'clock,
AT TIM~Oil V 0TAN ND
I WILL SIf, L L,
BLS. Double Extra Family FLOUR
-' Do. Washing SODA and Kerosene OIL
Bags CORN and RICE
Boxes Soda BISCUITS Boxes CHEESE
Boxes. Boneless FISH
Half Bls. Family BEEF
Tins BUTTER and LARD
MACKEREL in Half and Qrtr. Barrels
STARCH SOAP Wrapping PAPER
10 Kegs NAILS, assorted sizes
CANDLES BUCKETS and BROOMS
10 Half Chests Oolong and other Superior TEA
100 Boxes FIGS and RAISINS
15,000 CIGARS, Tip Top, &c. Fancy PIPES
& WATCHES Some JEWELRY
STATIONERY Dry GOODS
2 Sewing MACHINES
1 STOVE, No. 7, new and complete
1 Second-hand STOVE, No. 8 (good)
A ROW-BOAT, quite new
60 Dozen Lamp CHIMNEYS, improved style
Some FURNITURE and a miscellaneous lot
GOODS, which will be sold without reserve.
JOHN HARNEI'T,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, Maich 26, 1878.
P. S.-Weather not favorable on Wednes-
day, then first fair day after J. H.
For Benefit of Owners, n&derwrit-
ers and all Concerned.

BY AUCTION,
WILL BE SOLD,
AT PENNO'S WAREHOUSE
IN THIS TOWN,
To-morrow, Wednesday,
The 27th inst., At 12 M.,
The Ia;sai ce, of' OCsuargo,
About 20,000 Bushels


Auction


Sale.


I


WE WILL SELL, AD1o
AT PUBLIC AUCTION,
Under the Big Shed, TO DEFR)
At 12 o'clock
On Thursday next,
28th instant,
25 BLS. Bright Grocery SUGAR At this Poi
20 Bls. Choice FLOUR boy
10 Do. MEAL Said amou:
20 Bags OATS, 3 Bushels each Bond on sa
25 Do. BRAN 25 Bales HAY Timber, to
20 Bls. Table POTATOES
25 Drums CODFISH
100 Bxs. HERRINGS
10 Kegs and Tubs BUTTER Will be rec
50 Reams Tomato PAPER
HAMS and SHOULDERS I 1
Bologna SAUSAGES Kegs NAILS
Boxes SOAP Half Chests TEA From part
Tins LARD, 10 lbs. and 25 lbs. each amount.
Hf.-Brls. BEEF Boxes Corn STARCH
BUCKETS BROOMS Georges
1 Barrel Waste OIL, ex Lighthouse St. George
1 Do. Draught ALE
35 Pairs Girls Boot TOPS, Kid
3 Do. Ladies r(1llE lJn
AT SAME TIME, TendE
[0.] 36 Iron POTS, assorted sizes
12 Camp OVENS Do. A
24 Spider PANS Do.
9 Oven DOORS Do.
Damaged by seawater on board the Barken- Fr(
tine Satellite," Winter, Master, while on a Ren
voyage from London to this Port and on Sur- Re_
vey recommended to be sold for benefit of From their
whom it may concern.
AND, The TEN
[L.] 125 Bags CORN Cash per
Ex Schr. F. E. Hallock," Moule, Master, borne in mi
from New York, on Survey condemned as un- Stalls must
merchantable, and recommended to be sold for
benefit of whom it may concern.
Hamilton, !
ALSO, 19th Mar
THE PROPERTY
or Th
MAJ. H. J. WILKINSON, A.C.G., H
If not Postponed by Posters, Viz.:-
1 BEDSTEAD and BEDDING A New
complete 2 CHAIRS
1 TABLE, Portable, and Cover
1 Towel HORSE 1 Covered BOX
1 Toilet GLASS and WARE
1 Cedar Boot RACK For
1 GREY

HORSE, Hmo
5 Years Old, Royal
1 CHESTNUT MARE
Well known in the Hunt,
1 Dog CART, Halifax made
1 Single Brown HARNESS CA
B. W WALKER & CO., r
Hamilton, March 25, 1878. Auctioneers.H A


Furniture Sale.

We have been instructed by


Sur'g...- major S. IA'DEIts,
) A. M.D.,
The same having been damaged on board Who is about to leave these Islands,
the Italian Barque Veronica Madre," Mura- T 0 S E ,
torio, Master, on a voyage from Philadelphia A
bound to the Channel for orders, and on Sur- AT PUBI LIC AU TION
vey recommended to be sold as above. AT OUR STORES,
The greater portion of this CORN will be The Whole of His
found to be of superior quality to any offered t
heretofore. J NoDR ELUz 01b furniture,
JOHN S.DARRELL, &c., &c.
A n&.c.


St. George's, Bermuda, March 26, 1878.

)FOR SALE.
A very Superior

Cow & Heifer.

ALSO,
A quantity ( f valuable
GL4ISS and CHIo'sd,
For Private Sale,
S"T14E COTTAGE,"
Ireland Island.
March 25, J1 ,
-


NEW 8OOKS.
At the Royal Gazette" Stationery Store,
A Choice Seleetion of Childrens

Just Received by the "Carrie Dingle" from
London.
HIamilton, March 26, 1878.

Lost,
ON Saturday last, between hamilton and the
FlaAts, on the Middle Road,

And on the North Road of Paget,
A B3OWN LAP 'R. 3
Whoever has found either of the above will,
on leaving it at the Ilamilton Ilotel, be suitably
rewarded.
Hamilton, March 25, 1878.


The Times's Paris dispatch says 176 persons have
died from small-pox in St. Etienne in six weeks.
Great distress prevails at Bonne Bay, Newfoundland,
as the result of the scarcity of fish last season. Half
the people of the place are living entirely on herrings.


Full particulars of which and day of Sale,
made known by Handbill.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers,
Hamilton, March 25, 1878.

READ THIS!

Call at the Subscriber's for
L INSEED MEAL Buckwheat FLOUR
Crushed White WH1EAT, 2 Ibs.
WALNU I'S and FILBERTS
Oolong, Souchong, Formosa, Congou, and
Young Ilyson TEAS
CORN FLOUR Corn STARCHi
CHOCOLATES P RUN I
DATES and FIGS
AJ of which are New.
FRED. A. WITER
NeK 10 &. t Queen Street.
March 26, 1878.-2*
I Gazette only.

Notice
To Farmers and Others.


THE UNDERSIG NED
Would Respectfully Solicit Consignments of
Bermuda Produce,
Throughout the present Crop Season.
Feeling confident that his long experience and
thorough acquaintance with the Business will
enable him to give every satisfaction.
MR. W. T. JAMES,
42 Front Street, Hamilton,
Will receive and forward Consignments free of
charge.
AccountSales and Cash returns promptly made.
WILLIAM PEACOCK,
58, 60 & 62 Centre Row. W. Washington.
Market, New York.
February 4, 1878.-3m. 8p.


a- ISUU
Half, One a
faint 0o
Exercise B(
Lead I'NEN
ter, b!it
SCIS-Ol;
PUZZLES,
J and other
Pencil point
Sealing W/
Fancy 1'O
Cricket B \


Di
I amilton,


WANTED,
ut Four Hundred
Pounds,
AY THE DISBURSEMENTS OF
THE GERMAN BRIG
" C. V Truenfels,"
Haverman, Master,

rt in distress on a voyage from Do-
bound to Channel for orders,
nt to be secured by Respondentia
id Cargo, consisting of 200 M P. P.
be shipped hence in a good vessel.
CM. i OUre-1
eived at the Subscriber's Office till
5 o'clock, p.m.,
URIISDA Y EXT,
ties willing to furnish the above

J. S. DARRELL,
s, March 25, 1878.

Notice.
designed will be prepared to receive
ers until


The 30th Instant,
om Persons willing to

aove Manure
' Stalls at Waterloo, during the
Month of April next.
NDER to state the price payable in
ordinary Cart-load; and it must be
ndl by the party To'doting that the
be clean every Saturday afternoon.
TIROTTI & COX.
lermuda,
ceh, 1878.-2 3p


te Subscriber
Eas Just Received
Per Str. Canima,"
Supply of Ladies, Gents
and Childrens
Boots & Shoes,
Sale at LOWEST CASH I'RICES.
At 46 & 47 Frout Street,
A. GItANT'IHAM.
March '25, 1`78.-3
Gazettc Stationery Store.
JUST RtECEIVEE)D
BY THE
RRIE DIN-G6LE,"
'ROM LONDON.
One and Two qr. Foolseap Account
1KS
nd Two qr. Foolscap BOOKl(, ruled
nly
OOKS, various sizes and thicknesses
CILS, l)rawingd, Common, Carpen-
ue, green and red
S, and Scissor SIIARPEN FIRS
PPEil and PENKN[VFS
PENS
t PROTECTOI'RS
AX, red and black, Ilat RAILS
XE', Peg TI'OPS
T R, BALLS, SPIKES, &Ie.
ALSO,
A Few
diaries for IS78.
March 26, 1871.


JAS. A. JUDGE,
COIM MISSION DEALER
IN FRUIT AND PRODUCE,
46 4. 48 Broad Av. West Wash-
ington Market, .N.Y,
IJ'lIE Undersigned, represents this Seasou in
Bermuda the above house. Consignments
of PROi)UCEK solicited, for which lie can as.
sure highest market rates aid prompt returns.
JAMS H. BUTLER,
15 Front Street.
March 20i 1878.--tf

Notice,

.Now being Received

BLS, CRUSHED SUGAR,
Very Cheap.
Green GINGER
And Planting CORN


B. E. DICKINSON.
n. .-*


o IUrIII L-treet, > t ill iJLUll,
March 19, 1878.-2 3p.

LNoice.
To Farmers and Shippers of

Bermuda Produce,
Consignments to
Messrs. E. P. LOOMRIS & C0o.
92 Barclay Street,
NE V YORK,
Are solicited by the Undersigned who will re-
ceive and forward same,
Returns made Promptly.
B. W. WALKER & CO.
Hamilton, March 4th, 1878.-to May 31 3p.


Eating Potatoes.

3UST RVaACSlVxiV ,
Ex. "BETA," FROM HALIFAX,
Another Lot of those Superior
TSIBLE POTdTOLEl'.
ALSO ON HAND,
At Low Prices for Cash,
BLS. Superior Family FLOUR
Bls. FLOUR, common Brands
Bls. Corn MEAL Bls. Pilot BREAD
Bls. Crushed SUGAR Bls. Kerosene OIL
Bls. Muscovado SUGAR
Half Bls. Family BEEF and PORK
BUTTER in Half Firkins, Tubs and 5lb. Tins
LARD in 251b. and 5lb. Tins
Boxes CHEESE Boxes SOAP
Boxes Adamantine CANDLES
Boxes Tallow \DO.
Boxes Toilet SOAP in variety
Boxes STARCH
Boxes Patent Glass STARCH, 6lbs. each
Cases LOBSTER, SALMON and OYSTERS,
in llb. Tins
Half Chests Superior Oolong and English
Breakfast TEA, by I Chest or single pound
Bags BRAN. CORN, PEAS and BEANS
Soda BISCUITS in Boxes and Half Bls.
Reams Wrapping PAPER (large size and for
Tomatoes)
HAMS, BACON and SHOULDERS
&c., &c., &c.
ALSO,
A Supply of Patent Spring
BED BOTTOMS,
Price 2.5'.,
Very desirable for the approaching Summer
weather,
And a New Florence"
Kerosene oil 0 T'4OVE,
At Cost Price.
W. T. JAMES,
42 Front Street.


Hamilton, March 25th, 1878.-1

Royal Mail Steamei
' ,1LPHa-1' a.d I B 7-
Deduction in Freight Charg
ROM and after this date FREIGH'
be taken at following rates:-
Freight to St. Thomas on Barrels Po
and Onions, 50 cents per Barrel, pf
in American Gold at St. Thomas.
Freight from St. Thomas on Barrels c
Vegetables and Fruit, 50 cents.
Freight to Halifax on Barrels Potatoe
Onions, 50 cents, Dominion Currenc
Freight to Halifax on Boxes Onions, 20
Freight to Halifax on Bxs. Tomatoes, 10
Small Packages as usual, 2s. sterling.
Goods for shipment will have to be re]
at the Office, where a Shipping Ticket -A
furnished and the Goods received at the
tackles.
JOSEPH M. HAYWAR
St. George's, Bermuda, 2 3p
March 26, 1878. 2 3p
Other Papers copy once and send bill.


For Sale,
t the flamilton Hotel Stables.

Carriages, Horses,
IHarnesses, &c.,
ALSO,
ONlE CHICK RING'S PIANO
iOne Florence Sewing MAC3tHINE
One Cooking STOVE
Four Barrels Soft SOAP
Fishing POLES COIOC K R Y
One SOF.A Rocking CII Al S
Cot BIEDSTEAD)S Hair 1 A'ITTRI('_ESS ,
Lot of Door and Window SASHES
Four Patent Night COM M1ODES.
Apply at the Hamilton hotel.
Hamilton, March 25, 1878.

The Undersigned,
Offers ex Barque J. I1. Haven,
Just Arrived from New York,
I AItRELS S. F. FLOUR
Barrels Corn MEAL
Barrels Pilot and Navy BREAD)
Bags CORN BRAN and OATS
Bales, IlIf. do. and Qrtr. do. Compressed IIAY
Tubs Choice BUTITERP Boxes CHEESE
Boxes TOBACCO Bbls. KEROSENE
Bbls. Fish GUANO COAL BRICKS
LUMBER, 4.c, 4.c., Lcc.
JOHN F. BUIIROWS.
Hamilton, 18th March, 1878.-2 3p.

Notice
i To Growers and Owners
OF BERMUDA PRODUCE.
j N consequence of the great increase in ship-
ments of Produce to New Yoik since the
season of 1874, we deem it necessary to give
notice, that we are ready to give our personal
attention as usual to all Shipments of Bermuda
lProduce for New York made through us, but
without being responsible for the net proceeds
until paid to our order in New York, which will.
be given to the New York Consignees for Sale,
by-each vessel transporting a shipment.
When necessary to order Specie in return for
any shipment it will be insured at the expense
of the Owners interested, and Owners will
clearly understand that all the dangers of trans-
port are borne by them.
t TROTTc COX.
Hamilton, Bermuda, to 3th une, 3
February 9, 1878. to 3th June, 3p


Colonial Secretary's Office'
lMARCl 25TI, 1878.
A LL Persons having Demands against the
Public Treasury, for Services which are
nuthorised by law and which have heretofore been
paid by the Public in virtue of such legal author-
ity, are hereby required to render their respective
Accounts made up fo !h, 31st day of this present
Month oj Mareh, to the CLERICK OF HIER MAJES-
TY'S COUNCIr
On or before the 8th day of pril,
1878.
'ITh, Committee of the Gereral Assembly ap-
pointed under the authority of the Act entitled
"An Act to provide for the quarterly auditing
nnd payment of the claims or certain Public
Creditors,"-are hereby required to meet be-
tween the 8th and 13th days of the said month
of April, and the Comnmi'ee of the .egislative
Council between the 8th and 16th days of the
same month to audit and pass such Accounts.
By His ExcellencY's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER.
I Colonial Secretary. *



Army Contracts.

Commissariat Ofice,
HAMILTON, 25th March, 1878.
T HE DISTRICT COMMISSARY GENER-
AL will receive Tenders, in duplicate, up
to 12 o'clock, Noon,

ON MONDAY,
The 1st day of April next,
From Persons desirous of supplying to H. M.
WAR DEPARTMENT



Forms of Tender containing all information
can be obtained at the above Office, daily, be-
tween the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
The DISTRICT COMMISSARY GENERAL re-
serves the right of rejecting any or all the
Tenders.
H. J. WILKINSON,
A.C.G.,
1 District Commissary General.
Colonist Copy once.

Box Material.


AREB JOW R~EtEIVrNG
Ix Schooner F. IC. 11 \LLO(K,"
Onion and Tomato Box

MATERIAL,
Of best Quality.


Which is offered on accommodating
ID the Wharf.
Agent. Parties who have engaged will
Agent. early.


terms from
please call


B. W WALKER & CO.
Ilamilton, March 18th, 1878,4-3 3p.

Notice to Growers
of Bermuda Produce
H'HI,. Undersigned beg to offer their Services
for Receiving and Forwarding Consign.
ments of
Bermuda Produce,
To Messrs. JO11UJ .NIX 4 Co.,
Of NEW YORK,
Throughout the coming Crop Season."
All Shipments intrusted to our Care will have
our usual good attention.
J. T. DARRELL & CO.,
Hamilton, IBermnuda.
January 21, 1878.-2 m. 3rd p.

For Sale,
500 Empty Corn ,'eal
B a l iU? EL N ,
Now at the Waterloo Stalls, and to be removed
by the 15th APRIL-Price 1/6 each, cash.
TROTT & COX.
Slamilton, Bermuda,
19 March, 1878.-2 3p.

anclaimei Lvetters.
Garcia Augusta, Thtomas Adams, Mary Frances
Anderson, Mlrs Altcombe, Mr B1yndless, R Bedding.
field, Joao b,,ttelicour, Mrs James Coy, John Cox,
Alice Cox, Catherine Casey, Mena Cohen, R J P
Darrll, Franc s C Dunkley, R H Duerdern '.pinal.
la Dina, Mrs Mary F Eve, Mrs E Fraser, C Freeman,
De Soura Gonsalves, John Greensladl,, Marshal Gil-
bert, Sarah Htnry, M J Harvey, F T Hamilton, R N,
John James (Mason), Maria Charlotte Johnson,
Christopher Jemmeti, Jas F Kilner, J S Kerateman,
S Littanar, lMrs Montague, Vinira V ciel, Joze Sari-
ante, M rs Meany, 1I Outerbiidge, James D Perenchlef,
John Petter (Brigt. Carrie !)inl .), T H Pit', tW
Robinson, J R Smith, R I atlders,' Jimes Fulton
Smith, George Simons, Mlis E J Simmons, Mrs
Elizabeth Simmons, J B Schioley, Miss Elizabtth
Simmons, Joanna Smith, Mrs France.s Smith, Ben-
jamin C Simmons, Mrs H Tl'oigios, G orgo 'I'rott,
Mrs Jane Wright, W II Williims, Sarah Wood, R
E Willock.
Post Office, Hamilton. March 25, 1878
UNCL-\IMED LETTERS IN THE POST OF-
FICE, ST. GEORGE, 25th larch, 1878.
William Albuoy, Mrs Andcrson, Mrs Thomas
Brown, Alfred Butch, Fredk Barren, Alexander
Black, C 13imbach, 13 Jurchawl, W 'C Casey, B
Crame', Mrs Edward+, FeeJk 'S-Flanders, Maria
Frith, MN Gould, Sand H:irvey, Joseph Jennings,
Charlotte Johns,n, Jatmcs Mig, Harry .1\iiil.n,
Colin AleVicar, t ugh Alt chel', William clCallan,
Eliza McNiver, Jam s W Ricson, W I' Roberts, A
S lRo's, .nlono 1,iintle, lJenj F Smi-h, John [T
Smith, A\,rv J liot Susan Trott, Mary F Trotl,
Cattie 13 B Todd, Manuel D Viara, Alfred While.


Prnf. Qtroar IIfl i,.




re*4-


7or tIe T'n muda Royal CGzelte.

(Froin a Ionaon Correspondent.)
LONDON, 25th February, 1878.
The enormity of the demands of Russia, as now
come to hand, are only equalled by her self-confi-
dence and her defiance of the apparent wishes of
England and Austria. A peace bases, forsooth!
appropriating province after province of the rich
and fair Turkish dominions; establishing herself,
en permanence, in the Sea of Marmora; absorbing
the Egyptian tribute; preferring demands for an
indemnity impossible for the remnant of Turkey to
recoup; closing her hand on the Turkish ironclads,
and making a holocaust generally If that is not
hissing defiance in the teeth of Europe, it is a truly
marvellous insanity-either one or the other.
We must acknowledge she has deceived us
all along in a most persistent manner; and now we
find her preparing for the Conference in the charac-
ter of bully once more, and apparently determined
to make the most of her victorious aggression.
Her inspired oracles of the press are graphic enough
in depicting how by a further manceuvre on the
political board to afford breathing space she might
be able to defy any combination of adverse powers.
An able advocate (let us charitably hope uninten-
tionally) of Russia, Mr. John Bright, deprecated
any idea of the British Empire making the slight-
est effort in the way of "preparation" for an en-
forcement of our view of the matter-a view which,
if at all earnest or even worthy consideration, must
inevitably clash with that now arrived at by Russia
-and then it would be easy for the Muscovite to
score his point of established vantage in the strong
places of Constantinople, at his own good will and
pleasure; and from whence we might have to think
twice before attempting the feat of driving him.
Are we to allow the farce to proceed any further
, without mobilization ? Let us look the facts calm-
ly in the face: Russia puts forth unofficially a
statement that her strength is not vitally impaired
and if we thwart her hopes she may let us feel the
force of that she has husbanded for such an emer-
gency. It seems very much like bluster, but we
ought to give it credit for the will, the wish, and
the fact even; Prince Bismarck in announcing the
policy of Germany lately was good enough to point
out broadly that Russia had made good her claims
to do as she liked-that it was the destiny of Rus-
sia to gradually incorporate the dominions long
reigned over by the Turkish potentate-that nei-
ther Austria nor England (his dear neighbours)
could hope to settle things better hereafter than
was being done without their interference at this
present-and that.... well, a Conference would
only be valuable as a confirming body.
Russia must find this style of reasoning very pa-
latable indeed; and no wonder she should try and
grasp the actual realization; no wonder she should
try and confine or cajole the Austro-Hungarian
Monarchy, which had also dreams of a happy des-
tiny, butnow they are very much disturbed indeed,
-look at the assembly of a force of 300,000 troops
in Transylvania; no wonder she should make her
defiance of England's accomplished destiny in the
Levant and East so patent that we might be able
to swallow the bitter dch&ance hereafter with calm
philosophy-has she not the neutral lines of demar-
cation so convenient as to be able at any moment
to take quiet possession of the last existing defences
of our interests; and we can only wonder what
price Prince Bismarck means to acquire, at some
convenient opportunity, backed by similar revela-
tions nd sophistry from St, Petersburgh.
Well, a sham Cbnference be it, but we hope the
sham (?) vote of 6,000,000 wrested from the
"peace" party has placed us in a better position for
active measures; this is how matters are looked on
now, I believe, at home. We no longer witness a
divided Parliament, a perplexed people, or hear un-
patriotic speeches; we see by the earnest prepara-
tions going forward, by the mass meetings in sup-
port of Earl Beaconsfield's policy-consisting of all
classes, creeds and opinions, because of his pre-
science and renowned firmness, by the irritability of
the masses at the suspected hesitation of even Lord
Derby as to fighting Russia with her own weapons,
by the spirit of revenge roused against Mr. Glad-
stone, who has failed in his efforts at betrayal,. and
who may now at any unguarded moment pay the
penalty of his convictions (?)-We see, I say, that it
is high. time Russia. should understand she must
give way, for we will not, Austria may not, and the
British Cabinet can not abate one jot or tittle, if
they ever so desired to. The die is cast.
I think the last publicly-expressed wish of Mr.
- Gladstone that no alliance with Austria might be
in contemplation," was a sad blunder even for him,
and will not be echoed as a party cry from the Op-
position benches, by even the most frivolous or ob-
structive. Such a resolve would only give a fresh
impetus to Russian ambition; and it is not neces-
sary to be a Conservative to be able to appreciate
the strength of Russia even yet, nor to be a Radical
to understand that a strong pretentious will must be
met with an apparently stupendous coercion in or-
der to avoid a conflict if possible. An alliance of-
fensive and defensive with Austria, and firm and
consistent opposition to all Russian propositions of
an ultra character, is the only hope of peace. At the
same time we must be credited with a desire equal
to that of any other power, and more disinterested,
to settle this much vexed question on such a bases
as will preclude "the necessity of interference every
fifteen or twenty years" in the future as in the past.
We feel the Russian measures now proposed do not
afford sufficient guarantee that even our interests
will be adequately protected thereby, but are in-
teided merely as a huge advance in the Russianir-
ing process, as viewed from the standpoint of "pre-


destination."
The Conference being convenient to Russia will
in all probability assemble at Baden Baden as pro-
posed; and I see a wish has been expressed by
Russia that her friend, our brother Jonathan, might
be allowed a word. Now whether he is or is not,
one thing he may rest assured of that his meddling
will be productive of little good to himself or any
concerned. Our representative, LordAugustusLof-
tus, although he speaks and understands pretty well
the great American Language, is not to be led
astray by "tall talk" or bunkum; and although
influences of this nature determined the choice of
Baden Baden for a place of meeting, the Great
Republic which endorses Autocratic Russian prin-
ciples might save their Treasury an Ambassador's
expenses. It is a significant fact that even the
opinions of our Foreign Secretary precluded the
possibility of his attending in person at the Con-
ference, they not being sufficiently .pronounced.
The death of Pope Pius IX. has been mildly re-
gretted, but the wish to see a*milder sway at the
Vatican has reconciled most people to the fact of a
Pope Leo XIII., of whom much is expected in the
way of reconciliation with accomplished ideas gen-
erally.
A very early Spring might easily be predicted,
from the extreme mildness of the winter, and the
budding hedge-rows, fruit-trees, &c. Farming
operations are therefore being pushed forward
briskly, and indeed are already well advanced.
A good sign of the times is to be noted in the
fact that the various trade's unions are seeking to
revive trade, by actually recommending a reduction
in their rate of wages to employers, in order to en-
able the latter to meet foreign competition. If
successful, of course it is stipulated that the rates
will be raised again, as prosperity can afford. I
have wondered would it ever devolve on the State
to fix equitable rates of wages ; and I feel a kind
of conviction that trades' unions will certainly lead
up to the maximum rate being so fixed and guided,
having a superior means of obtaining knowledge
1d4 of s9 arbitrating.


The Army Estimates shew no increase to the re-
gular forces, except the 60 men to the A. S. C, but
a large increase is expected in the Militia,Ycomanry
and Volunteers, for which an increased sum of
money is asked.
The disturbances on our Indian frontier have
been -- tI1,., by the Jowakis signing a treaty, and
our difficulty at the Cape is being rapidly sur-
mounted. J. S. H.

THE COLONIES.
INDIA, AUSTRALIA, CANADA.-THEIR STRENGTH
IN A MILITARY POINT OF VIEw.-The colonies, lately
a source of weakness, are rapidly becoming an ele-
ment of strength, Australia, Canada, and New
Zealand have commenced to arm themselves, which
has set the English troops free, and also, in part,
the Navy. Australia has an armed and trained
volunteer force. The Province of Victoria has a
powerful ironclad in the harbor of ?!,l-11 .nrne, and
a heavy frigate. New South Wales is now negoti-
ating for the hire or purchase of a large ironclad for
its harbor at Sydney, and these two colonies and
Queensland have lately appropriated $25,000,000
for fortifications and their armaments. Sir John
Jervois, Royal Engineers, and his brother officer,
Col. Scratchley, have arrived from En. l,1, at the
request of these Colonial Governments, and are now
engaged in planning the works. New Zealand has
a volunteer force, and is also about to fortify her
principal harbors.
To England, however, the most important ele..
ment of strength is, in my opinion, the Dominion of
Canada. I was greatly surprised, when lately
visiting that country, to find its Militia organiza-
tion so carefully attended to, and at the prodigious
number of men (600,000) at the disposal of the
Government Of this number, only a few, about
30,000, are called out for training every year, but I
was struck with the hardy appearance of the popu-
lation, and as they ate not rich, I cannot but think
the English Government, with the consent of the
Government of the Dominion, could easily raise a
corps d'armee in Canada of 30,000 men for foreign
service. I believe $100 bounty for five years' gar-
rison service in India, and three years' pension on
return home, would soon find the men, and, let me
add, trained officers and men. This contingent,
with the Militia contingent, would set the whole of
our Indian forces free in case of war. All these
points have been carefully considered by the mili-
tary authorities at home.
If we had now an obstinate German King, with a
bigoted.Tory Ministry bumping about our colonists
with Indians and Hessians, till they were driven
to distraction, then, indeed, Mr. Lowe might wring
his hands, lamenting at such iniquity, and the
prospective extinction of England as a useful power.
It is fortunate he stands almost alone in his scare;
a loss of confidence to hold one's own is the first
step to failure. The service in India for British
troops has very much improved. Fine barracks,
-in healthy situations, nutrerous stations for regi-
ments in the mountain ranges, 10,000 feet above the
sea, have greatly reduced mortality and sickness,
and I can testify to the service in India being very
popular with the private soldier. He is able to
save money there, and is to a great extent free (ex-
cept in the cold season) from the continued parades
at home. It is usual, when a regiment is about to
embark to return to England, to call for volunteers
to remain and join other regiments. Any officer
who has served in India will, I feelconfident, agree
with me that one-fourth of the men remain.
) There are now three elements of strength we had
* not during the mutiny and these are too important
to omit. (1) Railways, which enable the troops to
quickly concentrate on any menaced point. (2)
Breech-loaders, before which the native matchlock
is no more than a toy. (8) Our Artillery, which is
now altogether English. During the mutiny the
artillery was nearly all native, and moreover these
people were in possession of all the arsenals inland,
this was a great drawback, and caused terrible loss
of life. as we had no heavy guns to reply to theirs
at first, and had to take them at the point of the
bayonet. We have 600 field guns of the Royal
Artillery in India on a complete war establishment
including 180 guns of the Royal Horse Artillery.

A CROCODILE AND A BALLOONIST.

An air voyage near Calcutta- Thirteen thousand feet
above the Earth-The descent, ond how the Aeronaut
escaped a huge Crocodile.
Mr. Simmons Lynn made an ascent in a balloon, at
Calcutta, on the 29th of January. He descended safely
some miles from the city, after an exciting adventure
with a crocodile. Owing to the density of the gas
supplied for the balloon, Mr. Lynn did not deem it
advisable to take up with him Mr L'Estrange (Blon-
din,) who was much disappointed in consequence.
The balloon first moved in the direction of Balliganj,
but afterward shifted toward Dhappa and the Salt Lake s.
Having passed over 'he eastern boundary of Calcutta,
Mr. Lynn found that at 4"40 o'clock it was beginning
to move rapidly toward Tiger Point, in the Sunder-
bunds. He descended from his then altitude of 13,000
feet into the current which was blowing for a few mo-
ments from the south-east. In this current he could not
remain, anl at 5 o'clock a descent into the jungle
seemed inevitable. He at this time observed that
there was not a breath of wind over the surface of the
jungle for 3,000 feet in height. Either he must come
down at once or be enveloped in darkness, and have
no chance of getting out of the jungle. Even with
light the ch nee of being extricated seemed small.
While slowly descending, and at an altitude of 10,000
feet, in an otherwise perfectly clear atmosphere, avast


plain of intense white toward the north was open to
view. Ile could not form any conception as to the
cause of this phenomenon, except that the rays from
the setting sun had come in contact with a cold blast
from the snowy range in the Himalayas. He contin-
ued his descent, and very soon the phenomenon was
lost, but alfough every moment's d lay increased the
risk in landing lihe could not resist the temptation of
reasc(-nfling to trv :d fathom this mystery, but did
not suecced. -t 5.15 h' w:as within 1,000 feet of ter-
ra firnm a ,rt.r inaippl opriat' i;ame for tihe locality.
A hre croeoedile was ,,oving toward him with an im-
pressive tcadin(ess, and when lie came down into the
niiid and ruh(s, which for n:i (s around were over 10ft.
in height, lie ouhld see the ni(ister's h:,ad level with
the bulrushes. Fortunately, there was enough ballast
lelt to thiow overboard just as the monster was within
50 yards of the balloon, and this enabled Mr. Lynn to
rise above the thick jungle to the length of the grap-
pling rope, about 30 feet. The story that a crocodile
cannot turn rapidly was in this case disproved, as
this one ran round the grappling rope. Having call-
ed lustily for help, Mr. Lynn found some natives
making their way toward him, wading through the
thick mud and rushes. As the rushing sound was
heard on all sides the crocodile made off. About half
a dozen natives were induced, after much persuasion,
to hold the rope, and ultimately the balloon was
wafted over the jungle and across creeks for nearly 3
miles, until a small dry space was reached.

LONDON, March 7.-The Grand Lodge of Free-
masons of England, Lord Carnarvon presiding, has
unanimously passed a resolution refusing to recog-
nize as a Freemason any person initiated in a lodge
where belief in God is denied or ignored. This re-
fers to the action ol the Grand Orient of France,
which recently eliminated the article expressing
belief in God from its ritual.

Dr. Mary Walker has applied to.the Washing-
ton Police Board for appointment as special police-
man in order to protect herself from insult on ac-
count of' her costume.


CANADIAN MAEIN STAT1-TitS.
The Toronto (Globe of the 23rd inst. s.Ts: "The
light-house service has now reoichld very large di-
mentions. In 1868 there were 198 light-house stations:
in 1877, 416. The number of lights shown at the
former date was 277: at the latter, 509. In 1868
there were only two fog-whistles, and in 1877, 25.
While much has been done to render our shores safe
for shipping, a great deal more remains to be accom-
plished before things are entirely as they ought to be
in this respect. During the year 60 new steamers
were added to the list of Canada's steam marine, while
15 were broken up or put out of service. The chief
increase has been in the Ontario and Lower Province
divisions. The number of merchant ships on the re-
gister books of the Dominion on the 31st of December,
1877, was 7,362, measuring 1,310,468 tons register
tonnage-an increase over the previous year of 170
vessels and 49,575 tons. The registered tonnage of
the whole British Empire, including all the Colonies,
was 7,677,024 tons. This shows that Canada has more
than one-sixth of all the registered shipping of the
British Empire. The United States had at the same
time 2,564,980 tons, not including that trading on the
lakes and rivers. Norway comes next, with 1,391,877
tons; then Italy, with 1,360,425 tons. Canada is next,
showing that she occupies the fifth place among the
nations of the world in reference to the extent of her
mercantile marine. France has not very much more
than half the tonnage of Canada."

While speaking of the humane, well intentioned
policy of the Russian, self constituted protector of
the Christians in the Ottoman dominions, the New
York Tablet says as follows:
Since the outbreak of the present war and the
late Russian success the St. Petersburg Government
has grown daily more repressive in its dealings with
its Catholic subjects. : While the Czar goes forth
with a lie on his lips to play the role of liberator of
the Bidla inns. his minions are working systemat.
ically to effect the complete destruction of the
Church within his own dominions; and this, too,
by his express orders. The opinion prevails that
the present ruler of Russia is a man of peace and
generous impulses. Than this nothing could be
further from the truth. He is, on the contrary, one
of the most arrogant and despotic sovereigns who
has ever sat on the throne .of Peter the Barbarian.
During his reign the Catholics of the empire have
been subjected to flogging and banishment to the
mines for simply petitioning to be allowed to prac-
tice their religion unmolested ; millions of Greek
Uniats have been driven by force into the Orthodox
Church, and butcherles have taken place in War-
saw and surrounding districts in comparison to
which the horrors of Batak dwindle into insignifi-
cance.


Wm. James Henei,


BROKER
AND
Commission Jgent,
HAMILTON, BERMUDA,

Comfortable lodging
For either a Single Gentleman or
a Lady, can be obtained in Church Street, in
.this Town. Board can a!so Ie obtained if re-
quired.
For Peference apply at the Office of the
Royal Gazette."
Janiuvry 28, 1878.

WT 0 13AC i '7 I7
F.A.A.) S.,
REID STREET, HAMILTON.
EAST END


-t

D ,IL' G"..AE ore

S T A BL E S.

DANIELG. LANE Proprietor


HAMILTOUiN.

Branch Establishment, St. George.J

THE Proprietor of the above Es-
tablishment having just returned by the
" Canima" from New York, and brought with
him a number of NEW CARRIAGES and
Stylish YOUNG HORSES to add to his already
well selected Stock, begs to thank the Public of
Bermuda generally for their past Patronage and
hopes for a continuance cf the same. I
Strangers visiting the Islands are particularly
requested to call and give the above Establish-
ment a .trial before going elsewhere.
Hamilton, Sept. 19th, 1876.


P L 7 5/ 0 ,"?

CALLING AT QUEENSTOWN,
Carrying the United States Mail
from New York.

ON TU ESDAY,.
SStea ship s
NEVADA sails March 26, at Noon.
IDAHO sails April 2, at 4 p.m.
WYOMING,sails April 9, at 10 a.m.
WISCONSIN sails April 16, at 4 p.m.
MONTANA sails April 23, at 10 a.m.
NEVADA sails April 30, at 3 p.m.
IDAHO sails May 7, at 9 a.m.
The above Steamers are built expressly for
the Trade, have five watertight bulkheads, and
carry experienced Olficers, Surgeons and Stew-
ardesses. The Saloon Accommodations are un-
surpassed by any Atlantic Steamers, and the
State Rooms are on main deck opening into the
Saloon, thus securing that great comfort in
ocean travel, perfect ventilation and light.
The U. S. Mail Steamer Canima" from Ber.
muda, Thursdays, generally arrives at New York
on Monday, and Passengers' baggage can he
transferred direct to the Liverpool Steamer sail-
ing next day.
WILLIAMS & GUION,
A gents,
29 Broadway, New York.
New York, MN.rch 14, 1878.

Garnet Seed Potatoes,
In prime Condition for Planting.
S. S. INGHAM.
15th January, 1878.

For ff.nt;
M. vf 2 ) lv


That very


Desirable and
niently Situated


Conve-


tyDwellinr 'IOUS ,
In Reid Street, Hamilton, known as "iTONK
HAVEN," with Stables, Coach House, &c.


Apply to


January 29th, 1878.


MR. M. S. HUNT.


g43, U


~~14


-. -. I --

('. ~ H E W-4 04 co ,_s_
Ge C 3 -. 4-
&'Q' E-4 A .v .-
0 0

J. ~
(R.5 I PI
o cd



c~c a
P4~


Theodore Outerbridge,


HAMILTON.
Reid Street, West of "Royal Gazette" Office.

Office Hours-10 to 12 and I to 4.
Will Visit St. Georges, Tuesdays and Fri-
dlays.
Orders Promptly Attended to.
Hamilton, October 26th, 1876.


The Standard o-f au" of )r. iioltz for
e Wdr HAIR DYE*.
the World


S SCAL
Adapted to the standardd of all Nations, Packed
ready for Shipping.
World's Fair, London 1851
World's Fair, New York 1853
Wohld's Fair, Paris 1867
World's Fair, Vienna 1873
World's Fair, Santiago, (Chili) 1875
World's Fair, Philadelphia 1876
World's Fair, Sydney, Australia, 1877
IIANCOCK'S INSPIRATORS -
The best Feeder known for Stationary, Marine,
and Locomotive Boilers, &c.,) also
Oscillating Pump Co.'s Pump.
FAIR BANK'S & CO., N. Y.
October 16th, 1877.-6m

Wanted,


Apply to
DR. SINCLAIR,
March 5, 1878. Mount Hill, Pembroke,


;r1l-8 WATER is of an: entirely vegetable
composition, and its use is quite& inof-
1 cn sive.
Thanks to this peculiar quality which gives it,
no rival, l)n. IloL-rz's Hair I)ye has not the
disadvantage of t(le other preparations whiehi
give to the hair nr. unnaturally vulgar co!lr.
G(uid, d l) his mnudical knowledge and his
great c-l,, "id'l experiences, Da. HOLTZ lh,
Sncc,.id, in the discovery of plants, which give.
the uitciest balsamic dyeing and curative esen-)-
ces, aud it i- by this study that he succeeded to
con poutid a dye which may be styled as the
Regenerator by excellence of the chevelure.
GENERAL WAREHOUSE, IN PanIs.
La Correspondance Parisienne,
4 Rue de la Tacherie, 4.

ProfeclioH t at, ,11'"a ," .'-,, V .
XT' TI1lE MOST MODERATE, iATE'
Can be obtained from the
PHOENIX INSURANCE CO MIPA N '
of London,
One of the lorgast Established and Wealthiest
Offices in Great Britain.

Through the BRANCH OFFICE in these
Islands, a Saving is effected to the Insured
of the Stamp Duty, a very considerable item.
RISKS taken both on REAL and PERSONAL
PROPERTY for 3, 6 or 12 months.
No Fi'ES and no CHARGE lor Policies.
N. A. BUTTERFIELD,
Agent.
Hamilton, September 9 h, 1856.


J. & E. A.t inson's

PERF IITMER'Y,,
celebrated for nearly a century past, is of the very
best English manufacture. For its purity and great
excellence it has obtained the following
EXfIIBITION PRIZE MEDALS,
LONDON, 1862. PARIS, 1867. COBDOVA, 1872.
LIMA,1872. VIENNA,1873.
PHILADELPHIA 1876.

dtkinson's Choice. Perfumps for
THE HANDKERCHIEF,
White Rose, Frangipanne, Ylang Ylang, Stephano
tis, Opopanax, Jockey Club, Ess. Bouqnet,
Trevol, Magnolia, Jasmin, Wood Vio-
let.
And all other odours, of the finest quality only.

ATKINSON'S
Celebrated aui de Cologne
s strongly recommended, being more lasting and
fragrant than the German kinds.

ATKINSON'S
OLD B1OWN WINDSOR SOAP
celebrated for so many years, continues to be rmad&e
as heretofore., t is strongly Perfumed, and will be
found very durable in use.

ATKINSON'S BEARS' GREASE, COLD'
CREAM, SACHET POWDERS, 'PRANR PAR.
ENT GLYCERINE SOAP, ROSE TOILET
POWDER, TOILET VINEGAR, VELOUTINE,
WHITE ROSE TOOTH PASTE,
and other specialties and general articles of Perfu.
mery may be obtained of all dealers throughout the
World, anJ (if the manufacturersr,
z. & E. A.TK ITO ::
24, OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, W.

PRICE LIST FREE ON APPLICATION. -

CAUTION.-Messrs. J. & E. ATKRISON mani..
factnre their articles of one and the best quality
only. Purchasers are cautioned to avoid counter.
feits by observing that each article is labelled with
the Firm's Trade Mark, "a White Rose on a;
Golden Lyre;" printed in seven colours.
ESTABLISHED 1799.
April I11, 1876-12m If


Q v S ,i SI


N,.


F.
















I-


W. 0o, F. BASCOME,
M.D,
DENTIST,
REID S I'REET, HAMILTON, EAST,
Has Received a supply of the fol-
lowing
PRE PRSd TIO./PS
FOR THE TEETH-
Put up by t1e well known Dentists Messrs. GA-
BRIEI,, Ludgate.Hill, London.
SED A DENT, or Curefor Toothache
COR A LITE TOOTH PASTl', for Cleansing
and Improving lthe Teeth
ROYAL DENTIFRICE, gives the Teeth a
pearl-like whiteness
WiiITE GUTTA IP'I1RCHIA ENAMEL, for
Stopping decayed Teeth
OSTEO-ENAM EL STOPPING,, warranted to
remain white and firm as the Tooth itself
ODONTALGI1Q,UE ELIXIII celebrated
Mouth Wash..
Hamilton, March 26th, 1877.


AlL `/A.NlqCII-MARCu,-


Sur..

ris. set s.

5 58 6 i2 423
5 58 6 12124
556 6 14o25
5 54 6 14 26
5 54 6 1427
5 W 6 1628
551 6 1729


Tide,



1 54
2 42
3 30
4 18
5 6


APRIL, 1878.


REMARKS.


5 541 4th in Lent [Term,
6 42 Ct. of Assize, Easter


New Moon 2 day, 4 hour, 55 min. P.M.
St. Thomas Mail Steamer due on 2nd April.

THE BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTg is published
every Tuesday by DONALD M'PHEE LEE,
Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent
M ajesty,
AT HIS OFFICE,
North-west Corner of Reid and Burnaby Streets,
Hamilton,
where Blanks, Hand-bills, &c., will be
printed at the shortest notice -Agent
at St. Georges for the Royal Gazelle,
JA1MES THIEs, Esqr., Post Master General.


- XM& E,
7


:- 2; :


,


Vj"FW. T, ;7-%






Supplement to the Bermuda Royal Gazette, Hamilton, Tuesday, March 26,1878.

jm~ii~i '^^tB'ij~g'^^^aia- ~-

For the Bermuda Royal Gazette.

HORTICULTURE.
MR. EDITOR,-I said in my last that I did not know
whether I would take up the subject of the Plum or the
Cherry for your next issue. As the Grape is of more
importance and of more sterling worth to the country
than the Plum or the Cherry, and as there is just
time to import and plant it this spring, I will take up
the GraI.i..
THE GRAPE.
With the lapse of years the preparation for the culti-
vation of llhe Grape is very much simplified. In my
early days (I don't wi.- it to be understood that I have
got any gray hairs in my head but Horticulture has
made some rapid strides) it used almost to be so many
pounds of this kind of soil and so many pounds of ano-
ther ; so many grains of this and so many penny weights
of the other. In England they are rather too thorough in
their work ; in America they are rather too surface a
class of eple. omine time ago I read in an American
Horticultuo paper-the writer of the article was vaunt-
iigly speaking that they (Americans) could belt the
year round with apples ; in a few years more they would
be able to belt the year round with pears, and in a score
more years they would be able to belt the year round
S with grapes, he had no doubt. Poor man his experience
must have been very limited. From 1840 to 1843 when
I was in the service of the Earl of Derby, of Knowsley
Hall, Lancashire, England, (the grandfather of the
y present Earl,) we belted lthe year round with grapes;
we always had new grapes before we cut the last of the
old ones, and the best keepers were the West St. Peter
blackck, and the Muscat of Alexandria (an orange color.)
I regret to say that I was greatly disappointed in not
finding the grape more extensively cultivated than it is
in Bermuda, and when I made enquiry, it was the old
story over again ; and the only chance that I had before
-me was to have patience, wait and watch the climate, also
to see what sort of a winter there would be, for I did
not know, and consequently I could not say anything
until I had experienced a winter; for I was doubtful
whether the deciduous fruit trees got sufficient rest or
not. I am now very well satisfied that the deciduous
fruit trees gets the requisite rest, and I now can say
with confidence, what I have wished to say. It is an
acknowledged fact that the grape stands second only in
importance to the apple. This opinion refers to its uses
as fresh fruit only, and not to its manufacture into wine.
* As I have hinted above it used to be the practice of
highly enriching the deep vine borders of exotic grape
houses which misled the cultivators of the vineyards
into the practice of heavily manuring the ground, in-
tended for that purpose ; it is now fully proved that land
of moderate fertility is much better. Rich soils pro-
duce a strong growth of canes and leaves at the expense
of the fruit. A considerable portion of clay in the soil,
provided there is a perfect under drainage, either natu-
ral or artificial, is better than light sandy soil. The
greatest success I have ever had in growing and fruit-
ing grapes waia compost made of three inches of sur-
face maiden soil including the sod and old lime mortar
that I got from the debris of a house that was pulled
down. About one-eighth of sand and a moderate sup-
ply of rough ground bones. The most successful cul-
tivators of the grape that I have iret with, were the
Germans at Pittsburgh, Pa., both for wine and fresh
eating. The grapes are planted on hill sides at an
angle of 40 and 50 degrees; a person would almost
think that a goat could not get up the mountain sides
where the grapes were planted. Then the next sur-
prising thing- was, you could see but little, if any at all,
of soil, scarcely anything but shaley rock. As regards
training the grape on these Islands I would prefer a
strong stake, eight feet out of the ground ; plant four
feet apart in the row and six feet apart from row to
row. In this mode of planting and training the vines,
get all the air and light that it is possible for them to get,
which is very essential both for color and flavour. The
over-head trellis-training is a bad system, excepting
for shade for an harbour. Pruning-there is a great
deal of bad management in pruning, even by those men
in whom you would naturally expect the exercise of
better judgment. For the want of pluck, spirit or
knowledge the vines are half barren and thus the canes
cover a very large surface and do not bear half a crop.
It is not to be understood that a grape vine is to carry
all the fruit it shows; if that were to be the case the
grape vine would very soon be in a sorry condition.
If a grape vine makes a growth this year of twelve feet,
in the fall of the year when the wood is thoroughly ripe
and the leaves off, eight feet must be cut off, and every
other eye, in the four remaining feet cut out alternately;
each eye that is left will break out a strong shoot show-
ing a very strong bunch of grapes, perhaps two or three
bunches ; here is a vine that is showing three bunches
from a single shoot, two of them must be taken off, and
when the shoot has made two joints above the fruit,
the leader must be pinched out, so as to give the bunch
of grapes the benefit of all the food the vine is able to
give it. When the fruit is matured and cut, and when
it is proper time for pruning, cut back this last year's
bearing-wood to two eyes next to the main stem : the
following Spring both eyes will break and as likely as
not some other small shoots will break out; select the
strongest shoot, and what looks to be the best will make
the finest bunch of grapes; then rub the other shoots
off and treat this shoot this year as you treated the
other last year. This treatment stnds good for all
time ; this is what is called the spur system and a genu-
ine safe system. Some people advocate the cane system
-that is, to grow two canes together, the one that fruits
this year is cut out next, and the one that has grown
this year is supposed to bear the next; and so it does
in a fashion. In 1864 I was at a nursery in Hamilton,
in the Dominion of Canada; the grape vines had made
an extraordinary growth; the nursery man had cut
something like ten feet of the previous summer's growth
and then they were :14 feet long. The length of the
rafters of the house (grape vines are generally taken off
the rafters and turned down to the front of the house so
as to keep them cool, so that the house can be made use
of for other purposes.) In the Spring these vines are
put up. I asked the man if he was not going to cut
them back; he said no, for he thought they would,
being so strong, break regularly ; I told him that they
would break regularly for about 4 feet at the ends, and
all the rest of the buds would go blind ; and such proved
to be the case. Grape vines are very easily managed
when they are once properly understood.
The treatment of the grape vine is simply this:-
Purchase two year old plants ; when you get them from


the nursAry man and before planting cut them back to
6 inches of the root; the 2nd year to 3 feet; the 3rd
year cut back to 5 feet; the 4th year cut back to 8 feet;
and every year afterwards cut back all, both spurs and
leaders, to two buds of the main stem ; every other eye
of the leader cut clean out ; this will regulate the bun-
ches to about one foot apart. If two bunches show upon
one spur, keep the best and cut the other off. There is
iLuclh harm done by over-bearing as their is in any
Sway ; and indeed more. A grape vine that has
, -borne this year, will not fruit satisfactorily next.
Then some disease, or the climate, gets the blame.
Grapes are propagated in various ways; I prefer graft-
ing upon the roots of the Catawba. Thrip and the Red
Spider are the greatest enemies of the grape vine.
Sulphur and soft soap will settle them: make the li-
quid pretty thick ; put it on with a brush ; the bark is
annual; the rough bark should be rubbed off before the
liquid is applied.
The kinds that I would grow on these Islands are :-


Black
69
Ct
"
"
"


Tropical.
Hamburgh Muscat of Alexandra
Muscat Hamburgh (golden color)
Barbarosa #harlesworth's Tokay
West St. Peter Syrian
Wilmot's Hamburgh Bowood Muscat
Golden Hamburgh
Black Lombardy.


American Native Grapes. .
Concord, Delaware, I Hartford Prolific-,
Clinton, Diana, I Israella lona.
Plums and Cherries next Gazette.
I am, yours most respectfully,
JAMES PILLING,
J. F. Burrows, Esqr., Seaforth, Somerset.
March 20th, 1878.

I saw a notice in your last Gazette relative to Tobac-
co. If Tobacco will grow in the Public Garden wall in
St. George's in a wild state, producing leaves 12 and
15 inches long and 6 inches broad, what would it do if
it had a chance of cultivation ? I don't know whether
the damp atmosphere would be against curing it or not
-for there is always a something to keep the rabbit's
tail short. J.P.


For the Royal Gazette.
ST. GEORGE, BERMUDA,
March 14, 1878.
MR. EDITOR,-T have quietly refrained from making
any comment on The Velocipede Case" as I under-
stood from the parties more particularly interested that
the proceedings had been laid before His Excellency
with a view of getting the decision given in the Police
Court, reversed. It however appears from the proceed-
ings published in the *' Colonist," His Excellency sees
no reason to conclude that the decision of the Police
Magistrate is not justified by the pr',vi-nn of the Po-
lice Act of 1875, No. 23. I do think there must be some
mistake or misrepresentation of the case somewhere.
I have carefully read over the charge against the defend-
ant, all the evidence thereon, S. Brownlow Gray, Esqr's.
opinion, and the Police Act, still I fail to see how the de-
fendant erred by riding his velocipede in the street ; but
I am open to conviction and if any of the numerous read-
ers of your journal can point out where the defendant
erred, or what terms of the Police Act justified the Po-
lice agistrate's.decision, please come forward and do
so and if satisfactory, I will be convinced. The Police
Act reads .
(1) Every person shall be deemed a loose, idle and dis-
orderly person and shall be punished as such under
this Act. (Clauses 2 to 11 omitted because they have
no reference to the question.)
(12) Who shall cause a disturbance or make a noise in
any public street, highway, thoroughfare or public
place, by screaming, shouting, swearing or singing in
a disorderly manner, or by being drunk and impeding
or incommoding any peaceable passenger or wayfarer,
or
(13) Who shall fly any kite in or over any street or
highway or public thoroughfare to the annoyance or
danger of passengers or frequenters thereof, or
(14) Who shall play at cricket or other games in any
public street, highway or public thoroughfare to the
annoyance or danger of passengers or frequenterss
thereof or of any person in any house adjacent or near
to such street. highway or thoroughfare.
Clause No. 14 is the one that the Police Magistrate
points out as having been violated.
From the evidence published in the Colonist it does
not appear that the defendant was causing a disturbance
or noise in the street, or was playing at any game, to the
annoyance or danger of passengers, or committing any
of the above named misdemeanors. In the statement
of the Chief of Police it reads ; about to run
round b; the Post Office," so I am at liberty to presume
that as he was only about to run" he must have been
standing still. The Editor of the Colonist, who has
been acting as a mouth piece for the Police Magistrate,
in an article in his issue of 13th instant, states, The
record of the Police Court has the following statement
by the Chief of Police," that by the expression "about
to run" he meant about to run a race." No such ex-
planation of the expression about to run" was made
during the trial, had such a statement been made the
defendant would have produced evidence that would
have refuted such a statement, for it can easily be
proved that he was not about to run a race. however
the defendant was not permitted by the Police Magis-
trate to bring forward any evidence, that he (the de-
fendant) thought would show that he had not committed
any breach of the law, because in the Magistrate's
opinion it would uselessly employ the time of the Court.
It appears the Magistrate heard the statement from
the Chief of Police and Constable Amory both for the
prosecution, and without asking the defendant if he
wished to call any evidence, proceeded to give judgment
Sin the case. Was this right ? Was it just ? It looks
as if there was not a shadow of fair play ; the least he
might have done was to have heard the evidence on both
sides, especially if the defendant thought he could pro-
duce anything in his favour, even supposing it did occu-
py a little more time ; but I expect the case was not a
paying one,;hence the necessity to hurry it through. I
understand a great deal of dissatisfaction exists concern-
ing this case, for the public generally feel that the de-
fendant has not committed a breach of the peace and
His Excellency, for some reason not known to the pub-
lic, sustains the Magistrate in the position he has taken ;
several have surmised it was for the welfare of the lit-
tle fellows to prevent them from accident or damage.
, It is right to avoid danger when possible, but we see no
probability of danger by the intended and legitimate
use" of these vehicles in the almost deserted streets of
our town ; one great fact in their favour is that no acci-
dent has ever happened from their being used in our
streets, but supposing there is danger is it not right
that we should allow little boys to learn to exercise
their presence of mind at such times P There is more
or less danger to all every day whether riding, driving,
hunting, boating or walking, but because an accident
may happen, is it right that we should desist from tak-
ing such needful and necessary exercise ? And if we
indulge in these necessary exercises why should we wish
to prevent little boys from taking theirs ? I have been
informed that our Police Magistrate will permit boys
to ride their .velocipedes in the street leading to the
Park ; of all the streets in our town the one leading
there is the most dangerous for the little fellows ; were
a boy in almost any part of the street to meet a car-
riage an accident would be inevitable, because the street
is so narrow the two could not pass. but he knows that
another public official lives in that direction, hence the
permission to travel that way. As for boys riding in
the Park it is ridiculous, the only velocipede accident I
ever heard of in Bermuda happened there. I allude to J.
M. Higgs, perhaps our Magistrate would like our little
; boys and bigs ones too, to meet with a similar fate.
The fact is (there is no use in trying to hide it,) our
police have too little to do, and they must make it ap-
pear that they are very vigilant, but those who reside
here know how"useless they are. To give you an in-
stance; a man from one of the upper Parishes, on three
separate occasions within the last week, appeared in
Water St., between the Post Office and Police Station ;
he was drunk and was driving a horse and cart about
the town for about an hour, and whenever he felt dis-
posed, used most abusive and indecent language to
persons passing by, and altho' this was going on for an
hour or more within sight of the Police Station no no-
tice was taken of it by the police. If a policeman is
required you cannot find one, if a row occurs they are
not on hand until the damage is done. I believe this
state of affairs is largely caused by our Police Magis-
trate not complying with the law in his own case, for
instance The Police Act of 1875. No. 20." reads


"The Governor shall from time to time appoint by
commission under the Great Seal one Police Magis-
trate for each of the Towns of Hamilton and St.
George, which Magistrate shall reside in or near the
said Town respectively." The Police Magistrate in-
stead of complying with the above law resides at St.
David's Island, entirely outside the Police limits of the
Town, and if you wish to see him or he is required, if
you do not possess a boat you cannot get there; there
are no boats kept here for hire, but supposing you are
fortunate enough to possess one, it often happens that
it is too rough to cross over. But why should the in-
habitants be put to this expense and trouble when the
law says he shall reside in or near the Town."
I understand he has His Excellency's permission
to reside there, however, you know the old proverb,
"While the cat's away the mice will play." It is
not to be supposed that in our reserved community
there are those bold enough to incur "His Wor-
ship's" displeasure by reporting to His Excellency
the necessity for a change of residence, but that such
a change is necessary is apparent to all.
I do hope the little fellows will not be deprived
of their pleasure because the Magistrate thinks an
accident may happen to them, this is a mere subter-
fuge. I think their parents have the welfare of
their children too much at heart to allow them to run
into danger. These vehicles have been in use to
my knowledge for the last thirty years, and I have
never heard of an accident happening in our Town
to one of the little fellows. But if we are to study
the interest of each other so seriously and worry
because an accident may happen, why permit our
Police Magistrate running such danger by crossing
the harbour to St. David's Island in an open sail
boat in such stormy weather as we frequently have,
when I understand he cannot swim. If boys are
to be prohibited by him from riding in the street
because an accident may happen, surely he should
be prevented from crossing the harbour to and from
his country-seat when there is such a possibility of
accident: just imagine what a dangerous predica-
ment he places himself in, and as he cannot swim
he would inevitably be drowned. ;I think all the
boys had better go in mourning at once. But as


the Police Act of 1875, No. 20, expressly stipulates
that he shall reside in or near the Town" why not
carry out its provisions ?
Perhaps I have already occupied to much of your
valuable space, so I will reserve a few other valu-
able suggestions for another time.
Yours truly,
JUSTICE.

THEATRICALS.
In our tight little Colony, which is so rarely
visited by professional performers, any intellectual
amateur amusement finds a ready welcome, and
we are glad to observe that the patronage of the
performance given by the Royal Engineers at the
Theatre Royal at Prospect, on Friday, Saturday
and Monday evenings last, was not stinted.
On Friday and Monday the pieces produced were
the celebrated Drama The Ticket-of-Leave Man,"
by the popular author of "'Twixt Axe and Crown,"
followed by an amusing farce entitled A Terrible
Tinker," and on Saturday the drama was repro.
duced, but was unsupplemented by the farce,
owing, we believe, to some disarrangement of
scenery. The performance throughout was what
the fashionable world would call "slow," "The
Ticket-of-Leave Man" being a world-renowned
drama, and decidedly too difficult for amateurs
lacking experience; but we must not be captious
towards those who strive to their utmost to afford
us amusement. Hawkshaw and Sam Willoughby
found fair representatives in Sappers J. Sadler and
C. Prankard, but Sergt. Pollard and Corporal Bir-
mingham, although perhaps good actors in their
way, cannot be pronounced especially adapted for
the characters allotted them. By this we do not
mean to say that glaring deficiencies exist, but un-
fortunately there appeared a something want-
ing to cause an impression. An easy.flow of high
spirits and mirth-provoking hilarity amongst the
performers in the farce, especially in the characters
of Matty and -Mivins, rendered it very enjoyable.
The performance is notified for repetition this
evening.

CRICKET.
This match was played at Prospect on Saturday
afternoon last, and resulted in another victory for
the Ghagans" they having won by seven wickets.
Considerable interests was displayed in the match
and the number of spectators was unusually large ;
every one appearing to admire the excellent style
in which Sergt. Hart and Pvt. Riordan bowled.
Subjoin is the -score:--
B. COMPANY 46TH REGIMENT.


1st Innings.
Pvt. C. Clarke, st Tanner, b Cook
" G. Davis, b Barron

" H. Snell, c Welch, b Hewitt
Sergt. H. Hart, b Barron
Pvt. J. Andrews, b Hewitt
" M. Riordan, run out
Corpl. J. K. White, b Hewitt
Pvt. J. Harrington, b Hewitt
0. R. Clerk G. Down, not out
Pvt. J. Sprangle, b Hewitt
" W. White, c Redhouse, b
Hewitt
Extras


Total 52


2nd Innings.
1 b Welch
10 st Hewitt, b
Welch
14 b Welch
0 not out
4
8
4
2
3 run out
0


Extras 7

Total 45


26TH COMPANY RoYAL ENGINE ER.


1st Innings.
Corpl. Cook, c Davis, b Clarke
Sapper Welch, b Riordan
Hewitt, c Hart, b Riordan
Co.-Sg. Mj. Redhouse, b Riordan
Sapper Sturt, b Riordan
Corpl. Aplin, c Clarke, b Riordan
Barrow, b Riordan
Sapper Worrall, b Clarke
Buchanan, not out
Tanner, b Clarke
Curtis, b Riordan
Extras


Total


2ud Innings.
4 b Hart
0 b Hart
2 b Riordan
8 b Hart
0 b Riordan
2 6 Riordan
0 b Riordan
0 not out
0 b Hart
0 b Riordan
6 run out
9 Extras


Total


THE COMING TIDAL WAVE.
The Jears of the people on the New Jersey shore-
Boats moored to houses and provisioned, awaiting
the High Tide-Superstition among the people.
LONG BRANCH, Tuesday, March 12, 1878.-For
the past 36 hours a north-east gale of unusual sev-
erity has been breaking on the coast. As yet no
marine disasters have been reported. The Life-
saving service men fear trouble along the shore to-
night, and the patrols between Stations Nos. 1 and
9 will be doubled. The telegraph wires are all
down, and there is but little communication below
Wreck Pond. Great fear is entertained that at
high tide to-night there will be a disastrous wash-
out. Warned by the experience of the great south-
east storm of January 31, which swept with such
destructive force along this portion of the coast, the
Southern Railroad people have erected breakwaters
and taken other precautions against another such
storm. Around the Highland Station the track is
strewed with the debris of demolished bathing
houses. The tracks of the New Jersey Central
Railroad at Wreck Pond and other dangerous
places are being carefully watched. For weeks the
Central authorities have been preparing for the high
tides, and long trains of broken rock have been
transported daily to Spring Lake, Shark River,
Wreck Pond, working up toward Great Pond In-
let, for the purpose of strengthening the places that
are exposed to tidal waves.
A superstition exists among the people here that
the tidal wave will inundate the coast and extend
into the interior of the country. Last Sunday a
meeting was held at the Branchport Church, and
the preacher, after proclaiming that the Judgment
Day would arrive in two weeks, narrated the story
of a deaf and dumb boy who died in Eatontown on
Friday last, and who just before expiring recovered
his speech, and declared that "in two weeks not
enough live persons would exist to bury the dead."
This worked upon the minds of the simple fisher-
men who heard it, and the story travelled until the
people in nearly every hamlet that skirts the sea-
shore have been seized with fear that the tidal wave
will wash their little homes away, So impressed
are many with impending danger that boats have
been moored to houses awaiting the coming of the
rushing waters. The greatest alarm is felt in Sea
Girt, which town was submerged during the Jan-
uary gale. To-day the Times correspondent saw
in the yards of two fishermen's huts boat provisi-
oned and fastened to the second story windows,
while at nearly every fireside women and children,
and in some instances men, clustered together,
calmly awaiting the wash-out. Old surf-men, and
some of the oldest residents on the beach, say that
between now and Sunday one of the highest tides
ever known will wash the shore.

The most frightful storm of hail and rain ever
known in that vicinity visited Jefferson County, W.
Va., on 12th instant. Thousands of acres of wheat
and other grain, were destroyed, houses unroofed,
buildings blown down, and cattle killed. The loss
throughout the county will amount to at least
$150,000. The freshets in the neighborhood of
Wheeling have been very destructive. No through
trains have arrived over the Baltimore and Ohio
Railroad for forty-eight hours, owing to the slides
and the track being washed away.


BALL AT PROSPECT.
On Wednesday evening last a Grand Ball was
given by the Drummers of the 46th South Devon
Regiment, in the Theatre Royal at Prospect. The
weather during the evening was very favorable,
being lit up by a splendid moon, in consequence
of which there was a good and fashionable attend-
ance, which included Lieut.-Col. R. Bennett, Com-
manding the Regiment, with other Officers of the
Corps, together with their Ladies, besides a number
of other Officers and Ladies of the Garrison.
The large and propitious building was very taste-
fully decorated, every available space being utilized
by flags of all nations and of no nation at all. The
stage was made to render a favourable place for
the Orchestra, whilst that portion of the room which
is allotted when theatrically in use to the Gods,"
was surmounted with boards, thus forming a large
and lofty platform for a recess, and where a splen-
did and very sumptuous table was laid out.
Any individual acquainted with the biography of
"Tommy Atkins," who is fond of tripping it on.
the light fantastic toe," and who had visited the
Theatre Royal at Prospect on this occasion, would
without doubt join in saying, that he never in the
whole of his life saw such airs and graces, such
bowing and scraping, such pirouetting and teeto-
tuming, such ceremony and deportment as is to be
witnessed at a military dance. To a person who had
never seen soldiers except stiffly on parade, and had
heard only of Circassian slaves-never of Circassian
circles-the sight would be passing strange, for he
could hardly realise that the model of deportment
he would see bending in the graceful varsoviana,
or chasseing in the stately Caledonians was the same
individual who on a parade could be seen looking
straight to his front, and holding his thumbs one
inch in rear of the seams of his trousers." The
dancing on this occasion was extremely good and
the music, which was rendered by the Drummers
themselves, was of an excellent style and attracted
considerable attention from the wallflowers" ;
some of the pieces had been set in order expressly
for this occasion; one, a Quadrille, arranged by
Lc.-Corpl. F. Fitzgerald, was, without doubt, a
dance cleverly adjusted.
The dancing was kept up with considerable vigor
till late on the following morning, and it was very
satisfactory to see that all enjoyed themselves.
Too much cannot be said of the very admirable
manner in which Corporal S. Wright brought the
arrangements of the evening, which had been en-
trusted to his care, to so successful an issue. Upon
this point we feel sure each visitor will agree in
saying that he was the Wright man in the Wright
place. Praise is likewise due to Drum-Major Mere-
dith.-(C7om.)

THE NEW IRONCLAD.
The Royal Navy will obtain a powerful vessel by
the purchase of the ironclad Payki Sherref. The
Payki Sherref is finished and ready for sea. She
is, says the Standard, an armour-cased corvette,
with a raised fighting battery deck amidships. The
battery deck rises from below the water-line to a
height of about 18 feet, and mounts four 25-ton
guns, 12-inch muzzle-loaders, which are already on
board, having been provided by Sir W. Armstrong
when the ship was built for the Turkish Go7ern-
ment, more than a year since, and detained as con-
traband of war. Two of the guns fight on the port
and two on the starboard side, each pair being pro-
vided with gun-metal racers, giving them such
scope for traversing that they can fire direct fore
and aft, or combinate upon one spot at 90 yards
range. There is ample room to work the guns, the
battery deck being an octagon of about 60 feet;
while the guns, which are somewhat short in the
chase, are 16 feet in the length. They are rifled
with eight grooves, and on an increasing twist. The
shot rises through a lift under the muzzle, and is
carried along a bar overhead to the position most
convenient for loading, the cartridges also coming
up from below through openings on the centre
line. The projectiles as well as the guns are already
on board, consisting of 660 12-inch shot and shell
far the big gun., and some 200 for the 9-pounder
guns, which will probably be mounted in the bows
and astern. The large projectiles comprise 240
chilled shell, on the Palliser principle, 100 chilled
shot, 240 common shell, 70 shrapnel, and 170 seg-
ment shells. The armour plating consists'of a belt
of 12-inch iron at the water-line, diminishing above
and below to 8 inches, the thickness of iron protect-
ing the battery varying from 91 to 104 inches,
The main deck, which will be nearly level with the
water, is composed of 3-inch plates of armour, en-
cased in oak. Upon this main deck i-- erected a
spar or hurricane deck, containing the officers' ca-
bins and other appointments; but the assumption is
that all this deck would be shot away in action,
leaving only the armour-defended battery and
submerged hull as amark for the enemy. The
designer of the ship was Hemit Pasha, of the Turk-
ish Navy, and for her length she is remarkably
spacious. She measures between perpendiculars
245 feet, and has a breadth of nearly 60 feet even
at a few feet from the stem and stern. The saloon
apartments are handsomely decorated and fur-
nished, partly in the Turkish and partly in English
fashion. The ship's crew, officers and men, will
number 300. Her burden In tons is 3,075, build-
er's measurement, and her draught of water 19 feet
forward and 19 feet 6 inches aft. Her displace-
ment at the load-line is 4,777 feet, and the area of
her midship section 895.68 square feet. She is pro-
pelled by a pair of engines constructed by Messrs.
Maudslay and Fielti, having a nominal horse power
of 600, and 3,900 indicated. The guaranteed speed
is 12 knots an hour, but she has actually attained


12-99 knots on her trial. The armour piercing pro-
jectiles for her heavy guns weigh each 6001b., and
arrangements are made for stWving 17 rounds with
each gun. There is a steam searing apparatus and
wheels to be worked by hand, both on the battery
deck, and under cover of the lower deck, and pro-
vision is made tacook for 350 men, while 13 tanks
are on board, to contain 8,000 gallons of water.
An official survey has also been made of another
Turkish ironclad, the Hamidie, detained in the
Victoria Docks. She is plated with twelve inches
of iron on 14-inch teak, and two inner plates each
of 24 inches of iron, and is pierced for twelve 18-
ton guns, supplemented by some lighter guns on
the upper deck, but none of the guns are yet on
board. She has a length of 380 feet with 60 feet
beam, and her engines, which have been supplied
by Messrs. Maudslay, are exceptionally powerful.
She has no turrets, and fights her guns from the
main deck. The purchase of this vessel is still un-
der consideration, and there are one or two other
ironclads in the docks near London which may be
obtained if required for the service of the British
Government.

There has been a frightful outbreak of small-pox
in Rieutort, in the Department of Lozere, France.
The population of the commune has been dicimated
and nearly all the inhabitants are sick.
Model French obituary :-" We announce ths
death at the age of eighty-eight years, of Georgee
Cruickshanck, the celebrated caricaturist English.
Cruickshanck during long years has collaborated at
The Punch, which besides he had founded. He had
illustrated a part of the works of Dickens. It was
a sort of Cham English, less the wit sparkling of
our caricaturist inexhaustible and with the humor
English above. But the humor is it worth the wit ?
That is the question."
CEASING TO DO GOOD.-A man whose heartdoesno
respond to an act of doing good or giving happiness
Is no longer a man. He has passed the line of man-
hood, and should be ranked among beasts.


JOHN BRINSMEAD & SONS'
GOLD MEDAL o

PIANOFORTES
WERE AWARDED
THE GRAND MEDAL OF HONOUR AND DIPLOMA
OF MERIT, Philadelphia, 1876.
THE GOLD MEDAL. Paris, 1870.
THE HIGHEST AWARD, THE GRAND DIPLOMA
oF HONOUR, Paris, 1874.
THE MEDAL OF HONOUR, Paris, 1867.
THE PRIZE MEDAL, London, 1862.
THE DIPLOMA OF EXTRAORDINARY MERIT,
Netherlands International Exhibition, 1869. etc.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
PATENT
PERFECT CHECK REPEATER ACTION PIANOS.
Patented 1862, x1868, 1871, a..1 i:--,, in
GREAT BRITAIN, AUlSTi1.A,
PRUSSIA, ITALY,
FRANCE, BELGIUM.
AND AMERICA.
( ILBERT I. BAUER'S Prize Medal,
Drawing Room ORGANS,
From 8 guins, to 300 guins.
On the Three years System.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
with the Patent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
"" I have examined Messrs.
BRINSMEAD & SONS' New
Check Action as applied to
SIR JULES BENEDICT. their Pianos, and consider
it a most ingenious andval-
uable invention, which can-
not fail tomeetwith success."
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS
with the P.teint Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
On the Three Years System.
I have" much pleasurs in
testifying to the great exol-
lence of Messrs. JOHN
BRINSMEAD & SONS' Pino-
SYDNEY SMITH. fortes. Their"Perfect Check
t-SYDNEY SMITH. produces a touch
that is absohite perfection,
and which is unsurpassed by
any other maker, native or
foreign."
TOH-TN BRINSMEAD and SONS'


BRINLBY RICHARDS.


GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
with the Patent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
Qn the Three Years System.
"" I have much pleasure in
tc. tir ir th. .. ncy of
Nlc t, i-. '%1r .. SONS'
New Ptent Check-Action
(i, r Pianofortes), which I
c ..*i ',.r a very Cletver and
isctul inve tion, and likely
to be extensively adopted."


J OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
SHtORT IRON GRAND PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
Where all the pianos go to seems somewhat of a
mystery, for a really good instrunment will last a lifetime;
a. d yet every year thousands are made by each of the great
London Manufactuters, vt:ile the numl crs made by the
tw. hundred or n'ore smaller-firms must represent an enor-
no'-is number in the course of each yer. The improve-nents
m.nte in English Iianos have caused this trade rapidly to
increase, until onn pianoforte manufactory after another
ha. been built to supply the growNh'g demand. One of the
largest of these, lately erected by Messrs. JOHN BRINSMEAD
& SbNS', of WVigmore-street, covers nearly an acre of
ground in the Gratton-road, Kentish-town, and is intended
to accommodate 300 workmen. These works alone can
supply 3,0oo pianos annually, and there are at least three
nanufactories in London capable of making an equal
i-.mber."-Illustrated London News.
OH N BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
From FREDERICK CHATTERTON, Esq.
Harpist to the Queen.
I have great pleasure in certifying to the fine, rich, and
)verful tone of Messrs. JOHN BRINSMEAD & SONS', Pianos,
so to the great improvements they have succeeded in
trainingg
As a Professor of the Harp, I can safely add that the
:Ilow tones of their short iron Gold Medal Grands blend
iarmingly with the Instrument I profess, and form a
,:licious ensemble.

OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Action Repeater.
From Professor W. KUHE.
It gives me the greatest pleasure to state that I con-
sider the the instrument manufactured by you to be most
excellent in tone, touch, and quality of m .terial. I
particularly admire your Pianos with he Patent Check
Repeater Action and new Grand Cons ruction, bing a
w nderful improvement upon the old system; in my
opinion your firm having been successful in crea-ing as
good a touch to the Cottage Pianofort- as that usually
accorded to the Grand. All those I have chosen have
given the greatest satisfaction to th- purchasers.
JOHN BRINSMEAI) and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
From P.ro'essor HERM.ANM PAPENDIECK.
I have great pleas-re in: t .,'i. i.,- to the excellence of
your in truments. Your newly patented system "the
i'-rfect Ch--ck 'Repeater Action," when applied to these
Pi ;no, greatly increases their value, and I have no doubt
t'l it these valuable improvements will excite general
atten'i n a- d admiration."
J OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
Q- GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Aetion.
From Mr. BOYTON SMITH.
I have much pleasure in bearing' testimony to the
per section of Me-sr., 1. BRINSMEAD t& SONS' New Piano-
forte Action, which, for promptness in repetition, and
g-neral e':c lentc. in touch, surpass :,, i.-. of the kind I
h iv- yet scen, whilst the extreme simplicity of the mechan-
'sm by which such important results are attained is an
additional recommendation."
0 H N BRINSMEAD and S'D NS---
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
1,rcm FREDERICK GUILLAUME, Chevelier de Liguro,
Ex:-iiner-General of the Ancient Bourbonnic Society in the
*Royal Academy of Fine Arts at Naples, Honorary
Member of Musical Academies at Rome, Venice, &c.,
formally Director-General of all Military Music
for both Infantry and Cavalry of the Line in
the Armny of the Two Sicilies.
I have much pleasure in testifying to the excellence of
your upright and horizontal Grand Pianofortes, as they are
simply perfect in touch and tone."
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
with the Patent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
On the Three Years' System.
Receive the greatest appro-
THE STANDARD," bation everywhere of musi-
cians and manufacturers."
OHN 3BRINSMEAD and SONS'
PATENT "PERFECT
CHECK REPEATER
ACT 10 N" Pianofortes of
every description, manufac-
tured expressly for India and
extreme climates.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
May be obtained of all the principal music sellers.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SON
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS, A
With the Patent Perfect Cheque Repeater Action,
From 33 guins, to 500gumins.

JOHN BRINSMEAD AND SONS'

PIANOFORTES,
GUARANTEED FOR FIVE YEARS.
*o Illustrated Price Lists and Descriptions,with Opinions
of the London Press and Musical Profession, forwarded
Post Free upon application.
18, WIGMORE STREET, LONDON, W.

MANUFACTORY,
THE '"BBINIMEAD WORKS," GRAFTON-ROAD,
KENTISH TOWN, N.W.


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