Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00301
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00301
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text
"I fiE


No. 7.-vot LI.


BERMIUDA C()'MMURCGIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER1l AND RECORDER.



STATE sJ VSA. ATEq U .


4


24s per A c


Hamilton,


r,
~ ..:.


I 5 S 6


EXTRACT from METEOROLOGICAL OBSER- Iopponents were enabnl)d to upset it. Had it been
VATIONS taken undiir the dlir'etiw.n of thePrincipal presented to the House in its modified shape, it
S Me,:ieal Olficer, Pruoqpect, Berziuula. Above the sea would have been less open to objection, and it
S151 feet. might have escaped the storm raised against its
W.JY Wind Teri..,ertur. previous passing outside. Within the House it cannot be
iurs. Rain. said there was any violence or angry feeling exbi-
"2 S u___ bited. On the contrary the debate was carried on
, Date a c with temper and decorum on both sides. We have
g Inch. been able to give only an imperfect report of what
-.J was said in the course of it, and from the speeches
--- .__ w",.;__ of the mover and the seconder it will sufficiently
S.879. o o o o appear, that the failure of the Bill is in no way to
SJ. 29 3') 1-, sw 3 8-.9 l7"8 108-8 38'0 0"37 be attributed to the lack of ability or zeal on the
'-9 _'.9 7 NW 3 65-1 59-5 115-8 37-0 0-00 part of its advocates. But the debate shews that
S 1 30: 31'1264 NE 1 63-1 55-2 121-4 43-2 0-00 in point of fact there is no obstacle to the introduc-
S 31 3'2i0 SE 3 66-3 55-4 108*0 46-0 0-98 tion anddiscussionofgovernmentmeasnres,eventhe
S y. 1 29 "9 sw 1 71-9 60"2 126'6 55-2 0-02 most open to objection, in the Assembly. Thediffi-
2 2 2 9'96 -w 3 67-1 62"0 123"0 51'6 0'12 culty that the Secretary of State .ik.s so much of, is
3 3...10 12 5 .0.. 119-4 47"2 -' in reality, not a mountain, but a mole-hill, and
Total 149 strange to say it is only because Lord Carnarvon
Total Raifaill for tie month of Jany. 1878...5-70 Ins. looks at it from a great distance that it appleas to
him much larger than it is in our eyes who are on
the spot. There is no real difficulty in the way to
BARBADOS. prevent the passing of any measures, from what-
ever source they come, which are directed either for
MESSAGE FROM THE GOVERNOR,--TO the reform of abuses or the promotion of the public
-- HE HOUSE OF AS.?EMBLY. good, in proot of which we need only refer to the


The Governor has the honor to transmit to the
House of Assembly a Bill embodying the proposal
of the Secretary of State, with regard to the intro-
dluction of two salaried officers, to represent the
Governioent in (be House of As:-en'1rly.
GEO. C. STRAHAN,
Governor.
Government House, 3rd January, 1'78,.-
BAR13BADOS.
WITlHEREAS it is expedient that provision
should be made for the presence in -the
General Assembly of this Island of two of the sal-
aried officers of the government, in order to pro-
mode those explanations and communications,
between the Executive Government and the As-
sembly, which are (-z-enlial to- the conduct of pub-
lic business,. and to remedy, as far as possible, the
inconvenient practice of lengthy Messages between
the Governor and the Speaker of the House of As-
sembly ; Be it' therefore enacted by the Governor,
Council, and Assembly of this Island, and by the
authority of the same as follows :
1. From and after the publication of this Act,
and upon the annual or other convoking of the
General Assembly at any time hereafter, it shall be
lawful for the Governor on behalf of Her Majesty
the Queen to appoint two of the salaried officers of
this Government to sit, speak, and vote as Mem-
bers of the said House of Astembly.
2. The Officers so appointed shall have all the
rights, powers, immunities, and privileges, which
are now enjoyed, or may hereafter be granted by
an Act, to Members elected to serve in the Gener-
al Assembly, and shall be subject to the Rules and
Regulations of the said General Assembly, and
shall cc.rtinue Members of the. said House of As-
sembly, until the General Assembly to which they
have been so appointed as aforesaid, shall cease to
exist either by expiry or by dissolution.
8. In the event of the deatb, resignation, inca-
pacy or absence from the Colony of the said two
Members or either of them so appointed as afore-
said, it shall be lawful for the Governor to appoint
some other salaried officer or offices of the Gov-
ernment to fill the seat or seats so vacated by death,
resignation, incapacity or absence and from time
to time to make all such appointments to any
vacancy or vacancies, as may become necessary.
From the Barbados West Indian, Jany. 25.
The Governor's Bill for the r.ppointment of two
salaried officers, to be government organs in the
Assembly, was lost on Wednesday, after a two.
days debate, on the second reading, upon a divi-
sion of 10 for it and 12 against it. There was a full
house of 28 members, only one being absent in
England, and the Speaker in the Chair, who did
not vote. The vote was carried by two, it may be
said, by the votes of Mr. Reeves in St. Joseph and
Mr. Marsh in St. Thomas, their colleagues not vo-
ting, one in the Chair and the other absent, and the
other constituencies balancing each other. Of the
12 constituencies, four plumped up on either side,
Bridgetown, Speightstown, (St. Peters,) St. George
and St. John in favor of the Bill, St. Phillip, Christ
Church, St. Michael and St. Lucy against it. St.
James and St. Andrew were divided, and the sin-
gle votes of the other two Parishes turned the
scale against the Bill. It was a fair fight, and the
battle was stoutly fought. It is the victory of pub-
lic opinion. The result was undoubtedly owing to
4he expression of the sense of the public through
the constituencies. The member for St. Philip, de-
clared that he had consulted his constituents, and
They were to a man against the Bill.' A numerous-
ly signed and influential address was presented to
the members for Bridgetown against the Bill. In
St. James and St. Andrew the electors left it to
their representatives to vote as they pleased, and
they divided their votes, one for and the other
against. Lord Carnarvon has no reason to be dis-
satisfied with the decision of the Assembly upon his
proposals. It expresses the sentiment of the com-
munity. Lord Carnarvon will accept that expres-
sion of opinion, because he has no wish to disturbthe
self-government of Barbados. That His Lordship
will be satisfied with the way in which his propo-
sals were submitted to the Assembly, and to the
judgment of the people of Barbados, is more than
we can vouch for. The Bill went beyond the letter
of his despatch. It was sent down to the House in
an unusual manner. It was immediately taken up
by the two senior members of the H 'to the Governor, and in deference to the Secretary
of State; it was read before the House, and circu-
lated throughout the country, but when it came to
be discussed on the second reading, those who had
brought it forward, held back and declined to pro-
Sceed with a Bill at variance with the character of
the House as a representative body. Others were
btfouid to go on with it, but it was necessary to
pieeslnt it under a new title, and in a modified
form. It was no longer treated as a Bill to autho-
Srise the Governor to appoint members of Assembly,
but to appoint two officials to be exponents of his
measures in the House without a vote, a very dif-
ferent thing from the Bill in its original character.
SThe clauses of the Bill remained unchanged, but a
diffemfl interpretation was put upon them. This
was understood in the House, but not in the coun-
try, where the people cannot read between the lines.
The form of the BiJ was the difficulty its advocates
liad tQ contend withl, and the lever by which its
-- ,


e Statute Book, since the passing of the Emancipa-
tion Act.


Notice.


p ETER SMITtH, of Tueker's Town, Pilot,
t having been convicted before us of ignor-
*ance, negligence and carelessness, in anchoring
the Biigantine MAGENTA," Captain LocK-
HART, in an improper position on Sunday, the
30th cday of December last, whereby she parted
one of her Cables and dragged into the Rocks,
has been adju-.-l.,d by us to pay a Fine of Six
Pounds, vn.h Thiii Shillings Costs, to be not
entitled to any Pilotage, and to have his License
suspended for Three Calendar MIonths.
N. A. BUTTEI'lFIELD,
SM,,,," of Hamilton.
RICHI. J. P. DA RR1ELL.
Justice of the Peace.
H. F. CONYEIRS,
Master Mariner and Assessor.
Hamiltor, February 1st, 1878.

Just R.ceived,
FBO3I LONDON via HIALIFAX,


Men's Calf and Kid


Spring side


Ditto BLUCHERS and SLIPPFiJS
Ladies 13uttoned KIt) BOOTS
CLOTHING Silk UMBRELLAS
FLANNEL, &c., &c.
T. M. JONES.
Hamilton, Feby. 4th, 1878.--3

Business Opportunidy.

ANY GENTLEMAN or Lady who can com-
mand Cash Capital of Pounds, One Hun-
dred, and would like to see the World and
make Money, can have this rear chance by ad-
dressing Traveller" at this Office.
State where an Interview can be had.
January 28th, 1878.

To All whom it may Con-
cern.

I IIE.REY give Notice that I have been
appointed AGENT AND) ATTORNEY for
the Hoard of Underwriters of New Orleans, and
will from this Date, represent the Interests of
the following Companies, Vizt :-
New Orleans Mutual Insurance Company,
Crescent do. do. do.
Merchants do. do. do.
Sun do. do. do.
Union Insurance Company,
Hope do. do.
Hibernia do. do.
Factors and Traders Insuraince Company,
Tentonia Insurance Company,
New Orleans Insurance Association,
Peoples' Insurance Company,
Mechanics and Traders Insurance Company.
W. C. HIYL3ND,
Agent for the several Boards of Under-
writers for Ne%% York, Boston,
Baltimore and Philadelphia, &c., &c., &c.
St. George's, Bermuda, '
21st January, 1878.

Comfortable Lodging
For either a Single Gentleman or
a Lady, can be obtained in Church Street, in
this Town. Board can a!so be obtained if re-
quired.
For Heference apply at the Office of the
Royal Gazette."
January 28, 1878.


For Sale.


A Splendid Bay
4kt ( Z31 W I


74 Years old,
Fit for general Work, warranted Sound.
Apply to
M. KENNELLY,
St. George's Hotel.
St, George's, 5th Feby., 1878.--2


An il itert'aiuienrt,


Snhursd Id a'ri

day, the 14th and 15th inst.,
In aid of THE FEMALE CHARITABLE UNION
SOCIE rTY."
The ALEXANDRINA BAND will be in attend-
ance.
l)oors open at 3 p.m. each day.
Admission Cd. (ach.
JOHN ". SIMONS,
Secretary, F. C. U. S.
Pagets, Feby. 5th, 1878.-2

For Sale Te.

A Cove&ntrys OIC
(Challenge No. 3), 50 inci:. lBy Singer & Co.
For Particulars au ,p' to
JOHN BB.RRIT T
East Broadway, H amilton.
January 29th, 1878.

Sotice.
A LONZO PRNIS'TON has made arrange-
inents for obl.aii.,: a quantity of the
GENUINE RED ANI' V'IIITE TENERIFFE


-d ~ all


'~, CI~ ~'
I.,,,
- 4,~I'~ I.


Which he expects to receive in Feptember next.
Persons can en,.-,' the sHir by applying to
the Rubij-irP .-r ,. to
JOHN ZUILL, o- .r:. ,
A. J. HODSDON, Hamilton.
W. 0. NORTH, Bailey's Bay.
The Undersigned will al,. take this opportu-
nity of informing his F -liti.ls and the lublie
generally, that he is now prepared to give his
personal attention to ih:- i,;e!:t of
.-.. ,_ N 4T ^ ,0
..~- '
o !; ; rssg. LT &' Co.,
OF NEW YORK,
And will assure all that he will do every thing
in his power to promote the welfare of those
that favor him with Consignment-.
L OJZO PEA.ISTOA.X
lamilton, Jany. 22nd, 1878.

CE'NT!!.


Portland, in Casks of 4 Bushels
Rosendale, in Barrels,
AT LOW RATES FOR CASH.
S. S. ING FAM & CO.
Ilamilton, Dec. 18, 1877.

Fashionable Dressmak-
ing.
a/j ISS ANNIE SMITH takes this opportuni-
,g- ty of thanking her Lady Patrons and the
Public generally, for their past favors, ai d to
inform them that she has removed her place of
Business from 'ose Cottage to the DWELLING
tlousE next South of Brunswick House, Angle
Street, near Cedar Avenue, where she solicits
a contir.uance of same.
Hamilton, Jan. 29th, 1878.


Johl'n B. Newman,


lieid Street,


- H-amniltont.


(Nearly opposite the Royal Gazette" Office.)
General -arness Maker and
tlcpaierc.
Carriage TRIM ER and UPHOLSTERER.'
MATTRESSES made to order,.
N. B.-Neatness, Strength and Pinctuality
Guaranteed at the above Establishment.
Hamilton, Dec. 1st, 1877.-3m.

1Boots & Shoes,
Cheap.
31so SLIPPERS in great variety
AMERIC.AN NOVELTIES,
LAMIP3 of the latest improvement,
TIN and HARDWARE
SHEETING and Fancy PRINTS.
J.N. J N ES,
Five Doors West of G '-' Office,
In James ichard Store.
'Hamilton, Nov. 2Q, 1677.

For Sale,
4 A Fine

^--fs
Arrived by the '"CANIlIlA" on 20th In tant,
Suitable for general purposes.
THEO. OUToERBRIDGE,
REID STREI'T.
January 22, 1878,


Foy


IT


F- wmm -.2m-M mL aajar--FAw T.-310MMM, 60754 3 f& =0


cii
~dLe.


R. 11. MILIrLEII.


iMil


OFFERS TH'I E


Following A rticlPs,
J-it Lotw'Rates for Cash
-; Ls. and Half Barrels S. F. FLOUR,
Barrels Corn M E:AL
lalf ';r. rels Fiamily H i 1-: F
Barrels Packet BEEF
Barrels TAR, PITCH and ROSIN
Harrels Portland and SRoseudale CIM.MENTS
P-;'4 BRAN, CORN and POLLAIRDS
Sacks CHARCOAL
Vhite Pine Lumber,
Clear and Merchantable,
Consisting of ,1, I3, 14 and 2 inches-lDry
and Cured-Diessed Boards, Groove.! and
Tongued and with Square edges, .6 feet
long x 12 inches wide.

I and 1j dressed Flooring 44 to 6 inches
in width.
RAILING and SCANTLING
Of assorted Sizes.
SPRUCE PICKETS,


4 and 5 feet Lengths.
ALSO',
Onion Box .0 material,
LATilS and Peruvian GUANO.
Which, to approved Purchasers, will be Sup-
plied on accommodating terms.
S. S. rNGHJAIL.
Hamilton, Jany. 8th, 1878.

Notice.
4 LI Persons having CL IMS against. AN-
/ TIIONY BURGESS lHILL, late of liami
ilton Parish, deceased, will present the same to
the Sijbs ibers on or before the first day oj April
next, and all Pei..i,, INDI)WjTvED to the Es-
tate, will please make Payment by that time.
WNM. WHITNEY,
SAML. A, MASTERS.
r. t 'c;* rs.
January 14, 1878.

Privae --"s :ad LL .- ,-

At mys. a. m 'B,


Corner of Dundonald and
II jilIo)n.
January 2 1878.-3


Court Streets,


3"S t ; S t B *






I:*s>~ O wf





o
L
:1 0 0 ,
,i ... .- .crI|1














Picked Up, z

ON Sunday last between St. John's Church,
The Owner can have same by proving Pro-.
*d 'J g-| :- w
S Hamilton, Jany. 8th, 1878.














heo ore uter bridge,
Suna AstiwLTON. 's
R Peid tree, est of Royal Gazette" OLttce.
Oie ours-10 to 12 ad to 4.
O ice r- to12ndUp o .













Office flours-lO to 12 and I to 4.


'.Vill Visit St. Georges, Tuesdays and Fri-


(Iays.
Orders Promptly Attended to.
Hamilton, October 26th, 1876,


0. "1"",S FNC FR.


Her & Snpencer,
306 Wasli3inton Street,


NEW YORK.
All persons I -I'ous of shippii; to the' above
address will be rff'r.'eI every :;c.om'i odalii
by applying to our Agent,
SHEO. OUTERBIlDR1,1
Reid StrrI' r, ia n ol'.Io,.
Bermuda, January 28, 1878.

52 EXCHANGE PLI'E,
NEW YORK, Jany. 15th, 1878.
Any Parties d osfiros of

Shipping' Produce
to our Address will please apply to MVr.C. A. V.
FR ITHI (at tore of Mr. E. H. JONES, Hamil-
ton), who will forward them free (of Cu'niil's
Certificate, &e.
Our Junior, Mr. NASH, will be on hand as
usual, later in the Seaso.i.
I. W,. HAYWARD & CO.
January 22, 1878.-tf.
A. EMILIUS OUTERBRIDGE. JOHN S. SOOTT.
. i. JEmi/ius Outerbridge

Shipping and Comrission

No. 29 BROADWAY,,
Agents for NI..w YORK.
Quebec & Gulf Ports S. S. Co.,
New York and West India Division.
Jany. 7, 1878.

I. WV. Iay ward l Co.,
General Shippin.f and


C o in 1-1


I 1. AY
F. 1). `. NA


(P. O BOX :37.)P, _
52 EXCi.vN(A P I LCE,
XWARD, New York.
LStf.


Garnet Sced Poltoes,
In prime Condition for Planting.
S. S. INGHAM.
15th January, 1878.

For Rent,
Ccci.r tlie coWfc,
(Near Cedar nue,) Hamilton.
Immediate possession given. For Particulars
4pYp to


January 25th, 1878.


WV. J. HIENEY,
Agent.
Or to HENRY H A LII!T,
Devonshire.


For n
That very Desirable, and
niently Situated


Conve-


"D Dwelling IIO1UJ1,
In Reid Street, Hamilton, known as STONE
HAVEN," with Stables, Coach House, &c.


Apply to
January 29th, 1878.


MR. M. S. HUNT.


For Rlent,

I WEST SIDE,
Lately Occupied by llonorable II.
FOWLER.


A pply to


MRS. FACE.


Hamilton, Jany. 28, i878.-3


Notice.
HOUSE FOR RENT.
Il The Dwelling House,
In Town of Hamilton,
At present occupied by Mrs. Louisa Beinnet.
Possession given in January next.
Apply to
B. E. DICKINSON.
Hamilton, Dec. 18, 1877.

For Rent,
The Comfortable and Pleasantly
Situated

Ih DWELLING,
In the Town of Hlamilton, now occupied by
Mr. N. 0. D)un.AM.
Possession given 5!h January 1878.
Apply to
J. E. EVANS,
A; the Paint Shop,
Next Cor. of Queen and licid Street,
llamilton, Novr. 19th? 1877.


-- --mommomolwo


Ef cbr8l(,r..l r*-


AM


Janary25- .78.


A-


v re lin Bits,,


e-'- V








E TRACT from METEOROLOGICAL OBSER-
VATIONS t.l,(n under the direction of the Principal
Med(lleal ,: Frospect, Bermuda. Above the sea
'151 feet.


Date


87y -
Fy. 4


29-765
30-043
30-242
30-181
30-019
29-939


Wind
9a.m.

. 0


s
NW
N
N
SW
SW
SW


Temperature previous
24 hours.


0 0
66-3 57-0
64-1 59-2
61-1 49-2
66-3 52-0
6S-5 50-4
72-5 60-0
69-21 64-2


a0

0

82-2
107-2
126-4
132-8
132-4
127-2
84-2


a.


0
48-8
49-0
42-4
44-2
31 *2
53-2
56"0


Total 3-74


74evraunt *opl (Andekt


Hamilton, February


12, 1878.


CUSTOM HOUTSE-HAMILTON.
*" ENTERED.
Feby. 8-Barkentine Satellite. Winter, London; goods
for merchants.--Agetsh; N. T. Butterfield & Son.
9-Steamer Glenloan. Lirnlit-r', Rio Janeiro; 11,000
bags coffee, 600 hides.-Agent, John S. Darrell.
11-Barque Malta, Montgomery, Androssan ; 200 tons
coal; bound to Delaware Breakwater; stranded.-
Agent J. S. Darrell.
CLEARED.
Feby. 7-Mail Steamer Canima, Liddicoat, New York ;
14 cases wine and spirits, 602- bis. potatoes, 366
boxes tomatoes, 12 boxes beets.
--Barque Eliza Barss, Hollis, New York.
11-Steamer Glenlogan, Lindberg, New York.
PORT OF ST. GEORGE.
ENTERED.
Feby. 7-Brigt. Zetland, of' Liverpool, N.S., Hicks,
10 days from New York bound to Malpas, England,
with a cargo of wheat and oil cake, was towed into St.
Georges by Steam Tug Ackermann, in a leaky con-
dition. Captain reports having experienced a succes-
sion of heavy gales, during which had to throw over-
board a portion of the oil cake. Will require to dis-
charge to effect repairs.-Agents, W. C. Hyland
& Co.
Feby. 8-Brigt. Clara and Agnes, of Arichat, C.B.,
Abraham Gagnoin, 10 days from New York bound to
Gibraltar for orders, with a cargo of radiant oil, in 10
gallon cases; towed into port by Tug Ackermann in
a leaky and disabled condition. Capt. reports having
experienced a succession of heavy gales nearly the
whole passage. Decks constantly flooded with water,
most of the time up to the rails ; constant pumping;
had to rig a platform to prevent the men at the pumps
from being washed overboard. Concluded, for the
preservation of life and property, to bear up for Ber-
muda. Feby. 3rd passed a Brig hove to.-Agent,
John S. Darrell.
Feby. 10th-Am. Schr. Lizzie M. Stewart, Perkins,
from Boston bound to Guadaloupe, W.I. ; 12 days
out; cargo fish ; mainmast and all attached gone in a
hurricane on 31st ult.-Agents, W. C. Hyland & Co.

MOVEMENTS OF VESSELS PORT OF ST. GEORGE.
Barques.


Monarchy-discharging.
Veronica Madre-reloading.
.-l'r('i--repait ing.
uasan .1J. Diddman-sold at Auction last
for :35.


Wednesday


Brigs.
'fte- ready for sea.
r,l.i7 LZ i., ',--,.-;dv for sea.
'rio1/,'.-takin :.n board sufficient of inward cargo to
place her in ballast, trim.
liza-repairing.
w'ur;, and Agnes-getting ready to discharge.
'- ,tln,--discharging.
C. V. Treuerfell-preparing to discharge.
Zza-to be sold at Auction to-moirow, at 12 M., with
materials.
Schooners.
Uncle Tcmi-awaiting orders.
g,,ound-laid up.
* PASSENGERS ARRIVED.
In the R. M. Steamer Beta from St. Thomas on 6th
inst. :-Mr. C. E. Curtes, Mr. C. G. Weld, Capt. G. A.
Webb.-Second Cabin from St. Thomas to Halifax,,
-Captain Thomas Wood, Captain Gaminon, wife and baby
Captain W. A. Ee Me? Captain Walter Flaine.
PASSENGERS SAILED.
In the R. M. Steamer Beta from Bermuda for Hali-
fax on 6th instant :-Captain G. A. Webb, Mr. Scott
Fairley, Mr. J. D. Dickinson.-.'co,f d Cabin, Sergt.
Curran, '*7th R.I.F., wife and 2 children, Sergt. Stap-
les, 87th R.I.F., wife and 1 child, Pvt. Crowe, 87th
R.I.F., and Mrs. Crowe, 11 Naval Invalids, and 5 dis-
tressed British seamen.
In the Mail Steamer Canima on Thursday last for
New York:-Miss Martha Hill, Dr. A. Mitchell,
R.N., Messrs. Francis Perot, Jr., C. E. Curtis, W. W.
Dudman, John Barber and 2 children, E. L. Anderson,
A. E. Outerbridge, A. Holden, B. W. Watlington,
Captain Corning (ex S. M. Dudman), Captain Beattie.
-Second Cabin, Mrs. Christiana Miller.-Steerage, J.
W. Fraser, J. Franklin, Irish Shoemaker, Peter John-
qon.
The British Steamer Glenlogan, Capt. Lindburg, from
Rio de Janeiro, bound to New York, with coffee (11,000
bags) and hides-carrying the Brazilian mails-put
in here on Saturday last in want of 50 tons coal;
which, having been kindly supplied by Captain Leve-
son Somerset, R.N., the Superintendent of Her Ma-
jesty's Naval Yard, she was enabled to proceed on
her voyage on the following evening.-Agent, John S.
Darrell.
The Barque Malta (537 tons), Captain Samuel Mont-
gomery, of and from Androssan, out 35 days, bound to
Delaware Breakwater, with 200 tons coal for ballast,
struckon the South reef Westward of Devonshire Bay,
at half-past two o'clock on the morning of the 10th
instant, during a heavy south wind and a dense fog,
so dense that Gibb's Hill Light, distant only about
eight miles, could not be seen. Soon after striking the
vessel bilged and in a very short time settled down:
the water was up to her lower deck beams. The first
intimation the Captain had of his proximity to land
was the noise of the breaking ol the surf on the shore:
the helm was immediately put down and when heading
off she struck on the outer reefs, inside of which she
had in the first instance come. Rockets were thrown
up and the people along the shore soon became
aware of her position. She will, doubtless, become a
wreck. The Malta was owned by John Barr, Esqr., of
Androssan; was built at St. John, New Brunswick,
about.20 years since; had just undergone extensive
repairs, and reclassed for five years.-Agent, John S.
Darrell.

RAINFALL, JANUARY, 1878.


0-~29
0-28
0-32
0-06
0.00
0-~46
0.03'
.0-03
0.00
o.78
0-84
0-34
0.00
0 00
0-86
0-06


17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31


0-06
0"05

0'02
0-01
0-00
0-19
0'00
0-00
0-01
0.00
0*00
0-41
0'00
0"00

Total 4-79 Ins.


Rainfall January, 1877......................... 2-97 Ins.
Average Rainfall for 8 years, from 1870 to
1877 inclusive .......... .......................3-59 Ins.


(Fio Yn/.I'.5vfor the PLArnutda fRmyal Gazette )
T'Fv 1' Pief"--is tapr'~ tact ins tiald iMe-
olnlisnn.


Joh. Spira died in 1470 and was succeeded by his
brother Vindelin.
435-Petrarca-Sonetti e Trionfi. Vindelin di
Spira; Venice, 1470. Lent by Earl Spencer. First
edition of Petrarch.
The Turks did Western Europe a material service
by the capture of Constantinople in 1453, when
many illustrious and learned Greeks found a refuge
in Italy, where literary treasures where revealed
to the world by the dispersion of printers,'owing to
the capture of Mainz by Prince Adolphus of Nas-
sau in 1462.
Aldo Manuccio, of Venice, Latinized into Aldus
Manutius, (Romanus sometimes added as being a
native of the Roman States), was an accomplished
scholar and the head of the well known Aldi print-
ers. He invented and largely used the Italic letter,
which is said to be a careful reproduction of the
handwriting of Petrarch. He was the first to bring
out books in the convenient octavo and duodecimo.
The Aldi published all the great works of classic
antiquity, and of all the best Italian authors of
their own time. Aldo Manuccio married the daugh-
ter of Andrea Torresani, the successor of Nicholas
Jenson at Venice.
448-Musceus-Gr. et Lat. Aldus; Venice, 4to.,
about 1494.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
Supposed to be the first book printed by Aldus
Pius Manutius, the head of the celebrated Aldine
family of Venetian printers. A Roman by birth,
he first made himself known at Venice in 1488
by giving public lectures in Greek and Latin.
He was on most intimate terms with all the
scholars of his day, and formed what was known
as the "Aldine Academy," which counted among
its members P. Bembo, Erasmus and Demetrius,
Chalcondylas, who assisted him in superintending
the production of his works. Twenty-eight first


(Continued.)
Schoeffer by the invention of the art of punch
cutting did much to render typography successful.
Fust and Schoeffer some eighteen months after
, Gutenberg's dismissal published the famous Mentz
Psalter, only six copies of which are- extant, beau-
tifully executed with hand-painted initials.
612.-Psalms (Latin).
Psialmorum Codex. Presens Psalmorum Codex
venustate capitalium decoratus, rubricationbusque
sufficienter distinctus, ad invention artificiosa im-
primendi ac caracterizandi absque calami ulla ex-
aracione sic effigiatus, et ad eusebiam dei industries
est consummatus, per Johannem Fust civem mag-
untinum et Petrum Schoffer de Gernszheim anno
4 domini MCCCCLVII. In vigilia Assumpcionis
[Mentz] 1457. Folio.
Lent by Her Majesty the Queen.
The Mentz Psalter on 138 leaves, the first book
printed with a date and names of the printers. This
large and sumptuous volume, probably the most
magnificent printed book known, is on pure vellum.
Indeed we believe no copies are known printed on
paper. It measures 16l x 12 inches.
367-Psalterium-Fust and Schoeffer-Mentz
1457. Folio on Vellum.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
The Mentz Psalter 143 leaves. The first printed
Psalter, the first book printed with a date, and the
first example of printing in colours. Only six or
seven copies known to exist.
368-Psalterium-Fust and Schoeffer-Mentz
1459. Folio on Vellum.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
Second edition of the Mentz Psalter, almost as
rare as the first. Contains the first printed text of
the Athanasian Creed. Second printed book with
a date.
Fust died of the plague at Paris in 1466, at the
age of 72 and was buried in the Church of St. Vic-
tor. John Schoeffer, the son of Peter and his suc-
cessor in the printing establishment, which long
continued to flourish, in a dedicatory epistle to
Emperor Maximilian of an edition of Livy de-
clares that the whole merit of the fused metal
types is due to Gutenberg. In 1462 the City of
Mainz was besieged and captured by the Archbis-
hop of Mainz, Prince Adolphus of Nassau, not de-
sired by the people, and who had to oust another
Archbishop already inpossession placed there by an
0 anti-Pope. The workmen employed by the three
0 earliest printers were dispersed and carried the art
into different countries. Ulric Zel, of Hanau,
one of the employees in Fust and Schoeffer's Print-
ing Office at Mentz, set up at Cologne in 1465.
387-Chrysostomus super Psalmo L. Ulric Zel,
Cologne 1466.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
First book printed by Zel with a date. A tract
of excessive rarity.
On the capture of Mentz by Adolphus of Nas-
sau, Conrad Sweynheym and Arnold Pannartz, two
of Gutenberg's and Schoeffer's workmen, took re-
fuge in Italy, and set up a printing press in the
Monastery of Subiaco. They first produced a small
school book, which they named Donatus," of
which no authentic copy has been found, and the
three following works:-
420-Cicero de Oratore Libri III, Subiaco 4to.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
First known book printed in Italy. A copy of
this work at Lugano contains some manuscript
notes with the date Septr. 1465. The Lactantius
was printed October 1465.
421-Lactantius adversus gentes de ira Dei.
Subiaco 1465. Folio.
Lent, by Earl Spencer.
The first work printed in Italy with a date.
422-Augustinus de Civitate Dei. Subiaco;
Sweynheym and Pannartz 1467.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
Sweynheym and Pannartz set up a printing
press in the house of Peterand Francis de Maximis,
who had induced them to leave Subiaco and come
to Rome. In 1474 the partnership broke up, as
Sweynheym wished to devote himself to the art of
copper engraving. They were the first to make
use of Roman characters, and their works are rare,
as they only. struck off 275 or 300 copies of each
edition. Almost all their publications were revised
by J. Andreas, Bishop of Aleria.'
423-Cicero ad familiares Sweynheym and Pan-
nartz, Rome 1467.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
First impression of the first book printed at Rome,
and the first edition in which these two printers'
names appear. First book printed in Roman cha-
racters,
Philip de Lavagna was the first printer in IVIilan.
431-Lascaris, Grammatica Grmeca-Dionysius
Paravisinus. Milan, 1476-4to.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
First edition of the fist book printed in Greek,
This was composed for the daughter of Francis
Sforza, Duke of Milan, into whose house Lascaris
had been received on taking refuge in Italy, with
many of his countrymen, after the taking of Con-
stantinople.
432-- Esopus, Vita et Fabulhe-Gr. et Lat., 4to.
Printed at Milan about 1480. Bonus Accursius.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
First edition of the first Greek Classic printed.
Johannes Spira first introduced printing into
Venice, which was the capital of the printing press,
between 1465 and 1500, and, according to Panza,
issued 2,980 works executed by no fewer than 198
printers.
434-Cicero ad familiares. Venice; Joh. Spira,
1469. Folio. Vellutm.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
First book printed at Venice, and the first in
which JohbSpira's name appears. According to
Van Praat, six copies only on vellum are known.


Psalmes, Faithfully Translated into English Metre.
Whereunto is prefixed a discourse declaring not
only the lawfullness, but also the necessity of the
Heavenly Ordinance of singing Scripture Psalmes
in the Churches of GoD. Coll. III, Let the word of
GOD dwell plenteously in you in all wisdom, teach-
ing and exhorting one another in Psalmes, Himnes,
and spiritual Songs, singing to the Lord with
grace in your hearts. James V.-If any be af-
flicted let him pray, and if any be merry let him
sing Psalmes. Imprinted 1640, 4to.
Lent from the Bodleian Library.
This first book in the English Language printed in
America is usually called the Bay Psalm Book,
from Massachusetts Bay. It was translated by
John Eliot, Thomas Welde and others in Boston
and Roxbury, and was printed by Stephen Daye at
Cambridge, in New England. It is very rare even
in America, and this fine clean and perfect copy is
believed to be the only one known in Europe.
Here is a sample:-
0 Blessed man that in th' advice
of wicked doeth not walk;
nor stand. iu sinners way, nor sit
in cijayre of .scornfull folk.
2.-But in the law of Jehovah,
is 1 longing delight;
and ii his 'dw cloth meditate
Ty day and eke by night!
3.-And he shall be like a tree
planted by water rivers;
that in his season yields his fruit,
and his leafe never withers !
4.-And all ho doth shall prosper well,
the wicked are not so ;
but they Pre like vnto the chaffe,
'-',': winde drives to and fro ;
5.- T :.,::-f...'.. .-'. i not .',i ..7 men,
rise to stand in the doome,
nor shall the sinners with the just
in their assemble come.
6.-For of ithe righteous men the Lord
acknowledgeth the way;
but the way of vngodly men
shall utterly decay. Psalm I.


editions of Greek C'.- besides editions of al-
most every Greek and Latin '.u; ..' of celebrity,
: 1 "i.:,1 from his press, and he was on the point
of publishing a t!. in Hebrew, Greek and Latin,
which would have been the first Polyglot, when he
died in 15.
455-Virgilius-Venetiis. Aldus. Mense Apri-
lis, 1501, 8vo. Vellum.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
First book printed in Italic type, and the earli-
est attempt to produce cheap books by compressing
the matter into small space. It is said that the
type was invented in imitation of Petrarch's hand-
writing. Renouard mentions only six copies on
vellum.
457.-Dante. Aldus, 1502. Venetiis Mense Aug.
8vo.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
A complete copy, 244 leaves. Renouard quotes
this edition as the first in which Aldus employed
the device of the anchor and the dolphin.
King Charles VII., desirous of introducing print-
ing into Paris, had Nicholas Jenson educated at
Mainz (1458), but he went off to Venice and estab-
lished for himself. The credit of introducing
typography into France belongs to the Theological
College of the Sorbonne at Paris, two of its mem-
bers, Guillaume Fichet and Jean de la Pierre, hav-
ing induced three working printers from Germany,
Ulrich Gering, Michael Friburger, and Martin
Crantz, to set up a press within its walls in 1470.
Peter Keyser and John Stol, workmen under Ger-
ing, soon began printing on their own account at
the sign of the Green Rod, Rue St. Jacques. Pan-
za enumerates 85 printers and over 790 works exe-
cuted at Paris during the fifteenth century.
480-Gasparinus Pergamensis (Barzizius). Folio.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
Supposed to be the first book printed at Paris. I
481-Biblia Latina Vulgata. Paris; Gering,
Crantz and Friburger, 1475-6. Folio, 2 vols.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
First Bible printed at Paris. The type is pecu-
liar, between the Roman and Gothic.
At Paris the illustrious typographic dynasty of
the Stephani (Les Estiennes) took its rise. Henry
was born at Paris 1470. Francis, Charles and Rob-
ert Stephens, also printers, were his sons. Francis
I appointed, in 1531, Robert, a man of great learn-
ing, King's Printer in the Greek and Hebrew lan-
guages. He published Bibles in Latin, Greek,
Hebrew and French, and a Latin Thesaurus in
three folio volumes. He dismissed from his edi-
tions of the Classics all the manuscript contrac-
tions. His eldest son and worthy successor, Henry,
published in 1572 a Greek Thesaurus, in four volms.,
folio, whence John Scapula, one of his employees,
constructed his one-volume Lexicon (1579), for-
merly so familiar to English scholars.
Bertholdus Rot, one of Gutenberg's associates,
was the first printer at Basle, where the Frobens,
father and son, have a special interest as the friends
of Erasmus and the printers of his works.
505-Novum Testamentum Erasmi. Gr. et Lat.
Basil; Froben, 1516. Folio, 2 vols.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
First edition of the Greek New Testament, which
having been executed, as it is reported, in five
months, abounds in errors, which were corrected in
subsequent editions. J. Froben, of Franconia,
studied at the University of Basle, where he began
printing in 1491. He was on terms of intimacy
with the savants of the day, and was highly prais-
ed by Erasmus for his generosity and disinterest-
edness. The Utopia of Sir Thomas More was
printed at Basle by John Froben in 1519. The
genius of Holbein enriched the productions of
Froben'spress with most beautiful borders and or-
namental woodcuts.
Printing wr..i iJtr:.,1u.".:d into Spain at Seville,
1476, by three Spaniards-Ant. Martinez, Barth.
Segura, and Alph. del Puerto-where numerous
and valuable works were produced during the fif-
teenth century. Through the instrumentality of
John Cromberger, a German printer at Seville,
printing was established in the city of Mexico in
1540, Pablos being the foreman.
Mendez has given us evidence that the Alcala
Press was at work in 1502. It will ever be famous
in the annals of literature from its having given to
the world the first Polyglot Bible. In 1479 a Bible
in Spanish was issued at Valencia by a German
named Lambert Palmaert.
522-Biblia lolyglotta Cardinalis Francisci Xi-
menez. In Complutensi Universitate. A de Bro-
cario, 1514-17. 6 vols., folio.
Lent by the \President and Governors of Sion
College.
First Poliglot Bible. Printed at the expense of
Cardinal Ximenes. Did not receive the sanction
of Pope Leo X until 1520 for publication. Copies,
of which only 600 were printed, were not circu-
lated until 1522.
The earliest printing at Constantinople was that
of the Jews, who are believed to have executed
Hebrew works btw>:.-u 1490 and 1598. In the
sevtenteenth century Metaxa, a Greek, endeavoured
to establish another printing office, but his attempt
was defeated by the Jesuits, and an Armenian
press brought from Venice was established there,
Which in a short time the Janissaries received or-
ders to destroy. The first printed Turkish book ap-
pears to have been a Turkish Arabic Lexicon, 1726.
Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the cradle of
the art of printing in the United States. The first
book printed was the Bay Psalm Book in 1640 by
Stephen Daye, a printer, who left England with
the Rev. Joseph Glover, a Non-Conformist Minis-
ter, who proposed to establish a press in New Eng-
land but who died on the passage out.
1110-Psalms (American). The Whole Booke of


WASHINGTON, January 27.-The sub-com-
mittee of the house judiciary committee having
under consideration the bill providing for the
distribution of the balance of the Geneva
award fund, amounting to about $9,000,000, to-day
heard the closing arguments in favor of the pass.
age of said bill. J. F. Manning of Massachusetts
appeared in behalf of the owners of vessels and
cargoes and the payers of war premiums. Mr.
Sedwick of New York was present in the interest
of the underwriters. A majority of the sub-com-
mittee favor the class of claims represented by Mr.
Manning, but in the case of the underwriters they
hold that those experiencing a net loss on their
war business have recovered the same. A report
of the sub-committee will be submitted to a full
committee for its consideration at an early day.

DISAPPEARANCE OF AN ISLAND.
Captain J. 0. Lunginers of the Danish vessel
Lutterfeld communicates to a Copenhagan paper
an interesting account of a novel experience which
occurred on December 10, 1876, while on a voyage
to Valparaiso. The vessel was at this time in the
neighborhood of Terra del Fuego, about 140 miles
from Magellan's Straits, when early in the morning
it narrowly escaped collision with an island where
no trace of land appeared on the charts. The ves-
sel hove to until daylight, when the captain pro-
ceeded with a boat's crew to the new island, which
had gradually diminished in size since the first ob-
servation. Around the conical rocky mass the wa-
ter was i;:I., and although no smoke appeared,
it was found to be too "I:'Ly heated to permit of
landing. The sinking continued slowly, until at 8
o'clock the island completely submerged, and an
hour later the vessel .:'.- ov':r the spot where it
had disappeared. T":'. volcanic island is probably
due to the same causes which have produced the
recent severe earthquakes on the west coast of
South America.

Sir Edward Shepherd Creasy, the English his-
torian, is dead.


William B: :..i, of Leicester (England) set up
a press near i. .." .i .ji,, 1686, and moved into the
city 1689. Benj. Franklin commenced the business
of a printer on his own account in Philadelphia and
continued it till 1765.
524-Analysis of a General Map of the Middle
British Colonies in America, by Lewis Evans, 4to,
Philadelphia 1755, printed by Benjamin Franklin
and D. Hall. Lent by the Earl of Leicester.
A present from Franklin to Thomas, Earl of Lei-
cester. The inscription is in Franklin's handwri-
ting, when he was a printer at Philadelphia.
525-Cato Major. Printed by Benj. Franklin.
Lent by G. Tawse, Esqr.
With presentation autograph from Franklin to
General Washington.
Theodoric Rood carnc from Cologne to Oxford
about a year after Caxton's arrival in England 1478.
Between 1482 and 1485 he took into partnership
Thomas Hunte, a stationer to the University.
Rood died in 1486 fand for a century afterwards
there is no trace of printing at Oxford. Joseph
Barnes, the first "printer to the University," issued
his first book in 1585 assisted by the Earl of Lei-
cester, Chancellor to the University. Some 17
works were issued by Rood, and Rood and Hunte
in seven years.
195-Expositio Sancti Jeronomi in Simbolum
Apostolorum, Oxford 1468, 4to.
Lent by All Soul's College, Oxford.
First book printed at Oxford. The correct date
is 1478.
Nothing is known of "the schoolmaster of St.
Albans" who worked his press from 1480 to 1486,
and issued eight works. When Cardinal Wolsey
was Abbot of St. Albans, it is supposed he forbad
printing, as we find no trace of it in his time. In
1534 it was revived by John Hertford.
In 1498 John Sibert, of Lyons, commenced print-
ing at Cambridge. He died in 1522 and not till 1582
was his successor appointed, "Thomas Thomasius,
M.A., Fellow of King's College, who began printing
two years later. It was John Legate, a distinguished
printer in 1589, who first made use of the design
still to be seen in the Cambridge books-a figure
of Alma Mater Cantabrigia, standing behind an al-
tar with streaming breasts, and holding in one
hand a sun, in the other a chalice, with an encir-
cling legend, Ilic Ivcem et pocula sacra."
At York, a Hollander, Hugo Goes, was printing
in 1506, and John Mytchell, was printing at Can-
terbury in 1550.
The first printing press in Scotland was intro-
duced under the patronage of King James IV. by
a grant of exclusive privileges in favour of Walter
Chepman and Andrew Myllar, burgesses of Edin-
burgh signed under the Privy Seal at Edinburgh,
15th September, 1507.
284-The Maying or Disport of Chaucer.
"Impretit in the south gait of Edinburgh be
Walter chepman and Androw myllar, the fourth
day of apile, the yhere of GOD MCCCCC and VIII
yheris, 4to. Unique.
Lent by the Faculty of Advocates, Edinburgh.
The earliest book known to have been printed in
Scotland. It has on the last page Myllar's device,
representing a windmill with a miller ascending
the outside ladder and carrying a sack of grain
upon his back.
In Dublin printing was introduced in 1551.
The first press set up in the City of London was
that of John Lettov, 1480-81. Letton & Mach-
linia, and William de Machlinia 1481-5. At least
twenty works issued from this press, among them
the first printed Law Book in England. Littleton
on Tenures-probably published 1481.
Wynken de Worde, a native of Lorraine, suc-
ceeded Caxton at the Red Pale, and about 1499 re-
moved to Fleet Si reet, under the sign of the Golden
Sun, in the Pari-li of Sf. Bride, where he died in
1534-410 works or editions are enumerated from
his press, among them the Koran of the false ne-
cromancer, Mahomet."
236-Bartholomaeus de proprietatibus rerum.
Wynken de Worde-Folio. Without place or date
but probably about 1495.
Lent by Earl Spencer.
The most magnificent production of Wynken de
Worde's press.
First book printed on paper of English manufacture.
The first paper mill was set up at Hertford in
Henry VII's reign by John Tate.
Richard Pynson, a Norman by birth, was an early
servant of Caxton's. His stand was.on Fleet Street,
at the sign of St. George, beside St. Dunstan's Church.
He was the first typographical artist who intro-
duced the Roman letter into England-215 works
or editions are given from his press. In 1503
Henry VII appointed him King's Printer. He
printed Henry VIII's Treatises against Luther,
which, as he is well known,-led to the Pope confer-
ring on His Majesty the title of "Defender of the
Faith," which is still so tenaciously held to.
(To be continued.)

AFGANISTAN.-CALoCUTTA, January 28.-A
doubtrul rumor, though transmitted through offi-
cial channels, says that the Ameer ofCabul is mass-
ing troops at Oandabar. This might mean a me-
nace to Persia or Engla'nd, against both of whom
the Ameer is hostile. The significance of his hos-
tile attitude to the English lies in the fact that
hitherto, in considering the possibility of a Russian
invasion of India, we have been accustomed to look
upon Afganistan as an all but invincible barrier
between English territory and Russian aggression,
whereas now, for all military purposes, that bar-
rier ha3 ceased to exist.

THE GENEVA AWARD.


inst., after a short illness, ELLISTON B. PEROT, Esqr.,
aged 85 years; leaving a widow and numerous relatives
to mourn their loss.
The deceased was ever a true friend to the poor even
to the last days of his life,-and though suffering under
keen bodily afllic-tion for a number of years, which he
bore patiently, he ever gave evidence of being a de-
voted and exemplary Christian.
........., in this Town, on the 7th instant,, after a long
and painful illness, which she bore with Chri tian for-
titude, Mrs. PRISCILLA HINSON, in the 52nd year of
her age.
........., in the Town of St. George, on Sunday, 3rd
instant, after a severe illness, Mary Susan, the be-
loved wife of J. T. Nugent, Esq., in the 29th year of
her age. Leaving a husband, two children, and a
large circle of friends to mourn their loss.-(Comr.)

.A Supplement of Four
Columns accompanies this issue
of the" Royal Gazette."
It contains two communications on Dises-
tablishment,
Lord Carn von's Explanation as to his resig-
nation, and the Earl of Beaconsfield's Reply,
Latest rumours respecting the War, &c.


Money
To be Loaned on approved Mort-
gage Securities.
S. BROWNLOW GRAY.
l.n..:,_.n, Feby. 9th, 1878.-I pd


antd,
& 21 OD OORP ,
By a Family in this Town.
Apply "Gazette" Office, lamilton,
Feby. 12th, 1878.


Fr:; a the West Indies and Demerara.

The R. M. Steamer Beta, Captain Shaw, arrived
on Tuesday morning last from St. Thomas, and
sailed same evening for Halifax. We received by
the Beta, our usual exchange files from the West
Indies,
On our first page to-day will be found a copy of
the Bill, transmitted to the Barbados House of As-
sembly on the 3rd January, by Governor Strahan,
for admitting two salaried officers of the Crown in-
to the House of Assembly,--and following it-copied
from the 'West Indian of the 25th-the result of
the proceedings of the House on the question, which
was, the rejection of the Bill, by a majority of two.

AMUSEMENTS.
The musical Enif!tiimnunt, announced in our
last edition came off on Friday evening last, in the
Mechanics' Hall in this Town, and it is pleasing to
remark that the indefatigable efforts of the "Pornm
pon.Rouges" were attended with success.
The spacious Hall was literally crammed, every
available corner being occupied, and although some
little confusion was caused amongst the holders of
reserved seat tickets, by an apparent error in nunu.,
being, it must be borne in mind that an undertaw
king of this description by Amateurs is inva.
riably attended with difficulty, and leniency must
be extended to its shortcomings. It should also
be remembered that the Mechanics' Hall can.
not be said to be peculiarly adapted to this class of
amusement.
The first and second portions of the Programme
consisted of Overtures, Selections, Songs, &c., by the
Company, a Duet The minute Gun at Sea," sung
by Sergeant Heut and Private Ashford, eliciting
well earned applause, but the hit of the evening
certainly was "The Conductor of the German
band," sung by Sergeant Heut in character, which
commanded such enthusiastic applause as shook the
house.
The Alleghany Miit .J assisted by Professor
Ramous (who acted as their leader), afforded consid.
erable merriment, and some excellent music,vocal and
instrumental. Please give me a penny, Sir,' and
Kiss me Mother 'ere I die," both rendered by Pri-
vate Ashford in his usually careful manner y
"Away from the Isle of Bermuda" (Sergt.-Major
Crausby), and a novel solo on the bones by Profes-
sor Ramous, brought a most successful performance
to a close, and we departed highly contented with
the evening's amusement. Thle Musical arrange-
ments as usual, found an efficient director in Mr.
Campbell, Bandmaster 46th Regt.--(Contributed.)

We understand that it is intended to appoint a
Staff Commander to the Terror as a supernumerary
for service at Bermuda Dockyard. His duties will
be those of Harbour Master and Master Attendant.
Army and Navy Gazette, Jany. 12.
An account, not strictly accurate, of a misunder-
standing between Vice Admiral Grenfell, C.B., and
Captain W. E. Stone having appeared in, the pa-
pers, it is only fair to the first named Officer to
state that with the exception of one instance, when
he had to assign reasons for a public action of his,
he carefully avoided every renewal of difference,
and no challenge was ever offered or received by
him.-Ibid.
The uniform of the new Army Pay Department
is now settled upon, and will be of scarlet, as we
some months since intimated was probable.-Ibid.
Captain-General Jovellar liberated forty-seven
prisoners, confined in the Havana fortress, on the
day of King Alfonso's marriage.
The Supi'erhe Court of Canada has decided that
the provincial governmentsacannot tax brewers, the
power being alone vested in the government of the
Dominion.
The French Academy of Sciences has awarded
the Lalande prize of astronomy to Professor Hall
the American discoverer of the satellites of Mars.
It is stated that the Messrs. Lairds of Birkenhead
received a telegram last night ordering them to pre-
pare a ship-building yard for laying down new
gunboats.
Italian vessels will shortly be despatched to vari-
ous Turkish ports to protect the interests of Italian
subjects.
Statistics allow that over one-third of the sugar
product of the world is obtained from beets, France
producing the greater amount.
The Irish Societies of Boston and vicinity voted
last evening not to parade on St. Patrickl's Day,
but instead a public lecture will be given, and pro-
ceeds of which will be distributed among charita-
b institutions.

BERMUDA HUNT.
The finish of the Bermuda Hunt on Thursday
next, the 14th instant, will be at Warwick Camp,
instead of at Inverurie, as previously announced.

An Inquisition was held in Sandy's Parish, on the
9th inst., before Charles C. Keane, Esqr., Coroner,
on view of the body of a child about 16 months old,
named Clarence Addison Leon Kendle, who was acci-
Sden llv drowned in a tub or trough used for watering
Cattle, on the premises of Mr. Bento Powell.-Verdict
in accordance.

BIRTH, at Ireland, on the 10th inst., the WIFE of
Mr. R. Galloway, of a SON.

DIED, at his residence, in this Town, on the 7th




~ \:,~ ~r


A z~{**~-~ ~


CA)


10 GALLOWTS EACH .
The above is Undamaged, and will be found
a n excellent Article and in good condition.
Sold, in accordance with Instructions.
JOHN S. DARRELL,
Agent.
St. Georges, bermuda, Feby. 12th, 1878.

For Benefit of Owners, Underwri-
ters and all Concerned.

BY AUCTION,


AT AT W 0 0 D'S W ARF,
ZN TEZ2S TOWN.
T--morrow, Wednesday,
February 13th, at 12 M.,




SPARS, SAILS and RIGGING,
CHAINS,- ANCHORS, BOATS, &c., &c.,
Of the American Brigantine
"I Z A,
William Chandler, Master,
Which Yessel put into this Port in distress
on a voyage from Hyeres, France, bound to
Providence, R.I., and abandoned on Survey
and Estimate and sold as above in accordance
with instructions.
JOHN S. DARRELL,
Agent
St. Georges, February 12, 1878.

SNotice.

A full attendance of the Members of Coun-
cil No. 8, of the Patriarchal Order of
P. G. M's. of the G. U. 0. of 0. F. is re-
quested on
To-morrow Evening,
I .t the Odd i'elow,'s 1-011l,
At half past Seven o'clock.
FREDERICK J. SWAN,
Grand Secretary.


Hamilton, Feby. 12th, 1878.

Hamilton Mari


ne


Assu-


rance Association.
T HE SHAREHOLDERS are re-
quested to attend a Meeting,
J1t the BROKER' S OFFICE.
On Friday the 22nd Inst.,
At 12 o'clock,
For Special Business of Importance.
J. H. TRIMINGHAM,
Broker.
11th February, 1878.-1



SEEDS! SEEDS !!

Cucumber, Musk & Water Melon.
ALSO,
Peas and Beans,
Beet, Carrot, Turnip,
Radish, Cauliflower,
Cabbage, Kohl Rabi,
Flower 3eeds,
And a variety of other SEEDS and Garden
IMPLEMENTS.
C. H. ROBINSON.
45 Front Street, Hlamilton, 1
12th Feby., 1878.
Bermudian" once.


To Arrive from
Islands,


Turks'


bout the 18th Instant,
Per SCHOONER
J. W. Peasley9
A CARGO Consisting of :-
Coarse Salt & Donkeys,
Which will be Sold cheap from t4 Wharf.
By
THEOS. J. LIGHTBOURN.
Hamilton, Feby. 11th, 1878.-1

Lost,
ON the Night of the 10th, or on
the morning of the llth instant,
0 i B O T,
Of about 12 feet keel, sharp at both ends. Gun-
nel painted Black, sides White, and
bottom Grey.
A *titable Re\ard will be paid to any one
who will bring the same back to MR. CHARLES
THIELE, Royal Naval Hospital, Ireland Island.
February 214, 1878.
Colonist copy once.


I ST QUALITY
11IM'UDA ARROWROOT, Genuine, in
"- Small and Large Packages
Cassava STARC H
Palmetto WVOItK ACACIA and SlIELL, very
fine
.Honey, Cedar Berry SYRUP, for Coughs,
Golds, Consumption and Liver Complaints
Sea RODS Sea EGGS, the finest to be ob-
S trained in Bermuda.
All of above are Bermuda Products.
C. H. ROBINSON
45 Front Street, Hamilton, C O
12th Feby., 1878.
Gazette" only.


Receiving ex ,
FR 0 L 0 1 0N,
41t the Royal Gazette Stationery
Store,
SCRIPTURE Text BOOKS
k" Exercise and Copy BOOKS, various sizes
Patent CLIPS
Cream-laid and Fancy Note PAPIER, and EN-
VEIOPES to match
FO(OLSCAP, plain, ruled, blue and for Ac-
counts
Audiscript, J. and other PENS Pen KNIVES
PENRACKS PENCLEANERS
PENHOILDE1S Date R \AC,
PURSES FILES for Papers
Red, Blue, Green and Li;,(ii PENCILS
Dog WHISTLES, metal and wood
Shaving PAPER, &c., &c., &c.
Hamilton, Feby. 12th, 1878.


14th FEBR U3RRY.

VALENTINES.

rr 1 E Cheapest and BEST ASsORTM EN'P
i ON SALK at the 1 Royal Gazette" Stati-
onery Store.
. Liberal DISCOUNT to the TR iDE.
Hamilton, Feby. 4, 1878.-2 3 p.

A further Supply of the above
by the Satellite."


SEWING


Machines.


THE SUBSCRIBER
Is now prepared to have Sewing M\ CHINES,
purchased at his Establishmoent,


I.T ,,
c- of .' ^


At Moderate rates.
C. H. ROBINSON.
No. 45 Front Stiect, Hamilton, I
12th Feby., 1878. .
Colonist" once.


For Benefit of all Con-
cerned.

BY AUCTION,
WILL 3BE SO3D

This Day, Tuesday,
The 12th instant,
AT ZUILL'S W7IARF,
IN THXS TOWO ,
At 12 M,,
235 Cases Iladiant


To-morrow, Wednesday,
S13th inst., At, l1 o'clock,


A Lot of

Viz:
FLOUR MEAL HAMS BA(ON
BUTTER LARD CHEESE
RAISINS FIGS
Canned FRUITS and OYSTERS
Bags RICF, 1B1 AN & orTS
SHalf Chests and Small pI.,s. TE A (delicious)
Half Barrels Family B!'EF and less PORK
Do. & Qr. do. Salt MACKEREL.
Smoked IIERRINGS CANDLES
SOAP & SODA
Only 4 Bris. of that Illuminating Kerosene
OIL, fire test
A Large CHANDELIER, with Lamps, &c.,
complete
Some FURNIITU]E
A Lot of STATIONERY
A Lot of GLASSWARE, &c., &c., &c.
ALSO,
A Child's


JOHN HA RNETIT,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, Feby. 12. 1878.
N.B.-Should to-morrow be unfair, sale will
take place first fair day after. J. II.




I AM INSTRUCTED TO SELL,


On Thursday Next,
14th instant, at 11 o'clock,
1.-A LOT OF LOGWOOD, FUS-
TIC arid LANCEWOOD POLES, saved
from the Wrecked Schooner "Clara," as
it now lies on the Wharf.
2.-TWO OLD ANCHORS; some
OLD SAILS, A RUDDER, some OLD
RIGGING, &c., &c.
3.-THC E LU LLB, CARGO
and MATERIALS, of the Wrecked Schr.
Clara," as they now lie on the Northern
Reefs.
N.B.-The Buoys and Moorings placed near
the wreck do not form part of her materials.
ALSO,
A Good ROW BOAT,
With Oars and Awning, &c., suitable for the
Ferry.
1 Case of DI? GOODS,
Consisting of Blankets, Trowsers and Shirts.
1 Case Long BOOTS and BRO-
GANS
3 Cases Lamp CHIMNEYS
&c., &c.
JOHN HARNETT,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, February 12, 1878.
N.B.-If foul weather on Thursday the Sale
will take place first fair day after. J.IH..

P ERSONS desirous of Con-
- sig nin g

i TO
Messfr.s. Middleton 4* Co.,
NEW YORK,
Will please call upon MR. SAMUEL A. MAS-
TERS, Front Street, who will attend to the
Shipment of their goods, as heretofore.
MIDDLETON & CO.
Ilamlton, Feby. 12th, 1878.-3 m

; 1878.
Souvenirs of Bermnnuda.


T' e tIAF" .s *r-, -.7I
xfrs: 7 A:^ '-s, f f c C."', ff ,
Under the distinguished Patronage of
His Excelaency Sir 3. and
I Ld y L .affan,
Will give a DRAMATIC ENTERTAINMENT
on the Evenings of
Thursday and Friday,
The 14th and 15th instant.
By kind permission of -Colonel DEANE and
Officers of the 19th P. W. 0., a portion of the
Band of that Regt. will form the Orchestra on
each Evening.
The Comedy
"WHO'S TO WIN HIBM,"
Will be repeated by special request; to be
preceded by the Farce
Qppi. the e.'stion,
And follow-1d by

It would be advisable that persons desiring
Tickets should make an early application to
some member of the Club.
February 12, 1878.

Card of Thanks.

O- M. LINDBKERG, Master of the British
'"' Steamship Glenlogan takes this means of
expressing his grateful thanks to Captain LEVE-
SON F. It SOMERSET, I.'., A.D.C., Naval
Superintendent, for suppi in,. his Ship with
Coal, and for the facilities and despatch ren-
dered him while at Hler 3i.,ij.ty's Dockyard.
Hamilton, February 10, 1878.




STOTVES-

FOR SHIPS AND HOUSE,
To burn with Coal, V1uod or Kerosene; to be
used either for Heating or Cooking.
UTENSILS for same, either with Stov.s or
sold separately.
MEDICATED) PAPER, very Cheap
Blristol's and Ayer's SARSAPARI LL \
Powel's BALSAM OF ANISEED for Coughs
and Colds,
C. H. ROBINSON.
45 Front Street, Hamilton,
12th Feby., 1878.
Gazette" on!y.

Notice to Growers
of Bermuda Produce.

rH!, Undersigned beg to offer their Services
Sfor Receiving and Forwarding Consign-
ments of
oermuda Produce.
To Messrs. JOHA NIX Co.,
Of NEW YORK,
Throughout the coming Crop Season."
All Shipments intrusted to our Cnre will havo
otir usual good attention.
J. T. DARRELL & CO.,
Hamilton, Bermuda.
January 21, 1878.-2 m. 3rd p.

Durnscomb & Fith,
-!7 '1 .
No. 40 EXCHANGE PLACE, NEW YORK.
To Consigners of

To above address I beg to offer my services in
facilitating Shipments, &c.
J. F. SMITH.
January 14th, 1878.-6 3p.

Mr. Robert Bedingfided,



Animals and Birds of all Descrip-
tions STUFFED.
SMITHS HILL, HAMILTON.
of Orders may be left at the Otfice of the
Royal Gazette."
February 12th, 1878.


Notice
7To Growers and Owiners

OF ___M A PRODUCE,
[N consequence of the great increase in ship-
,ments of Produce to New Yo k since the
season of 1874, we deem it necessary to give
notice, that we are ready to give our personal
attention as usual to all Shipments of Bermuda
Produce for New York made through us, but
without being responsible for the net proceeds
until paid to our order in New York, which will
be given to the New York Consignees for Sale,
by each vessel transporting a shipment.
When necessary to order Specie in return for
any shipment it will be insured at the expense
of the Owners interested, and Owners will
clearly understand that all the dangers of trans-
port are borne by them.
TROTT I COX.
Hamilton, Bi-rin i, to 30th J une, 3p
February 9, 1878. to 30th June, 3p

iNotice
To Farmers and Others.

Would Respectfully Solicit Consignments of
Bermuda Produce,
Throughout the present Crop Season.
Feeling confident that his long experience and
thorough acquaintances with the lBusiness will
enable him to give every satisfaction.
MR. W. T. JA 1I':S,
42 Front Street, Hamilton.
Will receive and forward Consignments free of
charge.
Account Sales and Cash returns promptly made.
WILLIAM PEACOCK,
18 Vesey Pier, Washington Market, New York.
February 4, 1878.-3m. 3p.
UNCLAIMED LETTERS IN THE POST OF-
FICE, ST. GEORGE, 11th Fcby., 1878.
Joseph Arlington, B Burchal, Win H 1iBel, Steph-
en Brangman, Mrs Thos Brown, Joseph Burchall,
Susan Catty, James Dowling, Miss R M DaCosta,
Charlotte Fox, James Griffith, iMingo Jones, Mrs
Sarah larivey, J C Hay.vard, Harry XlcMillan,
Hugh Mitchell, Colin McVicar, Miss R Outerbridge,
David C Pitcher, G R, Rankin, John Rizhardson,
Theophilus Smith, Mr Win Smith, John Smith,
David Troit, Elias Trott, Benj D Talbot, 'Susan
Trott, James B Webb, Charles Williams,


Colonial Secretary's Office,
FEBRUARY 11TH, 1878.
New Regulations for the
Sale of Postage Stamps.
IT has always been open to any inhabitant
of Bermuda to sell Pig,.. Staiips-but
it being desirable that the practi,- wiltn h has
hitherto been followed with a view to facili-
tating the sale of those stamps of making an
advance of 25 in Postage Stamps to certain
individuals, should be discontinued-it has
been ordered by the Governor in Council that
the practice of making such advances shall
forthwith be discontinued, but that the indi-
viduals to whom such privileges have been con-
ceded shall be allowed to profit by their use
-up to the end of the present year 1878,-and
it has further been ordered by the Governor in
Council that from and after this present date
any individual purchasing Postage Stamps at
the Post Office to the extent of 5, or up-
wards in any single purchase, whether for his
own use or for purposes of sale, shall be en-
titled to a repayment from the Colonial Trea-
sury of a percentage of 5 per cent on the
amount so paid by him for Stamps-and that
in order to enable such purchaser to obtain
repayment of the said per centage he shall be
furnished at the same time that he receives the
Postage Stamps with a Certificate, signed by
the Postmaster, setting forth the amount paid
for Postage Stamps and the sum to be repaid
thereon as a percentage by the Colonial Trea-
sury, and that on presentation of such Certifi-
cate at the Receiver General's Office the
amount set forth therein for percentage shall
be paid.
By His Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSETR,
Colonial Secretary.


Clothitag al
Woolen Jackets
Osnaburgh Do.
Drill Do.
Guernsey Frocks
Woolen Pants
Osnaburgh Do.
Drill Do.
Woolen Robbins
Do. Drawers
Cotton Shirts
Do. Socks
Do. Handkerchiefs
Do. Braces
Neck Collars
Straw Hats
Woolen Caps
Men's Boots (Bluch'rs)
Slippers
Thread, White
Do., Black


Tape
Blankets
Women's
Do.
Do.
Do.


Cotton Hose
Straw Hats
Boots
Slippers


,nd Bedding.
Linsey for Dresses
[for Wo-
Blue Serge )men', &
Blue Deims A Men's,
SApparel
Osnaburgh, for Wo-
men's and Men's use
Drill, for Pants
Calico, for Women's
use
Cottons, for Do.
Cottons, inferior, for
lining
Flannel, for Women's
use
Flannel, inferior, for
lining
Prints, for Dresses
Shirting
Calico, for Coverl t'ts
Venetians, for Window
Curtains
Needles
Buttons, assorted sizes
Ribbon
Quilts or Rugs


No. 2.
Utensils.


6 Chambers
6 Galvz. Iron Buckets
4 Do. Do. Large
2 Sauce Pans
1 Coffee Pot (Tin)
1 Tea Do. (Do.)
20 Tin Cans
12 Do. Pans
1 Carving Knife and
Fork
1 Large Kitchen Knife
2 Common Tin Kero-
sene Lamps
1 Corkscrew
1 Coffee Mill
2 Spades
2 Forks (Iron)


1 Pair Pin,.-ors
6 Hand, Scrubbing
Brushes
6 Corn Brooms
3 Pr. Smoothing Irons
2 Large Tumblers
2 Small Do.
6 Combs
4 Hair Brushes
1 Large. Tin Pan
1 Nutmeg Gratert
1 Large Do.
1 Pair Bellows
1 Sieve
2 Shovels
2 Weeding Hoes
3 Sizes Gimlets


No. 3.
Drugs.


j lb. Tinct. Digitalis
2 lbs. Tinct. Camph.
2 lbs. Tinct. op. Camph
4 lbs. Tinct. Hyosey-
amus
2 lbs. Tinct. Carrabis
Indicus
2 lbs. Tinct. Gent.
1 lb. Acid Sulp. Dilut.
2 lb. Pulv. Myrrhae (in
wide-mouthed Salt
Bottles)
2 lbs. Potiass Bitar (in
wide-mouth eA Salt
Bottles)
36 1-oz. Phials


4 lb. Mut. Morph.
2 lbs. Hyd. Chloral
1 lb. Potass Bromide
l lb. Citrat. Quinia et
Ferri
lb. Pulv. Ipecac (in
wide-mouthed Salt
Bottles)
2 oz. 01. Cinnamon (in
a Tinct. Bottle)
2 oz. 0. Menth. Pip.
(in a Tinct. Bottle)
1 lb. Spr. Amonia.
Aromat.
6 Bottles Condy's Dis-
infecting Fluid


No. 4.
Needlework for one Year
or more at the discretion of His Excellency
THE GOVERNOR AND COUNCIL.
CONDITIONS.
The Artical required must be approved by
the MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT, and samples
must accompany Tenders for Contract No. 1.
The Articles must also be delivered at the
Asylum on such day and hour as the MEDICAL
SUPERINTENDENT may direct.
Payment will be made at the close of the
Quarter, the Accounts having been previously
duly certified by the MEDICAL SUPERINTEN-
DENT, and audited by the Committee of Quar-
terly Accounts.
Forms of Tender required for this Service
can be obtained at this Office.
By Command of His Excellency the Governor in
Council, -
R. E. WEBSTER,
Colonial Secretary.
Uclaimed LLetters.
Thomas G Adams, Aitkins & Co., Jose Antonio,
Robert A Adams, J R Armstrong, W Adcock, "Ap.
plicant," Richard J Bean, Peter Burgess, James WV
Buttertield, Joao Bettencourt, Gus Brown, Frank W
Brown, Ruthy Barnes, Mrs James Bascome, Mrs
Annie Brown, Mirs Peter Basset', Para Minha Maria
Sr Rozi do Conceicas, J W Cook, Robert Cooper,
Fraser Deshield, George W Daymon, Win Frazer,
I Freeman, J B Fox, Mrs Gibsbn, Elizabeth J Har-
ford, Joseph Hinson (Hinson's Island), WH Hlealey,
Wm Healey, J H Hopkins'Miss A 8 Inglam, Em-
ma Jackson, Eugenius Jones (Warwick), Frank
John, Martha Johnson, Mrs Emily Jane Jones, S
I Littaner, Philip A Moor, Win J Mellows, Ellen
Murphy, Miss Kate Peniston, TJ Place, J W Place,
Samuel D Robinson, Mary Rees, Miss Mary Smith
(Shelly Bay), Matilda Steed, Georgc Simonq, Eliza
J Smith, Edward J Smith, Hans P Simnonsson, Edith
Simmons, Ambrozio de Silva, Mri Richard btovell,
Frederick Simmons, George N Swan, Charles A
Smith (Smith's Parish), Joseph Smith, Julia Smith,
! Mrs Edward Tateum, Richard Tynes, Mrs Ruth Anna
Tucker, Mrs Wm F Tiney (Somerset), LlII..n Tuck-
er, Dinah Williams, Letitia Williams, Elizabeth
Wilson, Mary Whitecross, Lizzie \Va:-ington.
Charles Williams, James L Ward, Laura F WVilk-
inson, Albert Young.
Post Office, H amnl:on, February 11, 1878.
A MAIL for Jamaica, per H. M. S. Plover, (loses
at the Post Office, Hamilton, today, (Tutsday), at
hreo o'clock,


Contracts for


TO THE
L,.13ALUNATIC ASYLUM
Colonial S,',riv'yfs QO.ee,
FEBRUARY 11TH, 1878.
EALED TENDERS in Duplicate, addressed
to the COLONIAL SECRETARY, and marked
on the Envelope Tenider for Supplies to the
Lunatic Asylum," will be received at THIS
OFFICE on or before


The 18th inst., at Noon,
From Persons desirous of Supplying the
Following ARTICLES,
For the use of the Lunatic Asylum, viz.:
Contract No. 1.


71.1 --
Fi


Notice.


A STEADY YOUNG MAN
is required aq
Second Officer,"
Of the Steamer Canima." A Bermudian
preferred.
Young men willing to serve in this Capacity are
requested to apply in writing to the Undersigned
until the 18th instant, and the applications will
be handed to the Mas'er of the Slea i.er for
decision.
TRIOTT & COX,
Agents.
H1amilton, 1-th Feby., 1878.-1
Colonist copy once.

Notice.

To Farmers and Shippers of

Berm lida Produce.
The Undersigned Solicits Consignments to
Milssrs. A, t% nnett Co.,
156 West Street, New York,
Throughout the corning Crop Season.
The usual care and attention will be observed
in receive tg and forwarding Shipments. Sales
G i ;'ra it 'dl.
S. S. INGHAM.
Hamilton, 15th Jany., 1878,
O' Liberal Prices will be paid for Produce
thrrughcut the Season S. S. I.
llaImilon, 15'h Jany 1878.-6 3)p.





~~1. -s ~ I


AB.T1RACT OF lIiIThSO OF I'"X E '-l)-

In dI.c Svp c: ae Ccai oHf the 7urirs ad Cauiccos Islads.
Before the lion. Wm J. Anderson, Esq., .Y,-. :.
November Term.
GRAND TURK, 15th December, 1877.
The Court met pursuant to nil iurn ic1 h .
The Queen's Advocate moved for sentence to be
passed upon W. G. Arthur, convicted of libel.
Whereupon His Honor the Judge passed the fol-
lowing sentence :-
Walter Gray Arthur, you have been convicted.of
a charge of maliciously publishing a Defamatory
Libel, knowing the same to be false; and it is-by
the 4th Section of the Imperial Act 6 and 7 Victo-
fin, Chapter 96, (which has been by local enactment
declared in force here) enacted: "That if any
person shall maliciously publish any defamatory
libel, knowing the same to be false, every such per-
son being convicted thereof, shall be liable to be
imptiioned in the Common Gaol or House of Cor-
rection for any term not exemedirg two years and
-to pay such fine as the Court shall award." By
this, you see that a very painful duty is placed be-
fore rme of passing a sentence upon you, which, for
a lime, will deprive you of liberty. It is in every
case a painful duty to me, but all the more painful
in the present case, on account of your family con-
V* section here, and they have mvy heartfelt sympathy,
and, I- can safely say, the sympathy of the entire
community. I am placed here by a high au-
thority to administer the law and I am bound
by a solemn oath "to do right to all manner
of people alter the laws and usages of this Colony,
without fear or favor, affection or ill-will," and
tho' I do experience strong feelings of compassion
for you, and strong feelings of sympathy for your
family, yet I must not let my feelings carry me
Sway from performing what is my duty, but I shall,
bearing in mind the strong recommendation to
mercy expressed by the jury, as far as is consistent.
with justice, temper % ith mercy the sentence which
I am now about to pass on you. You have, as. I
said, been found guilty of maliciously publishing a
libel, knowing the same to be false, by an unani-
mous verdict of a special jury, and, in deciding
what sentence to pass, I must look to the facts of
the case to see with what animus you acted and I
can come to no other conclusion but that you were
actuated with feelings of great personal ill-will;
and altho' you did not plead in justification, yet
You have by your defence urged upon me and upon
the jury that the libellous communication was an
honest and bonafide comment on your part, but not
the slightest evidence was adduced on your part to
..how that there were any circumstances that could,
in any way, warrant such an opinion, and also the
jury have negatived the possibility of such an
opinion by finding you guilty of the offence, know-
ing it to be false,- I have always heard that you
were a generous and warm-hearted man to those
defendant on you, and I heartily trust that this,
tho' a sad one, may be a useful lesson to you not to
make such a reckless and deliberate attack upon
the character of any one, and that you will, for the
future, lead, in that respect, a more honorable life.
The sentence of the Court is that you, Walter
Gray Arthur, be imprisoned, as a first class misde.-
meanant, in the Common Gaol at Grand Turk, for
the space of three calendar months, and that you
pay a fine of 25.
There being no further business before the Court
the same was adjourned to Tuesday 20th February
next, at 10 o'clock a.m.--Turks' Islands Royal Stand-
ard, December 22, 1877.

THREATENED WITH AN UMBRELLA.
A Vice Adiniral of the'Navy in Da.ger.
A dispute that has existed for nearly three years
between naval officers at Exmouth, England, was
recently brought before Major-General Sir Charles
Stewart, Admiral May, and Mr. F. D. Fulford,
magistrates of that town. The parties to the dis-
pute were Vice-Admiral Grenfell and Captain El
phinstone Stone, and the latter was summoned by
the Admiral for disorderly conduct in calling him
a coward and threatening him with an umbrella,
and he was called to shew cause why he should not
be bound over to keep the peace. Both gentlemen
have for some little time retired from the Navy,
and have taken an interest in educational affairs at
Exmouth. Captain Stone was one of the candi-
dates for the School Board, and Admiral Grenfell
was supporter of a clergyman, who was, to some
extent, an opposition candidate to the Captain.
At.the meetings that took place the language of
some speakers was of an excited character, and
subsequently when the parties met in the street the
Admiral used an expression which gave offense to
the Coptain, but the latter was said by the Admiral
to have used menacing language to the clergyman.
At an orphan asylum meeting the unpleasantness
was renewed, and Cnptaiin Stone afterwards sent a
written communication to Admiral Grenfell. The
Feeling between the parties did not lessen, and a
challenge of some kind seems to have been sent.
One day they accidentally met on the platfoi m of
the Exeter Station. Then, it appears, Capt. Stone
several times called the Admiral a coward, and
seems to have held up his umbrella in a threatening
.manner. While b' fore the magistrate it was sug-
gested that the affair should be referred to one of
the bench,; who, as a private gentleman, should
hear both parties, and they should agree to abide
by- whatever was thought to be right by the ar-
bitrator. The Admiral, however, said the out-
rages were so gross and the insult was so repeated
that he could not accept anything less than a full
and unconditional apology. He assured the bench
that be had not by word, look, or gesture given


Captain Stone the slightest provocation. Sir
Charles Stewart, as an old officer, reminded the
Admiral that the instruction conveyed in Her Ma-
jesty's regulation for the guidance of officers was
that all differences of this kind should be settled
among themselves; and as he understood Captain
Stone tendered an apology without reservation it
should *be received. The Admiral said as this was
the opinion of the Bench he was prepared to abide
byit, as he felt that his reputation had been too
long established to be affected by what had been
s:ai. 1 Captain Stone said the remark which was
made by the Admiral during the election was
thought to be insult to himself, or those acting
with .him, and hence the unpleasantness. He ad-
mitted that he was excessively annoyed, and might
have been a little harsh in some of his remarks.
'iH extremely regretted that the harmonious rela-
lions that previously existed between himself and
the Admiral had been disturbed, and was grieved
that any one belonging to the same profession as
himself should experience annoyance. He trusted
that Admiral Grenfell, as his superior officer, would
accept the apology. Admiral Grenfell said when a
man had stated that he was sorry he could say no
more. The Bench expressed their approval of the
manner in which the case had been settled, and
'hoped that the parties would commence the new
year with better feelings than had existed between
them lately.

Two Russian officers stole four cannon from their
batteries and sold them to a Jew for old metal.
They will summer in Siberia.

UNANbWEBABLE !-" Really," said Brown, as he
woke in the morning after a splendid night, "I
don't think there's anything to equal a feather bed !'
-" Ain't there ?" replied the still small voice of
Jones, who was already up and thinking about
breaklast; what about a bed of oysters !"


.fl, t.o.i! i af, ) .' .......
in tnho veo (,Js treits.N whe.e the war is now carnte-
on. In eleven years it will bl precisely 500 years
since Amurath I. overthrew, on the borders of
Set via, the whole power of the the-i 1..' !1.._ g-
dom of Servia, in one of the -'e. ,.'i'. -.
that ofKossova-a 1jl,',,i, .*,1 t which so im-
pressed itself on the imaginations of men, and
was followed by such immense consequence to that
portion of Europe, that the Servian and Bulgarian
peasants still refer to it as an event which affects
even now their:destinies. And they do not e:.':'r -
ate its consequences. After Amurath followed Ba-
jazet, surnamed the Lightning," and in his track
was desolation and hills of human heads. The
Turk was then no sick man," but a barbarian of
uipi'uprnped vigor and valor, with, it must be al-
lowed, a certain talent for command. He swept over
all Eastern Europe, and but for the long and he-
roic defense of Hungary, would, no ai..It,', have
ce.nqlr.i- and held S,-';. ,'n Germany, as he
afterward conquered and held Thrace and the
Danubian countries. It was more than half a
century from the battle of Kossova before the
Turk wrested from the decayed Greek Empire the
City of the Golden Horn, which he has held ever
since. In the long empire of lust and blood by
the Osmanli, whether in Europe or Asia, it will be
difficult for the most ardent admirer of the race to
find a-single blessing or benefit which it has con-
ferred on humanity. In Thrace, Tipi,'n. Macedoni,
the Bosnian Provinces, Bulgaria, Servia, and the
Wallacho-Moldavian districts, the rule of the Ot-
tomans has been nothing but repression or plunder
and violence. Liberty, of course, has never flour-
ished under them, nor science, nor agriculture, nor
commerce, nor trade. 'Where they have been,
there has been the slightest progress in all material
things. Generation after generation of misery and
submission to *:.in1!:;;, tyranny has passed away.
The Christians have been pressed to the earth,
while the Mohammedans have not advanced. One
of the fairest portions of Eastern Europe has been
rendered poor and half barbarous by this long-en-
during tyranny. In fact even in the neighboring
districts now under Christian sway, the scars and
relics of the former Turkish domination may be
seen, in barren fields, poor roads, miserable villa-
ges, a degraded peasantry, and a want of all the
best appliances of civilization.
Turkey itself, in Asia, seems outside of all mo-
dern progress, and unnatural vices, such as con-
sumed the pagan Empire of Rome, have eaten away
the vigor of the people. Nor does this corruption
and degradation seem an effect of r ,l':i, alone,
though that no doubt, has had much influence in
causing it; it belongs also to the race. For one Mo-
hammedan people, the Arabs, encamped some four
hundred years in Europe-as the Turks have done
--but when they were driven forth, they left schools,
colleges, and places of learning, palaces, and an ar-
chitecture which still delights the eye, and perma-
ment traces on the arts, science, and learning of
Europe. When the Turk departs from Eastern
Europe, as soon he must, there will be no monument
of his five hundred years of residence, but smoking
.villages, piles of human bones, peasantry imbruted
by his government, and a fair country made almost
a desert.
a The latest telegram from the seat of war was that
the Turks were b1'in-ai,.r Philippopolis. an.! o'ier
Christian towns in their retreat. The ex dls is
characteristic and consistent. h' ., ',- .t ancestor
of the Sultan's family entered Europe over burning
towns, and marked his way with pyramids of hu-
man heads. The deE.nera-? .Ie.'p'int departs
amid the smoke of pEaceful lrafi.l1,- ,-zrt;, with his
line of retreat covered with he i :JBl and de.
faced corpses of prisoners and of the unfortunate
peasantry. No sentimental -v.:--.' !t. will follow
the Ottoman, as has attended the Moor in his de-
feat. Even England will soon forget him. The
historical scholar will rejoice at the just retributi-
on ;.the legislature will look for new advances in
that miserable region ; and the curses and hate of
populations whom the Teti:; for centuries has
plundered and oppressed will go with the last
battalion as it carries the crescent back from the
hills of the Balkan peninsula to the Sea of Mar-
mora and the Golden Horn.

GRAVITY IN THE MOONS OF MARS.-We are able
to consider the relations of inert matter in worlds
where gravity is so small as it must be in the
Martian moons. It has been said, by myself among
Others, that building and all engineering processes
would be much easier in a world where gravity is
very small than in our own world. But it less
arduous, so far as mere labour is concerned, they
would in some respects be far more difficult. Much
more skill would be required to give 1 1-'1',iu.: sta-
bility to iuildiun:~,. made even of the most solid
materials, in a world where all weights are so much
reduced. Suppose even iplt;;';:i, were available
in sufficient quantities for architectural purposes,
yet a block of platinum of given size would press
downward with less force there than a block of
deal wood of about one-twentieth its size on our
earth. Whewell has well described in his Bridge-
water treatise the effects of a great reduction in the
force of gravity, though he is not there considering
Life in other worlds, but the impcrtance (which
many are apt to overlook) of those portions of our
earth's frame which lie far below the deepest mines
ever yet dug by man. If the interior of our earth
could be scooped out and removed, we should in
fact suffer from precisely the same inconveniences
as would affect creatures like ourselves living in
moons of Mars. We should indeed find ourselves
living like them in dread and terror, Things,"


as Whewell truly says, would not lie where we
placed them, but would slide away with the slight-
est push. *We should have a difficulty in standing
or walking something like that we have on ship-
board when the deck is inclined; and we should
stagger helplessly through an tos .there thinner
than that which oppresses the respiration of the
traveller on the tops of the highest mountains,"
"It is hard," says the ingenious writer in the
Spectator, "to conceive even a one-storied house
holding together," in the Martian moon world,
"against any serious lateral blows." Projectiles
would be no less deadly than in our own world.
But the range which projectiles such as ours would
obtain in such a world would render close fighting
impossible on the one hand, and efficient aiming
Impossible on the other. A Krupp cannon, for
instance, whose greatest range on our earth is, let
us say, five miles, would on the Martian moon fire
a projectile which would lave that moon forever,
and the recoil of the cannon would probably carry
it half a dozen miles away from the firing point.
Much weaker projectile force would have to be em-
ployed, and less mischief would be done on this ac-
count, and also because any living bodystruck byone
of these projectiles would give way before it much
more readily than a similar body similarly struck
on our own earth.-Rica. A. Proctor in Belgravia.
NEW THING IN HATS. -An Article in the win-
dow of a hatter's shop is labelled, "The Patent
Bismarck Flexible Silk Hat." The names of great
Generals used in other days to be appropriated to
boots; but there was never any Blucher or Wel-
lington Hat. A fitness of things may be percepti-
ble in the notion of a Bismarck Hat; as a hat is
for the head, and head is the Great Chancellor's
strong point.' It may be difficult, at first blush, to
imagine Bismarck in a flexible hat. But when one
comes to think of it, an inflexible head in a flexible
hat is not at all a bad symbol for the Policy ofe
Blood and !ron in diplomatic forms,


That ~h nieProperty in
P at ish,


At present occupied by MAJOR WILKINSON,
D.C.G. Possession given 1st January next.


Apply to


MR. M S. HUNT,
tamilton.


November 3, 1877.

For Rent,
In the Town of Hamilton,
---- uA Furnished Two Story

Apply at the "Royal Gazette" Office.
Hamilton, 25th, 1877.

oil Rent,



Completely furnished, with Out-
houses, Stables and Coach House, convenient-
ly situated and being in the Township of St.
Georges, in its own grounds.
lImmediate possession given.
Apply to
W T. ROBE TS,


St. Georges, 12th 'r ;.


i -- "r ...- .

-. ,~ --"= *




Ii '.* lL'lON

anch E St.. eor e.

T[HE P .' of the above Es-
. tablishment, ha'--i :- just returned by the
"Canirna" from New York, and brought with
him a number of *W CARRIAGES and
Stylish YOUNG rHORSES to add to his already
well selected Stock, begs to thank the Public o
Bermuda generally for their past Patronage and
hopes for a continuance cf the same.
Strangers visiting the Islands are particularly
rei-etc ..L to call and give the above Establish-
ment a trial before going elsewhere.
Hamnilton, Se.. 19th, 176.


00









g Po

"g P. I
c~ ~ 6:z~ P











U-1








M. D.,
DENTIST)
It Eli1) STFR '4T,1-HA M-ILUr(
Hlas R~eceived a supply,
lowing
t7~.-1- Ttl


E-i
-Z


FOR THE E1-1
Put up by the well known Dentists Messrs. GA-
BRIEL, L,!U..t Hill, London.
SEDADENT, or Cure for Toothache
CORA LITE TOOTH PASTE, for Cleansing
and Improving the Teeth
ROYAL DENTIFRICE, gives the Teeth a
pearl-like whiteness
\VHITE GUTTA PERCIIA ENXiMEL, for
Stopping decayed Teeth
OSTEO-ENAME L ,STOPPING, warranted to
remain white and firm as the Tooth itself
ODONTALGI QUE ELIXIR, celebrated
Mouth Wash.
Hamilton, March 26th, 1877.



F.A.A., D.S.,
REID STREET, HAMILTON.
EAST END,


iet


7, "'*)~


7 IN)..


'~w '~.


CA i,. AT Q l'; iSTOWN,
CAnrr'ing the United States
from New York


Mail


N ON TIJUSD AY.

S e e fm s h Ps
MONTANA sails Feby. 12, at Noon.
NEVADA sails Ftoy. 19, at 7 a.m.
)IDA1HO sails Feby. 26, at 1 p.m.
WYOMING sails March 5, at 6 a.m.
WISCONSIN sails March 12, at 11 a.m.
The above Steamers are built expressly for
the Trade, have five watertight bulkheads, and
carry experienced 0:'. Surgeons and Steiw-
ardesses. The Saloon Accommodations are un-
surpassed by any Atlantic Steamers, and the
State Rooms are on main deck opening into the
Saloon, thus securing that great comfort in
ocean travel, perfect ventilation ahd light.
'.. U S. '" ; Steamer Canima"from Ber-
muda, T:!.:-ys, generally arrives at New York
on oi,.1,ys, and Passengers' baggage can be
transferred direct to the Liverpool Steamer sail-
ing next day.
WILLIAMS & GUION,
Agents,
29 Broadway, New York.
New York, .Jany. 31, 1878.


The Standard of
the World.


AI:.,I.l to the Standard of all Nations, Packed


ready for -hi:iping.
World's Fair, London
World's Fair, New York
World's Fair, Paris
World's Fair, Vienna
World's Fair, Santiago, (Chili)
World's Fair, Philadelphia
World's Fair, Sydney, Australia,
IIANCOCK'S INSPIRATORS


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October 16th, 1877.-6m

1878.


The P--a Lc~
&:I. f-- e-- -!n1


fit Sheet
r 170 ~-
A l


FOR ISiv,
Are now ready for delivery,


I The Sheet contains all the necessary informa-
tion for an Almanack.
The Book contains in addition to all other
useful information usually found in such a publi-
^a m cation:
4 s .3 i A Business Directory for the T<.vwns of Hamilton
and St. George.
S. An Elaborate Itinerary.
| | A plan of the Town of St. George, kindly furnished
Si by P. Ness, Esqr., Colonial Surveyor.
SA Catalogue of most of the Plant -, both wild and
Cultivated, growing in Bermuda, obl gingly pre-
g % spared and classified for the pu' isther by Henry
0 Z 5 J. Hinson, Esqr., MID)., for this Edition--The
most complete yet furnished.
I -g P4 A Catalogue of the Fishes of Bermuda by Professor
,. Q I 0G. Brown Goode, Esqr., of the Smithsonian In-
0 M stitute, Washington.
g E A Catalogue of the Birds of Bermuda, revised by
11 Lieut. Denison, R.E.
0 1 And a Catalogue of the Sea and Land Shells of
Bermuda, by Mr. John Tavenier Bartram, of
Stock's Point, St. George.
'.PRICEs-Sheet I/. Book, plain, 1/6; ditto,
-' 1 -i interleaved, 1/9.
Can be had at the Post Office, St. George ,
at the CHIEF WARDER'S Office, Royal Naval Yard;
Ireland Island; of the several Carriers of the
0N, EAST, Gazette," and at the Royal Gazette" Station-
of the fol- ery Store.
Royal Gazette Office, Dec. 18, 1877.


f

D


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U.'

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~
C-,
~
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AND


HA.IllLTON, I3FRMUDA


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S14


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i., T :'^ O S P ,\tS '.V ?. ."!'.ffrS
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PH :.VIX INSURANCE CO i!P.IN '
of/ L'-.m"n,
One of the Jrr.-:-, Est.ibliahelat:d \Vealtliieqt
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Through the B 11ANCIt OFFICE in, ithIeso
Islands, a Saving is eflctcd t o thInsured
of the Stamp Duty, a very considerable item.
RISKS taken both on i'EAL and PERSONAL
PROPERTY for 3, 6 or 12 moulhs.
No FEES and no CHARGE for Policies.
N. A. BUT'TERFIELD,


lito l -i',,J5~;e':be r !fthI, I1865.


Agent.


PERFUME ERY,.
celebrated for nearly a century past, is of the very
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EXHIBITION PRIZE MEDALS,
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White Rose, Fr:igiannine, Ylang Ylaoz. Stophano.
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3tkinson's Florida Water
A most fragrant Probi,,, distilled from the choicest
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ATKINSON'S QUININE HAIR LOTION.
A very refreshing Wash which stiniulates iTe skin
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ATKINSON'S
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ATKINSON'S QUININE TOOTH PO\VD.ER
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RIMMEL'S GLYCERINE HONEY, WINDSOR, and
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RIMMEL'S VIOLET, ROSE LEAF, RICE, and ,other
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Eatut of Dr. foltz for
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GENERAL WAREHOUSE,. IN PARIS.
La Corresponidance Paridieune,
4 Rue de la Tacherie, J.

Cook Waiinted,
By a Family in this TowUn,
Apply at the "Royal Gazette" Office.
Hamilton, leLby. 4th, 1878.

L.,ANld..ICK-FE B1 U.AR I, 1878.


o y
- -~


12
13
14
15
16
17
18


Tu
We
Th
Fri
Sat

Mo
F


SUN.
0
ris. sets.

6 48 5 40 10
647 5 41 11
6 #6 5 42 12
6 5 5 43 13
6 45 5 43 14
643 5 45 15
6 43 5 45 16


Ti de,



3 .30
4 18
5 6
5 54
6 421
7 30
8 18


ull Moon, 17 day, 6


I!` FILAPIU(S.





St. Valentine.


hour, 57 m. a.m.


TIm. bL.-.-iUD-A o 3.L GAZEiTE is publiie-hd
eveiy Tuesday y DiON iLD I'Pr. HLFuEE,
Pri-trci to tlhe ".Queent's 1 ost Excellent
Majesty
AT HIS OFFICE,
North-west Corner of Reid and lin naby Streels,
i i lii l ton,
where Blanks, Hand-bill.s, &c., will be
prinlte, at. the shortest notice.--A ent
at St. Georges for the Royal Gazelle,
JAMES THIES, sqr., Postl Iaster General.


}


W
Wm.lzmm m mm W42 WAN ao--Mx


i q, -;, P ga
Wme





supplement to Bermuda oyal azette, Tuesday, Jannary 12, 1878.


DISESTABLISHMENT.
MR. EDITOR,-In reply to your correspondent" Con -
servative," I beg to say that he entirely misconstrues
the object of the preliminary meeting on 13th Decem -
ber, at Trinity School Room, and seems to attach mo -
tives to the originators that they do not merit. Every
one knows that, in the present state of our Church, it
is necessary to do something, and the question is what
that something shall be P and it was the object of that
meeting to act upon that question, and, therefore, it
was merely initiatory to take the sense of those who
might be there as to what should follow, and how to
proceed to react the whole Body of the Church. It was
called quite in an informal manner, and without refer-
ence to any particular views and opinions, for those
who had expressed themselves on both sides were asked
promiscuously. Under the circumstances a goodly
number attended upon short notice, and all the Rectors
in the Island, in active service, were amongst them.
After an interchange of ideas, which all were solicited
to declare freely, it was "unanimously resolved" to
call a Public Meeting of the Church upon notice to be
given in the papers, to ascertain their views and have
them discussed accordingly. As all present seemed to
be of the opinion that nothing was left to us but dis-
establishment, it was proposed to put this into shape
by appointing a Committee to draw a Bill to be digest-
ed at the Public Meeting, and, when approved, to be
presented to the Legislature. It would have been use-
less to call such a meeting without having something pre-
pared for them to talk about, and think about, to be acted
upon at some future meeting or meetings when agree-
ment might be arrived at. Now, in all this I, as one of
the invited, guests see no harm nor none of those moti-
ves nor farfetched conclusions illiberally, if not unkind-
ly, insinuated by "Conservative," who seems to enter-
tain dreadful fears of an Hierarchy Clause" in a sim-
ple Synod. Surely if so serious a matter had been
tampered with" by that body, composed of some of
'our best and purest-minded and sincere Churchmen,
the Public Assembly expected to pass upon it and the
Legislature together, would have penetration enough to
detect and counteract it! Of course, after hearing that
the matter had been presented to the Secretary of State
from another quarter, it was but discreet in them to
pause, and hence the meeting and resolution of 30th
January. Is there anything in this to call forth all
those evil forebodings of Conservative," and has he
already repented of joining in the "unanimous resolve
at the initiatory ?
If the Church of England in Bermuda has not the
*ability in mind, means, knowledge and experience to
set up for itself and take care of itself (like our breth-
ren around us) when once free, why of course we had
better hold on to the old establishment; otherwise let
us cut loose and live in peace with them all, and trust
to God to take care of the laborers as well as of the
vineyard. Yours, &c.,
GUEST.

DISESTABLISHMENT.
For the Bermuda Royal Gazette,
Will some person connected with the recent move
for the Disestablishment of the Church of England in
Bermuda, come forward and explain to the public, what
are the '., -fit-, proposed to be derived from such a
desperate measure P
Surely, when the religious interests of eight thous-
and or more of the population of the Colony are at-
tempted to be so seriously affected,--when it is pro-
posed to cut us adrift from all connexion with the Gov-
ernment of the Country,-a connexion which has exis-
ted almost from the first settlement of the colony,-
some very great and positive advantages ought to be
shewn, as certain to result from it, to counterbalance
the evils of separation.
It is possible, if Disestablishment were to take place,
that two, or perhaps three, of the more populous and
wealthy parishes in Bermuda, could maintain their
Ministers and otherwise provide for the continuance of
Divine Service in their Churches ; but what would be
the condition of the poorer Parishes P
There is no other British Colony in this quarter of
the globe, whose circumstances so nearly approximate
to those of Bermuda, as the Bahamas. Disestablish-
ment of the Church has been adopted there, and whatis
the consequence ? C.: idiler what a deplorable condi-
tion the Church 1w.; .-en reduced to in all their outly-
ing Parishes, more or less remote from Nassau! Ought
we to. follow their example in this respect,-and sacri-
fice the existence of the Churches in our poorer Pa-
rishes ?
Would it not be far more prudent to hold on as long
as possible to our existing connexion with the State,
* and with the. Church in England ;-to endeavour, by
the liberality of individuals, to make some permanent
provision for the occasional visitation of a Bishop from
one of the neighboring Colonies; and also gradually
to establish a fund for the partial endowment of our
Clergy; Pnd for their Parishioners to be empowered to
supplement it by annual assessments on the property
of members of the Church P
PARISHIONER.
February 9, 1878.

LORD CARNARVON'S EXPLANATION IN
IN THE HOUSE OF LORDS, JAN. 25.
The Earl of Carnarvon rose to make a personal
explanation. He said that in order to justify his
conduct he wished to state the reasons which had
led him to place his resignation of the Colonial
Secretaryship in the hands of Her Majesty. That
step he had taken, and this afternoon the Queen
was graciously pleased to accept it. He would not
impute blarne to any of his colleagues, but circum-
stances had tarisen which rendered it incumbent on
him to take the course he had named. He dissented
to the resolution for sending the fleet to the Dardan-
elles, and also to the supplementary vote which the
Chancellor of the Exchequer had proposed to take
on Monday. He considered that such a vote ought
not to have been mooted till the terms of peace
arrived and became known. On January 2 he had
occasion to address a deputation. It would be
remembered that he had made a speech, in which
he had expressed his views in regard to the state
of affairs in the East. On the following day, in the
Cabinet, the Prime Minister condemned severely
the language he used. He (Lord Carnarvon) took
time to consider the course he should take under
the circumstances and as there was no public dis-


cident. No one rejoiced more than he at the coun-
termanding of the order; but' there had been for
some time' a very wide divergence between himself
and the cabinet. His object in making this state-
ment was to shew that he had not acted precipitately
or capriciously. Nor had Lord Beaconsfield hastily
snatched at his resignation when first offered. He
objected to moving the fleet, because if allowed by
active measures it would be a departure from the
neutrality to which the government was pledged,
and also because it would be unfortunate that the
fleet should be moved at the most critical point of
the negotiations, and dangerous to place the fleet in
position where at any moment the contingencies of
war might lead us into difficulties we could not for-
see or measure. In adopting such a course it seemed
we were exchanging an attitude of observation for
one of menace. He did not swerve in the slightest
from the opinion he expressed on January 2, that it
was England's right to have a voice in the final set-
tlement as far as European interests were concerned,
but he saw no intention of disputing that right. He
expressed great regret in separating himself from
his colleagues, but there were some questions with
such mighty issues regarding the happiness and
lives of others, that a man must be guided in them
by his own inclinations. It was wrong that one
man should reject the action of a government major-
ity, and equally wrong if one in a desire.for a com-
promise should be drawn into measures of which he
disapproved.
Lord Carnarvon, on taking his seat, was much
cheered by the opposition.
BEACONSFIELD'S REPLY.
The Earl of Beaconsfield said that, after listening
to Lord Carnarvon's speech, one was at a loss to
understand why he resigned. He reminded his
hearers that the Government, when laying down
British interests, declared that the occupation of
Constantinople would not be regarded with indiffer-
ence, and that England desired the maintenance of
existing treaty relations as to the Straits. In or-
dering the fleet-to the Dardanelles in certain contain.
agencies the government desired simply to guard these
interests. Unless they acted up to it, their despatch
definingEngland's interests might be regarded mere-
ly as words. He believed if the conditions of their
neutrality were violated with respect to any of the
foregoing points, all his colleagues were resolved to
do the best as their duty to their country and their
sovereign required to maintain the policy they had
laid down. Relative to Egypt, if those who said the
government had taken needless precaution in stipu-
lating for the exclusion of Egypt from the theatre of
war had heard all the wild and perilous propositions
that the Government had heard, they would be of a
different opinion. The Cabinet never hesitated or
differed regarding adhesion to the policy of condi-
tional neutrality, although the method of carrying
the policy into effect was of course a question open
to discus. ion. The Government should at the proper
moment be perfectly prepared to vindicate the mea-
sures which they had taken. He believed these
measures were likely to have a most salutary effect,
He must tell the House frankly that these measures
were part of a consistent policy that the Government
had resolved to pursue, and which they originally
announced, namely, to observe neutrality; but if that
neutrality were to depend on their allowing their
greatest interests not to be defended he would say
he was no longer in favor of neutrality, but of the
interests of his country and the honor of his sovereign.
Earl Granville asked whether an armistice had
been arranged, and what the terms were.
Lord Beaconsfield replied that relative to the date
and form of what he (Lord Granville) termed an
armistice, there was no such instrument in exis-
tence. He added that it was only decided Tuesday
last to send the fleet to the Dardanelles. Therefore
the government were not concealing anything when
Parliament opened.
In reply to a question as to whether the Earl of
Derby had resigned, Lord Beaconsfield said any
minister who resigned had the right of announcing
his resignation himself. On that right he (Lord
Beaconsfield) -would not trench.

THE VERY LATEST NEWS FROM VARIOUS
SOURCE'.
LONDON, FEBRUARY 1.
Russians at Tcherkeskoi.-The Cologne Gazette's
special from Constantinople reports that the Russians
have arrived at Tecerkeskoi, within thirty miles of
Tchataladja.
That Piece of Territory. --It is rumored in Constan-
tinople that Russia has demanded as one of the condi-
tions of an armistice the right to occupy some point
on the Asiatic side of the Straits.
Reported End of the Negotiations.-The Rotterdam
Cour'ant publishes, under reserve, a private telegram
from Constantinople asserting that peace negotiations
have been broken off; that the Turks will resist to the
last extremity; and that the foreign ambassadors are
taking measures for the protection ot the Christians.
No importance should be attached to this, as the news
would probably have reached here direct from Con-
stantinople it true.
No Anglo-Austrian Compact.-A despatch from.St.
Petersburg says :-" A semi-official contradiction is
given to the report of the dispatch of identical state-
ments by England and Austria to Russia. The Aus-
trian and English notes are by no means identical,
nor is Austria's and England's action analogous. A
friendly interchange of opinion, such as would natur-
ally arise from the present situation, is now proceed-
ing between Vienna and St. Petersburg.
Austria Still Friendly.-" The latest statement of
Count Andrassy respecting the preliminaries of peace
does not bear any unfriendly interpretation. The at-
titude of Austria is that of a friendly Power. All


avowal of the language which has been used, he felt
justified in tendering his resignation. He maintained
that he had not in any way misrepresented the
intention, of the Government.
L _'r Carnarvon stated that when the Earl of
i conefield condemned his language to the deputa-
tion of January 2, he, after taking time to consider
) his course, handed to the Premier a written state-
ment of the position he (Lord Carnarvon) had taken'
upon that occasion, and there the matter rested for
the time. His language not having been publicly
disavowed he felt justisfied and still considered him.
self justified in believing he could not have seriously
misrepresented the opinions of the government.
The Cabinet on January 12 discussed the desirabi-
lity of sending a fleet to the Dardanelles, and he
expressed a decided opinion against the -proposal.
No decision was then arrived at, but on the 15th the
Cabinet decided to send a fleet. He thereupon
wrote the Premier, reminding him that he had pre-
viously requested that his resignation be submitted
to the Queen as soon as the fleet w& ordered to the
Dardanelles. Lord Beaconsfield's r ly led him to
believe that the intention to send a fleet was aban-
doned, and stated that his resignation would not be
submitted to the Queen, and should at any rate be
reserved till there was some important difference
between him (Lord Carnorvon) and his colleagues.
These communications passed on the day afterward
the opening of Parliament. A few days after the
proposal to send the fleet was renewed and decided
affirmatively. He thereupon immediately wrote
Lord Beaconsfield that, believing the circumstances
were not changed to render such step necessary he
saw no alternative but to ask the] submission of his
resignation to the Queen. To-day he received Lord
Beaconsfield's reply that the Queen had accepted
his resignation. Although the order to the Admiral
to pW.need to the Dardanelles had since been coun -
termanded, he could not help saying that this was
not through lack of an agreement of opinion upon
the proposal, 4ut because of some supervening ac-


It recognizes the fact that the present or future stipu-
lations between Russia and Turkey are subject to mo-
dification, and are not definitive until sanctioned by
the Powers.
What Austria would oppose.-Tho Vienna cor-
respondent of the Times, referring to the reports
about the Austrian note to Russia, says :-" At the
beginning of the war the government informed Russia
that the continued, even if professedly temporary, es-
tablishment of her power in Bulgaria would not be
viewed with indifference, and there can be no doubt
that the occupation of this province after peace is
proclaimed, either with the ostensible view of consoli-
dating the new organisation or as a pledge for the pay-
ment of the war indemnity, would meet with the earnest
opposition of Austria, in whose eyes it would amount
to little else than an indirect way of re-establishing
Muscovite power and influence on the right bank of
the Danube. Still, with all this, any rumours as to
diplomatic action going on at present m'ist be received
with great reserve."
France asserting herself.-A Paris despatch states
that M. Waddington, Minister of Foreign Affairs, yes-
terday apprised the Budget Committee that in the
event of a European Congress he should ask a special
grant in order to secure the proper representation of
France as one of the great Powers.
Mr. Gladstone Rebuked.-The Times condemns Mr.
Gladstone's speech at Oxford on Wednesday on the
occasion of the presentation of an address to that gen-
tleman by the Liberal Association. It says:-" The
part of an agitator is a dangerous one and apt not to
be least harmful to the person who assumes it, too
persistently. The signs are only too apparent that his
opposition to Lord Beaconsfield hai done something
both to sour him and distort his judgment of facts."
Did Gladstone incite Insurrection ?-It is currently
rumoured that a question will be asked in the House
of Commons during the debate respecting the corres-
pondence between Mr. Gladstone and Nc-'ropon-t
It will be remembered that Mr. Gladstone some time
ago was accused of inciting the Greeks to attack Tur-
key, He refuted the charge and challenged the Daily
Telegraph, which printed the charge, to produce its
informant. It is reported that the question will elicit
the fact that Mr. Layard, the Ambassador at Constan.
tinople, furnished the charge to the Daily Telegraph's
Constantinople correspondent.
Roumania will object.-In Wednesday's sitting of-
the Roumanian Chamber of Deputies at Bucharest the
government was interpellated concerning the military
requisitions and irregularities of railway traffic. M.
Bratiano, the President of the Ministerial Council,
said :-" Would these evils were the only ones the
country had to endure." M. Cogal Niceano, Minister of
Foreign Affairs, stated that the Government would per-
haps receive information on Thursday of the conditions
of peace. GOD grant," -he said that the sacrifices
Roumania has already made may be the only ones she
may have to make in consequence of the present
war." These words are understood to refer to the de-
sire attributed to Russia to reannex Roumanian Bes-
sarabia.
The Hellenic Dilemma.-The secret sitting of the
Greek Chambei of Deputies on Wednesday was very
important. M. Coumoundouros, the Premier, sub-
mitted the Ministerial programme. He said if it
was accepted the Ministers of Finance, War and Ma.
rine would submit extraordinary estimates. The
Premier recommended the Chamber to continue its
deliberations yesterday. He said that if there was no
quorom present he should regard it as a vote of want
of confidence and resign. Twenty-four communes in
the district of Vola, Thessaly, have formed a provi-
sional government.
A Vote of Confidence Passed.-A later telegram from
Athens says that after the speech of the Greek Premier,
M. Coumoundoura, the Chamber, by a vote of 121
against 6, passed a vote of complete confidence in the
government granting Ministers full powers to act in
accordance with the interests of Hellenism.
Eastern Diplomatic Correspondence.-The Foreign
Office has published further Eastern correspondence :
" Lord Derby on January 29 instructed Lord Loftus,
the British Minister at St. Petersburg, to make a no-
tification to the Russian government. The terms of
the notification are almost identical with those attri.
buted to Austria in yesterday's despatches. Copies of
this notification have been sent the Ambassadors at
Paris, Vienna, Berlin and Rome, together with the
expression of a hope that the views therein contained,
which were based upon the treaties, would receive the
assent of the other signatory Powers.

INCOGNITO.-To avoid ceremonious receptions,
which he cordially hated, the Emperor Joseph II.
assume-I the title of Count Falkenstein. This incog-
nito sometimes led to amusing scenes. Once, on
the road to Hungary, his Majesty halted at a post-
house, when the newly born babe of the Postmas-
ter was about to be baptized. Joseph offered
himself as sponsor. The priest asked for his name.
" Joseph," replied he. "But the surname?" Sec-
ond." What rank or profession ?" "Emperor,"
was the reply. The amazement of the party soon
gave away to a burst of gratitude when his Ma-
jesty presented his little godson with the custom -
ary gift, but in this case, of really royal magnifi-
cence. On another occasion Joseph alighted at a
hotel before the arrival of his suite. The inquisitive
host inquired il he belonged to the service of the
Emperor. "Yes," answered Joseph; I shave
him sometimes." Many anecdotes are told of his
amiable benevolence. Hearing of an old officer
who possessed a large family with straitened means,
the Emperor unexpectedly called at his house, and
finding 11 children said; "I know you have 10
children, but whose is the eleventh ?" It is an
orphan," replied the veteran, whom I found at


the views expressed by Austria concerning a due re-
gard for its interests have been met by Russia in a
considerate spirit befitting the personal relations be-
tween the Czar and the Emperor." "Russia," it is
added, "is not disinclined to settle in common what
is of common interest."
Turkey Exceeding her Rights.-A despatch from
Vienna says:-" The Austrian ambassador at St. Pe-
tersburg is understood to have delivered to Prince
Gortschakoff on Wednesday a note declaring that
Austria in no way disputes Turkey's right to conclude
treaties in her own interest, but must consider the
arrangements at Kezanlik, so far as they may modify
present treaties or touch Austrian interests, as not
falling within the right of Turkey until new arrange-
ments have been made with the signatory Powers of
the Treaty of Paris.
A ndrassy's Plan.-The Neue Freie Presse states that
Count Andrassy has taken steps to bring about joint
action of Europe to prevent a prejudicial policy on
the part of Russia. Austria, with this object, would
take the initiative in assembling a European conference
at Vienna to discuss and determine all points of the
peace conditions affecting the common interests of
Europe."
This Policy Foreshadowed.-This agress with the
Austrian policy foreshadowed in a despatch from
the well-informed Vienna correspondent of the Times,
who says :-" It seems likely that this government
will concentrate its whole attention and energies upon
an effort to reach some understanding about the mode
of settling all questions which touch the general in-
terests of Europe and individual Powers."
Russia Ready for a Conference. -A despatch from
Vienna says the intention to bring about a conference
for the purpose of settling the points in the prelimin-
aries to peace which trench upon international inter-
ests is assuming a more positive shape. No objections
seem to have been raised on the part of Russia.
She recognizes Austria's Claims.-A telegram from
Vienna, received at Brussels, announces that the Rus-
sian answer to the Austrian note has been received.


my door, and I could not suffer it to perish from
want." Joseph struck by this act of humanity
said : Let the children be in future mine ; I will
provide for them, and do you continue to give
them examples of virtue and honor." Another
time, passing down the streets of Vienna, he saw a
young girl, with a bundle under her arm, seeming-
ly plunged in the deepest distress. His delicate
inquiries led her to confide to him that she was
the daughter of a deceased officer, and that her
mother and herself were reduced to such penury as
to part with their few remaining clothes as a last
resource. "You ought," replied Joseph, to
have petitioned the Emperor." She told him this
had been already done, but without success, not
concealing her opinion of his Majesty's want of
generosity. You have been deceived," he replied,
surpressing his emotion. I ill myself report
your case to the Emperor. I know him too well
to fear he will refuse you assistance." The girl
now broke forth into expressions of thanks, which
Joseph hastily interrupted, saying Allow me to
lend you 12 ducats for your present u-c.cssities."
In a day or two Joseph dispatched a messenger,
bidding her and her mother repair to the palace.
When the young girl saw the Emperor she fainted
from fear and emotion. On her recovery Joseph
said, in delivering to her a pension equal to the ap-
pointment of her father, I retreat you and your
mother to pardon the delay which has been the
cause of your embarrassment. You are convinced,
I trust, it was involuntary on my part; and should
any one in future speak ill of me, I expect you to
be my advocate -.Tinsley's Magazine.

THE GREAT COAL COMPANIES.
PHILADELPHIA, Jany. 25.-The Board of control
of the great coal companies to-day, all the lines be-
ing completed, finally signed an agreement which
binds them all to fulfil the combination contract.
The monthly quotas for January, February and
March were agreed upon, but are not publicly
.known.


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with the Patent Perfect Check
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S OH N BRINGS E AD and SON S'
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largest of these. lately erected by Iessrs. JOHN>ix RINSMEAD
SO SoNs, of ,ig;.,re-stceet, c-vers nearly an acre of
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OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
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With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
Fron, FRYDERICK CHATTERTON, Esq.
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I have great pleasure in certifying to the fine, rich, and
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As a Professor of the Harp, I can safely add that the
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iiciozus ense nuble.

OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
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With the Patent Perfect Check Action Repeater..
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JOHN BRINSMI EAD and SON S'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
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r .I N BRINSMEAD and SON S'
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PIANOFORTES,
GUARANTEED FOR FIVE YEARS.
*** Illustrated Price Lists and Descriptions~with Opinions
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18, WIGMORE STREET, LONDON, VW.

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THE "BRINSMEAD WORKS," GRAFl'QI-23AD,
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JOHN BRINSMEAD & SONS'
GOLD MEDAL

PIANOFORTES
WERE AWARDED
THE GRAND MEDAL or HONOUR AND DIPLOMA
OF MERIT, Philadelphia, 1876.
THE'GOLD MEDAL. Paris, 1870.
THE HIGHEST AWARD, THE GRAND DIPLOMA
OF HONOUR, Paris, 1874.
THE MEDAL OF HONOUR, Paris, 1867.
THE PRIZE MEDAL, London, 1862.
THE DIPLOMA OF EXTRAORDINARY MERIT,
Netherlands International Exhibition, 1869. etc.
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Patented 1862, 1868, 1871, and I875, in
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AND AMERICA.
-ILBERT I. BAU HER'S Prize Medal,
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TOH N B RIN'SM EAD and SONS'


a-




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