Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00298
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00298
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text

THE


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


m _________________________________________________________


,No, 4.-Vol. LI.


STATE SUIPER VAS ANTIQUES.


294s per Ann.


Jfafifi.lb ia,.


Berna 1IE'lff,


TuIes id" Yr.,


Jaiauu.ai'y 2~,


Pitblic Auction.

Family Residence and
Sixteen Acres of Land in Smith's Parish.
'I have received instructions to offer
for Sale,
-AT PUBLIC AUCTION,
ONi THE PREMISES,

:ON MON DAY,
The 28th January, instant,
THE ESTATE OF

In Smiths Parish, fornmirly the Residence of
'-4 COLLECTOR SALTON.
"The HOUSE is situate in picturesque and
well Timbered Grounds of about Sixteen Acres,
"more or less, commanding a fine view, of the
South Shore, and with a little expense might
be made, with its surroundings, one of the
-prettiest. Residences in the Islands.
The Planting Land (uii,h of which has ne-
ver been turned over for many years), is of the
richest description, and capable of yielding
large Root Crops. There is also sufficient
Pasturage for two or three Cows. Plenty of
young Trees for Fencing.
JOHN SKINNER.
January 1, 1878.

Notice.

T H E Undersigned respectfully
notifies Shippers that he will receive and
forward co-ignnieiils of

rTo Messrs. MIDDLETON & Co., and Messrs.
DAB.ELL & Co., New York, by every opportu,
nilty throughout the Season.
Prompt 5 lTes and Returns fur

SAM L. A. MASTERS,
26 Front Street.
Jaiy. 14, 1878.-3

For Sale.

3 Carriages,
Will Seat only Two Persons.
Those in want of a Carriage will do wll to
.call at once as these will 1le Sold iat a very low
SP ice to close the Consignment.
AdLBERT 1NGLIS.
St. Gergu's, Jany. 3rd, 1878.-3

for aalE.
STWO GOOD


One will calve about 14th May, th9 other about
24th April.
One charming little

CHAR A BA NCS
Fittvd fur single or pair, with Lamps and Whip
complete.
Built;by DEWoLFP, of Halifax PRICE 32.
Apply to FLA0 LIaOITENANT,
iClarence Hill.
Jantiry 13, 1878.

Wanted.
250 Cedar Posts,
From 10 to 15 feet long and to square 4 inches,
S ALSO,
1000 Double-Twelve Stone.
Apply at once to
N. T. BUTTER FIELD.
Ha iltn, Dec. 22, 1877.
I -^fc


AcIra'ted


Waters, .8 c.


THE UNDERSIGNED,
Is. Prepared to Supply
*Soda Water, Lemonade,
GilSer ALE and other Aerated

At the Shortest Notice, at any part of the
LIslands, West of the Causeway,
Orders for the above will be Received at the
,STAR AND GARTER" Tavern (Late the
",,W"ROPOLITAN") Queen Street, and at
his .tFe near the Commissariat Buildings, East
End,- Hamilton.
."^.^' 0 J. W. ADKINS.
Octol.er 9th, 18*,. ,


Marshal's


Sale.


TO BE NOLD,
uSp luIitc auction,
IN THE TOWN OF ST. GEORGE,
At 12 o'clock,
ON


The 30th January, Instant,
Under and by Virtue of Sui, dayi Writs of Exe-
cution issued from the Court of General
Assize ,I, Iji,4. R.RI,-HARD THOMAs PON-
TON otherwise called RIcHARDE
P(ONTON,
THE FOLLOWING
Personal Effects,
SVz:-


1 PIYING PUMP and HOSE,
by Andrew J. Morse & Son., Bos-
ton, Mass.
1 Diving BASKET 1 Wooden or Iron GIN
4 Old Diving DRESSES
2 Sets Diving LEADS
About 60 Fathoms of Towing RQPE
About 100 lbs. Old JUNK
And 1 Iron WRENCH
J. H. TROTT,
Pro. Mar. Genl.
12th Jany. 1878.

Notice.

iI Persons having CLAIMS against AN-
I 'll(NY BURGESS IIILL, late of ilam
ilton Parish, deceased, will present the same to
the Subscribers on or before the first day oj April
next, and all Persons INDEIBT'E) to the IEs-
tate, will please mak, Payment by that time.
WM. WHITNEY,
SAMIL. A, MASTERS.
E. ecuttors.
January 11, 1878.

Facts Speak Louder than
Words / !

C411 insit thie 0I, 9 Stsuai
And Know for yourself,
TZ3E JA.TOU NDN I N LCO' W



Just Received and now being open-
ed, adapted for the Season,
Selected expressly for this Market to Suit the
Times, and will be Sold at bottom figures
for the Cash only,
Viz.:
City ,'lade CL 0 TIlI.'IG,
Full Suits,
Also CO3TS and P1NTS, ic.,
Good Material, good Workmanauhip, and
good Style,
SHIRTS, a great variety
Under CLOTIlING, a large assortment
HOSIERY of every description
Felt HATS, Latest Fashion
BOOTS & SHOES for the million
Ladies', Misses' and Children's Worsted JACK-
ETS, HOODS and NUBIAS, &c., &c.
FUlNITURE- Black \W. N. Parlour and Bed-
room Suits, Soras, Lounges, Chairs, &c.,
Painted Suits, &c.
MATTRESSES BOLBS itRS
PILLOWS BLANKETS
SHEETING, White and Brown
Canton FLANNELS and COTTON., White
and Brown
Queen's WARE, Glass WARE, and other
WARES
Clothes LINES Clothes PINS
Improved WASHlERS
Shoe BRUSHES & BLACKING
Stove POLISH &c., &c.
JOHN HARNETT.
Hamilton, December 22, 1877.


LOST,
A BUNCH OF-KEYS,
Attached to a chain,
On the road between Mount Langton and Ce-
dar Avenue, or, on the foot-path leading be-
hind Pembroke Church to Mt. Langton Marsh.
The finder bringing the same to the "Gazette
Office" will be rewarded.
Jany. 14, 1878.




j Rose Cottage,'
A pleasantly located Dvelling in West War-
wick, near Riddle's Bay.
For particulars apply to
THEO. J. LIGHTBOURN,
Front St., Hamilton.
December Q2, 1677,


SSJLE OF For Sale.
Valuable Real Es- N N
Stat and Prsonalr Pvron T H UNS U D E I NE D.


S, T iE Real and Personal Estate of
;th e Ilate 11iss ELIZ4' SEY-
IVMOUR, (deceased), will be Sold 'by
PUBLIC AUCTION.
The Persnaai Property
O.V T!ES'6if,1*
5th February Next, At 12 o'clock Noon,
At Deceased's late residence at the COTTAGE
adjoining the Royal Naval ilospit;l, Ireland Is-
land (the particulars will be "given in a subse-
quent Advertisement: and
On 0 ,Wednesday, 6th
February Next, O At 12 o'clock, Noon,
On the Premises,
TH REAL ESTATE
Situatl at MANGROVE BAY, Somerset,
near the Public Wharf, e,,isisting of one TWO
STORY HOUSE, a CO l'-. ., with LAND
attached, h.irerin, on the Queen's Ri,1, W\est,
and on the North, uith a W1HA1iF9; by the
Waters of Mangrove Bay.
W. T. ROBERTS,
Survivin .Executor.
St. George's, 7th January, 1878.

CEMENT!!
Mt N
Portland, in Casks of 4 Bushels
Rosendale, in Barrels,
AT LOW RATES FOR CASH.
S. S. INGHAM & CO.
Hamilton, Dec. 18, 1877.
A. EMILIUS OUTERBRIDGE. JOHN S. SCOTT.
.. Emilius Outerbridge
6V 08.,9
mSirlifiig and matisjosti

No. 29 BROADWAY,
Agents for NEW YORK.
Quebec & Gulf Ports S. S. Co.,
New York and West India Division.
Jany. 7, 1878.



Slana, on & o.,
"THE ARMY AND) NAVY"


BREWERY CITY OFFICE and VAULTS,
Turtle Grove, Dartmouth. 36 & 38 Duke St., Halifax.
Sole Agent for Bermuda,
AUBREY J. RICHARDSON,
St. George's.
SA Large Stock (llhds. & BrIs.,) ALE
and PORTER on hand and just received per
Steamer Beta."
December 31, 1877.-5

R. J. Hayward Co.,
General Shipping and
CommissioS n JO rcl;RnaRts,
(P. 0. BOX ;3709.)
52 EXCHANGE POLICE,
It. W. HAYWARD, New York.
F. D. S. NASH. ,
FOR Si-LE,r
ME P 'S.
Young and Old.
.Apply to the GARDNER at IouNTr LANoTON.
January 14th, 1878.

Notice.
HO iUSE F OR R T
The Dwelling House
In Town of Hamilton,
At present occupied by Mrs. Louisa Bennett.
Possession given in January next.
Apply to
B. E. DICKINSON.
Hamilton, Dec. 18, 1877.


For Sale.

A Splendid Saddle


Would Suit any GenK uinn of the Bermuda
Hunt Club, who would require a good Hunter.
Apply to
M. KENNELLY,
St. George's Hotel.
St, George's, 18th Dee., 1877.


'1


OFFERS THE
Following Articles,
dt Low Rates for Gash
BLS. and Half Barrels S. F. FLOUR
Barrels Corn MEAL
llalf Barrels Family BEEF
Barrels Packet BEEF
Barrels TAR, PITCH and ROSIN
Barrels Portland and Rosendale CEMENTS
Bags BRAN, CORN and POLLARDS
Sacks CHARCOAL
White Pine Lumber,
Clear and Merchantable,
Consisting of -, 1, 1I, 1- and 2 inches-Dry
and Cured-Dressed Board?, Grooved and
Tongued and with Square edges, 16 feet
long x 12 inches wide.
Pitch Pi e L n1Zi B f 4,B,
I and 14 dressed Flooring 4j to 6 inches
in width.
HAILING and -SCANTLING
Of assorted Sizes.
SPRUCE PICKETS,
4 and 5 feet Lengths.
-ALSO,
(Onion Box Material,
LATIS and Peruvian GUANO.
Which, to approved Purchasers, will be Sup-
plied on acconimnodating terms.
S. S. INGH3JVI.
Ilamilton, Jany. 8th, 1878.

Garnet Seed Potatoes,
In prime Condition for Planting.
S. S. INGHAM.
15th January, 1878.


John B.
Reid Street,


Newinan,
- Hamilton,


(Nearly opposite the Royal Gazette" Oilice.)
General SHarnes WMaker and
[Elepai rer.
Carriage TRIMMEER and UPHOLSTERER.
MATTRESSES made to order.
N. P.-Neatness, Strength and Punctuality
Guaranteed at the above Establishment.
Hamilton, Dec 1st, 1877.-3m.

? I Boots & Shoes,
Cheap.
dlso SLIPPERSin great variety
AMERICAN NOVELTIES,
LAMI P of the latest improve'n.e-nt,
TIN and HAIb)WARE
SHEETING and Fancy PRINTS.
J. N. JONES, .
Five Doors West of Gazette" Office,
In James Richardson's Store.
Hamilton, Nov. 20, 1877.


BULL'S HAD LIVERY
ST ABLE S.
DANIEL G. LANE Proprietor.
IIAMILTON,

Branch Establishment, St. George.

T HE Proprietor of the above Es-
tablishment having just returned hy the
"Canirna" from New York, and brought w ith
him a number of NEW CARRIAGES and
Stylish YOUNG HORSES to add to his already
well selected Stock, begs to thank the Public 0t
Bermuda generally for their past Patronage and
hopes for a continuance cf the same.
Strangers visiting the Islands are particularly
requested to call and give the above Establish-
ment a trial before going elsewhere.
Hiamilton, Sept. 19th, 1876.

Theodore Outerbridge,

HAMILTON.
Reid Street, \Vest of Royal Gazette" Offices
Office Ilours-10 to 12 and I to 4.
Will Visit St. Georges, Tuesdays and Fri.
days.
Orders Promptly Attended to.
Hamilton, October 26th, 1876.
Picked Up,
O(N Sunday l it between St. John's Church,
l Penmbroke, and this Tow.i and left at this
Office to be claimed,
.1 Gold Fipser K^R.i'G.
The Owner can have same by proving Pro-
perty and paying expenses.
Ha iltcon, Jany. 8th, 1878.


SNotice.
IpHE CORPORATION OF HAMILTON
Shereby gives Notice that
Tlhle PARK in ithis TownV
IS OPEN
To the Public from This Date.
It is boped that those who avail themselves of
itf use will I-c careful not to damage, or in any
,way interfere with,' the Trees, l'hrubs, Flow.
ers. &c.
N A. UTTTP'LRTIlA'T.


Mayor.


Hamilton, January 1st, 1878.

For Sale,.
Abo ut the' Elud ol the
.. 3 tri,


One DOG CART, fitted for Single
Horse or a Pair, with Pole, complete. Built
at Quebec.
Two Bay MA RES, accustomed to
run singly or as a pair, both good for Saddle
and have been ridden by a Lady.
ALSO,
One Chestnut MARE and one
Black MAIRE, both .ccistomed to Parade
work, i ill s tani fire, and have beeii constant-
.*y ridden by Liie-.
A LSO,
A Complete Set of DOUBL F
HARNESS in very good condition, converti-
ble into Sinti'e Harnesses at will.
For furthrr particulars apply to the FLAG-
LIEUTEKNANT, CLARENCE HILL.
* January 1, 1878.

Notice.
"'he Undersigned
N/NOULI) respectfully notify his friends and
I Patrous that after January Ist, 1878, all
repairing done at his Establishment, must be
paid for on delivery.
Respectfully.
E. T. CHILD.
Hamilton, Deer. 31, 1877.-4
To Let,
A Comfortable and well Arranged
Two Story


Very Pleasantly Situated,
Being next Melbourne House," Parliament
Street. Immediate Possession given.
JEREMIlAd HARNET1T.
Htamilton, Jany. 7, 1878.


For Rent,
That desirable Property in Paget
Parish,


At present occupied by} MsAJOR WILKINSON,
D.C.G. Possession given 1st January next,


Apply to


MR. M. S. HUNT,
'Hamilton.


November 3, 1877.

For Rent,

Rose Cottage,
Completely furnished, with Out-
houses, Stables and Coach i house, convenient-
ly situated and being in the Township of St.
Georges, in its own grounds.
Immediate possession given.
Apply to
W. T. ROBERTS,
Agent.
St. Georges, 12th November, 1877.

For Rent,
A Neat and convenientlyy situated
,, .'TWO STORY
ilDwellisg 8U SE
In the rear of the Town of I lamilton.
A portion of the lower '-art of the Devcllingis
fitted and well adapted for a Grocery Store.
Possession given on Ist January, 1878.
For all particulars please apply to MR. JAMES
WATKINs, Union Street.
tamnilton, December 1Stli, 1877.


,i. r La. i '
B 0 ARI UN U H O U SE,
North of Trinity Qhurch,
1HAMILTON, BERMUD4


U.S7S.


* 4


r I .1 i




[-ISla T -ZA? -NAZETUrq;


'EX T \T fro- METE,., TiOn,,,~. CAT, OBSEP-
VA TI uNS taken under the direction of the 1Principal
Medical t;-er, Prospect, lr.rinil.i. Above the sea
151 feet.


Date


1878.
Jn. 14
15
16
17
18
19
0


C-


33-245
29-912
30-150
30-064
80-225
30-399


Wind Temperature previous
9 a.m. 24 hours.
.. j


o 0
69-9 56-6
71-6 62-8
65-9 59-6
61-9 57-0
60-3 57-0
63-3 52-4
63-6 54-2


0 / 0
129-2 40-4
122-0 54-0
103-0 45-4
83-6 44-8
71-8 49"8
123-2 45"0
95-4 37-4


Rain.

Inch.


0-82
0"06
0"10
0-06
0"18
0"00
0-02


Total 1-24





H1amilton, January 22, 1878.

* Colonial Secretary's Offce,
JANUARY 21ST, 1878.
HIS EXCELLENCE THE GOVERNOR
has been pleased to appoint
Charles Henry liutterfield, Esqr.,
fM. D.,
To be HEALTH OFFICER for the West End and
Port of Hamilton, in the room of Thomas C.
Higgs, Esquire, M.D., deceased.
By His Excellency's Commnand,
R. E. WEBSTER,
1 Colonial Secretary.
"-
CUSTOM HOUSE-HAMILTON.
ENTERED.
January 21-Mail Steamer Canima, Liddicoat, New
York ; assorted cargo.-Agents, Trott & Cox,
CLEARED.
[None.]
10.--. The Schr. J. W. Peasley, sails for Turks' Is-
lands to-morrow. -
The Barque Eliza Barss, hence at New York
on 14th instant, and was to leave on return to-day.
PASSENGERS ARRIVED.
In the Mail Steamer Canima on Sunday last from
New York :-Mrs. T. Liddicoat, Mrs. J. W. Roberts,
Miss Wyllie. Captains J. Harwood and F. S. Ellis,-
Messrs. A. E. Outerbridge, F. Green, A. Holden, F.
S. Fairley, H. E. Rogers, S. B. Smith, Berwind,
Br., and G. Berwind, Jr.
PORT OF ST. GEORGE.
ARRIVALS AND MOVEMENTS OF VESSELS IN PORT,
16-Brigt. Kate, of Halifax, N. S., Fader, Master, 40
days from Palermo bound to Baltimore, with a cargo of
oranges, lemons, nuts, sulphur, &c., was towed into St.
Georges with rudder broken, sails split, and topsides
leaking. Will forward fruit by "Canima."-Agents,
SW. C. Hyland&Co.
.16-Am. Schr. Uncle Tom, Austin, 11 days from
.vannah,. for Millbridge, Me., was towed into port in
'ry leaky and disabled condition, having lost sails,
Tn foremasthead ; is discharging cargo of p. pine.
3nts, W. C. Hyland & Co.
.Brigt. Eliza, Steele, 78 days from Liverpool,
bound to Charlottetown, P.E.I.; ballast; lost
pars, sails, &c. ; was towed into port leaking; isgoing
on Marine Slip.-Agent, John S. Darrell. '
Brigt. Iza, of Providence, R.I.. Chandler, salt; from
Hyeres, France, bound to- Providence in distress; dis-
charging.-Agent, John S. Darrell.
Brigt. Wapiti, Smith, outward cargo petroleum ex
Schr. Mary E. Rankin, ready for sea.
Brigt. Julia Lingley,. Harward, waiting for orders.
Barque Susan M. Dudman, Corning, waiting for orders.
Italian Barque Veronica Madre, Muratoria, discharging.
Barque Monarchy, Pearce, discharging.
Barque Aurora, Albrechtson, discharging.
Barque Priores. Richards, waiting for orders.
Schr. Franklin, Davis, reloading.
Satellite left London, December 22nd, for Bermuda.
S* Brigt. Carrie Dingle was up at London for Bermuda
on the 3rd of January.
Reullura was still up at London on 29th December.

We understand that H. M. S. Bellerophon, bearing
the lag of Vice Admiral Sir Cooper Key, K.C.B.,
F.R.S., Commander-in-Chief on this Station, accom-
panied by H. M. Ships Sirius and Argus, will leave
for Barbados about 1st proximo.
H. M. S. Zeph!r, left on Wednesday.last for Nassau,
N. P., and Jamaica

BIRTH, at Woodbine-Cottage, Pembroke Parish, on
8th inst., MRS. CHARLES ATKINS, of a SON.

MARRIED.-LIDDICOAT-JARVIs.--On Wednes-
day, January 16, 1878, at Zion Church. 38th st. and
Madison av., at 4 p.m., by the Rev. Dr. Gallaher, Cap-
tain T. LIDDICOAT, of the British Steamship Canima,
to AMELIA SOPHIE; eldest .surviving daughter of the
late Captain Peter Jarvis, of Lansdowne Road, Fal-
mouth, England. No cards.-.New York Herald Jan-
uary 17.

DIED, at her residence, St. David's Island, on
Thursday, the 10th of January, Miss MARIA F. HAY-
WARD, youngest daughter of the late Captain John
Hayward, aged 65.
The deceased lady, by her kind and affectionate dis-
position, won the love and esteem of all who knew her.
Hers was the ready hand, ever willing to comfort and
relieve the sick and the afflicted, the poor and the
needy; and her death will be long and deeply regretted
by her two sorrowing sisters and a very large circle of
relatives and friends, to whom she had greatly endeared
herself.-" Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall
see GOD."
........., in Pembroke Parish, on the 16th instant,
LINNIE STREET, aged 70 years.
........., at Pitt's Bay, on Sunday, Jany. 20th, MRS.
MARY W. MILLER, relict of the late John W. Miller,
aged 64 years; leaving a large circle of relations and
friends to mourn their loss.

DEATH OF ASSISTANT COMMISSARY DRURY.-On
24th December, MI r. George Drury, Assistant Commis-
sary in this district, died at his late residence Patrick
Street, Kilkenny, after a short illness. The


funeral took place on Wednesday and it was
attended with the military honours which mark the
burial of an Officer who died holding the rank of Cap-
tain. The military in this Garrison consisting of the
18th Regiment, (the Royal Irish) under command of
Lieut. Colonel Gregorie, and Major Humphrey's Bat-
tery Royal Artillery paraded shortly after 11 o'clock,
and marched to the late residence of the deceased.
The coffin, containing the remains, was carried out of
the house by soldiers and placed on a gun carriage and
then covered with the Union Jack. The Band of the
Royal Irish marched first in the procession playing
Beethoven's Dead March." The gun carriage on
which was the coffin, occupied the next place and was
succeeded by a full company of the 18th Regiment
forming the firing party. The remaining companies
came next and were succeeded by the artillery. The
funeral proceeded at slow march to St. Mary's Church-
yard. The burial service was performed by the Very
Rev. Thomas Hare, Dean of Ossory, and the Rev. R.
H. Rogers, Protestant Chaplain to the Garrison and
Rector of St. John's. When the burial Ser'vice had
concluded three volleys were fired over the grave and
the military then marched back to Barracks.-Kilkenny
Moderator.
[Mr. Drury served for some years at this command.
He has left a wife and six children.]-ED. BR. ROYAL
GAZETTE,


Following the interval, the celebrated Comedietta
" A Winning Hazard" was produced, every one of
the played, especially the ladies by their admir-
able acting, shewing the care with which their
parts had been studied. If we may judge by
crowded houses, and the rounds of applause which
greeted the performers individually and collective-
ly, the performance was a decided success, which
is the more gratifying considering the laudable ob-
ject in view.
The splendid String Band of the 12th Company,
R.E., was in attendance, and played a pretty selec-
tion of music during each evening.
Lieut. Spencer Login, R.N., acted as Manager,
and Corpl. Jones, R.E., as musical director.

Mr. A. E. Outerbridge. Jr., of the Philadelphia
Assay Office, exhibited before the Franklyn Insti-
tute some thin films of gold obtained by electric
deposition upon copper and afterward detached.
These pieces of gold leaf were transparent, and gave
a green color to transmitted light. Mr. Outerbridge
has thus produced films of gold so thin that one
grain of the metal would cover nearly four square
feet. This is 10,000 times thinner than ordinary
paper, and 2,708,000 of such films together would
only make one inch in thickness.

The Queen has been graciously pleased to signify
her intention of conferring on Lord Lytton, her
Majesty's Viceroy and Governor-General of India,
the honor of the Grand Cross of the Civil Division
of the Order of the Bath.
H. M. S. Simoom was taken into Plymouth sound
to be refitted, to be completed by Feb. 1, when she
will be employed to go through the Suez Uanal to
Zanzibar to relieve the crew of the London stationed
there.
Sir William Sterling Maxwell, Bart., the distin-
guished author of typhus fever, died at Venice
recently.


g Owing to the approaching departure of the
Flagship for the West Indies, LADY KEY wishes to
make it known that to-morrow will be the last
Wednesday on which she will be able to receive
visitors.

THE WAR IN TURKEY.
The Russians have been gaining great advanta-
ges over the Turks. Their first achievement was
the capture of Sofia. There was no defence of
the place itself, the fight to protect it having been
made in its front. General Ghourko, who com-
manded the Russian forces operating against Sofia,
had to fight two or three severe battles before he
reached the city, but once there the residents open-
ed their gates and the Russians took quiet possession.
The Servians who were co-operating with the Rus-
sians rendered seasonable help. They took Nish,
and later on, Widdin, two important towns which
promised to give the Russians a new-line for obtain-
ing supplies. Soon after the capture of the above
points, the Turkish.army defending the approaches
to the Shipka Pass was surrounded and captured.
It numbered some twelve to sixteen thousand men
and was what was left of the army Suleiman flung
so unavailingly against that stronghold. He wreck-
ed twenty-five thousand men in his attempts, but
the force he left to hold the Pass on the Turkish
side was deemed sufficient, so great were the natu-
ral advantages of the position. The capture of this
Shipka army was considered a great achievement.
It is taken as proof that the vigor of the Turkish
defence is gone, that they cannot bear up under
their reverses, and that there is ground for the be-
lief imputed to them that fate and Allah are against
them. The capture of this army, together with
that of Sofia, opened two roads to Adrianople, and
they were both taken. General Ghourko is well on
his way, and has met Suleiman near Philippopolis
and defeated him.' The army under General Ra-
detzky from Shipka will take a shorter road which
would strike the rear of Suleiman's army, or of the
place where Ghourko defeated it, and there will be
a race between the two to get to Adrianople first.
What will be done after they get there will appear
in due time, but it looks now as if the Russians
were to have it all their own way. The Moslems
are getting the worst of it on all sides. The Mon-
tenegrins are holding, if not adding to, the gains of
their campaign. In Erzeroum the pent up Turks
are sickening and dying by dozens and are asking
terms of surrender. Their only aggressive acts are
the bombardment of some forts on the Black Sea by
the Turkish fleet. The Russians have not only dis-
appointed them by. pushing their operations in
spite of the severe winter, but also by pushing them
on all sides with equal vigor. Roumelia in which
the armies will move against Adrianople, is much
milder than it is on the Danube side of the Balkans.
It is called the region of roses, and is noted in times
of peace for its beauty and luxuriance.
While all this fighting has been going on, over-
tures for peace have been made and considered. In
England the feeling seems to have settled down to
this, that in arranging the terms of peace, the Bri-
tish Government must be consulted and satisfied.
This is also the position of Austria. If Russia was
to treat and to conclude negotiations with Turkey
alone, England would not be satisfied, even if the
results were such as she would consent to, if con-
sulted. It does not at pi-esent. seem as if her wishes
would be disregarded. The indications were that
Russia would agree to the first proposition of an
armistice simply, without any terms or basis of
peace being stated. But after the capture of the
Shipka army which seemed to put Turkey at her
feet, Russia required that the negotiations for an
armistice should also deal with the conditions of
peace. The Grand Duke Nicholas is authorized to
act for Russia, and two Generals attached to the
departments at Constantinople, have left that city
for the Russian headquarters. They are empow-
ered to treat for the Sultan, and it looks as if they
would have to be quick about it, if they want to
stop the Russians from getting to Constantinople.
The feeling in England is for the moment less in-
tense than it has been, but it is expectant rather
than allayed. It would take very little to commit
the country to war, but it seems more and more
probable that the emergency will be avoided. Rus-
sia's plans are no doubt feared and mistrusted, but
for all that she is believed to have expressed every
disposition to heed and respect the requests and
desires of England. Her good faith will soon be
shewn by the terms she is willing to make with
Turkey. Of course, she will demand large sacrifices
by the Sultan to indemnify her losses. But she
knows the points on which England will be inflex-
ible, and knows too, perhaps, that as to all else no
formidable objection will be made, and if she
chooses, the way will not be difficult to satisfy her-
self and England too.

ROYAL NAVY.
AMATEUR THEATRIOALS.
Rarely has it fallen to our lot to enjoy a pleas-
anter evening than those afforded by the entertain-
ment given by the Officers of the Royal Navy, at
the Theatre Royal, Ireland Island, on Saturday and
yesterday for the benefit of the proposed Sailor's
Home, Bermuda.
The entertainment on each evening was opened
by the Rev. Mr. Harbord, R.N., reading a well pre-
pared and appropriate preface, in verse, intended to
set forth its object. Following immediately came
the Comic Drama in 1 Act, entitled "Delicate
Ground," in which the playing was so unusually
good, the characters so carefully rendered and the
management so able that we could almost forget
the performance was an amateur one.
During an interval which now occurred a Duett
was sung by Lt. Savile, and Mr. Wildman, R.N.,
and loudly encored.


before Parliament.
Her relations with all foreign powers continue
friendly. She expresses her thanks that the Indian
famine is nearly ended. She refers to the condition
of native affairs in South Africa, which has caused
her some anxiety. The troops there have been re.
informed, but she trusts for a peaceable and satisfac.
tory settlement shortly of all differences. The es.
timates of the year will soon be presented to th(
House of Commons.
Her Majesty, in closing, details a number 0:
measures of a local character that will be laid be.
fore Parliament.

Telephoning to the Queen.-Professor Bell and Col-
onel William R. Reynolds, of Rhrde Island, were
presented to Queen Victoria at Osborne, Isle of
Wight, on Monday tight Jany. 14 They exhibit-
ed and carefully explained the telephone to Het
Majesty, who listened with evident curiosity.
She was especially interested in the conversations
carried on between Osborne and London, South-
ampton, Cowes, and the residence of Sir Thomas
Biddulph, Her Majesty's private secretary. An
organ in London, a bugle in Southampton and a
vopal quartet at Cowes were perfectly heard. Miss
Kata Field also sung through the telephone from
London. The experiments continued for three
hours, with wonderful success.

LONDON, Jany. 12.-The Times' Paris correspond.
ent telegraphs that ex-Queen Isabella, who, it was
stated some days ago, would not be permitted t(
return to Spain on account of her action in connee.-
tion with the expulsion from France of Don Carlos
insists upon attending the marriage of King Alton-
so, her son, and the Spanish Ambassador at Paris
is compelled to resort to nuinberless petty precau-
tions and stratagems to prevent her from carrying
out her intention. The marriage of King Alfonso
and the Princess Mercedes is now fixed for the 2nd
of February.


THE QUEEN'S SPEECH.
We are enabled to present to our readers to-day
the substance of the Queen's Speech, through an
advance copy of the New York Evening Paper of
Thursday, owing to the Canima" sailing a little
later than her advertised time on Thursday after-
noon. The Speech, probably delivered at West-
minster at the usual hour of 2 o'clock on Thurs-
day afternoon, was in our possession on Sunday
afternoon shortly after five o'clock. By the
" Beta" on Friday next we shall probably have an
explanation of the present state of the political pro-
blem, and some summary of the voluminous mass
of official papers which have passed since the pro-
rogation of Parliament, which has been summoned
to meet at a most opportune time. The situation
of affairs has materially changed since the close
of last session, and we trust that the diversities of
English opinion will now converge more towards
a unanimity of purpose, such as will make England
strong in dealing with Russia single handed on be-
half of Turkey-and consequently of English inter-
ests which are therewith directly and indirectly
concerned. We have reached a grave crisis in the
so-called Eastern Question and on the present de-
cision of the Imperial Parliament hangs a great
deal that will influence the state of Europe. Par-
liament is to be asked to provide means to guard
against contingencies that may arise. In other
words, England will insist on nothing essential
which she is not prepared to carry into execution.
If Russia, if all Europe is prepared for this that
British Diplomacy is substantially backed up, we
may hope for a speedy settlement ,of existing and
threatening troubles. But if, on the other hand,
an indecisive and vacillating policy is observed, the
very detection will prove most disastrous, as Russia
and others will thereby be emboldened to insist on
conditions highly unsatisfactory to the national
structures of Europe. Through'impotency or sel-
fishness, perhaps both, the Great Powers of Europe
refuse interference,. England has alone boldly come
forward. The Czar apparently respects her inter-
ference, and were he personally left to his own
judgment, would act in strict accord with the
wishes of English statesmen. But, powerful as the
Czar is, he is a unit, and conviction must be carried
home to Russia and all Europe by stern prepara-
tion for even direful extremities. The Turks have
had quite enough of war, and, if now they could be
spared absolute humiliation, would feel grateful to
England for securing them from that, while in jus-
tice they could not blame England for leaving them
to face Russia single handed, since they openly set
-at defiance the recommendations of the Constanti-
nople Council, which, through the influence of Eng-
land, might have saved them from war. The age
we live in is one of practical politics" and out of
it we cannot safely move. We ought to feel grate-
ful, being preserved from extremists, who would
have precipitated the country into war, without
reckoning its cost and its consequences. The present
British Ministry deserve well of the country, and
we think if Parliament energetically, as we trust,
supports their policy, that the gloomy horizon of
Europe will brighten and that the arts of peace
will once more and more fully than ever increase
over soils that cover the wrecks of armies, and seas
that roll over the wrecks of naval grandeur.

OPENING OF THE IMPERIAL PARLIA-
I MENT.
THE QUEEN'S SPEECH.
LoNDON, Jany. 17.-Parliaament met to-day. As
the Queen did not open the session in person there
was no state ceremonial, and the proceedings were
confined to what usually takes place when the open-
ing is by royal commission. The weather was very
fine, being clear and exceptionally mild.
The Queen's speech says that she summoned
Parliament before tih usual time of meeting that it
might become acquainted with the efforts she has
made to terminate the war, and that she might
have its advice and assistance. She alludes to her
having declared her intention at the outbreak of
the war to observe neutrality in a contest which
she lamented, but failed to prevent, so long as the
interests of her empire as defined by her govern-
ment were not threatened. The Russian successes
convinced the Porte that it should endeavour to
bring hostilities to a close. The Sultan's govern-
ment accordingly addressed to the neutral powers
-parties to the Treaties relating to Turkey-an
appeal for their good offices. It did not, however,
appear to a majority of them that they could use-
fully comply with the request, and the Porte was so
informed.
The Porte then determined to make a separate
appeal to her government and she at once agreed to
inquire of the Czar whether he would entertain
peace overtures. The Czar in reply expressed his
earnest desire for peace and gave his opinion as to
the course which should be pursued to attain it.
Upon this subject communications have taken place
between the governments of Russia and Turkey,
through her good offices, and she earnestly trusts,
that they may lead to a termination of the war
She will spare no efforts to promote that result.
Hitherto in the war neither of the belligerents
has infringed the conditions on which the Queen's
neutrality is founded, and she willingly believes
that both are desirous to respect them so far as lies
in their power.
So long as her conditions are not infringed her
attitude will continue the same, but she cannot con-
ceal from herself that, should hostilities be unfortu-
nately prolonged, some unexpected occurrence
may render it incumbent on her to adopt measures
of precaution. Such measures could not be effec-
tually taken without adequate preparation, and she
trusts to her Parliament's liberality to supply the
means which may be required for that purpose
SThe papers on these affairs will be forthwith laid


1Later from IEriope and the Uniited
States.
The Mail Steamer Canima, Captain Liddicoat,
from New York, arrived at her wharf in this town
on Sunday afternoon, in an exceedingly quick, pas-
sage. She left New York at 4 p.m. on Thursday,
the 17th, and averaged ten miles an hour during
the whole passage.
Captain Liddicoat, Mr. Purser Gale, Mr. Dough-
ty and Mr. Harding will please accept our thanks
for files of New York papers of the afternoon of
the 17th.
Gold in New York on the 17th 101i to 102.
Shares Delaware and Hudson Co. 501.
LONDON, Jany. 17.-There is no news from the
seat of war, which has a bad appearance for the
Turks. The Cologne "' Gazette" has a special des-
patch which says that the Russians are before Phi-
lippopolis, that a battle is imminent, and that the
foreign consular representatives had demanded a
suspension of arms twenty-four hours, to send a-
way non-combatants. Not much reliance can be
placed on this, nor on a Constantinople despatch in
this morning's Standard, saying that Suleiman
Pasha, after fighting his way from Tartar-Ba-
zardjik to Philippopolis, found the Russians there
in great force and fought a desperate battle on Tues-
day, finally succeeding in clearing the road to Ad-
rianople and continuing the retreat thither.-
Any news favourable to the Turks would be offi-
cially reported from Constantinople, while Russian
bulletins probably require several days to get
through.

ENGLAND'S P REPARATIONS.
LONDON, Jany. 18.-A Router dispatch from
Malta announces that Vice Admiral Hornby has
sailed for the Levant on the ironclad steamer Sul-
tan. The ironclads Devastation, Achilles and
Alexandra, and the frigate Raleigh are preparing
to follow. The force in the dockyard is working
till 8 o'clock every night. The troop-ship Jamna,
homeward bound from India with 1,067 men, is
detained at Malta. The Euphrates outward bound
with 1,142 men is also detained thete.
The Standard understands Mr. Layard, British
Ambassador at Constantinople, has requested the
immediate dispatch of a British man-of-war to
Crete, and that the Admiral commanding the Med-
iterranean fleet will order the permanent station-
ing of one there.
The population of Constantinople are irritated
against England, whom, it is declared, is morally
responsible for Turkey's misfortunes. There is
great distress among the refugees from Adrianople.
The Turks claim that their fleet has bombarded
and destroyed the ports of Eupatoria and Yalta in
the Crimea.
Captain Fife, the British military attache, tele-
graphs to Minister Layard from Adrianople that
there is no immediate ground for the existing
panic, as telegraphic communication is still open
from Adrianople to Tahar-Bazardjik and Yamboli.
The marriage of King Alfonso and the Princess
Mercedes is now fixed for the 2nd February. The
Spanish Ambassador at Paris is obliged to resort
to numberless petty precautions and stratagems to
prevent ex-Queen Isabella's attendance.
LONDON, Jany. 10.-Mr. Henry M Stanley, the
African explorer, arrived at Brindisi, Italy, Thurs-
day.
A Rome special to the Pall Mall Gazette says :
"A grand reception had been prepared for Mr.
Stanley on his arrival here, but in consequence of
King Victor Emmanuel's death a private dinner
will be substituted. The latter will take place
next week."
LONDON, Jany. 12. William Cobbett, well
known for the strenuous efforts he made in behalf
of the Ti'chborne claimant, fell dead in Westmin-
ster Hall this morning. He was a son of William
Cobbett, the celebrated English radical politician
and writer, who died in 1835.
One of the largest fires that han occurred here in
many years is now burning (January 12) in Friday
and Wat ling streets. The fire originated in the
warehouse of Crocker Sons & Co., calico printers,
Nos. 82 to 87 Watling street, corner of Friday
street. The whole block was at one time threaten-
ed, but the fire is now believed to be under control.
The loss by the fire at corner of Friday and Wat-
ling streets was over $1,000,000.

GENERAL INSPECTION OF ROYAL ENGINEERS.-The
10th Company, R.E., Captain Coddington's, arriv-
ed at the Ducking Stool from St. Georges at 8"30
a.m. yesterday morning, and the 12th and 28th Com-
panies, R. E., Captains Slacke and Heneage, landed
at the Club Steps, Hamilton, at noon yesterday, and
marched to Prospect, where there is to be a Gene.-
ral Inspection to-day of six Companies, R.E., viz.
the 10th, 12th, 21st, 26th, 28th and 32nd. It will
be the largest inspection of Royal Engineers evem
held in Bermuda.


0,* ,Smith's Parish.-
THE CONCERT AT THE MEOcHANICS' HALL.-The Ist Li ,y., 1878.-Im 3p
Concert at the Mechanics' Hall, Hamilton, on the,
evening of Thursday last, was, we were pleased to All Orders left at the Stores of Messrs. J. T.
learn, most successful. The Hall was well filled, DARRELL & CO., will be attended to.
and the youthful performers acquitted themselves
very creditably. 52 EXCH ANGE PL C(E,
NEW YORK, Ja,,y. 15th, 1878
The latest English Mail received per Canima is 6th ,
January. H.M.S. Sirius, on her arrival from Halifax Any Parties desirous of
12th instant, brought only a Halifax and Newfound- *
land Mail-the English Mails having been despatched 1 IR11O 1O
via New York.
to our Address will please apply to Mr. 0. A. V.
For the Royal Gazette. FRITH (at Store of Mr. E. B. JONES, Hamil-
ANSWER TO CHESS ENIGMA ton), who will forward them free of Consul's
By "M. S. H," in "Royal Gazette" of 15th inst. Certificate, &c.
WHITE. BLACK. Our Junior, Mr. NASH, will be on hand as
B to K R 3rd K takes Kt usual, later in the Season.
P to K B 4th K to QB 3rd R. W. H AY WA RD & CO.
B to K Kt 2nd, and mate
J. A. F. January 22, 1878.-tf.
St. Georges, 16th January, 1878. -

For the Royal Gazette, Notice.
MR. EDITOR-I would respectfully submit that ALONZO ,PENISTON has made arrange-
your valuable "Incidents of 1877" have not in my A ments for obtaining a quantity of the
mind sufficiently explained the causes which led in GRNUINE RED AND WHITE TENERIFFE
France to the ministerial crisis of the 16th of May,
the following extract from the minutes of the sit- JN WSV?
ting of the National Assembly of the 3rd of May,
is most important. A .L
Hamiton, JanA. uary 19, 1878. Which he expects to receive in September next.
Hamilton, January 19, 1878. o l 1 ,i.,n


X' M. LE PRESIDENT.-Il a et6 depose deux ordres
du jour motives. Le premier, signed de MM. Laus-
sedat, Leblond, de Marcere, est ainsi conqu:
La chambre, considerant que les manifesta-
tions ultramontaines, don't la recrudescence pour-
rait compromettre la security interieure et exte-
rieure du pays, constituent une violation flagrante
des droits de l'Etat, invite le gouvernement, pour
r6primer cette agitation anti-patriotique, A user
des moyens legaux don't il dispose et. passe a l'or-
dre du jour.' (Tres bien !)
M. JULES SIMON. M. LE PRESIDENT DU CONSEIL
Le gouvernement accepted cet ordre du jour. (Ap-
plaudissements a gauche. Rires et applaudisse-
ments ironiques a droite.)
M. KELLER. Nous demandons 1'ordre du jour
pur et simple.
L'ordre du jour pur et simple, mis aux voix,
n'est pas adopted.
A la majority de 361 voix centre 21, sur 482 vo-
tants, l'ordre du jour motive, sign par MM. Le-
blond, Laussedat et de Marcere, est adopted "


0 the Subscriber or to
JOHN ZUILL, Somerset.
A. J. HODSDON, Hamilton.
W. 0. NORT' 1, Bailey's Bay.

The Undersigned will also take this opportu-
nity of informing his Friends and tlh Public
generally, that he is now prepared to give his
personal attention to the Consignment of
P -ODUCE,
To Messrs. T. H. Bock & Co.,
OF NEW YORK,
And will assure all that he will do eve.thing
in li:i power to promote 4he welfare 4fthose
that favor him witi Consignment .
AILONZO PENIS TON.
Hamilton, Jiny. 22nd, 1878. *


Asst. Commissary Gen. A. D. Burnaby, to be
placed temporarily on half-pay for ill-health. De-
puty-Comy. G. C. Murray, to be commissary.-
Jany. 6, 1878.

A duel was fought at Savannah, Georgia, on ,the
morning of the 12th instant, between Walter S.
Harley, a lawyer, and Robert Fishburne, Clerk of
the County Court of Walterboro. They fought at
10 paces, with Colt's revolvers. They fired together,
Harley in the air, as he had expressed his intention
to do. Fisbburne's ball entered Harley's right
side, severed the bowels, and lodged in the abdo-
man, he died same night. The insult was a poli.
tical one.
The Victoria Hotel, Nassau, N. P. is advertised
by the Colonial Secretary of that place,, for sale,
The particulars appear in the New York Journal of
Commerce of the 12th inst.
Charles McCarthy, one of the recently released
Fenian prisoners died at Dublin on the 12th inst.
A very sad railroad accident occurred on the
Connecticut railroad on the 14th instant, by the
breaking of an iron bridge over which a train was
passing, suddenly hurling without the slightest
warning, two engines and four cars into the frozen
river beneath; whereby fourteen persons were
killed and over fifty persons injured, several of
whom may die of their wounds. The majority of
the persons in the cars were returning from a Moody
and Sankey meeting.
S A Five Column Supple-
ment accompanies this issue of the
GAZETTE. It contains,
Lord Carnarvon's Despatch to Governor Strahan,
of Barbados.
Particulars of the rather sudden death of Victor
Emmanuel, King of Italy.
Notice of the St. Thomas Almanacks, &c., &c.

BERMUI)A,
BY ORDER.OF THE WORSHIPFUL
THE JUSTICES OF THE PEAKE,
Tr HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that HER
MAJESTY'S next GENERAL COURT OF
QUARTER SESSIONS of the PEACE for
these Islands, will hbe holden

ON THURSDAY NEXT,
The 24th Instant,
AT THE COURT HOUSE, Hamilton,
At 10 otlock in the forenoon.
W.J. HENEY,
Clerk of the Peace.
ilamilton, January 21st, 1878.-I

Notice.


Has just Received Ex Canima,
A few Jugs of
d11iesadale .Mineral Spring
Water.
A said Curative for all Diseases ; Drink freely
of it. Can be had at Cost and Charges in
Butts." I
Apply to L4
AUBREY J. RICIHARDSON.
St. George's, 21st Jany., 1878.

Dunscomb & Frith,'


No. 40 EXCHANGE PLACE, NEW YORK.
To Consigners of

To above address I beg to offer my services in
facilitating Shipments, &c.
J.F. SMITH.
January 14th, 1878.-6 3p.

[ime Lime Lime !!


OOO 5000 USH LL of

,HARD STONE LIME.
i Burnt entirely with Wood,
SFOR SALE by the Undersigned.
CLARENCE PENISTON,


I





I3ERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTI-:1


Public Auction,
To-Morrow, Wednesday,
23rd Instant, at 12 o'clock,
I WZLL SEL L,
AT T1I V OLI TAAD.
BRLS. Extra Family FLOUR
Barrels Rye FLOUR
Barrels Yellow Corn MEAL
Bags OATS, BRAN and CORN .
HAMS BACON SHOULDERS
Superior BUTTER Boxes CHEESE
CONFECTIONERY, in 2 lb. Boxes
Barrels, Half, Quarter and Kits MACKEREL
Quarter Barrels SALMON
Tins PEACHES, 3 lbs. each
Tins OYSTERS, 1 lb.
Adamantine and Tallow CANDLES
Laundry and Toilet SOAPS
Barrels Kerosene OIL
Mens' Ready Made CLOTHING
Some Dry GOODS Some FURNITURE
2 very Superior Sewing MACHINES
A fine Ferry BOAT
AND,
A Superior Child's PER-
AMBULATOR.
JOHN HARNETT,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, 22nd Jany., 1878.
N. B.-Should To-morrow be unfair Sale
take place first fair day after. J. H.

AUCTION SALE.

WS WILL SELL,
AT PUBLIC AUCTION,
L under the Big Shed,
At 12 o'clock,

On Thursday next,
26th Instant,
10 DRUMS CODFISH
50 Sugar Cured HAMS
10 Kegs American BUTTER
25 Dozen Tins Roast BEEF
5 Half Chests TEA
5 Casks VINEGAR 5 Barrels ONIONS
3 Kegs TAMARINDS
ALSO,
-1 Spring COT
1 Easy CHAIR, Cane Seat.
AND,
To Close Consignment,
A few Pieces PERCALES and French GRE-
NADINES.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, Jany. 21st, 1878.

Notice.
THE UNDERSIGNED,
ARE NOW RECEIVING
Ex CJ1.N IM1,
TAnn & U01oN ON'S
Copper Paint,
In Gallon and Half Gallon Tins, and offer the
same for Sale.
The above Paint having given Satisfaction to
all who have used it, we confidently recom-
mend it.
B. W. WALKER & CO.
Hamilton, Jany. 21st, 1878.-3

NEW GOODS
Per CAmZMA,'
BLS. Extra Family FLO UR
Bis. Yellow Corn M EAL
Bags CORN
do. BRAN
d l\s. Family BEEF
CHEAP FOR CASH.
FRED. A. WHITE,
Family Grocer,
Nos. 10 & 12 Queen St
Hamilton, Jany. 22, 1878.-2


The Genuine Teneriffe

ONION SEED
For 187S.
rT1|HE UNDERSIGNED expects to receive in
SEPT EMBER NEXT, a Supply of RED
AND WHITE
o.IO./r SEED,
And would recommend all those who have not
yet engaged, to come forward and secure
some of the Genuine Article.


W. E. TALBOT.
Hamilton, Jany. 1st, 1878.-4 3p.


JAMES PILING,


Landscape and Practical

Address-
MR. GEORGE SIMMS, Reid St., Hlamilton.


Pruning and Propagation of Fruit Trees,
Flower Plants and Shrubs, a speciality.
Early application should be made for the
lPruning Grape Vines.
New Grounds laid out, or old remodelled.
,eferences as to ability may be made to
James 11. Thies, Esq., the Mayor of St. Georgez,
J. M. Hayward, Esq., or to O)r. Lough, ilamil-
ton.
Jany. 7, T878.-1m 3p


itiTClO &L


Valuable


New York .Mail Steamer.


OF
Furniture.


The Undersigned has been favored
with orders
TO SELL THE WHOLE OF THE


Belonging to
.fajofr Trench, ,9.,
Comprising a number of Articles that are New,
Valuable, and in excellent order.

The Sale will take place at
ROSE COTFTAGiE"
ON WEDNESDAY,
30th day of January, 1878,
Commencing at 12 o'clock,
When will be offered as follows:-
Drawing .Room.
CHAIRS (small)
TABLES PICTURE (Madonna)
A Lot of BRACKETS MIRRORS
Book CASES Newspaper RACK
Folding Door BLINDS (with Rod and Rings
complete)
Window BLINDS
LAMP (with Extra Glass)
QUAILS (Game) Lot of BOOKS
HARP INKSTAND
CARPET RUGS.
Dining Room.
TABLE (with 2 Wings) Knife BOX
STRAYS MATS TABLE
A Lot of PICTURES and FRAMES
Water BOTTLE Stick RACK
LAMP (Hanging) CARPET.
Spare Bed _Room.
TRON BEDSTEAD (Double)
Mosquito NET BEDS PILLOWS
BOLSTERS MATS RUG, &c.
Bed Room.
TRON BEDSTEAD BEDS
BOLSTERS PILLOWS PRE SS
Toilet SET CARPET
Verandah.
IRON Folding CHAIR (with Cushions)
BENCH Flower STANDS, &.
Rain GUAGE.
Pantry.
A Large Assortment of GLASSWARE
DELPH ETNAS BASKETS
LAMPS D-ert DISHES, &c., &c., &c.
SK itchen. '-' '"=-
-OOKING UTENSILS in large variety
C Dish COVERS TINWARE
Kerosene STOVE TUBS
CROCKERY Baking TINS, &c., &c.
W. T. ROBERT'S.
Auctioneer.
St. Georges, January 21st, 1878.*


TO BE SOLD,
By Order qof the Mortgagee under a
Power of Sale,
ON THE P ZEMIS3S,


The 8th February next, at 12 Noon,

A Parcel of Land,
IN SANDY'S PARISH,
Containing about TWO ROODS, bounded on
the North by a Public Cross Road; on the
South by Land of the Heirs or Devisees of
Pilot William Morris, deceased; on the East
by Land of the Heirs or Devisees of Charles
Hewlett, deceased; and on the West by Land
of the Heirs or Devisees of Captain William
Morris, deceased; with the
DWELLING HOUSE
li thereon now occupied by Timothy
Seymour.
Further particulars may be had of S. BRowN-
LOW GRAY, Esqr., Hamilton.
W. J. HENEY,
Auctioneer.
January 22, 1878.-3 3p


Notice to Growers
of Bermuda Produce.
'THE Undersigned beg to offer their Services
for Receiving and Forwarding Consign-
ments of
Bermuda Produce,
To Miessrs. JOltA .NIX 4' Co.,
Of NEW YORK,
"Throughout the coming Crop Season."
All Shipments intrusted to our Care will have
our usual good attention.
J. T. DARRELL & CO.,
Hamilton, Bermuda.
January 21, 1878.-2 m. 3rd p.
Colonist, please copy.


For Sale,
A Fine

Bay Horse,
Arrived by the "CANMIA" on 20th Instant.
Suitable for general purposes.
THEO. OUTERBRIDG E,
RLID STREET.
January 22, 1878;


The Steam Ship

"Canima,"
Captain LIDDICO AT,
Will leave hence for St. Georges,
At 1 P.M.,
WEDNESDAY,
23rd instant,
To leave that Port for New York
At 4 P.M.,
TRW 3ThAT1-
The 24th instant,
To leave New York for return o


0


n


31st.
All MAILS %vill close at the Post Office at
10 a.m., 24th inst., as usual.
Merchandise and all Produce except Toina-
toes, will be received until 10 a.m., Wednesday,
28rd.
Tomatoes are to be received until 6 p.m.,
9.3rd inst, and will be sent forward by boat to
St. Geore.-i.
Specie List to close as usual, 6 p m., 23rd.
Passengers will be sent free by Carriages
leaving the Office of the undersigned at 12 noon,
Thursday, 24th inst.
Warehouse must be cleared on 26th inst.
TROTT 4 COX,
Agents.
Hamilton, Bermuds, Jany. 22, 1878.

A 1M hKTING
OF THE SAILING COMMITTEE
I. it. CLU II
Is requested
On Thursday, 24th inst.,
At 4 P. M.
C. G. GOSLING.
January 22, 1878.

PEMBROKE PARISH.

NOTICE is hereby given that the BOOK
S OF VALUATION OF PROPERTY in
Pembroke Parish, for the purpose of Assess-
ment, having been revised by the Parish Vestry,
will REMAIN OPEN at the Office of the Un-
dersigned for inspection by the Ratepayers
until
TH UTR DA Y NEXT,
The 24th instant.
Parties having objection to any item therein
will please leave the same with me, in writing,
by that date.
ROBERT WARD,
Parish Vestry Clerk.
Pembroke Parish, Jan. 18, 1878.


-11. --.7,ft


JANUARY 19TH, 1878.


Notice.
''!IE BOOK OF ESTIMATE of Real and
' Personal Property liable by Law to Tax-
ation, has been revised by the Vestry, and will
remain OPEl'N FOR THEi INSPECTION of
all Concerned until the 28th Instant, at the Store
of N. A. Cooper.
AUGUSTUS WINGOOD,
Acting Vestry Clerk.

I. 0. G. S.


Grand


Cricket


~~atch


and Concert,
a Return Match will be played (D.V.) on the
Grounds at the rear of FO RT U KORGE
on
Thursday 31st inst.


Between 11 of PHILANTROPIC Lodge No. 5, and
an 11 of RECHAB Lodge No. 7, 1. 0. G. S.
There will be Luncheon on the grounds.
In the Evening there will be a PROMIE-
NAI)E CONCEPT', at the 'T'owtN HIIALL, when
the choicest Refreshments will be offered at
most reasonable prices.
The Amateur Band will be in attendance on
both occasions.
Doors open at 6'80 p.m.
Admission 6d.

To All whom it may Con-
cern.
I HEREBY give Notice that I h.ve been
appointed AGENT AND ATTORNEY for
the Board of Underwriters of New Orleans, and
will from this Date, represent the Interests of
the following Companies, Vizt :-
New Orleans Mutual Insurance Company,
Crescent do. do. do.
Merchants do. do. do.
Sun do. do. do.
Union Insurance Company,
Hope do. do.
Hibernia do. do.
Factors and Traders Insurance Company,
Tentonia Insurance Company,
New Orleans insurance Association,
Peoples' Insurance Company,
Mecharnics and Traders Insurance Company.
W. C. HYLJ.ND,
Agent for the several Boards of Under-
writers for Ne ,York, Boston,
Baltimore and Philadelphia, &e., &.c., &c.
St. George's, Bermuda, ?
21st January, 1878.

Comfortable Lodging
For a Single Gentleman, can be
obtained in Church Street in this Town. Bo:ud
can also be obtained if desired.
For Reference apply at the )lice of the
Royal Gazette."
January %2nad, 187d.


9


On which occasion the Celebrated
"dlleghany Minstrels,
Will make their first appearance in Bermuda.

On Friday 25th Satur-
day 26th, and Monday qeth January 1878.


MAN \GER -
MUSICAL I)IRECTORI -


SERGT. MURRAY.
MR. CAMPBELL.


The Performance to Commence 8 p.m., every
i Evening.
PRICES OF A1)MISS4)N.
Reserve Seats 2/. Pit I/. Gallery 6d.
TICKETS can be obtained from Sergeants
Messes and Color Sergeants ot Companies and
at the "Royal Gazette" Stationery Store, where
a Plan of the Ilouse may be seen. Carriages
may be ordered at 11"15.
I VIVAT REGINA.

Notice.


TO THE PU


BLIC.


MAY husband, MR. ALBERT
JENNINGS, having left Bermuda, for
New York per Steamer Canima on 10th instant, ?
on private business. I having heard since his
departure that several persons are under the
impression that he was implicated in the riot,
which took place at Mangrove Bay (Somerset),
on the night of the 4th Instant, in which several
Seamen of H. M. Navy, were shot.
I lo hereby forbid any person or persons using
the name of my husband in connection with the
above named riot, as I have sufficient evidence
to prove that Mr. Jennings had not left his resi-
dence on that night.
M RS. JENNINGS,
Windsor House, Somerset.
Son( r-et, Jany. rl4th, 1878.
Gazette only.


Army Contracts!

Commissariat Office,
S HAMILTON, Bermuda, 7th January, 1878.
HE DISTRICT COMMISSARY GENER-
AL will i, :. '-.rnders, in Duplicate, on
the undermentioned dates, from Persons desir-
ous of entering into Contract for the following
SUPPLIES and SERVICES,
For one year, commencing on the 1st April
Next-namely :-
12 o'clock, Noon, on
Wednesday the 23rd day
of January, 1878.
Water for "Pioneer"
Purchase of Stable Manure St. Georges Dis'ct
"9Ireland Isl'd "
Purchase of Empty Flour) 1 i
Barrels and Pork Tierces Hamilton "
St. Georges "
Ireland Isl'd "
Purchase of Hospital Refuse, Hamilton "
St. Georges I
Ireland Isl'd "
Shoeing Transport Horses Hamilton "
t" St. Georges "
Ireland Isl'd "
Supply of Lime For the whole Command
Sweeping Chimneys "
Emptying Ash Pits "
Supply of Lamps & Fittings "
12 o'clock, Noon, on
Friday the 25th day oj
January, 1878.
Supply of Hardware to Royal For the whole
Engineer Department Command
Washing and Repairing Bar- East of St.
rack and Hospital Bedding Georges Ferry
it cc it West "
Forms of Tender with Specification for the
Hardware Contract can be obtained at once on
a written or personal application to the DIs-
TRICT COMMISSARY GENERAL, between the
hours of 10 o'clock a.m. and 2 o'clock p.m.,
daily, on payment of the sum of five shillings.
This amount will be refunded to the unsuc-
cessful candidates on returning the Specifica-
tion. Other Forms of Tender and all inform-
ation can be obtained between the aforesaid
hours, on and after MONDAY NEXT, the
14th instant.
No Tender will be entertained unless made
upon the proper Form obtained as above, and
when sent in each set of Tenders must be pro-
perly enclosed in envelopes and addressed to
the DISTRICT COMMISSARY GENERAL, Hamil-
ton, marked on the outside Tender for Land
Transport," Hospital and Prison Supplies,"
or as the case may be.
The DISTRICT COMMISSARY GENERAL re-
serves the right of rejecting any or all the
Tenders.
H. J. WILKINSON,
A. C. G.,

"Colonist" copy once.

7ttatrtC Mopal,
PROSPECT.

A Grand Vocal and Instrumental


By the Band 46th Regt.,
At the above Theatre,
Under the Distinguished Patronage of is Ex-
cellency

K. C. M. G.,
COLONEL BENNETT and OFFICERS 46th
Regiment.


Immigration Notice.

Council Office,
3RD AUGUST, 1877.
PERSONS desirous of obtaining the Services
of any FARM LABOURERS or DO-
MESTIC SERVANTS who may be introducd .
next year under the IMMIGRATION ACT, OF
1873, are hereby informed that they may enter
their Names on a List which has been opened
at THIS OFFICE for that purpose.
By order of the Board,
J. ESTEN BUTTERFIELD,
3 ev qr Clerk.

Notice.

To Farmers and Shippers of

Bermuda Produce.
The Undersigned Solicits Consignments to
iess'rs. AI. Bennett & Co.,
156 West Street, New York,
Throughout the coming Crop Season.
The usual care and attention will be observed
in receiving and forwarding Shipments. Sales
Guaranteed.
S. S. INGHAM.
Hamilton, 15th Jany., 1878.
O(` Liberal Prices will be paid for Produce
throughout the Season S.S.I.
Hamilton, 15th Jany., 1878.-6 3p.

Unclainmed Letters.
John Adams, J R Armstrong, James Alls, Sarah
Adderley, J W Adkins, Gus Brown, Robert Bald-
win, Mr Berg, Mary Frances Butterfield, James
Butterfield, Peter Burgess, Joao Bettencourt, W 0
Buckley, Mary Ann Barrons, Eleanor J Bean, Helen
E Butterfield, Mena Cohen, Mrs Christopher Cox,
Antonio Calual, Henry Dillas, G B Damonte, Sophia
Darrell, Richard Thos Bill, Geo W Daymon, Fraser
Deshield, Florence Darrell, Samuel Frith, Elizabeth
Fowler, Conrad Gugy, Manuel de Soura Gonsalves,
John Greenslade, Mary E Gibbons (Bailey's Bay),
Joseph Hinson, J H Hopkins, Mrs Wm Harford,
Mary Hinson, Alex Jones, Sarah James, Wm 0
King, Clara E Lloyd, Jane Leach, Wm Landy, 0 T
Middleton, Rev R Miller, Henry Minton, Mrs Mon-
tagu, Wm J Mellons, Manuel Fueira Mello, J F
Motyor, Mozait's Band, Wm H Monck, Thaddeus
MicCallan, Mrs E A Newman, John B Newman,
Elihz Newman, Teresa E Olive, Francisco Jacinto
Pereira, Abraham Peterson, Mary Page, A H Rob-
inson, Mrs G Robinson, Lizzie Saltus, Geo Simons,
Mary Swan, Chas A Smith, Octavus Swan, Joe P
Silvia, Chas 0 Swan, Benjamin E Smith, George
Spencer, Joseph Smith, Mrs Richd Stovell, Richd
Smith, Patrick Swan, Wildis Swan, Edwd F Swan,
Rachel Tucker, Jane F Thomson, Henry Tucker,
John Virgin, Mary Warfey, Joseph Wellman, Harriet
Wells, Mrs Joseph R H Wellman, Charles Williams,
Richd Williams, James Watkins, Lewis A Yorke.
Post Office, Hamilton, January 21, 1878.
MAILS for England, United States, and Domi.
union -of Canada, per Steamer CAVIMA, close at
tie Post Office, Hamilton, on THURSDAY NEXT,
a' I EN o'clock, a.m.


1


I


i


j
I
I





,MBERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


" ofThook ? TIhere is no reason wny tile orationsot our
modern Ciceros shoubl not be recorded and detachable
bound so thnt we can run the indented slips through
lthe machine and in the quiet of our own apartments
listen again, and as often as we will, to the eloquent
words. Nor are we restricted to spoken words. Mu-
sic nay be crystalized as well. Iinagine an opera or
an oratorio, sung by the greatest living vocalists, thus
recorded, and capable of being repeated it we desire."
Of course Mr. Edison, at this stage of the invention,
.* 9tnds some difficulty in repro:lucing the articulations,
lbut he is quite justified by results obtained from his
first crude efforts, in Iris prediction that he will have
the apparatus in practical op ration within a year. lie
has already applied the principles of his speaking teo
lephone, thereby causing an elKetro-magnet to oper-
ate the indenting diaphragm, and will undoubtedly boe
able to transmit a speech, made upon the floor of the
senate, from Washington to New York, record the
sa8ne in New York automatically, and by means of
speaking telhphenes deliver it in the editorial ear of
every newspaper in New York. In view of the prac..
Iical inventions already contributed by Mr. Edison, is
there any one who is prepared to gainsay this predic.
tioi ?

The Kew York Heraldis a fine property. It is said
to bhing in 80,000 a year to Mr,Jas. Gordon Ben-
nett. It I as a circulation of between 100,000 and
150,000 copies aday. The advertisements are worth
about 4,000 a week. It has attained its position
certainly not by the high tone of its politics, for it
is not high-tcned; but by unlimited energy and
expenditure in obtaining news. For instance, Mr.
Benrett has an agent in London who receives all
his despatches from Europe and cables the most
important of them. lie has a steamer awaiting the
arrival of every mail off New York, and this steam-
er, being of great speed, carries the Herald letters
to New Yolk before the regular mails can arrive.
His rule, whenever hoe arranges with a member of
his staff to undertake a matter, is to give a carte
b'anche as to expenditure, saying, "Spend whatever
you want ab(ut doing it, only do it." It will be
remembered that it was the correspondent of the
Herald, the now celebrated Mr. Stanley, who first
communicated to the English Government the fall
of Magdala and the death of the Emperor Theo-
dore. Since then in Khiva, in Central Africa, in
the Arctic legions, and during the Franco-Gei man
war the Herald's correspondents have given ample
proofs of their energy. Mr. Bennett is very partial
to Paris, but Poole, of London, is his tailor. He
is fond of horse, and get erally takes some very
fine on(s w% ith him whenever he travels. He pass-
ed a large part of his youth in France and Germany,
completing I is educ, tion there, and when he went
back to the United States he soon shewed so much
genius for business that his father, the founder of
the Uerald, acquired the greatest confidence in him,
and gradually allowed him to take the manage-
ment of the paper into his hands. The younger
Bennett is 35 years old. When he is in Europe he
receives and despatches ten telegrams a day to and
from his office, so that he is kept au courant of all
that is going on, and is enabled to direct the policy
of tLe paper wherever l:e is. With that direction
Le allows BO one to interfere.

Gieat suiptise is expressed by the Christians of
England, who are interested in the suppression of
the opium traffic, that the Government delays so
long to ratify the Chefoo Convention, negotiated
by ir 'I h(otus Wade with China. This treaty
itquires that when opium is brought into a Chinese
poi t, it shall be deposited in bond, and that while
in Loud the importer shall pay the duty upon it,
and the buyer of the opium the local taxes. The
( I its (Jovetnmient proposes to make the local
tlX -o high as 46 check impottaticn. It is believed,
that Lorl Derby featrs the effect of the ratification,
in the recveniEsol India.


JOUN A LDEN.'-T'e Alen ousqs o( Duxbury is
probably the most ayn ci:nt in New England, ex-
ceptin' the S.tone Tlons."" in Guilford in Con-
nce ur"t., whiheb was bnilt in 1640.
This Alden Houne is believed to have been built
in ."1', 1by a snn of that .jr'hn Alden who came
or-r in the Mayflower in 1620-one of theimmortal
hundred" who founded the colony of Plymouth.
John Alden had been a cooper in England, and
joined the first hand of Pilgrims to come to
the New World. He was but twenty-one years of
,ee, being the youngest of all the Pilgrims, and,
tradition says, the handsomest. It was one of the
regulations of the colony that the unmarried per-
Fscn should live where the authorities directed, not
if all where they choose; so in the division of the
r Pilyrms into families (December 28, 1620), Alden
was put into the family rf Myles Standish. After
the deatb of Rose Standish, when Myles turned his
eyes toward the pretty Priscilla Mullons, we can
see bw fintural it was thlit the soldier, who had
courage enough to grapple with the most powerful
Indian, should have hesitated to attack Priscilla,
and should have sent y-,'!i :Alden to sue for him.
Let us try to picture the scene. The pretty Pri-
scilla is sitting at her wheel, and she does not look
like one ot the Fates who are drawing out the
thread of life. She wears on her head a small cap,
for the w-ter-fall" or the rat" had not been in-
vented. Her (Gress-well, a white jacket made of
line is belled about the waist with a white cord,
and meets the blue woolen petticoat, which har-
monizes well with the deep grey eye, fair face, and
silky hair of the lady. Of what is she thinking?--
of whom ? Is it of the.slender, dark-eyed young
cooper who came on the ship when she put back to
England? The -.'yii' was there old, Speak of the
devil, and he is at your elbow."
When the young John Alden appeared before
her, with hat in band, and wearing a doubting
look, why did the pretty Priscilla blush as she an-
swered his good day ?" Only that she was sur-
prised ; for no good girl then would be spending
her time in wanton thoughts, wondering and wish-
ing that the one she loved, or might love, was at
her side.
John had an errand, and how was he to tell it ?
Iie was love's messenger, coming from Myles
Standish-Mylecs, who was the captain of Pilgrim
soldiers ready at a moment's warning to buckle on
his sword, and fight. He was thirty-six years old.
How old!
It was not easy to tell his errand, we may well
believe. That he brought in the name of the cap-
tain, told of his virtues, was certain ; but when Lte
said, And Captain Standish likes you, Piiscilla,"
we can see the toss of that head and the glance of
the d-mure eye at the hesitating John.
He likes you, and wants to marry you "
f ,-Nor sense, John! Don't talk such things to
me."
But he does; I s-eak the truth; and he has
sent me to say so to you."
l.ien Pt iscilla jumped from her whl'i'l and -an
out of the room leavi g John to wonder. Was
SsLe angry ?-w'.s shle willing? What now was he
to do? for he must early lack an answer.
She soon came in, but her face told no t,,". John
must enew his message.
4" But he is so old !" she said. -'An then he is
short, and his hair is red, and he has freckles."
But he is so manly and so brave, and so many
believe in him and depend on him, and all men and
all women look to him in the hour of danger."
"But he is so old !" again.
"But-"
"But-" 'hen Priscilla looked out of her dark
gray eyes at the handsome young fellow with a
little bit of coquetry-can we doubt it ?-and said,
t Prithee, John, why do you not sp i.k i.Tr.
self ?."....=. -- "
SAd then -and then-p.' We must leave the rea-
der to guess what happened then. Priscilla never
told, nor did John, and we do not know.
We can accept the pretty story of the love-
making as true; while the +other story, that when
Alden went to marry Ptiscilla he rode on his bull,
and carried his wife back to his house on the same
lordly beast, is quite out of the question. The fact
being that cattle were not carried from England to
the colony till 1624, while J hnu's firi- born saw the
light in 1622, we are forced to diopl the pleasing
incident, or relegate it to the lovely domain-of poesy,
where all things are possible. Marriage was a civil
contract there, and was performed by the Magis-
trate, not by the minister.
Upon the matter of love-making the Pilgrims
were strenuous, for, of all the virtues, chastity held
highest place. So in 1638, it is ordered that if
any man make a motion ot marriage to any man's
daughter or maid without first obtaining leave of
hlEf parents or master, he shall be punished by fine
not exceeding five pounds, or corporal punishment
r botb, at the discretion of the bench, according
to the nature of the offence. What money, what
whippings, would now ensue, were this old statute
still standing "--From The Good Old Tim s at
Plymouth," by 0. IVyllys Elliot, in Harper's Mlaga-
zine 0or January.

A MODERN EVANGELINE STORY.
The story of Evangeline is repeated with won-
derful fidelity in all its details in the experience of
a young Fiench girl, a resident of Marseilles. She
was engaged to a sailor, to whom she was to be
married on his return from a voyage to New York.
He did not return, and after a year she got a berth
as stewardess' assistant on one of 'the Ilavre stea-
met's, to go there in search of him. On the passage,
a rich American lady became interested in her


stcry and resolved to help her find out her lover.
f In New York she learned that he had gone to Ca-
nada. For same months she travelled about the
Dominion, sometimes close on his track, and again
losing every clue. as to his whereabouts. She re-
turned to New Yomk, and one day while standing
at a Broadway c-ossing waiting her turn to get
across, she saw the object of her long search on the
other side. She shrieked his name and ran into
the middle of tLe street, but a policeman caught
her and saved her from the wheels of the string of
vehicals. "Angel of God there was none," and
she never again saw the Gabriel she had so long
sought and so nearly found. She learned then
r that he had sailed for San Francisco, and so went
overland to California to meet him. Arrived on
, the Pacific coast, she found that her lover had
fallen overboard, just outside the Heads, and been
drowned. Meanwhile the body of a young man
f dressed in sailor's clothes was cast ashore on the
beach, carried to the Coroner's Office, and, not
being identified, was interred in the Public ceme-
tery. A water-sodden pocket-book was taken
from the dead man, which contaitred only a few
letters written in French and unaddressed. The
girl, heating of this, went to the Coroner's office
and found that the letters were hers. The waves
had tardily and partially recompensed her devoted
search, and she was able to find the grave of her lover

THE LATEST THING IN FASHIONS.-The last thing
in the ladies' fashions rejoices in the name of
Plevna cloth,' and is presumably so called from
its powers of resistance. To the inexperienced
male eye it looks vastly like corduroy, a much ne-
glected fabric whi h is at once rich in appearance,
cheap in price, and lasting in wear. It appears that
this is to be the favorite stuff for walking dresses
during the forthcoming winter. I h(ar, too, that the
very becoming ruffles tiist introduce. d by the Prin-
tess ol Wales are now to be finally condemned,
and that they are to be replaced by the gigantic
cellars ofa bygone period.- Vanitl Fair.


Onae rf the most interested vol!.mes published for
many a (lay is the fac simile of the first edition of
Paradise Lost," which Mr. Elliot Stock, of Pa-
fernoster-row, has issued. The fac timi'e of Shak-
spere which was published by Messrs. Chatto and
Windus a little while back, was necessarily much,
smaller in size than the original, in order to bring
it within portable shape and size. Mr. Stock's
publication is an exact copy in every respect, save
for the addition of a most interesting introduction
by Milton's biographer, Professor David Masson.
He tells us how the early editions came to vary; how,
for instance, the fist issue had John Milton's name
in full, and how the second issue of the same edition
had merely the initials J. M.," it being thought,
apparently, that the name of one who had been so
prominent an actor in the Civil War might hinder
the sale of his poem. It has often been said that
"Paradise Lost" was sold for 5. This is not
strictly accurate. The arrangement between the
author and the publisher was as follows:-For 5
paid down, Milton was to hand over the MS. to the
publisher, with the stipulation that he was to re-
ceive another 5 when the first "impression" (i.e.,
edition) was sold off, a third 5 when the second
impression was sold off, and a fourth 5 when the
third was sold off. Each impression consisted of
1,30U copies, with 200 for presentation copies. So
that Milton looked forward at the utmost to a sale
of 3,900 copies out of 4,500 that might be printed,
and had parted with his entire interest in the. book
for a sum equal to -70 of money at its present
value, one-fourth being paid in advance, and the
rest wholly contingent. This is, of course, a very
low price for such a work, but how many publish-
ers are there at the present day who would care to
give much more for an epic-a religious epic-in
ten (subsequently divided into twelve) books?
The chances are that poems equal to the "Para-
dise Lost" have perished-not because the authors
were mute, inglorious Miltons," but because no
Simmons was found courageous enough to pay
even 5 for them and incur the expense of printing
them. As it turned out, Milton and his family
profited by his epic to the extent of only 63 of
money at its present value; and the Tonsons, into
whose hands it passed, grew fat upon it, while
Milton's widow died in extreme old age and in
very straitened circumstances.

An interesting and extraordinary marriage was
celebrated the other day at Moscow, the bride being
a lady of considerable beauty, boundless wealth
and aged twenty-two, while the bridegroom was
fourscore and six, and his profession that of begging.
The fact was that the lady's fortune, a handsome
one, could come to her only upon marriage. Her
relatives had fixed upon a party who was particu-
larly obnoxious to her. Still she wanted her for-
tune, and accordingly, she cast her thoughts upon
an old 1..-:..r man to whom she had been generous
for some years, and she undertook to pay him 300
roubles it he would marry her, and straightway
depart, ever to see her any more. These condi-
lions 1'e cheefully accepted, (what beggar would
not ?) and the marriage took place, all the beggars
ofe he tow\ assembling to see the ceremony.

A-5 -
V3 ,.a :4

1ENI) .'l
DENTIST,
E11I SITREKT, IIAMILT3 ON, '\SI'
Has received a supply of lthe fil-
lowing
3ZL" -3 _- Z--<- -.

FOR THE TEETIH
Put up by the well known DeItists M lessrs. (j A-
1 VItElL, Ludgate I ill, Londoin.
SEAl)ENT, or Cure for Toothache
XCOR k LI 'ITO' JOTH i'AST:f, for Cleansing
and improvingg thie Teeth
ROYAL DE \TIFRICE, gives the Teeth a
pearl-like whiteness
WVtl 'I'E GUTTAP iP'RCiiA 'N \111M L, for
Stoppin ( dlecayed Teeth
O:T EO- 1 NAi1KL S-TO 1'1NG, warranted to
remain xhitc and firm ns the. Tooth itself
OD)ONT'ALG I QUN' ELIXI!{, celebrated
Mouth W\ash.
IHamiltop, March 26th, 1877.


(~~'kimney


Sw C(i?~ i ng'.


r 1 11 E Underigned having re-
ceived a Patent GiCl.NEY S\VKFI'-
ING VM\ACi!INI' from New York, is prepared
to

Sweep Chimneys
At Mode.ate Rates in any part of the Island,
GEORG E OAKLEY.
Ilamilton, \pril 2nd, 1877.

For Rent,
The Comforiable andl Pleasantly
Situ te~l
1,~1) W [ LINO
.- DWELLING
In the Toxn of Ilamilton, nowv occupied by
Mr. N. 0. 1)uiiH.iM.
Possession given 5th January 1878.
Apply to
J: E. EVANS,
At the Paint Shop,
Next Cor. of Queen and Reid Street.
hIamilton, Novr. 19th, 1877.

For Rent,
In the Town of Hanilton,
-- A Furnished Two "ntory
l-c 40 UN
Apply at the It,,y'o l Gazette" )lfiee
Ilamilton, Sept. 25th, 1<77.

I0 joI cC, I aVt),# a iaJi JI j "I
\1' Fill; lMS I' mDIlATEi: AT':,,
Can be obtained front the
PIHENIX INSUIA NCE C) /' I .\ I
rf London,
One of the lor.gest Established and Wealthiest
Offiojs in Great Britain.

Through the BR \NCHU OFFIC E in these
Islands, a Saving is effected to the Insured
of the Stamp Duty, a very considerable item.
illSKS taken both on ;,EAL aid PERSONAL
PROPER'IY for 3, 6 or 12 months,.
No FEES and no CtlARGE for Policies.
N. A. BUl TTEItFIELD,
Agent.
ilamilton, September 9th, 1865.


-!: .- .. 9-_


CALLING AT QUEENSTOWN,
Carrying tlie United States Mail
from New York
('O7N TIU ESDAY.

Sl i:: s it ip s
NEVADA sails Jany. 15, at 2 p.m.
II) A I sails Jany. 2?, at 8 a.m.
VV )OM ING sails Jany. 29, at 2 p.m.
W\ISCONEIN sails Feby. 5, at7 a.m
.M)'NTAN. \ sails Feby. 1"2, at Noon.
The above Steamers are built expressly for
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carry experienced Officers, Surgeons and Stew-
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The U. S. Mail Steamer Canima"from Ber-
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on AMondays, and Passengers' baggage can be
transferred direct to the Liverpool Steamer sail-
ing next day.
WILLIAMS & GUION,
Agents,
29 Broadway, New York.
New Vork, Jany. 3rd, 1878.

Wmn. Jams Hleney,




AND


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ESTABLISH ED 179.).
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At the Stationery Store adjoining the above
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Always on hand, every variety of Articles in
that line.

./Also, Cricketing G EA R, c csc.
Nov. 14, 1876,


1878.

The Bermuda Pooket 4 Sheet



FOR 1878,
Are now ready for delivery,
The Sheet contains all the necessary informa-
tion for an Almanack.
The Book contains in addition to all other
useful information usually found in such a publi-
cation :
A Business Directory for the Towns of Hamilton
and St. George.
An Elaborate Itinerary.
A plan of the Town of St. George, kindly furnished
by P. Ness, Esqr., Colonial Surveyor.
A Catalogue of most of the Plants, both wild and
cultivated, growing in Bermuda, obligingly pre-
pared and classified for the publisher by Henry
J. Hinson, Esqr., M.D., for this Edition--The
A most complete yet furnished.
Catalogue of the Fishes of Bermudaby Professor
G. Brown Goode, Esqr., of the Smithsonian In-
stitute, Washington.
A Catalogue of the Birds of Bermuda, revised by
Lieut. Denison, R.E.
And a Catalogue of the Sea and Land Shells of
Bermuda, by Mr. John Tavenier Bartram, of
Stock's Point, St. George.
PRICEs-Sheet I/. Book, pain, 1/6; ditto,
interleaved, 1/9.
Can he had at the Post Office, St. George;
at the CHIEF WARDER'S Office, Royal Naval Yard,
Ireland Island; of the several Carriers of the
." Gazette," and at the Royal Gazette" Statioo-
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Royal Gazette Office, Dee. 18, 1877.

Eau" of Dr. Holtz for
HAIR DYE.

'1illIS WATER is of an entirely vegetable
composition, and its use is quite inof
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Thanks to this peculiar 'quality which gives
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Guided by his medical knowledge and his
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compound a dye which may be styled as the
Regenerator by excellence of the chevelure.
GENERAL WAREHOUSE, IN PARIS-
La Correspondance Parisienne-
4 Rue de la Tacherie, 4.


'~- ~ 66C




'da
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a~r I;-.Pr .0C .


r,IIE BEST INVEKSTM I;NT OF THE'
DAY FOR A SMALL OUTLAY

And where there is no
S 'I ( previous knowledge of
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.~-... lMachine, as the public
taste is so much on the increase (or Aerated
Drinks. The book of 9i pages of illustrations
and information forwarded free.
BAR E T, SON, AND FOSTER
Engineers, 23:, Forston Street, lioxton, Lon-
don, England. 3m

JILMJJlN'CK-JANUARY, 1878.


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I


Ad.1ple-I 1.1


Q KNI R K.S.







I Supplement to the Bermuda Royal Gazette, Hamilton, Tuesday, January 22,1878.

^__ _-----------*--- I -I -- II 'I


BARBADOS.
Despatch from Lord Carnarvon to Governor
Strahan and embodied in his Speech at the opening
of the Legislature on the 12th ultimo : -
DowNING STREET, 16th November, 1877*
Sir,-The time being now near at hand when, on
your return to Barbados, the Legislature will be
summoned to meet for the despatch of Business, it
is desirable that I should address you on some sub-
jects respecting which there is, as I am aware, con-
siderable anxiety to learn the views of Her Majes-
ty's Government.
2.-Having carefully weighed the inconvenience
and advantage attendant upon a temporarysus-
pension of legislation, I deemed it advisable that I
should have an opportunity of conferring with you
on the affairs of Barbados, and that the sittings of
the Legislature should not commence until you
could open the chambers in person, with an an-
nouncement of the course which I think it desirable
to pursue.
3.-A great pressure of business prevented me
during the earlier part of the autumn from confer.
ring with you, but though regretting the delay in
the re-assembling of the Legislature which has thus
arisen, I have been strongly impressed with the be-
lief that after recent occurrences there would be
distinct benefit in an interval during which the
strong feelings which had unfortunately. ,been
aroused might be allowed to subside.
4.-I will therefore at once address myself to
that question which is of the deepest interest to
the Legislature and the people of Birbados, and is
no less one which has weighed much with me.
Having regard to the past history and present
condition of the Island, and to the fact that the
emancipation of the slaves placed the various class-
es of the community in relations to each other dif-
ferent from those which existed when the present
constitution was granted to the colony, 1 have been
called upon to consider whether it is now possible
to maintain in existence the old constitution of the
Island. That constitution possesses features which,
0 however interesting as having been handed down
from a remote period, are in some respects inconsis-
tent with the principles on which it is now demand-'
ed that the subjects of Her Majesty in every part of
the world should be governed. The late unhappy
disturbances have, as all persons interested in the
Island are awai e, further attracted public attention
very strongly to the question whether the consti-
r tuition of Barbados requires amendment either by
extending the franchise, or by establishing that di-
rect protection by the Crown of the unrepresented
`Nunsses which takes the place of representation and
w is afforded by the constitution of a Crown
Colony.-
5.-Though in no way disregarding the interests
and claims of the large negro population, I cannot
on the one hand entertain the idea of any such ex-
tension of the franchise among them as could mate-
rially affect the present composition of the Assem-
bly :--nor on the other hand am I, after mature re-
flection, now prepared to invite either the local Le-
gislature or the Imperial Parliament to transform
Bazbados into a Crown Colony. I cannot but feel
some regard for that old constitution, which in the
hands of intelligent and frequently of distinguished
men, has been, with all its defects, during a long
period the means of affording good government to
the people of the Island. There have been, and
are still, grave deficiencies in some of the public
Institutions of the Island. They have not kept
pace with those changes which the advance of pub-
SMlie feeling has rightly enforced both in this country
and in other parts of Her Majesty's Dominions.
But I should not be doing justice to those who
have admistered a constitution conferring singular-
ly independent powers upon a small minority of the
people, if 1 did not recognize the fact that whatever
may have been the practical defects of administra-
tion the poorest classes have Ertained a remarkable
affection for their country,46d the universal loyal-
ty of the Islanders has became proverbial.
6.-While therefore it is hardly necessary for me
to observe, that to create a constitution such as
that of Barbados would be impossible at the present
day, there are strong reasons why I should hesitate
to recommend, and why I should try any other rea-
sonable course before recommending the abolition or
ever a radical alteration of the existing constitution,
and I need not say that it is much more in accord-
ance with my own views and wishes to rely as I feel
that I ought to be able to rely, upon the strong as-
surances which I have received that the Assembly
will be prepared to co-operate loyally with the Gov-
ernor, and with Her Majesty's Governmentin carry-
ing out such -measures as involve the well being
and happiness of the people, more especially of the
poor and infirm, in removing defects in constitu-
tional practice; and in amending the conditions of
those public institutions which are still in need of
material improvement and if this co-operation is
loyally and cheerfully given, I see no reason why it
should not be possible for Barbados to maintain
her present form of Government.
7. I have instructed you personally to report to
me, after further residence in the Colony, upon the
social condition of the labouring classes; I will
therefore pass at once to some points of general ad-
ministration as to which I feel it necessary that a
better system should be adopted.
8.-I must in the first place call your serious at-
tention to the procedure in Barbados as regards
financial matters which is defective and unsound.
It is neither in practice nor in principle essential
to the maintenance of the existing form of
Constitution, and I cannot doubt that the As-
sembly will readily agree to adopt such Re-
Solutions or enactments as may be necessary
Sin order to introduce a system more in accordance


with the universal practice. In Barbados there are
not, as elsewhere, estimates of Revenue and Ex..
peanditure prepared by the Government and sub-
mitted on the responsibility of the Government to
the Assembly; while there exists the anomalous
practice of expending the public money through
Committees or Boards composed of members of the
Legislature.
9.-Desirous however as I am, of meeting, as far
as possible, the wishes of theAssembly, I do not pro-
pose that the direct andactive supervision of Expen.
diture by members of theAssembly, should, under the
peculiar circumstances of the Island, be in all cases
abolished. But I would propose that either by al-
tering the constitution of the Consolidated Board
or by substituting for it some similar arrangement,
provision shouAl be made for associating the mem-
bers of the Executive Council (and the Colonial
Engineer as a consulting member) with a suitable
number-which might be not less than three, nor
more than five-of members othe Assembly as a
Board of Direction for carrying out the more cost.
ly public works, those for instance, the estimated
coat of which may excee .1000.
10.-I request therefore that you will invite the
Assembly to concur in the proposal that, as in other
Colonies, annual estimates of Revenue and Expen-
'diture shall be prepared by the Government and
submitted for the consideration of the Assembly,
and further to take steps for securing such super-
" vision of expenditure of the nature and to the ex-
tent which I have proposed.
11.-1 should not object, although it is unusual,
to leave to such a Board as I have referred to, the
duty of originating any proposals for additional
* taxation or other provision required to meet a de-
Blcit on the expenditure sanctioned by the House,
but it would still be in the power of the House
either to reject or amend such proposals.
12.-ItUs in the next place of pressing impor-
tance that provision should be made tbr the pres-


ence in the Assembly (as in all other important
colonies) of one or more of the principal officers of
the government. Up to a recent date this require-
ment has been more or less adequately provided for,
by the willingness of a constituency to return a gov-
ernment officer. But it is obvious (even without
reference to recent experience) that in a small Is-
land in which the constituencies do not represent
the various interests which exist in the Colony, any
divergence of opinion between the government and
those controlling the representation may lead to the
government being without a voice in the Elective
Chamber. There is then no opportunity for those
explanations and mutual understandings which are
absolutely essential to the conduct of public busi-
ness, and the communications between the Assem-
bly and the Executive Government can only be
carried on by means of Messages between the Gov-
ernor and Speaker, a practice which entails alike
upon the Representative of the Crown and upon the
Chamber inconvenient -and often lengthy commu-
nications; and thus engenders many causes of
difficulty and misunderstanding. To remedy this
serious defect, I request you to invite the Assembly
to pass an act declaring that any two of the salaried
officers of the government shall be entitled, to sit
and speak in the Assembly, notwithstanding that
they may not have been elected by constituencies.
This is in accordance with the practice which pre-
vailed at the Cape of Good Hope until the intro-
duction of Responsible Government. It is my
opinion that the Assembly, in giving seats to these.
Officers, should also give them votes: but as their
voting power would be practically of no material
force, the question is one which I am content to
leave to the Assembly. Whilst on this subject I
cannot but observe that the long intervals which
elapse between the sittings of the House, which, as I
understand, take place on an average once a fort-'
night, must seriously impede useful legislation, and
I would suggest, more especially with reference to
those weighty measures which will occupy the at-
tention of the House in connection with poor relief,
provision for the insane, education and other mat-
ters not less important, that the sittings of the
House should be more frequent, and that when the
public business will admit of it there should be a
recess during such season of the year as may be
most convenient to the Legislature.
13.-The last point to which I will at present
address myself is the necessity, which appears to
me urgent, of making provision for the systematic,
careful and frequent inspection of the Hospitals,
Asylums, Alms Houses, and other public Institu-
tions by a Government Inspector, who should re-
port monthly, or, if circumstances require, more
frequently, to the Governor, on the condition of
these institutions and their inmates. I do not
think it necessary to express an opinion as to the
precise provision to be made for this purpose:
there are details on which, with the local experi-
ence at command, there ought to be no difficulty
in arriving at a satisfactory conclusion, and it will
be for you to consider what proposal you should
make.
14.-I have now briefly, and necessarily in very
general terms,explained the policy which in myopin-
ion ought to suffice, if Her Majesty's Government
is cordially and energetically assisted by the Colo-
nial Legislature, to meet the more pressing require-
ments of Barbados. In these proposals I am con-
fident that the Assembly will read and appreciate
my desire to -avoid any interference with the con-
stitution; my wish that they should undertake
those reforms which every Government of every
country must, under the changing circumstances of
political life, accept and carry out, if they would
not see public institutions languish and become
useless from the inevitable growth of abuses, or
from a nonconformity with the niew wants and
conditions of their age; and my anxiety to deal
with them and their interests in a friendly and
considerate spirit. If they, on their part, show
themselves ready to meet Her Majesty's Govern-
ment in a similar spirit, I have little doubt that the
questions which occupy our common attention may
be settled in a manner to satisfy public interests in
Barbados no less than public opinion in England.
15.-I can hardly doubt that the reforms of
which I have indicated the general scope will be
considered reasonable, and it will rest with the
Assembly to show whether I am justified in the
hope that the existing Constitution of Barbados
may be made to meet the requirements of the com-
munity, and the necessity for any extensive modi-
fications of it may be averted.
I have the honor to be, Sir,
Your most obedient humble servant,
(Signed) CARNARVON
Governor STRAHAN, C.M.G.,
&c., &c., &c.

THE COAL COMBINATION.
Ratification of the Compact-Organization of the
Board of Control.
A meeting of the representatives of the leading
coal interests was held at 11 o'clock this morning
in the Coal and Iron Exchange, at Courtland and
Church streets, for the purpose of ratifying the re-
cent agreement for the control of production. The
meeting was attended by Messrs. Thomas Dickson,
president of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Com-
pany; Samuel Sloan, president of the Delaware,
Lackawanna and Western Railroad; Thomas A.
Scott, president of the Pennsylvania Railroad; E.
W. Clarke, receiver of the Lehigh and Wilkesbarre
Coal Company; F. B. Gowen, president of the Phi-
ladelphia and Reading Railroad; ExJudge Lath-
rop, receiver of the Central Railroad of New Jersey;


George A. Hoyt, vice-president of the Pennsylvania
Coal Company; Dr. Linderman and E. P. Wilbur,
representing the Lehigh Valley interests, and Ja-
cob E Graeff, representing individual operators in
the Schuylkill region. Mr. Dickson occupied the
chair.
The conference, which was held privately, lasted
about two hours. At its close it was announced
that the terms of the agreement already published
had been formally adopted without modification,
and that the Board of Control ha-I been organized
by the election of Mr. Dickson as president and Mr.
Gowen as Secretary. The Board is composed ot
Thomas Dickson, for the Delaware and Hudson
Canal Company; F. B. Gowen, Philadelphia and
Reading; Samuel Sloan, Delaware, Laqkawanna
and Western; George A. Hoyt, Pennsylvania Coal
Company; Mr. Cassatt, Pennsylvania Railroad;
Francis S. Lathrop, Central Railroad of New Jer-
sey; E. W. Clarke, Lehigh and Wilkesbarrp; Dr.
Linderman and.E. P. Wilbur for the Lehigh inter-
ests.
The Board of Control will meet in Philadelphia
a week from next Friday, and will meet monthly
afterward, alternating between Philadelphia and
this city. The meetings here will take place at the
Coal and Iron Exchange, and those in Philadelphia
at the offices of the Philadelphia and Reading
Railroad.
The Delaware and Hudson Canal Company ad-
vanced its prices to-day seventy-five cents per ton.
President Dickson said that he supposed a general
advance in rates would be made by the other com-
panies.-New York Evening Post, Jan, 17.

Arms for the Turkish Government.-Nzw HAVEN,
January 12.-This afternoon the iron steamer Remus
reached this port, having come tor a load of arms and
munitions for the Turkish Government. She will not
begin to tak6 in cargo for several days. Meanwhile
the iron steamer John Bramhall still. lies in the
Sound, just outside of the harbor, ready to start, bear*
ing a cargo worth over $1,500,000. She has been
long delayed, and for fourteen days has drawn demur-
rage at the rate of $250 a day.


DEATH OF THE K1JG OF


The King of Italy, Victor Emmanuel, is dead.
His Majesty was attacked with a violent fever which
produced pleurisy in the right lung at 11-30 p.m. of
the 6th.
On the 7th the King passed a comparatively quiet
night, but his fever continued to increase with fur-
ther extension of the pleurisy.
A special despatch from Rome to the Pall Mall
Gazette says : "Professor Baccelli, of Rome, and Dr.
Bruno, from Turin, have been summoned for con-
sultation in regard to the condition of the King.
The left lower lobe of his right lung is congested,
the whole right pleura is affected, and there is also
intense intercostal neuralgic pain affecting the
entire abdomen. This being only the second day of
the malady it is impossible to predict its issue. The
King is in perfect possession of his mental faculties,
and is desirous of taking his usual part in the direc-
tion of affairs. When news of the King's illness
reached the Pope he asked the cardinals who were
present with him: What will happen if the Vati-
can and Quirinal both become vacant ?"
Reuter's despatch from Rome, midnight, says the
King passed a fairly quiet day. The malady has
not entered any new phase, and the King's' general
condition is improved. It is declared that reports
as to the gravity of his illness have been exagger-
ated.
On the 9th, notwithstanding the hopes that were
expressed, His Majesty succumbed to the disease
which had so fiercely attacked him.

THE DEATH OF KING VICTOR EMMAN-
UEL.
Profound Impressions created--Consequences with
respect to Germyn, French and Papal Relations.
LONDON, Jany. 9.--The King of Italy died at
2-30 o'clock this afternoon.
Vittorio Emmanuel Maria Alberto Eugenio Fer-
dinando Tommaso, better known as victor Em-
manuel II., King of Italy, was the eldest son of
Charles Albert, King of Sardinia, and Theresa,
daughter of the Grand, Duke Ferdinand of Tus-
cany. He was born on. the 14th of March, 1820,
in Turin, and received his early education from
the Jesuits. In 1842, being then' Duke of Savoy,
he married the Archduchess Adelaide of Austria.
His father abdicated the throne of Sardinia in his
favor. He afterward obtained the throne of the
Two Sicilies, and at the conclusion of a war with
Austria for Italian independence, in alliance with
France, gained Parma, Modena, Tuscany and a
large part of the Papal States, and was soon after
declared King of Italy. In 1870 the rest of the
Papal States came under his dominion.
LONDON, Jany. 11.-The Court Circular says
Queen Victoria received the news of Victor Em-
manuel's death with deep regret. The deceased
was always the friend of England.
King Humbert 1, has issued the following proc-
lamation :
ITALIANs :-The greatest misfortune has sud-
denly befallen us. Victor Emmanuel, the founder
of the kingdom of Italy and its unity, has been
taken from us. I received his last sigh, which
was for the nation; his last wishes which were for
the happiness of his people. His voice, which will
always resound in my heart, bids me vanquish sor-
row and indicates my duty at this moment. There
is only one consolation possible-namely, to show
ourselves worthy of im-I by following in his foot-
steps, and you by remaining devoted to those civio
virtues by the aid of which he accomplished the
difficult task of rendering Italy great and united.
I shall be mindful of his grand example of devotion
to country, lote of progress and faith in liberal
institutions, which are ,the pride of my house. My
sole ambition will be to deserve the love of my
people.
LONDON, January 10.-The Times's Paris corres-
pondent, telegraphing last night, says :
"The death of King Victor Emmanuel produced
a great impression here. The sudden disappear-
ance of the patriotic promoter of Italian unity
creates fresh anxiety in, the minds of French politi-
cians. Victor Emmanutel, despite every influence
brought to bear on him, had remained the friend
of France; and, notwithstanding the cession of
Savoy and Nice and the hasty peace of Villafranca,
he deemed himself upder obligations to France.
Although Italy, made distrustful by Ultramonta-
nism, had latterly formed such relations with Ger-
many as to pass for her docile ally. it is known,
and was proved by his recent interview with M.
Gambetta, that Victor Emmanuel woqld not, ex-
cept as the last extremity, have acceded to any en-
terprise apparently menacing France. His death
deprives this country or this moral security based
entirely on the King's personal feeling, and effaces
the last trace of an individual gratitude which in-
spired the French nation with instinctive confi-
dence. The prospect of an early conclave coupled
with this event excites anxieties which Victor Em-
manuel might have warded off. Although Piux
IX. repeatedly declared that he should live long
enough to see the King repent on his death bed,
the two men, it is known, could not help liking
each other, and the King had often prevented his
advisers from taking too seriously to heart attacks
which the Pontiff took pleasure in heaping on him.
Here, too, individual good will and respect disap-
pear with the King, and there is no telling how far
Italy will now be willing or able to protect the de-
liberations of the conclave. Happily the issue of
the late crisis will have served considerably to at-


tenuate the consequences of the King's death, and
liberal Italy, under whatever sovereign, cannot re-
gard France as capable of cherishing hostile views
toward her."
The body of Victor Emmanuel has been em-
balmed, It is stated that the Cardinal Vicar has
granted the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore for
the funeral ceremony. :
Italian clerical journals declare that the dying
King, before receiving 'the Viaticum, asked the
Pope's forgiveness for biq sins.
A later telegram says this statement is authori-
tatively contradicted, and declares that "Victor
Emmanuel made no declaration which could give
the lie to his glorious life as an Italian King."
Several municipalities have already resolved to
erect statues of the latb King."


KINGSTON, Jamaica, December 27.-Disputed Pos-
session of a Guano Island-The American Claimants
Forcibly removed.-A number of American citizens
from Baltimore, who have taken forcible possession
of the Morant Keys, a dependency of Jamaica, and
who have established a Baltimore Guano Company
and have been shipping guano despite the warnings
of the United States Consul here and the Govern-
ment of Jamaica, have been driven off the Keys by
Her Majesty's steamer Blanche and brought to
Kingston. A Captain Jennett claims to have dis-
covered the Keys and to have taken possession of
them in the name of the United States, and pro-
tests against the conduct of the Jamaica authorities.
Recent Halifax advices from the West Indies are
very unfavorable to the fish trade. Several Hali-
fax vessels sold their cargoes below cost; one was
ordered to bring her cakgo back.
FRas MAT ]F roR EEifLAND.-The first lot of
western produce, consisting of six car loads of fresh
meats, &c., for England, via Halifax, had arrived
and were despatched by the Circassian on 7th inst.


THE ST. THOMAS ALMANACS 1878.
We have received the St. Thomas Almanack and
Commercial Advertiser for 1878, compiled, printed
and published by August Walloe-the first illustrated
book printed in the Island ;-and the St. Thomas
Times Almanac 'and Popular Mercantile Advertiser
for the year 1878-issued from the St. Thomas
"Times" formerly Tidende's" Office.
The latter publications the more portable of the two,
clearly and neatly printed, containing a quantity of
matter relating to the movement of steamships in the
West Indies, Consuls. Duties, Port and Customs
Charges, Commercial Directory, &.
The former is more pretensions, larger and more at-
tractive, containing eighty-eight pages of advertise-
ments, some fifty pages of description of St. Thomas
and St. Croix, and pretty much the same commercial
information as the Times Almanac. The cover is
embellished with a neat view of St. Thomas which gives
the volume an attractive look. The engravings have a
quaintness about them, and must not be criticised con-
sidering the manner in which they were produced.
They are a welcome addition to the Press matter from
which we will now give a few extracts:
7'"" Seen from the harbour, the Town of St. Thomas
presents a pretty appearance. All who behold it for
the first time, are fully alive to this fact and even the
most captious critic fails to discover a fault in the beauty
of its location. Clusters of houses, with their brilliant
red roofs, rise to the summits of three hills, projecting
fropi the .sides of a dark range of mountains, which,
forming a noble back ground, throws out in bold relief
the dwellings on its slopes. In agreeable contrast to
the whites, reds and greys of these habitations, the
mountain cabbage and palm tree with their green um-
brageous foliage peep out here and there and by their
modest beauty add a double attraction to a scene always
charming to the eye from its novelty.
Hurricanes sometimes play sad' havoc among hanging
signs but do not abate in the least the advertising
propensities of some of the merchants the stores
are substantial fire proof buildings, generally of but one
story, and often reaching from the street to the wharf,
a distance of from 300 to 400 feet. Here are no plate
glass shop windows, no meretricious ornamentation to
heighten the appearance of the articles offered for sale
or to tempt the purchaser. Most of the young
salesmen are natives. some of them are perfect
polyglots in their way. .. She sells Sugar Ba-
bies," a pet name for sweet meats of different devices
and colours, mounted on small thin sticks cut from the
palm leaf. Though composed of so many dif-
ferent nationalities, the people of St. Thomas appear to
live together in the greatest harmony. The
Reconciling Court is an admirable institution. It has
two Judges elected from among the citizens for a term
of three years, at the expiration of which time it is
optional for them to retire or not. The Judge of the
Town Court is obliged to sit with them, in person, or
by deputy to see that the proceedings are legal and to
give advice on all points of law, but has no vote. .
The disinterested and dispassionate opinion and advice
of the CITIZEN JUDGES generally produce peace and
good feeling, when the vexations of further litigation
might ha e engendered the most violent and deep-
seated animosity, and involved the parties in ruinous
expenses. Not far from the Atheneum is C. E.
Taylor's Book Store, the only establishment of its kind
in the Island. Of our domestic servants, we
we have but little to say As in other countries they
are good, bad and indifferent. The want of a character
makes no great difference here. They are hired by the
month. If they please you, they remain, if not you give
them notice to quit, and so on to the end of the chapter,
when you may very likely get a good one, only to leave
you by way of change. For a servant to remain in a
family for several years would be an anomaly. We
have known families who have had a dozen different
domestics in a year. As a rule they are honest and
obliging, if you treat them kindly, but many are very
stupid and provoking.
There are few Islands in this part of the world that
are more indebted to nature than St. Croix for pictur-
esque beauty a pearl of unpretending loveliness-
. My excursions hitherto had been limited to Bas-'
sin and to the east end of the Island, but having heard
a great deal about that famous residence built by Gov-
ernor General Von Scholten in 1834, I made up my
mind to pay it (Bulowsminde) a visit, a twenty minutes
drive to the top of the hill, about 600 feet about the
level of the sea. There is a charming villa attached to
it which is called Hufensight. Thought not so exten-
sive as Bulowsminde" it is built on a corresponding
scale and forms an admirable addition to the main
building. Dr. P. E. Kalmer is quoted as an authority
on "the remarkably fine and salubrious climate of St.
Croix."
The value of local Almanacs is great to the traveller
and they supply the curious with an interesting fund of
information. In the Counting House they are valu-
able books of reference on the commercial arrangements
and usages of the day.

THE HOME GUARDS OF ENGLAND.

According to all accounts says a London news-
paper of December 20, the number of our volun-
teers is still on the increase. So far as can he as-
certained from the reports of commanding officers
furnished during the past month to the War Office,
they amount to upward of 175,000 men, all of whom
have fulfilled the obligations required by the'Field
Marshal Commanding-in-Chief from efficient vol.
unteers. Of these 175,000 men, 32,000 are artil-
lerymen, 7,000 engineers, 133,000 infantry, and a
remainder mounted rifles and permanent staff.
The infantry are not only tolerably disciplined and
drilled, but are all of them intelligent men, armed
with weapons of precision, which they know full
well how to use. Every rifle volunteer among them
has, besides his drilling, gone through a course of
musketry instruction, and fired 60 rounds of ball-,.
cartridge at the butts; or, if he has not actually
expended so many rounds, it is because he has
proved himself a crack shot in the first score emp-
tied from his rifle. The artillery volunteers, again,
are not simply gentlemen soldiers. To earn the
capitation grant and become enrolled among the
available defenders of his country, a volunteer ar-


tilleryman must have, taken his turn at serving the
big guns attached to his batter, or must have pro-
ceeded to one of the coast forts or to Shoeburyness
to become practically acquainted with the working
and training of heavy cannon. We do not expect
them to act as field batteries, or horse artillery, but
the gunners are instructed in all the duties of coast
and Garrison artillery. Of cavalry, we have but a
few hundreds among the volunteers; the deficiency
in reserve horsemen is made up, however, by the
Yeomanry, who are supposed to muster upward of
14,000 sabres. These, with the Militia, represent
our second line of defence, which may be stated in
round numbers at no less than 800,000 men of all
ranks. Thus, of Militia, infantry and artillery, we
have 115,000; of Yeomanry cavalry 14,000, and of
volunteers 175,000 men.

LEITH, Jany. 12.-D. R. MacGreggor & Co.,
merchants and steamship owners at this place, have
failed. Their liabilities range from 81,000,000 to
$1,500,000, while their assets are not over $50,000.
Mr. MacGregor, who is member of Parliament for
the Leith district, has resigned his seat.
THE HOME RULERS.-DUBLIN, Jany. 13.-A con-
ference of Home Rule members of Parliament was
held last night. Dr. Butt was present. Entire
harmony prevailed. The question of Parliament-
ary obstruction was not discussed in detail. A
resolution was adopted that it was desirable an
amendment be proposed to the address :o the Queen
humbly representing that in the opinion of the
House of Commons it is important that all affairs
touching the Government of Ireland, whereof the
Irish people have reason to complain, should be im-
mediately considered by Parliament with a view to
their redress.
The Fenian prisoners who were recently released
arrived here to-night and were greeted by a torch-
light procession. From 15,000 to 20,000 people
witnessed their reception and 203 national bands
took part in the procession.;


JOHN BRINSMEAD & SONS'
GOLD MEDAL

PIANOFORTES
WBRE AWARDED
THE GRAND MEDAL or HONOUR AND DIPLOMA
OF MERIT, Philadelphia, 1876.
THE GOLD MEDAL. Paris, 1870.
THE HIGHEST AWARD, THE GRAND DIPLOMA
or HONOUR, Paris, 1874.
THE MEDAL OF HONOUR, Paris, z867.
THE PRIZE MEDAL, London, 1862.
THE DIPLOMA OF EXTRAORDINARY MERIT,
Netherlands International Exhibition, 1869. etc.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
PATENT
PERFECT CHECK REPEATER ACTION PIANOS.
Patented 1862, I868, 1871, and 1875, in
GREAT BRITAIN, AUSTRIA,
PRUSSIA, ITALY,
FRANCE, | BELGIUM.
AND AMERICA.
G ILBERT I. BAUER'S Prize Medal,
Drawing-Room ORGANS,
From 8 guins. to 3oo guins.
On the Three years System.
JOHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL 1MANOS,
with the Patent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
I have examined Messrs.
BRINSMEAD & SONS' New
Check Action as applied to
SIR JULEs BENEDICT. their Pianos, and consider
it a most ingenious and val-
uable invention, which can-
not fail tomeetwith success."
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS
with the Patent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
On the Three Years System.
I have much pleasurs in
testifying to the great excels
lence of Messrs. JOHN
BRINSMEAD & SONS' Piano-
SYDNEYSMITH. fortes. Their"Perfect Check
SYDNEY SMIT. Repeater" produces a touch
that is -absolute perfection,
and which is unsurpassed by
any other maker, native or
foreign."


SOH N


BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
with the Patent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
On the Three Years System.


BRINLBY RICHARDS.


"" I have much pleasure in
testifying to the efficiency of
Messrs. BRINSMEAD&SONS'
New Patent Check-Action
(for Pianofortes), which I
consider a very Clever and
useful invention, and likely
. to be extensively adopted.'


J OHN BRI.NSMEAD and SONS'
S SHORT IRON GRAND PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
Where all the pianos go to seems somewhat of a
mnv stery. for a really good instrument will last a lifetime;
a:'d yet every year thousands are made by each of the great
London Manufacturers, while e the numbers ma'e by the
tw.. hundred or more smaller firms must represent an enor-
mous number in the course of each year. The improvements
:nade in English pianos have caused this trade rapidly to
increase, until ono pianoforte manufactory after another
ias been built to supply the growing demand. One of the
arrestt of these, lately erected by Messrs. JOHN BRINSMBAD
.' SONS, of Wigmore-street, covers nearly an acre of
.round in the Gratton-road, Kentish-town, and is intended
.o accommodate 300 workmen. These works alone can
apply 3,000 pianos annually, and there are at least three
:ianufactories in London capable of making an equal
:mber."-Illustrated London News.
OHN' BRINSMEAD and SONS'
S- GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
From FREDERICK CHATTERTON, Esq.
Harpist to the,Queen.
1 have great pleasure in certifying to the fine, rich, and
,werful tone of Messrs. JOHN BRINSMEAD & SONS', Pianos,
so to the great improvements they have succeeded in
attaining
As a Professor of the Harp, I can safely add that the
yellow tones of their short iron Gold Medal Grands blend
harmingly with the Instrument I profess, and form a
delicious ensemble.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS',
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Action Repeater.
From Professor W. KUHBE.
It gives me the greatest pleasure to state that I con-
side ithe the instrument manufactured by you to be most
excellent in tone, touch, and quality of material. I
particularly admire your Pianos with the Patent Check
Repeater Action and new Grand Construction, being a
wonderful improvement upon the old system;, in my
opinion your firm having been successful in creating as
good a touch to the Cottage Pianoforte as that usually
accorded to the Grand ; All those I have chosen have
given the greatest satisfaction to the purchasers.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
From Professor HERMANM PAPENDIECK.
I have great pleasure in testifying to the excellence of
your instruments. Your newly patented system "the
P.rfaect Check Repeater Action," when allied to these
Pianos, greatly increases their value, and I have no doubt
thI-t these valuable improvements will excite general
atten:i-n a-.d admiration."
,OHN BRINSMEAD and SON S'
f GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Aetion.
From Mr. BOYTON SMITH.
I have much pleasure in bearing testimony to the
per section of Messrs. J. BRINSMEAD & SONS' New Piano-
forte Action, which, for promptness in repetition, and
general excellence in touch, surpass anything of the kind I
':vc yet seen, whilst the extreme simplicity of the mechan-
ism by which such important results are attained is an
ad-itional recommendation."
JOHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
Pronm FREDERICK GUILLAUME, Chevelier de Liguro,
'2 v:miner-General of the A ancient Bourbonnic Society in the
R, yal Academy 6f Fine Arts at Naples, Honorary
memberr of Musical A cademies at Rome, Venice, &c.,
formally Director-General of all Military Music
for both Infantry and Cavalry of the Line in
the A rmy of the Two Sicilies.
I have much pleasure in testifying to the excellence of
our upright and horizontal Grand Pianofortes, as they are
simply perfect in touch and. tone."
fOHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
J GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,


THE STANDARD,"


with the Patent Ferfect CheCk
Repeater Action.
On the Three Years' System.
"Receive the greatest appro-
bation everywhere of music.
( cians and manufacturers."


TOHN BRINSM EAD- and SONS'
S PATENT "PERFECT
CHECK REPEATER
'. :, ACT10 N" Pianofqrtes of
every description, manufac-
tured expressly for India and
extreme climates.
JOHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
May be obtained of all the principal music sellers.


OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Cheque Repeater Action,
From 33 guins. to 5oo0guins.


JOHN BRINSMEAD AND SONS'

PIANOFORTES,
GUARANTEED FOR FIVE YEARS.
*** Illustrated Price Lists and Descriptions with Opinions
of the London Press and Musical Profession, forwarded
Post Free upon application.
18, WIGMORE STREET, LONDON, W.
MANUFAQTORt,'
THE "BRINSMEAD WORKS," GRAFTON-ROAD,
KFNTISH TOWN, N.W. ,


I




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