Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00287
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00287
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text




THEE


^*^ / F~Ie


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERiAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER


VOL. LXXVI.-No. 78.


HAMILTON, BERMUDA TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER


29, 1903.


20s. PER ANNUM.


X THOUSAND MILES IN A REFRIGERA-
TOR.

BY RALPH SrOCK.

AN OUT-OF-THE-WAY EXPERIENCE WHICH BEFELL
A YOUNG "TENDER-FOOT" WHILE ON HIS WAY
HOME TO ENGLAND. N( T BEING OVER-
BURDENED WITH CASH, HE DECIDED TO TRAVEL
ACROSS CANADA FREE BY STOWING HIMSELF
AWAY ON A FREIGHT TRAIN.-THEREUPON
FOLLOWED AN ADVENTURE WHICH NEARLY
ENDED IN A DOUBLE TRAGEDY.
(From the Wide World Magazine.)
I bad very little money when I landed at Mon-
treal; in fact, I may as well be honest, I had ex-
actly twenty-five dollars (five pounds) when I
started on my wanderings, and it only goes to
show how a young man, possessed of a fairly good
physique and a rather limited amount of brains,
can push along in the Colonies when I say that
with that five pounds, and steadfastly refusing ail
monetary help from home, I travelled the greater
part of the country from Montreal to the other
side of the Rockies and back, landing in England
with a good deal more than I started with, both of
money and experience, after a thoroughly enjoy-
able, though rough, journey.
The end of October found me in a small mining
and saw-mill town of three year's growth situated
in the Rocky Mountains, working in the bush"
at forty dollars a month and board-of a sort.
The work was bard and rough, but sleep had far
more unpleasantness for me than work, perhaps
owing to the fact that during the three weeks I
stayed there I slept, or rather, tried to between
a burly negro and a greasy Italian of the barrel-
organ type of London.
Bat lumber-camp life is not to be lingered over
in writing; it is quite sufficient to have lived it.
Suffice it to say that by this time I was beginning
to wonder if life was really worth living-a sure
sign of home sickness. Add to this a somewhat
severe attack of illness caused by sleeping in wet
clothes, and an overpowering desire to live once
more like a civilized human being, and you have
my reason for throwing up the whole thing and
coming home for a holiday.
It was the manner of my home-coming that more
particularly affects this narrative. I had saved a
little money, but what was the use of spending
my entire earnings on getting home, and perhaps
being stranded half-way with insufficient means
to proceed ? I was pondering the situation as I
strolled into town the next night with my worldly
belongings in a grain sack slung on my back when,
on crossing the railway track at the station to get
to a boarding-house on the opposite side, I passed
what at home is called a truck, belonging to a
freight train awaiting an engine to carry it east-
ward.
Lying the entire length, and resting en the edge
at one end of this truck, were three long iron pipes
about two feet in diameter. There, was nothing
very extraordinary in this, but, as I was about to
move on, a head appeared out of the end of one of
these pipes, and a voice with an unmistakable
Western accent inquired genially, "Got a chew,
governor ?"
Trying not to look surprised (it never does to
show surprise at anything in the West) I remarked
that I could oblige him, whereupon six feet of
ragged "hobo"- i.e. a tramp-squeezed itself out
of the opening, jumped down on to the track be-
side me, anfi relieved me of half a good plug of
"Bobs" chewing tobacco. My curiosity was
aroused.
"What on earth are you doing in there?" I
asked.
Goin' way down to Winnipeg," he answered,
in a tone that seemed to express surprise at the
question.
But why in a pepe ? I asked, innocently.
"Have you never beat your way anywhere ?"
he replied, looking at me in evident contempt, an
attitude all Westerners assume when they see they
have a green" to deal with. "By the looks of
you I should h-thought you'd done plenty of it
yer'sl f."
At first I felt inclined to take this as an insult,
but r remembered in time that my outer man
consisted of-a leather jacket and ragged blue
linen trousers.
You see, there's no use in payin' four cents a
mile in a passenger when you can travel just as
comfortable for nothing, he continued, more
amiably. Look at this now" pointing with
pride to the three pipes; I'm in the first pipe,
my clothes in the second, and my food in the third.
I've never paid a train fare yet."
An idea struck me. You say this car is going
to Winnipeg ? I asked.
Look at the label for yourself."
I examined the little green card. Sure enough,
it:was labelled Winnipeg. Here was a chance.
"Do you think there's room for me on this out-
fit ?" I inquired, intending the question as a gen-
tle hint for my new acquaintance to let me occupy
one of his pipes. But the Western mind is evident-
ly dense (when necessary). "Waal, I'll tell you,"
he said, leaning towards me and whispering con-
fidentially in my ear. "This train's 'bout the
best I ever struck for beating, and its fair full of
men, though, of course, you can't see 'em. See
that box-car full of coal? Well, it isn't full.
Just up at the top there's a hole that's been made
by throwing' some o' the coal out on the line, and
there's a man up there; saw him get in myself. See
that ecar of lumber? There's a mau in the middle
of that, cos he came over and asked me for a
chew. An' there's one going to work his way
down helping' the stoker, but I pity him ; I've had
some. But to my mind the best place in the
whole outfit has been left out, and I had a mind
to give up my present quarters for it, and that's
the refrigerator."
It sounded chilly, I thought.
"It't eml ty, you know," he added, seeming to
read my thoughts. I'll take you down and
show you."
He led-the way along the track as unconcerned-
ly as though he.were strolling.down Regent street.
"It doesn't do to hurry, or they see you're trying
to hide yourself, he explained. ,
There you are," he said at last, pointing to
the huge box-car, which had apparently no open-
ing save the big door in the centre, always kept
locked. "You climb in through a heap' in the


top."
"Have you got any money? he asked, sud-
denly.
I wondered what was coming next, and uncon-
sciously put my hand on my breast-pocket.
"Don't put it there," he said, noticing the
action ; put it in yer sock. There's not much
chance of you bein' caught; but if you are it's
chances they'll sneak every cent on you. You'd
better go and get some grub and then come right
along here, and I'll help you in."
I thanked him and retired to the boarding-
house that had been my original goal. There
I had a parcel of bread and meat made up suffi-
cient to last three days, and wended my way back
to the freight train with as nonchalant a manner
as I could assume.


My adviser was waiting for me, and after a
hasty glance round climbed up the little iroa
ladder that is to be found at the back of every
car for the convenience of the brakesman. I soon
joined him on the roof and with our united
strength the little padlock of the trap-which was
of course, locked--gave way, and it came up
easily enough. Now, however, came another
task, rather more difficult. Underneath this
outer trap of boards was a heavy zinc-covered lid
about four inches thick, fitting closely into the
opening, which was also lined with zinc. This
of course, was intended to keep the cold air in
when the chamber was full of ice" and the van
below filled with meat. However, after a good
pull this also gave way with a rushing sound not
unlike the drawing of a cork.
"Now, then, in you get," commanded by com-
panion ; the engine may come long any time
now." There was no use in hesitating, so I let
myself boldly down into the hole, which proved
to be two feet deep.
Are you set? came the voice from above.
Yes" I answered, and the zinc lid shot down
into its place with a dull sog" that sent a shiver
through me.
It was quite dark, and I was crawling slowly
along the side of the car when I stumbled into
something soft and alive. For a moment it gave
me quite a turn, but I was soon reassured.
Who you pushin', stranger ?" came a voice
out of the darkness. It was a fellow passenger,
and I heaved a sigh of relief.
What you doing' in here, anyway?" he in-
quired, after an embarrassing pause.
"Much the sme sort of thing as yourself." I
replied.
Got a chew ? The inevitable query.
I handed my last plug into the darkness and it
disappeared with alacrity, to return in a moment
minus a fair-sized corner. My companion was
evidently not a conversationalist, for we sat in
silence for quite half and hour, and I began to
wonder if the engine was never coming, when
suddenly a terrific jolt shook the car and landed
me nearly into the lap of my fellow-passenger.
The engine had arrived. I heard a whistle, un-
usually muffled, and a faint puffing that seemed
to be very far off, and the next moment, with
many jolts and jars, we had started out on our
strange journey.
"'They'll be at Mitchell in a few hours," volun-
teered my companion, after another lengthy pause.
How long will they stay there I asked.
Long enough to shunt off the cars they don't
want and for us to get a breath of fresh air, any-
way.
"Did you mean to say you're going to get out
there?" I asked in surprise.
"Why not? It'll be dark and I've only got
two sausages and a bit of bread to last me down
to Winnipeg. Besides, we must get some fresh
air."
Do you mean this hole is air tight ?" I de-
mnanded, a creepy sensation stealing over me at
the very thought.
How do you suppose they keep the cold air
in when it is fall of ice ?' was the abrupt reply.
A sudden purely imaginary sensation of stuffi-
ness came upon me, for, considering that we had
not been in the box two hours, it could be nothing
more.
Let's have a breather now" I suggested.
Can't ; the brakesman might see us. He's
got a window in the van that looks all along the
top of the cars."
What's the fine if we are caught ?" I inquir-
ed, thirsting for information as well as fresh air.
Six months, unless you can get the brakes-
man to accept a dollar or two. You can't expect
to travel a thousand odd miles for nothing with-
out some sort of risk."
Visions of a luxurious Pullman or even a more
humble colonist car came before me, but I felt the
lump of paper in my sock and my heart was re-
freshed. My reflections were cut short by another
jolt that again precipitated me against my com-
panion.
Mitchell, I guess", he exclaimed, and crawled
past me. I heard hard breathing and the sound
as of someone straining against a heavy weight.
"This thing's got kind of stiff", gasped my
fellow beater" ; but the next minute, with the
same sickening sog," the heavy zinc lid gave
way to the burly hobo's back and flew open
pushing the outer trap with it, exposing a black,
star-spangled sky.
When my fellow-passenger had climbed out
and disappeared I thrust my head through the
opening and drew in deep breaths of the fresh,
clear air. About half an hour elapsed, during
which the train was shunted backwards and for-
wards in the usual apparently aimless fashion to
which freight trains are addicted, throwing me
hither and thither like a shuttlecock. At last,
however, we appeared to be ready, and the engine
gave forth a shrill whistle. I was beginning to
fear that my fellow-passenger would be too late,
when a head appeared over the edge of the car.
The "hobo was evidently in a hurry, for he
ran up the ladder like a cat, and, crouching low,
he made a dash for the trap, which I held in
readiness.
"Brakesman coming down the line; don't
think he saw me," he whispered hurriedly, and
snatching the trap from my hand, jumped down
into the car, letting both trap and lid fall simul-
taneously into place with unusual violence.
We were soon lost in the solid enjoyment of
munching bread and meat and washing it down
with the contents of a bottle which my companion
produced from somewhere, so we were thoroughly
warm and comfortable. The next stop was C'iw's"
Nest Pass, and after that I fell asleep with my
grain-sack as a pillow. After a month of life on
the prairie, with no roof above you except Nature's
and a saddle for a pillow, this is quite possible.
I have the least idea how long I stayed in this
blissful condition, I only know that the first thing
I noticed on waking was that the atmosphere was
decidedly stuffy.
"Are you there, pard?" I called into the dark-
ness.
"Waal, I don't know where else I'd be con-
siderin' that this blamed trap's stuck," came the
answer.
At first I thought the man was joking. Then
I remembered that Westerners never played prac-


tical jokes, their time being too much taken up
with the chase of the clammy greenbacks to
allow of such diversions. I crawled to the end
of the car, felt for the trap, and then, and putting
my back against it, pressed with all my strength.
It might have been the solid roof for all the im-
pression I could make. I thought a lot of things,
but only said, So it is !" and sat down to think
inwardly determined not to be the first to get
excited.
My companion vouchsafed no remark.
Shalt we both push together ?" I suggested,
in what I intended to be the matter-of-fact tone.
Can't ; there isn't room for both our backs in
that opening."
Couldn't we cut our way out though the
side?"


Got a knife?" I..
No.",
Neither have I."
What on earth are we'todo?" I burst out, in
desperation.
Wait till the next t,-'. and give ourselves
away, I guess," was the ch(-irful response.
When is the next stop?"
Look here, stranger ; do you suppose a
'freight' goes by a time-tabMle? How do I know
what the nextstop'll be, or woen, for thi.'. 'm.itt.-r?"
And supposing at the nixt stop mn',,ly hap-
pens to come along?"
This question was tvideprti: not worth answer-
ing, for no reply came. As. a matter of fact, I
expect my taciturn friend was sick of answering
the fusilade of idiotic questions.
My imagination, I suppose, must have increas-
ed the stuffiness of the atmosphere, for when I sat
down once more to think things over I felt as
though I could hardly breathe.
It may not sound a particularly awful position
to be in ; in fact, compared with some of the ex-
traordinary adventures thati- befall travellers all
the world over, it may be di bbed distinctly tame.
But circumstances alter c r. Ift is one thing to
go through peril in the hea, of the moment and
quite another to sit still ii, 'd blood and wait
for it. Besides, there are 1" I1 and perils. Suff-
ocation has always been my pet aversion as a
means of shuffling off this mortal coil. If I have
a nightmare it invariably t,kes the form of my
being buried] alive, usually in a trance, when I
can neither move hand nr foot, yet am still
conscious of all that goes o4 around me. Here,
to all appearances, was my'nightmare being ful-
filled in actual life under d. Terent, though none
the less terrifying, circumstances.
Instead of the narrow c ",'.u of my dreams I
had the more roomy, thouo.h more substantial,
chamber of a railway i,.fii ig ,tor. In place of a
trance, the full possession o one's faculties, with
the full realization of their nl*uf.,,-. I sat there
for what seemed to me ',- till at last with a
feeling that I must do ,-,1m .i',u,. 1I started kick-
ing and pummelling the -i-" f the ear till my
feet and fists were numi'. ; m'athiinig was now
becoming a matter of mork and more difficulty
every moment.
It's of no use getting' su ;ed, stranger," said
my calm companion. Of co',rse, I was righteous-
ly indignant at this acnu-., mon, but, as my ex-
postulations called forth no response, they were
rather wasted energy.
We must have sat there in suspense for at least
another half hour during which time I wonder
my hair did not turn white .'Imin anxiety. How
my companion could sit theui, gasping but other-
wise impassive and apparently resigned to his fate,
with the knowledge tlu.t uri-ss fresh oxygen was
forthcoming within .It tlin .-m4-t tw'o hams we
s0'-uld he struggling 4- pi ii !_ r the breath of
life, ani after the e.xph 1,,u of auithur hour
would have -',, 1.inkt t'.. '-"oi-r.i ',sne- from
which there is no ;i--'.i.: i.;, ,imtrpa '.-u .l ihy
" tenderfoot" understanding.
I crawled up and down the narrow box, hitting
my head first against the roof and then the sides
of the car. I pummelled and yelled and made
fierce attempts to push open that four inches of
zinc that separated us from freedom, but all to no
purpose. At last I sank into my original place
in the corner with the chill of despair at my
heart and beads of perspiration on my forehead.
I had almost resigned myself to death when a
shrill whistle announced that the train was ap-
proaching a station or siding. I think that must
be the first time that a train whistle was blessed.
Already I began to feel fresh air and freedom at
hand, the' two things that I have since come to the
conclusion are their possessor's greatest blessings.
The first jolt had not shaken the car before we
both set to shouting and kicking the sides of our
prison.
Jolt Jolt Jolt Bang Bang! Our
voices, amidst the din of the shunting cars, sound-
ed like the squeals of a caged mouse,.
Even in the position I was then in I could not
help feeling an exultant joy as I noticed that my
companion was at last just as excited at myself.
Ultimately the train came to a standstill, and
together we raised one frantic shout, accompanied
with kicks on the side of the car, which I verily
believe would have given way if we had kept
kicking long enough.
There was no answer.
We waited in breathless suspense.
Then there came a faint methodical crunch,
crunch, on the gravel at the side of the track.
Again we shouted.
Then crunching came nearer and nearer and
finally stopped.
We yelled and beat the ear-side afresh.
Where are you, anyway? came a gruff voice
from outside.
In here, and very nearly stifled," I yelled.
For Heaven's sake let us out sharp."
"Where's here?"
In the refrigerator."
A low chuckle, which at the time I remember
thinking distinctly out of place, greeted this
piece of information, and soon steps could be
heard ascending the little iron ladder.
I heard the outer trap opened. That was one
inch nearer fresh air, but there were still four
inches of zinc between ourselves and freedom.
"You can't open that," shouted my compan-
ion ; "it's stuck Open the other."'
There are always two traps on the top of a car ;
but of course, the second in our case was locked.
However, it soon opened to the brakesman's key,
the outer lid came up, and after a few seconds'
tugging the lid followed suit with the same curi-
ous sucking sound as before, as though it were
loth to release its captives.
I was about t,, thrust my head out to get a
mouthful of real air when the hobo pushed
me aside and whispered hurriedly:-
Let me work this.''
"Kind of cold-to-night," he remarked, jovially,
to the brakesman. As the perpiration was stand-
ing on my forehead in beads I couldn't quite see
the forcm'ee of this remark.
Yes, but what--- began the breaksman.
"Have a drink?" said the "hobo," and he
held out the bottle we had shared on the previous
day.
"Thanks ; but why-- The rest of the sen-
tence was stopped by the neck of the bottle and
the outflow of its contents.


He was ours He had, as it were, tasted of the
salt:
As for me I retired into the darkness once more,
and divesting myself of a boot and sock, selected a
dollar bill which I knew to be on the outside of
the bundle. Then, climbing back to the roof
again, I presented the IIni':.-y to the brakesman.
Hie looked at it for a moment and then at me.
"What's this for?" He asked.
Er-er-for you I stammered.
Thanks," "I've done some beating myself
in my time," and passed it back.
Which goes to prove that Westerners are enigmas
and that there are brakesmen and brakesmen. We
travelled the rest of the way with that trap open.


ELEVEN YEARS AGO LORD SALISBURY
ANTICIPATED MR. CHAMBERLAIN'S
PROPOSAL.
It is often forgotten that Lord Salisbury had
seen more of the British Dominions over sea than
do most modern statesmen; he had lived some
time in Australia, at the period when the first
great gold discoveries brought that immense con-
tinent to be a factor in the progress of the world;
moreover, he acquired his experience under far
more natural conditions than do the participators
in the largely advertised personally conducted
tours of this century, which so often result in the
visitor going back with impressions mainly formed
from daily contact with cliques, and without gain-
ing any real insight into the conditions under
which the great backbone of our country earn
their living and contribute to its marvellous
growth.
In all his speeches upon the affairs of the Empire
the effect of his Australian experiences were
strongly in evidence; we need only go back to his
speech at Hastings upon the eve of the general
election of 1892, to be convinced that he was,
more than ten years back, giving grave considera-
tion to the problems which have ripened for solu-
tion so fast during the past few months.
A PREGNANT PEOPHECY.
On May 19, 1892, Lord Salisbury said:-" Eng-
land only maintains the position which she occu-
pies by the vast industries existing here, but a
danger is growing up. Fifty years ago everybody
believed free trade had conquered the world, and
prophesied that every nation would follow the ex-
ample of England. The results, however, as yet
are not confirmed. Despite the the prosperity of the
free trade advocates, foreign nations are excluding
us from their markets, and are trying to kill our
tiade. And the state of things appears to grow
worse; we live in an age of war tariffs. An im-
portant point is that, while nations are doing every-
thing to obtain each other's commercial favour,
none is anxious about the favour of Great Britain,
because Great Britain has stripped herself of the
armour and weapons with which the battle is to be
fought. The attitude which we have taken in re-
garding it as disloyal to the glories and sacred
doctrines of free trade to impose duties upon any-
body for the sake of anything we get thereby may
be noble, but it is not business-like. (Cheers.)
On these terms you will and do get nothing. If
you intend to hold your own in this conflict of
tariffs you must b. prepared to refuse nations who
injure your access to your markets.
We complain most of the United States, and
it so happens that the United States mainly fur-
nishes us with articles which are essential to the
good of the people, and with raw material which
is essential to our manufactures. We cannot ex-
clude either without serious injury to ourselves.
I am not prepared, in order to punish other coun-
tries, to inflict dangerous wounds on ourselves.
We must confine ourselves to those nations where-
in we shall not suffer much whether importations
continue or diminish. While we cannot raise the
price of food and raw material, there is an enor-
mous mass of imports such as wine, spirits, silk,
gloves and laces from countries besides the United
States, which are merely luxuries, and of which a
diminished consumption could be risked in order
to secure access to the markets of our neighbours.
I shall expect to be excommunicated for pro-
pounding such a doctrine, but I am bound to say
that I think the free traders have gone too far."
It would have been interesting to have heard
from Lord Salisbury's lips how far the growth of
the food producing areas of the empire during the
ten years since he made this remarkable pro-
nouncement had induced him to emphasize his
opinions as to the necessity for a reform in the
British fiscal system. There is enough in this
speech, however to show that he would have
earnestly supported the enquiry which Mr. Cham-
berlain has forced upon the attention of the Em-
pire.
HIS LAST SPEECH.
Upon the day of the burial of the great Victor-
ian statesman, it seems appropriate to quote in

full from the last speech he made on any public
platform, the allusions which he made to Imperial
policy so far as it affects the great self-governing
dependencies. The speech was made in the Al-
bert Hall, on May 7, 1902, just before the close of
the war and prior to the last Coronation confer-
ence between the Colonial Premiers and Mr.
Chamberlain. Alluding to the future of the dis-
affected South African States Lord Salisbury ,aid:
" There is nothing which we more earnestly wish
than that the Boers and Free Staters would join
us in setting up, and entering into, a political
structure which shall enable them to enjoy to the
full all the order and all the strength which is
conferred upon our brother nations by our colon-
ial system, which has lasted and which has en-
dured so long. We see that in the world the
system of our colonial government has pro-
cured peace, acquiescence, and in the long
run a deep affection between the mother
and the daughter countries. We believe
that that process cannot be multiplied too much
for the advantage of the Empire or the benefit of
'the world. We earnestly hope shatfthose who
were and who are now our foes will see with us
all the merit which those traditional arrange-
ments can claim, and all that we can do to mould
them into a portion of that Empire which has
conferred so many blessings on the human race we
certainly shall do. But what we shall not do is
to place it in the power of any man of ill-will to
renew the conflict of the past time or to challenge
the complete supremacy of our Sovereign.
(Cheers) We cannot look upon the past, as we
have looked, without casting an eye upon the
future. I think there are dangers quite as serious
that concern us in the future as those with which
in the past we have successfully dealt. There is
no doubt that this conflict which has taken place
has left the world changed in some respects. There
are colonies which existed before, but as this
struggle has gone on they are colonies which have
warmed more and more in their affection to tihe
Mother Country, which have shown a zeal for the
progress of the Empire and an appreciation of its
benefits which I think some five years ago very
few men would have guessed was possible. That
is a phenomenon which has come so suddenly,
which has come in so vast a volume, that I cannot
believe it is transitory or precarious in its results.


I believe that it indicated a vast amount of feel-
ing which we did not here entirely realize and
which, under the stress of circumstances, under
the impulse of a strong sympathy, has made itself
felt throughout the Empire. And we feel, per-
haps without much merit of our own, but, at all
events, we feel, that throughout the Empire a
strong feeling has developed itself which has add-
ed enormously to the stability of its structure
and to the strength of its rulers in the world.
(Cheers) We cannot doubt that we are much
stronger for the feeling in our behalf that has been
evidenced by so many of our daughter countries at
a time of our greatest difficulty and stress. And
there has been a converse feeling, of which I wish
to speak with all restraint, but which I cannot


entirely ignore, and that is the sudden hatred on
the part of our rivals which the present circum-
stances and the vicissitudes of the present strug-
gle have exhibited. Both are matters of the very
highest importance ; both are matters which will
affect the future which stands before us ; both are
matters which all statesmen must take into ac-
count. But, though I believe it is true that we
are at the commencement of a movement of causes,
of opinions, and of feelings which will end in
changes largely modifying the present distribu-
tion, I may say, of allegiance-though I believe
it is true, I do not, therefore, on that account
advo-ate any impatient handling of the phenome-
non which we have to deal with.
IMPEhIAL FEDERATION.
There are very important men, men of intellect
and authority, who think that the moment has
come for some legislative action on our part which
should federate the colonies. I exhort them be-
fore they do so carefully to consider what steps
they are going to take and what results they ex-
pect to come from them. We have no power by
legislation to affect the flow of opinion and of af-
fection which has risen so largely between the
mother country and her daughter States. They
will go on in their own power, in their irresistible
power, and I have no doubt they will leave com-
bination)s behind them which will cast into the
shade all the glories that the British Empire has
hitherto displayed. But we cannot safely inter-
fere by legislative action with the natural develop-
ment of our relations with our daughter countries.
All kinds of difficulties are there before us-diffi-
culties as to the burden of finance, difficulties as
to the duty of defence, difficulties as to the rights
of decision which the mother country should re-
tain, and, unless feeling is running very strong
and we have a great force behind us, I look with
some apprehension upon any attempt to anticipate
evnets or to foreclose the results, the precious
results, which, if we were only patient and careful,
the future has in store for the Empire. (Cheers.)
The tendency of human beings, and of statesmen
-who are human beings (laughter)-is to antici-
pate all such matters and to think that, because
their own wretched lives are confined to some 60
or 70 years, therefore it is open to them to force
an anticipation of the results which the natural
play of forces and of affections and the alteration
of the judgments and the mutual feelings
of various people in the world will bring before us.
There is nothing more dangerous than to force a
decision before a decision is ready, and, therefore,
to produce feelings of difficulty, which if we will
only avoid, if we will only wait, will of them-
selves bring about the results that we desire.
There is no danger that appears to me more serious
for the time that lies before us than an attempt to
force the various parts of the Empire into a
mutual arrangement and subordination for which
they are not ready and which may only produce
a reaction in favour of the old state of things.
(Hear, hear.) This is a matter upon which it is
very difficult to speak with freedom, but which I
commend to your own consideration. If we will
be patient and careful, there is a tremendous
destiny before us ; if we are hasty, there may be
the breaking apart of those forces which are
necessary to construct the majestic fabric of a
future Empire. What we have to remember is
that matters have changed, are changing, that
there are for es in the world which more powerful
than used to work, and that we murt watch them
'with care in order to avoid that there energy
should be directed against the great interests
which it is our business to preserve.
NEW POLITICAL CONDITIONS.
Remember that out of the confusion that recent
events have caused, that out of the terrible diffi-
culties that have arisen, there is arising a state of
things perfectly new to the world, a condition in
which an Empire depending not on any territorial
contiguity, but merely upon the action of its
naval defences-that such an Empire is slowly
ari ing out of the sea, that it has behind it the
feelings and the affections of some of the most
vehement races upon the face of the world, that
the future destinies of the Empire depend upon
the prudence and judgment with which those
forces are guided, that the guidance of those forces
must be in such a country as ours largely affected
by the trend of popular opinion. And popular
opinion in this country is largely affected, is
largely modified by those organizations which
command popular opinion ; and most of all among
all the organizations that have that power, there is
assigned to the Primrose League an influence on
the present condition of political society which
they will be both unwise and criminal to neglect.
It is with them that the power will rest of deter-
mining whether the movement of these great
forces that have been unchanged shall be for evil
or for good. If they act up to the call of their
high destiny, their mission will be remembered
as the greatest blessing which the Empire of Eng-
land has been able to obtain. (Loud cheers.)

Extracts from General Orders
Head Quarters, Prospect
September 22, 1903.
LEAVE.
The undermentioned Officers having returned
from leave of absence, before expiration of same,
the unexpired portions of their leane are cancelled
viz :-
Bt. Lt. Col. K. E. Lean, 3. 3Bn. R. War. R.,
14th to 28th inst.
2nd Lieut. W. A. Wilson, 3 Bn. R. War. R.,
14th inst. to 12th prox.
2nd Lieut. J. H. B. Peyton, 3 Bn. R.,War. R.,
10th to 14th inst.




Wanted



TWO BOYS TO LEARN

THE BAKING TRADE.


Apply at once'at>


Thompson's Model Bakery.

Hamilton, August 28th 1903-tf


WOMEN
can obtain strength and vigor
by the use of DR. PIERCE'S
ELECTRIC BELT." A Won-
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(fib A









THE RCYAL GAZETTE-TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER


WEEKLY REPORT OF THE WEATHER at
Gibbs' Hill Light Station at Bqrmuda between
the 20th and 27th September, 1903 ; height
above the sea being 246 feet at base, where
the Register is kept.
.
^ t


oa 8




SE 682
SE 483
SE 680
SE 882
sw 482
SE 480
SE 681


a
2


GeneralRemarks



0.06 Fine day *
0.50 Fine day*
0.60 Unsettled t
Unstld., squally
Fine.
Fine.
0.26 Overcast +


Night squally, t Morning squally.
t Heavy ground swell in shore. Morning squally
WALTER S. PERINCHIEF,
Keeper.




Hamilton, September 29, 1903.

Rev. Canon Lightbourne.
Our readers will be pleased to learn that His
Lordship the Bishop of Newfoundland and Ber-
muda, has appointed the Rev. F. J. F. Lightbourn,
Rector of St. George's to the Honorary Canonry
of the Cathedral vacant by the removal of the Rev.
James Davidson. This appointment will give
'great and general satisfaction to the people of Ber-
muda. It will again complete the Cathedral
Chapter by the addition to its number of our
Senior Rector, whom we all so highly respect,
and will also, let us hope, bring again the Rev.
Mr. Lightbourn into closer connection with that
Parish in which his father of revered memory
laboured for so long a time and to which his own
earliest work in the Church of Bermuda was for
several years given.
4


YESTERDAY'S



STORM.ALITIES REPORTED.


FATALITIES REPORTED.


A gale of exceptional violence swept over Ber-
muda yesterday and resulted in injury both to life
and limb and considerable damage to property.
The storm, which was the severest that Bermuda
has experienced sines the hurricane of Sept. 12th,
1899, originated in the east,which is said to be
exactly the same quarter as the hurricane of
August 30th, 1880, arose from. Although yester-
day's storm was undoubtedly very severe we are
informed on reliable authority that it was but
the western portion of a hurricane passing to the
north-east. Rain commenced to fall in the early
hours of the morning and as the day advanced
the wind sprang up and steadily increased in
volume and in violence, until between twelve
and one o'clock it bad undoubtedly reached its
height. It was accompanied by torrential down-
pours of rain. Trees were up-rooted, and roofs of
houses, in some instances, were carried bodily
away. The extension to the Princess Hotel,
which was being erected at a cost of several thous-
and pounds to afford extra accommodation for the
winter tourist season, collapsed like a pack of cards
shortly before one o'clock, and is now only a mass
of debris. This work was commenced by Messrs.
Hayward & Baker, contractors, about five weeks
ago and so expeditiously had the operations been
carried out that the structure, which was made of
hard pine wood, had been erected to a height of
three storeys with a tower and the work of'roofing
in was being completed. During the height of
the storm the whole structure collapsed, with a
startling report, to its foundation, a part of the
stone work of which was also carried away. Some
of the woodwork was hurled into the sea
and so complete was the work of demoli-
tion that it is impossible to imagine that
the extension will be re-erected this season.
A curious feature in connection with the gale is
that nearly all the principal hotels appear to have
suffered more or less. A portion of the southern
side of the roof of the Imperial Hotel was
blown off. The weather vane of the Hamilton
Hotel was twisted in an incongruous manner
and the eagle which surmounted it was blown off
and took its flight in a southerly direction. The
slates of the roof and many of the blinds were
carried away, windows were broken, and the
ceilings were damaged. The damage by water to
the Windsor Hotel was extensive, many of the
bedrooms being inundated with water and the
appurtenances being considerably damaged. The
Cathedral also did not escape. A portion of the
scaffolding surrounding the tower was blown
away and fell upon the roof of the church; the
result being that a number of tiles were torn off
and the interior of the building was in parts
flooded. The roof of the Wesley Church sustained
somewhat serious damage; the water entered the
building to such an extent that the organ is
reported to be injured. The arrangements in
connection with the sitting of the House of Assem-
bly were completely disarranged. The hour
summoned for the opening of the House was as
usual one o'clock, but the force of the gale at that
time was so great and the rain fell in such tor-
rents'that the only member who put in an attend-
ance was the Speaker (the Hon. T. J. Wadson)
with the Clerk (Mr. D. E. Seon). At quarter
past one o'clock he declared the House adjourned
until tomorrow (Wednesday). In many parts of
the House water was percolating through the rcof,
and on the floor of the Court House there was a
miniature lake. The roof of Messrs. Bradley &
Co's stables was carried away; a portion of Mr.
H. Cox Outerbridge's verandah was blown off; in
Queen Street trees were torn up as if by a giant's
hand and telephone wires were to be found on the
ground in inextricable confusion.
Reports come to hand of carriages and express
wagons being blown over. The Cottage Hospital
felt the full force of the storm while.the damage to
property on the North Shore was very considerable.
At Warwick Camp the damage is also said to have
been very extensive and the troops were marched
into Prospect. In Southampton Parish a wall
near the residence of Capt. Williams was carried
away and a portion of the road washed out. Som-
erset escaped with very little damage, but the de-
struction to property at Boaz and Ireland Island is
reported to be great. Unfortunately the gale was
attended with loss of life; an engineer in the em-
ploy of Messrs. C. H. Walker & Co. at Ireland
Island was drowned, and at St. George's a wall in
theyicinity of the Royal Engineers quarters was
blown down and killed an ex-soldier named
George Evans. The Masonic Hall and Town Hall
at St. Geerge's are damaged. A number of freight
and row boats are also reported wrecked and dam-
aged. The estimated injury to private property
throughout the Island is stated to be considerably
greater than that occasioned by the hurricane
of 1899.
PROSPECT CAMP.
Prospect, situated as it is on an acclivity, felt
the full force of yesterday's hurricane. Several
roofs were stripped, chimneys and trees blown
down, and in some cases, whole windows were
blown out. Owing to the incessant down-pour of
rain the roads soon became miniature rivers, and


3


Prospect Notes.
The 27th Co. R. E. were at home to the 36th
Co. R. E. on Saturday week last, on the occasion
of the annual inter-coy, cricket match. The 36th
Coy. were conveyed to St George's by brake. On
arrival play commenced immediately, the visitors
batting first. After a close game the homesters
won by 17 runs. At the conclusion of the match
a capital tea was prepared for the visitors in the
R E Theatre. Whilst the tables were being clear-
ed for a concert in the evening, the visitors and
homesters adjourned to the recreation ground and
indulged in friendly games of football and tennis.
Tnere was a large attendance at the concert in the
evening, C S M Street presiding. Staff-Sergt Des-
mond and Lee Cpl W R Thomas presided at the
piano. A capital programme was rendered which
concluded with the singing of "Should old
Acquaintance" and "The King." Eulogistic
speeches by C S M Street, '27th Co R E, andCSM
Hills, 36th Co R E, were the order of the even-
ing. The Prospectors left for home at 9.30 p.m.,
having spent a very enjoyable day.
2nd Cpl Keating, R E, 36th Co R E, was pre-
sented, on Church Parade on Sunday week, with
the South African war medal (two clasps) by
Capt S M Hutton, D S 0, R E

Arrival of a German Cruiser.
The German Cruiser Vineta, flying the flag of
Commodore Schreder, arrived at Grassy Bay from
Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, on Saturday,
and is due to leave for the West Indies on Wed-
nesday. As the vessel was proceeding through
the Channel a seamen who was engaged in lower-
ing a ship's ladder down the side, over-balanced
himself and fell overboard. A gallant attempt
was made by another seaman to rescue the man
but unfortunately the latter quickly disappeared.
It is stated that there were a number of sharks in
the vicinity at the time. On Sunday morning
Commodore Schreder landed at Hamilton, and
was received by a guard of honour furnished by
the 4th Battn. Worcester Regt. and a salute of
11 guns was fired from Fort Hamilton. After
inspecting the guard the Commodore accompanied
by Captain Salton-Symons, A.D.C., drove to
Government House where he lunched with His
Excellency the Governor.

( hainmee ot Mail Hour.
On and after Thursday next 1st October, the
daily afternoon mails will leave Hamilton and St.
Georges at 3 o'clock instead of 4 o'clock.
Mails from Hamilton to Ireland Island will be
despatched at 3 o'clock p. m. instead of 3.30
o'clock.

PMails per S. S. Pretoria.
Mails per R.M.S. Pretoria for the United King-
dom, Dominion of Canada, Newfoundland and the
United States close at the Post Office, Hamilton
on Saturday next, at 8.30 a.m.
Supplementary Mails at 9.30 a.m.


Cricket.
HAMILTON C. C. 1st XI. V WORCESTER REGT.
This match was played on Tuesday last and
resulted in a win for the Regiment by 29 runs.
Appended are the scores :
WOUCIATER REGT.
Capt. Moss, b W. Conyers 4
Capt. Lang, b H. Ste eus 19
Mr. Deans, b W. Conyers 76
Mr. Bull, b Martin 0
Mr. Davies, c & b H. Mteveus 10
Cpl Delartouche, lbw b Stevens 0
S rgt Parkes, c Watlington b Stevens 11
Mr. Kay, b Stevens 0
Mr. Guy, b Stevens 2
Pte Andrews, lbw b W. Conyers 5
Pte Lilley, not out 5
Extras 5
134


heaps of wreckage blown from the roofs could be
seen floating down the hillside, Till the storm
somewhat abated only a vague idea could be form-
ed as to the extent of the damage done. Towards
four o'clock in the afternoon the wind dropped and
the rain ceased sufficiently to enable one to take
a more comprehensive view of the camp. In the
" compound" nearby huge trees were uprooted,
and hurled several feet away, the roads were
strewed with broken pieces of timber, etc., left by
the rushing streams, and the tennis court looked
like a ploughed field. In the R.E. married quar-
ters the zinc with which the roofs were covered was,
in many cases, thrown yards away, taking with it
slates and rafters. The cook-house of the Royal
Engineers was almost completely wrecked, whilst
a large portion of the roof of the library was blown
off. The strength of the wind can be better es-
timated from the fact that, when nearing the Or-
derly Room of the Worcester Regiment a horse
and trap belonging to Messrs. W. T. James & Co.
were completely overturned. Both driver and
horse escaped injury. On the glacis of Fort Pros-
pect telegraph poles were blown down and trees
uprooted and splintered like matchwood. One of
the trees fell upon and smashed a transport wagon
at the Transport Stables. Several jalousies were
torn away from the officers quarters. One of the
screens on the cricket field was blown over the
wall at the south end of the field and smashed to
atoms. The new block now under completion at
Prospect, came in for a large share ot damage, a
portion of the ceiling and part of the roof having
fallen. Nearly every barrack room in camp was
awash with rain water. A company of the Wore.
Regt. were forced to vacate Warwick Camp. They
presented an amusing sight as they marched into
Prospect being dressed in 'every kind of uniform,
and some without coats and hats. The bathing
stage on the North Shore was completely wrecked,
and the dressing shed washed away.

Court ot General Assize.
MICHAELMAS TERM.
BEFORE HIS HONOUR SIR S. BROWNLOW GRAY,
KT., CHIEF JUSTICE, AND THE HON. R. D.
DARRELL, C.M.G., ASSISTANT JUSTICE.

Benjamin Augustus Knight pleaded guilty to an
indictment charging him with house breaking
and larceny, and was sentenced on Saturday
morning to 12 months imprisonment with hard
labour.
The Court adjourned until this (Tuesday) morn-
ing at 10.30 o'clock.

Police Court, Hamilton.
[Before the Worshipful R W Appleby, Police
Magistrate.]
Augustus Paschall, of the American House, was
summoned for selling intoxicating liquor during
prohibited hours.
P. C. Tucker spoke to visiting the house at
10.45 p.m. and seeing a customer named William
Hooper being served with drinks. There was
practically no defence.
A fine of 10 and 16/- costs was imposed.
Ebbie Lobington was summoned for assaulting
Mabel Williams.
Both the parties are West Indian The defen-
dant was fined 20/- and costs.
Daniel Steeds, driver of Pembroke Parish, was
fined 10/- and 4/- costs for leaving a dray unat-
tended.

BERIlIUDA.

Abstract of the Proceedings of the Honoura-
ble House of Assembly.
No. 32.-Session ot 1903.
II..../.,,,,, September 28th, 190$,
The Speaker, being the only member present,
declared the House adjourned to Wednesday next
the 30th inst.

Orders for neit day of _JI. t,',
Consideration of the Petition of Mr. S. S. Tod-
dings.
Resolve,-" The Warwick North Shore Road
Resolve, 1903,"-3rd reading.
Further consideration of proposed insurance of
Government House.
Bill,-" The Public Buildings Act, 1903,"-3rd
reading.
Consideration of Governor's Message, No. 53,
re Revenue Department.
For next meeting but one :
Consideration of Mr Peniston's notice of motion.
Bill,--" The Bermuda Fire and Marine Insur-
ance Company Act, 1903,"-2nd reading.


21
2
0
13
0
11
11
20
10
4
8
5

105

Regt.


* The annual cricket week in connection with
the Hamilton C. C. 1st XI. was brought to a close
on Saturday when a match was played against
Lt. Noble's XI, and which was defeated by 36
runs. The following were the scores :
LT NOBLE'S XI.
Maj. Vaughan, b Martin 13
Lt. Noble, b Martin 3
Lt. Deans, c & b Martth 18
Capt. Truell, lbw b Stevens 4
Pte Brennan, b Martin 1
Lt. Davies, c R Conyers b Stevens 13
Lt. Gilbert, c Tucker b Martin 14
Lt. Guy, run out 0
Pte Saunders, b Martin 1
Lt. Bell, b Martin 2
Srgt. Burke, not out 2
Extras 3
74

HAMILTON C. C.
H. Conyers, c Noble b Deans 12
R. Conyers, b Bell -4 4
H. Butterfield, b Deane 8
H. J. Tucker, c & b Deans 17
0. Darrell, st Brennan b Deans 17
Martin, b Deans 15
Peniston, b Deans 0
Stevens, b Burke 15
West, run out 0
Watlington, not out 8
Gray, b Deans 7
Extras 7
110

In their second innings Lt. Noble's XI compiled
39 runs for six wickets.
0 *
To the Editor of the ?,ypil Gazette.
A Rainy Hlouris that ot 10 p.m. -
Sir,-As many of iaur tenders have probably
noticed, and ate-lTtar t t thefnt; f0orthe benefit
of those who have not been so ohbetvrant I have
thought to call their attention to it--as mine was
called to it by my wife forty years ago, shortly
after our marriage. One evening which we were
going to spend with some friends my wife said to
me be sure to take an umbrella and waterproofs
with you, as it will be certain to rain at 10 p.m.
when we will be about coming home. This
coming from her rather provoked my risibilities,
and I laughingly asked her how she became so
weather-wise. Her reply was, wait and see if I am
not correct We went, (I indulgingly taking the
umbrella, etc., with me) and spent a very pleas_
ant evening.
About 9.30 I said to her I think it is time that
we move homeward, as we are expect rain at
ten o'clock! She immediately got up, saying, she
had quite forgotten. Does it look more like rain?
On my looking out of the window I found to my
horror and surprise that it had the appearance of
a heavy rain storm, of long continuance ; so that I
advised her hurrying up and we started for home.
When near there it begau raining slightly and
almost as soon as we were in the house the rain
came down in torrents, when she exultingly turn-
ed to me, asked was not my prognostigation a
correct one? I had to admit that it was and
asked her how she ever came to notice this fact,
which I have proved it to be by long continued
close observation, ever since. And there was a
verification of it omy last night when, after a
long continued drought, or absence of rain of any
consequence during which pasture and herbage
have been dried up and many water tanks ex-
hausted (and after suspiciously threatening to
rain for some few days) the rain began to fall
about 10 p.m. and continued doing so at inter-
vals, until 8 a.m. this morning, 23rd instant,
much to the joy of the farmers and the whole
community at large-as everybody would have
been seriously inconvenienced, had rain not come
as it did.


OBSERVER.
23ri Sept., 1903.

Obituary.
Mr. Robert W. Kyme, for many years a mem-
ber of the Hamilton Police Force, but pensioned
when the new Police Act came into operation in
June 1902, died at his home North Shore, Pem-
broke, yesterday afternoon at one o'clock. During
his long term of service on the Police Force the
deceased won the esteem of many and had a halpp.
knack of discharging an unpleasant duty in such
a manner as to arouse not even the suspicion of
ill-feeling against him. He was a comparatively
young man, being only in his fifty-second year.

Prospect,"
Sept 28, 1903.
To the Editor of The Royal Gazette:
Sir,-Kindly allow me to correct an error which
appeared in your issue of Saturday last in connec-
tion with the presentation of the Humane Socie-
ty's medal. The recipient wvas repirsented to be
Sap. Nichols, whereas the medal was presented to
Sap. F Mitchell, 36th Co R.E. Thanking you in
anticipation, I am dear Sir,
Yours truly,
W. W. POPPERWELL.

Panama, Sept. 26.-It is announced that the
cable service to Buenaventura will be closed at the
end of September. The inspector of telegraphs
has received orders from Bogota to close the Cen-
tral and South American Company's office in this
town on the suspension of the service. The Cable
Company asked for a new concession of twenty
years and the privilege of raising the tariff which
has been refused.
Died.
NELMES-At her residence Eastbourne, War-
wick, on Saturday 26th inst. after a few hours
illness, Claudia Frances, widow of the late Wil-
liam Pope Nelmes. Aged 78 years.

WANTED at once, Housemaid. Apply to
Mrs. Chesney, Montpelier.


HAM~ITON C.C.
H. Conyers, c Delartouohe b Deans
H. Butterfield, b Deans
F. Peniston, c Parkes b Lang
H. Tucker, b Deans
R. Conyers, o Delartouche b Deans
0. Darrell, c & b Lang
Martin, b Deans
Stevens not out
Watlington, c Davies b Deans
W, Conyers, b Lang'
Gray, run eat
Extras



In the second innings the Worcester
scored 43 for 8 wickets. ,


ant, as the Baron's influence is certain to be ex-
erted in the case of peace. The correspondent
further states that Russia, having asked Corea to
protect Russian subjects at Yongampho against
Chinese brigands, Corea replied that Russians oc-
cupying a non-treaty settlement must take their
own risks. M. Pavloff, the Russian Minister at
Seoul, retorted that in default of Corean protec-
tion, as promised by the lumber concession, Rus-
sian soldiers would be employed.
-0 --

FRANCE.

Paris, Sept. 27-The feature of the closing ses-
sion of the International Peace Conference which
has been sitting at Rouen was a speech by the
Minister of Commerce who declared that France
was proud to be at the head of the peace move-
ment; he expressed the hope that time was coming
when the money devoted to keeping up armies
would be utilized for the benefit of humanity.
The Minister spoke again in the same strain at the
banquet held later in honour of the Congress.
-0-

MOROCCO.
London, Sept. 25.-The Paris correspondent of
the Daily Mail asserts, on unimpeachable author-
ity, that Great Britain and Spain have agreed to
the establishment of a French [protectorate over
Morocco. A strip of land along the coast will be
declared neutral in order to avoid international
complications over fortified ports.
Paris, Sept. 26.-The Foreign Office declares that
any negotiations with Great Britain on the subject
of Morocco do not go beyond the question of a
general good understanding. The utmost that


OUR CABLE DESPATCHES.

GREAT BRITAIN.
THE PREMIER ON THE MACEDONIAN
SITUATION.
London, Sept. 25.-In a long letter to the
Archbishop of Canterbury the Premier discusses
the Macedonian situation. The letter is a reply
to the Archbishop's action in drawing attention
to the growing uneasiness among churchmen at
the apparent apathy of the Powers while unspeak-
able atrocities are perpetrated in Macedonia. Mr.
Balfour says he is in entire sympathy with the
feeling of horror and indignation, and says the
instrument whereby the situation may be dealt
-with is the concert of Europe. But this, even
were they all in harmony, is necessarily slow and
may be easily ineffective if the problem is com-
plex. The Revolutionists have deliberately done
their best to drive the Turk to excesses and fur-
nish him with an excuse for deferring the execu-
tion of reforms, meeting horrors with horrors and
brutality-with brutality for the deliberate pur-
pose of driving the Turks to crimes against the
innocent and thus play upon the sympathy of the
world. Coming to the question of the attitude of
Great Britain, Mr. Balfour points out that Russia,
Austria, and Turkey cannot be indifferent to a
territorial redistribution in the Peninsula, while
Greece, Bulgaria, Servia and Roumania are still
interested in the fate of the Province whose Chris-
tian population is made up from all nationalities.
These external complications are doubled by in-
ternal ones, because of religious differences, the
Mohammedans fearing Christian rule, while the
Exarchists and Christians persecute the Patriarch-
ists. It is with problems such as these that one
has to deal, says Mr. Balfour, and I cannot but
believe that the best hope of dealing with it lies
in the continued co-operation of Russia and Aus-
tria, strengthened with the support and aided by
the advice of the other signatories of the treaty of
Berlin.

London Sept. 26th-The Premier left Balmoral
this morning. Mr. Balfour went to his estate at
Whittingham and is not expected to return to
London until after the Sheffield meeting Dec. 1st.
London, Sept. 26.-At an interesting session in
behalf of the people of Macedonia, held in one of
the city churches yesterday, Canon McColl des-
cribed the Macedonians as labouring under disa-
bilities rendering them practically outlaws de-
prived of the elementary rights of humanity.
Germany, Austria, and Russia, he said, are giving
a free hand to the Sultan because they have agreed
to a partition of Turkey in Europe. Austria is to
have a Protectorate over Servia with half of Mace-
donia down to Salonica. Russia will get the other
half of Macedonia with a 'protectorate over Bul-
garia, while Germany will get a slice of Asiatic
Turkey and the Port of Salonica where all the
Christians have been massacred. This triumvirate
establish a commercial Zollverein and keep out
British trade. Canon McColl urges immediate
action.
London, Sept. 26-Mr. John Redmond in a
letter to Mr. H. A.' Law, Nationalist member of
Parliament with reference to the atrocities in Ar-
menia says : It is surely a great reproach to
Christendom that these infamies are possible. I
wish it were in the power of Ireland to make her
voice heard on the side of justice and liberty in
the Balkans."
London Sept. 25th-A bye-election was held at
Rochester yesterday, to replace Viscount Cran-
bourne who resigned his seat in the House of
Commons on his elevationto to the peerage as a
consequence of the death of his father the Marquis
of Salisbury. The contest which was keenly
fought on the fiscal question resulted in the Con-
servatives retaining the seat, their candidate Mr.
Charles Tuff receiving 2504 votes against 1986 re-
corded for Sir Harry Johnson, Liberal. Tele-
graphing his congratulations to the .Unionist
Association of Rochester on the success of the bye-
election, Mr. Chamberlain said "This great vic-
tory strengthens the government and will give
the free importers a much needed lesson."
London, Sept. 25.-The United States is now
receiving great benefits from the storms which
made the past summer one of the worst on record
in Great Britain and on the Continent. Because
of ruined home crops California fruit is being im-
ported in larger quantities than ever ; the prices
average 30 per cent. above what has heretofore
been obtained here. There is practically no Eng-
lish fruit obtainable, while France, which usually
exports large quantities of pears to England, is
sending none. Forty-two thousand barrels of Ca-
nadian apples are expected in London at the end
of this week and record prices are assured.
London, Sept. 27.-The Duke of Richmond
Lennox and Gordon died last night at Gordon
Castle, Lochabers, Banffshire as the result of a
chill contracted recently.
London, Sept. 25.-A new Turkish cruiser,
Abdul Hamid, was launched at Elswick-on-the-
Tyne to-day.
London, Sept. 25.-Captain Wales, of Sydney,
N.S.W., is in England with a view of arranging
for a yacht to be built for the purpose of contest-
ing for the America's Cup next year.


THE EASTERN SITUATION.
Vienna, Sept. 26.-It is reported that a Rus-
sian note which was handed to the Bulgarian Gov-
ernment last night has caused excitement in Sofia.
The note admits Turkey's right to suppress rebel-
lion in her own territory as she thinks best.
Monastir, Macedonia, Sept. 22.-Snow has fall-
en on the higher mountain ranges and the refug-
ees must either leave their hiding places or suffer
the greatest hardships. The Turkish troops con-
tinue to slaughter refugees who return to their
former homes at the invitation of the government
which promised them protection.
0o---
THE FAR EAST.
London, Sept. 25.-The Times' correspondent
at Tokio, referring to the departure of Baron Von
Rosed-the Russian Minister to Japan,-for Port
Arthur, says it is regarded as politically import-


Excursions

Excursion Tickets by the Company's
Steamers sailing between BERMU-
DA and NEW YORK during...
June, July, August,

Septr. and October, 1903
WILL BE ISSUED AT
$35 ThirtyFive Dollars
for First Class.

$25 Twenty Five Dol-
lars for Second Class

$2f0 Twenty Dollars sec-
ond Class Forward.
EXTRA CHARGE for Berths in
deck-rooms at $5 and $10 each ac-
cording to location.

Tickets issued at these reduced
rates will not be good for return
from New York after 7th Novem-
ber, 1903, and from Bermuda after
31st October, 1903.


JAS. A.


CONYERS,


Hamilton, June 2, 1903.-T.o tf.


Agent.


29,


1903.


could happen in the case of certain eventuali-
ties would be that France would exercise her
right of assisting the Sultan in policing the Fron-
tier districts.
London, Sept. 26.-The Foreign Office denies
the statement that Great Britain and Spain had
agreed to the establishment of a French Protecto-
rate over Morocco.
-0-
HUNGARY.
London, Sept. 26.-According to a despatch to
the Daily Mail from Vienna, the Emperor of Aus-
tria has decided to resist if the Hungarians push
their opposition to his wishes to the extreme. The
Austrian Minister for War and a number of offic-
ials have already gone to Hungary.


THE UNITED STATES.
Philadelphia, Sept. 25.-The International .
Cricket Contest, between a team representing All
Philadelphia and the Kent County England Elev-
en, was begun on the grounds of the Philadelphia
Cricket Club to-day. The match is the first of
two test matches with the English team.
Washington, Sept. 25.-The following bulletin
has been posted at the State Department :-
The Department of State has received advices
from the Charge at St. Petersburg to the effect
that in the Gomel riot, which took place recently,
eight Jews and five Christians lost their lives.
No foreigners or foreign interests suffered."
New York, Sept. 25.-The event to-day at the
Empire City track was the effort of the champion
gelding Major Delmar to beat his own record of
2'001 and to beat the world's record of 2'00, held
by Lou Dillon. He trotted a most wonderful
mile and in a game but tiring finish finished in
the record time. He went the quarter in 301
seconds; the half mile in 59 seconds; the three
quarters in 1129, and came home in 2'00, thus
equalling the time of Lou Dillon. It was a splen-
did performance by the animal which only this
week changed owners at the highest price (8,000)
ever paid for a gelding.
Philadelphia, Sept. 25.-The first match be-
tween Philadelphia and the Kent County Eleven,
of England. began to-day, and although it was all
in favour of the batsmen the Philadelphians could
do little against the attack of the visitors and af-
ter three hours' batting their innings closed for
128 runs, the highest individual score being 29.
-0---

REPORT OF THE HALIFAX AND
BERMUDAS CABEE COY.
London, Sept. 26.-The report of the Halifax
and Bermudas Cable Company for the year ended
June 30th gives net result of :the year's working
profit as :3245 pounds. A further dividend of
two and a half per cent. is proposed leaving
745 to be carried forward.
-0O
SHIPPING.
New York, Sept. 26th-Ss. Pretoria sailed 2.40
p.m. to-day.
-0
MISCELLANEOUS.
The Hague, Sept. 26.-The Czar has appointed
D. Demartens, Professor of International law, at
the University of St. Petersburg, to be the arbitra-
tor in the claims of the allied powers against Ven-
ezuela for preferential treatment in place of the
Portuguese.commissioner whose illness has preclu-
ded his serving.
Carlsbad, Germany, Sept. 27.-Lord Milner
left here for London to-day to confer with the
premier.


Postponed Auction Sale.


THE AUCTION SALE of Household
Furniture, etc., advertised
to take place Yesterday,
(MONDAY) the 28th inst.,
at the residence of MRS. F.
B. STEED, on Reid Street,
next (West of Masonic Hall)
was postponed on account
of the Stormy weather, and
will take place

TOMORROW

Wednesday,

the 30th instant, at 12 o'clock.

B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, Bda., 29/9/03.





Steamship Coy., Ltd.



NOTICE,


SPECIAL

Passenger







THE BOYAL GAZETTE-TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER .29. 1903.


S S


Wanted to Rent




for one year with option of
two years a

FURNISHED

HOUSE,
in Hamilton.
W. B.
C/o Royal Gazette Office.
Hamilton September. 26. 1903. 3. 3p.


J. T. PENISTON,
Begs to inform the Public
that he is prepared with a


Staff of


CARPENTERS AND MASONS,
to repair any damage by
the LATE GALE, or to un-
dertake any work in those
lines, which may be en-
trusted to him.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
Work done within time
specified.
J. T. PENISTON,
Hamilton and
Flatts Village.
Sept. 28, 1903.-2.

FOR SALE

Hundreds of Slate Block

and

Thousands of Stone.

T. R. LIGHTBOURN,
Paget West.
September 29, 1903.-1

The IRCff


t.seipet std storage USt g on earib. ? makes and
burns its own gas. It is portable, hang it an y-
where. Requires no pipes, wires or gas ma-
chine. A safe, pure white, powerful, steady
light. Approved by Fire Insurance Underwriters.
100 Candle Power 15
Hours for Two Cents.
No wicks to trim, no smoke or smell. No
chimneys to clean. Superior to electricity or
acetylene and cheaper than kerosene. Saving
effect; by its use quickly pays for It. Great
variety of Fixtures for indoor anid outdoor use.
This is the Pioneer Incandescent Vapor Gas
Lamp. It is perfect. Beware of imitations.
SThere are More Every
"BEST" LAMPS i n Lamp
use than ALL other .
makes combined, AT.
I RANTED


W. H. JACKSON,
Corner Front and Queen Streets,
Hamilton.
IN AMP giving from 100 to 2000
UM 9'Candle Power.
Positively the best and most economical light
for Halls, Stores, Churches, Lodges, Hotels,
Workshops, Residences, Cattle Yards, and any
where else where a light equal to sunshine is
desired at night.
LAMPS put up for trial, free of expense, in any
part of Bermuda.
If you are interested in the question of good
light for any .purpose whatever, call or send
postal to the above address.
June 30, 1903,--3p. t.f.

For Sale.
THE PROPERTY KNOWN AS

Dundonald House."
belonging to the Estate of the late Chas. Thiele
and lately occupied by C. S. Peniston, Esq.
Consisting of
Dwelling House and Outhouses.
The Property is bounded on the North by Dun-
donald Street; South by Victoria Street; East by
Victoria Lodge; and West by land belonging to
Morris A. Frith, Esq.
Condition of Sale and other Particulars may be
obtained on application to
SAML. D. WALKER.
July 21, 1903.

ESTATE OF THE LATE

Mrs. Mary Jane Peniston
OF SMITHS' PARISH, DECEASED.

NOTICE.
ALL persons having just claims against the
Above Estate are requested to forward particulars
of same to Miss ALICE B. PENISTONT, Executrix,
Smiths Parish and all persons indebted will
please make payment to above on or before 31st
October prox.
HERBERT ALBUOY PENISTON,
THOMAS MELVLL E DILL,
Executors.
ALICE B. PENISTON,
Executrix.
Smiths Parish,
26th Sept. 1903.-3 3p. S.O.


E.


LIGHTBOURN & Co.,


-----AGENTS FOR-----


Wm. YOUNGER


WELL KNOWN

AND CONTRACTORS


& Co's.


ALE AND STOUT.

TO H. M. FORCES.


FOR


Beer, Wine, Spirits & Mineral Waters.
Hamilton, 24th June, 1901.



It pays to attend a iHigh=class School.



is CANADA'S GREATEST SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, SHORTHAND and PENMANSHIP.
If you cannot reach us we can reach you through the medium of our
MAIL COURSE DEPARTMENT,
In getting your instruction from us, either by attending here, or by taking our MAIL
COURSE WORK you are getting the best Canada can give, or this continent has to offer
in the line of business training.


" A bird in the
hand is worth
two in the bush"


-with
shelling
is wort,


us-a


in cash
h two in


goods on
shelves.


LADIES CLOTH COSTUMES, Splendid Bargains,
10/- to 22/6 each. Regular prices 25/- to
48/ each.
LADIES' ALPACCA & CLOTH SKIRTS,
Black 20 o/o discount.
WASHING SKIRTS, Deninm, Pique, Duck, new
stock 2 regular prices,
COTTON SHIRT WAITS, white and coloured,
S t.-gular 'prices. 'T
SILK SHIRTL'T WAISTS, small lot excellent value
y to regular, prices.
CORSETS clean, fresh stock, one of our leading
bargain lines, from k to regular prices.
SHIRT WAIST SUITS, Small lot new stotk I
regular prices.
LADIES & CHILDREN:-' UNDERVESTS,
Merino Finish, all wool, wool and cotton
mixture 2 to j regular prices.

We stand back of our assertions.
The usual prices here quoted ARE
GENUINE and the SALE
PRICES will hold good until Oc-
tober 3rd.

HOSIERY childs cotton, Lisle &.Cashmere Stock-
ings to I regular prices. Small line
Ladies Hose very cheap to clear.
TRIMMED HATS excellent value at usual prices
6/6 to 20/- now offered at from 2/6 to 12/9
UNTRIMMED STRAW HATS-Ladies' and
Children's-worth from 1/6 to 5/ each.
Sale prices from 3d. to 3/ each.
CHILDREN'S WASHING HATS & BONNETS,
1/6 to 4/6 each, worth 2/3 to .-',6 each.
RIBBONS-Plain and Fancy at from Id. to 1/6
yd. regular prices 3d. to 2/9 yd.
FLOWERS-from 3d. to 2/6 a mount worth from
1/ to 5/ a mount.
LADIES' NECKWEAR-Lace Collars, Scarves,
Turnovers at from 8d. to 1/3 each., worth
from 1/6 to 2/6 each.
LADIES' DRESS CAPS-2/ to 3/ each, worth
from 4/9 to 7/ each.


DRESS GOODS, Wool Novelties, Meltons, Serges,
Blk Figures, &c. at and original
prices.
DRESS GOODS, Cotton and Linen I and orig-
inal prices.
WHITE LAWN, 40 inches wide 9d. yd. For this
quality usual price 1/2 yd.
SILKS. Plain and Fancy at J and regular prices.
A1RT MUSLINS and CRETTONNES, 21d. to 9d.
Worth 4d to 1/4 yd.
UMBRELLAS and SUNSHADES a limited quan-
tity at 3 and I regular prices.
NOVELTY & PLAIN SILK VELVET, 3/- and
4/- yard. Worth 4/- and 6/6 yard.
CHIFFON. 40 INCH, 1/- yd worth 2/6.
VEILING (net) 4d & 10d yd worth 10d & 1/2 yd.
LACES, Black, Cream & Colors at tremendous
reductions.

All our energy hasn't been spent
in preparing advertisements, a very
liberal amount has been put into the
red ink pen which marked down the
goods.

MENS BICYCLE SWEATERS, 2/-, 2/9, worth
4/-, 4/9.
MENS' UNDERSHIRTS, Balbriggan, all wool,
Wool and Cotton mixture -, i regular
prices.
MENS' COLORED SHIRTS, neat stripes and fast
colors 2/-each.
MENS' NECKWEAR, 6d & 9d each, worth
9d & 1/-.
MENS' SUSPENDERS, 3d and 6d each worth
9d and 1/-.
MENS' HATS, Duck 9d each worth 1/6
Felt 2/- 4/6
Straw 1/- & 1/6 4/, 4/6, 5/ ea.
BOYS' REEFER JACKETS, Badges & Brass
Buttons x regular prices.
BOYS' CAPS at 3d and 4d each.
BOYS' SHIRT WAISTS, 9d to 1/6 each, worth
1/6 to 2/3.
BOYS' SAILOR SUITS, 3/-, 3/6 worth 5/ 5/6.


H. A. & E. SMITH, Reid Street.
(" Colonist" copy.)


ISLAND STEAM SERVICE
CHANGE OF TIME TABLE
On and after October 1st the
Island Steam boats will
run as under:-


Leave Hamilton
5.50 a.m.
9.30 "
3.00 p.m.
5.00 "


Leave I. I.
12.00 noon
4.15 p.m.
5.15 p.m.


PEARMAN, WATLINGTON & CO.
MIamngef.-.
Hamilton, Sept. 29. 1903-1
Colonist copy W.


CRICKET BATS.

A few Cane-handle
on consignment.

PRICE 15/- EACH,
On Sale at -_
THE ROYAL GAZETTE
STATIONERY STORE.
Hamilton, Sept. 29, 1903.


NOTICE.

The Sale of Real Estate in
Warwick Parish

advertised for Thursday negxt

will not take place.
THOSE. J WADSON,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, 29 Sept, 1903-1.


FOR


RENT


completely furnished,
The House on Victoria
Street known as
"MYRTLE BANK"
the residence of the late C. C. Keane, Esq., deed.
COMPRISING :
Drawing Room, Dining Room, 3 Bedrooms,
Kitchen, Servants Room, Bath Room, &o., &c.
Stable & Servants Room included in the letting.
For further particulars apply to
THOSE. J. WADSON,
Agent.
Hamilton, Sep. 28, 1903,-2 3p. T.O.


John


PETER


Barritt,


Manufacturer of Soda, Tonic, Seltzer and
Mineral Waters, Aerated and Car=
bonated Beverages, etc., etc.

CUSTOMERS' OPINIONS.

In the undermentioned Testimonials, that I
have pleasure in submitting to the notice of the
trade and the public at large, is a list com prising I
a few (and only a few) of the very many flatter-
ing Testimonials which I have received. These
are not specially selected, nor have they been
dressed up in any way, but are the real unbiassed
opinions of my Customers.
It is gratifying to note that many of these Tes-
timonials are from Medical Gentlemen and Com-
manding Officers who have been on station in
these Islands and which extend nearly 30 years.
and this is ample proof, far above any written
Testimony alone, that the Mineral waters manu-
factured by me are undoubtedly the purest and
most reliable of any manufactured on the Island.
I use only the best machinery appliances and
especially for filtering the, water before using.
I tender my most cordial thanks to my almost
numberless Customers to whose interest I shall
always give my earnest and careful attention.
TESTIMONIALS.
I have much pleasure in bearing testimony to
the excellent quality of Soda Water made by John
Barritt of Hamilton.


Ireland Island.


J. W. REID,
Deputy Surg.-Gen.


Mr. John Barritt of Hamilton, has supplied
myself and Regiment, viz : detachment and
Head Quarters, with Soda Water during the en-
tire period of the Regiment being in Bermuda,
and has always given the greatest satisfaction ;
also is most obliging in every way.
J. M. T. SIMPSON,
Col. in Command,
2nd Batt, York and Lancashire Regt.
Prospect.
John Barritt of Hamilton, has supplied me with
Soda Water since my arrival in Bermuda, and I
have been well satisfied with the quality of the
same.
J. SINCLAIR, M.D.,P.M.O.
Prospect. Deputy Surg.-Gen.
Mr. John Barritt,-The President and Commit-
tee of the Sergeants' Mess, 46th Regiment take
pleasure in giving you this testimony for the
good quality of youth Soda Water, and other
Aerated Drinks supplied to the above Mess dur-
ing the past two years, as they have always given
the greatest satisfaction to all.
CHARLES HALE,
Prospect. Color Sergt.
Mr. John Barritt has supplied the Royal Berk's
Regiment viz : Head Quarters and Detachment
with Mineral waters during the entire stay of the
Regiment in Bermuda, and his Mineral Waters
have given entire satisfaction.
G. FAUNCE.
Major, Canteen President.
Prospect.
I have much pleasure in recommending the
excellent quality of the Soda Water made by Mr.
John Barritt, of Hamilton.
H. CUMMERFORD, M.D.,S.M.O.
Prospect.
Mr. John Barritt,-I have much pleasure in
recoumuntudinm- your Soda Water, and you are at
liberty to refer to me for any information you
may require.
W. G. YULE,
Prospect. Lt.-Col. D.A.A.G.
Mr. John Barritt,-I have much pleasure in
placing on record due appreciation of the quality
of the Mineral Waters manufactured by you and
supplied to myself and Regiment, and the prompt
way in which you executed all orders. We had
with your concurrence the water analyzed and its
sources of supply examined by a competent au-
thority and it was found to be of excellent quality
and free from extraneous matter, a most inmport-
ant thing in a station like this.
J. GLANCY,
Commanding 2nd Batt. Leiuster
Prospect. Regiment.
gW Special terms to large consumers, Military
Canteens and Messes. All orders delivered.
Satisfaction guaranteed. Address orders to
JOHN BARRITT,
Mineral Water Manufacturer,
East Broadway and King St.
Hamilton, Bermuda.
Sept. 5-Sat. tf.


DAWSON'S


WORLD RENOWNED SCOTCH WHISKIES
IN THE FOLLOWING BRANDS :


DAWSON'S PERFECTION
DAWSON'S SPECIAL
DAWSON'S EXTRA SPECIAL
DAWSON'S OLD CURIO


3/ per bottle
3/3


5/6


33/- per doz.
36/-
42/-
60/-


Higinbotham Bros.,
Sole Agents for Bermuda.


15/8/03.


a This delicious BEER we have
t. iaull lately impoitcd dulect from
the

SLAGiER BREWERY
in Germany, and to introduce

BE R 1it are offering it at a very
SB. LOW PRICE.

SAMPLES will be sent FREE to Messes and
) Clubs upon application to us.
GOSLING BROS., Agents.


1903

Cable Address


ESTABLISHED
Telephone Call 146.


1874


" Botles, Bermuda."


MNotice toMarners

FROM THIS DATE, and until further notice,
No. 5 chequered buoy in the Outer Narrows is to
be regarded as not being where represented by the
chart, but only approximately so. It is recom-
mended that the eastern side of channel be kept,
both in entering and leaving Bermuda. Dredging
operations are in progress on the patch thus
marked.
Vessels should reduce to slow speed in passing
the dredger.
By order of
THE CAPTAIN-IN-CHARGE.
H. M. Dockyard, Sept. 22, 1903.-2

Pirkfl & 2 k t3emlllhhip Co., Litd

PROPOSED ITINEHA RY.
Canada, Bermuda, W. Indies & Demerara
Service.
(SOUTHBOUND TRIPs.)
Leaves I Leaves Due Bda.
Steamer. St. John, I Halifax, toSAILfor
N.B. N.S. W. Indies.
On or About


*Ocamo ....... Sept.
Orinoco ........ Sept.
*Oruro........... Oetr.
Dahome ...... Octr.
*Ocamo ........ Novr.
Orinoco ........ Novr.
*Oruro........ Deer.
Dahomine ...... Deer.


Sept.
Octr.
Octr.
Novr.
Novr.
Novr.
Deer.
Deer.


1
"- I -.lpt.
5 Oct.
19 Octr.
2 Novr.
16 Novr.
30 Deer.
14 Deer.
28 Jan.


(NORTHBOUND TRIPS.]
.'SttiameCi. are due at Bermuda to sail for St. John
N.B., or Halifax, N.-., on or about:-
S.S. ORINOCO Sept. 19 ; S. S. ORURO Oct. 3
S.S. DAHOME Oct. 17; S. S. OCAMO Oct. 31
S.S. ORINOCO Nov. 14; S. S. ORURO Nov. 28
S.S. DAHOME Deer. 12; S. S. OCAMO Deer. 26
S.S. ORINOCO Jan. 9; S. S. ORURO Jan. 23
PORTS OF CALL :-Bermuda, *St. Kitts, *An-
tigua, *Montserrat, *Dominica, St. Lucia-
Barbados, *St. Vincent, *Grenada, *Tobago-
Trinidad, Demerara.
Steamers marked do not call at ports
marked on the Southbound trip nor at
Tobago and Grenada on the Northbound
trip.
Halifax, Bermuda, Turks Ids. Jamaica Service
Ss. Bota sails from Halifax, N.S., on the
15th of each month, *id, qat Bermuda to sail
for Turks Islands and Jamaica on the 19th,
returning from south is due at Bermuda to
sail for Halifax, N.S., about the 4th of each
month.
Sailing dates of these lines will be adhered
to as closely as possible, subject to
weather and other circumstances.
W. T. JAMES & CO., Agents.
Hamilton and St. George's, Bermuda
Sept. 21, 1903.

Direct London Line

STE ASHIP

Cayo Mono
WILL LEAVE

London
FOR
Bermuda
ON OR ABOUT

OCTOBER 23rd.
First Class Passenger accommoda-
tion.
W. T. JAMES & Co, Agents.
Hamilton and St. George's, Bda.
HY. LANGRIDGE & CO.,
Agents,
16 Great St. Helen's,
London, E.C., England.
Sept. 26, 1903.-3p to Oct. 20.


SMITHS' SALE


will

continue

until

October 3rd.


ESTABLISHMENT
East Broadway and King Street,
HAMILTON, BERMUDA.


.


I ---








THE ROYAL GAZETTE-TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER


I


20 per cent.

CARBOLIC

SOAP
An excellent remedy-
A pleasant Soap for toilet purposes. In summer for Sore Eyes and Sunburn.
Especially valuable in countries infested by In winter for Chilblains and Chapped Hands.
Mosquitoes and other Insects to heal or At all times for Bruises, Burns, Cuts, Piles,
secure immunity from their bites. Scalds and Skin Ailments generally.
Carbolic Acid is freely used in water or oil solution by medical men for various Skinll
Ailments, and its utility, combined with a pure Soap or good Ointment, will be self-evident.

F. C.,CALYERT 4'i ..-. sA'c..& En"lanid
aij~ag^SSag^^!?...... --.* .i/^ ^ii. _.. 2"::.;5 ..:z,

WORTH A UINfA A BOX



EC



FOR ALL

BILIOUS AND NERVOUS DISORDERS,

Sick Headaohe, Constipation,

Wind, Weak Stomach, Impaired Digestion,

Disordered Liver and Fe:iralaire ts.
Prepared only by the Proprietor, TnomYs 1 -'TAI, i. Helens, E l9., in boxes,
1l. 11d., and 2s. 9d. each, with full dircctios. t everyvhere.


AT

Mechanic's Hall

HAMILTON.

Under the Distinguished Patronage
of His Excellency Lt.-General Sir
H. L. GEARY, Governor and Com-
mander-in-Chief. Capt. LEAH, R.N.
Capt. TRAVERS, R.N. and Officers
of H.M.S. "Hotspur."

A GRAND VARIETY

ENTERTAINMENT

will be held at the above Hall by
the TALENTED VARIETY COM-
PANY of H. ri. S. "Hotspur"

ON FRIDAY OCTOBER 9th, 1903.
INTRODUCING:
Latest Songs, Sketches and Dances.
Proceeds to be devoted to Pearson
Brothers Fresh Air Fund.
Plan of the Hall may be seen and tickets secur-
ed on and after Thursday 1st, October at the
"Royal Gazette," Office, Hamilton.
PRICES OF ADMISSION
Reserved Seats 2/6.
Body of Hall 1/-.
Doors open 7.30 p.m. Commence 8 p.m. sharp.

GO TO

"BELTERRE"
TELEPHONE 185.
FOR . . ..



Luncheons, Dinners and
Suppers,
ALWAYS READY.

Strawberries & Cream,
Cut Flowers, etc.
Furnished apartments to let on seaside
with or without board.
January 23, 1903.


St. James' Church Choir

Guild, Somerset.
Patron-The Lord Bishop of Newfoundland and
Bermuda

A BAZAAR
AND) FANCY FAIR
In aid of the Charch Organ Fund and the Guild,
will be held on the
-. d. i i ,


ON T-44URSDAY


AND FRIDAY,


THE 1ST. AND 2ND OCTOBER, 1903.
The Bazaar will be opened at 3 p.m. on Thurs-
day, the Ist October, by The Ven. the Archdeacon.
By kind permission of Col. P. R. Mockler and
officers, the fine Band of the 3rd Battn. Royal
Warwickshire Regt. will perform a choice selec-
tion of music each day.
A variety of fancy and useful articles, etc., will
be offered for sale. Teas, Suppers and other Re-
freshments will be supplied at Moderate prices.
Admission 6d,; Children half price.
The Steamer Prospect will leave
Hamilton each day for Somerset, returning at
10.30 p.m.
JAMES D. WILLIAMS,
Secretary.
September 22, 1903.-3


BY ROYAL WARRANT



1!ovril

is the best,

beverage;

because it not only stim-
ulates, but tones-up and
builds-up body and brain.
Added to gravies, hashes,
stews, &c., BOVRIL
makes them immensely
stronger, richer, and more
palatable and, nourishing.-
...........- --a ---


LIFE STAuiES ILLUSTRATED.


I



"'4


It
//


Photo by T. Holtoway, Chelteham.

A Famous Comooner.
THE DIARY OF A CELEBRITY occasionallyV tlhrowws
ailny curious and interesting sidelights on the circuimsta'ices
attending his rti-into Public Favour.
A Well Known Composer, whose exquisite melodies have
contributed to the happiness of numberless homes in every cornier
of the globe, makes a strikingly significant statement regarding
his most Popular Successes.
It is well understood that the Musical Temperament, highly
strung and sensitive, is peculiarly liable, especially under a
physical affliction, to worry its possessor into a form of mental
activity which speedily exhausts all the available nerve forces,
and becomes a serious menace to Efficiency.
Events combined to reduce the composer to the alarming
condition described above, but (as he relates in the impressive
communication which follows) he was fortunately ordered by his
doctors to take Phosferine, which he found so beneficial that the
public have been further enriched by the delightful songs which
his wonderfully restored health allowed him to compose.
Mr. EDWIN GREENE, Buckingham Villa, Cheltenham, one of the most famnolis
Musical Composer-, o' to-day, author of those beautiful songs Spri:gtide," "T (.r- is:;
Garden," I rtmentber, I rei~ember," Silx m to Sleep," se'-gs t4at broug' t ple :ii e
and co'isol tion into thousands of homes -trtui,,i ,,iit tke weri writes :-" Thre ::is
ago I had to undergo a most serious surgical op ration (Inquinal Colotomy), t is s-ve
my life, but e't my nerves in a frightful state. I took Phosferine on thle a vice cf nmy
doctors which has so thoroughly restored my health and vitality, tha' sin-c then I *
written my most s accessful songs. Allog-ther, since then, I have written 27, and f 110es
published 5, three of lhelm I ave been more successful thin I could i os ibly have
anticipated. I always say that it is a greAt mystery to in th t the e should be a p r. on
1 vieg who h s never used or h-ard of the woni!e-ful efRcts cf Phosfrine. So vianiy
friends of minie have express d their wonder at in wotdrrous vitality After so severe anl
illness and operation; my answer is Phosfir '1. I be iev iii Plosfe-rine as I do in the
sky b iog above me. rYou will reco'lect I wrote you a testimonial before (in March, 19oo),
and now aft-r a lapse of three yea s I send you thi s one to use a- you Ihke. I have
recommended it to scores of friends and have always found it exactly as you state. Your
Phosferine has helped me'so much that you cannot possibly understand all it has been to
me."-March 7th, 1903.


t l


TH~E RW1-


.AI E


,F ALL TONICS.


An y ,f5i -V-o
Neuralgia -..,. P.o: ion F1v '>ous Dyspepsia
Anemia Pa t'.ation Brain-Fag
Depression ofSpirits Faintness Impoverished Blood
Rheumatism Loss of -....-tite impure Blood
Sciatica Menial Exhaustion Sleeplessness
Indigestion Premature Decay Exhaustion
Nervous Debility Melancholia IVfluenza
Backache Stomach 'T;.-orders Headaches
Lassitude Nervous Ailments Hysteria
and all disorders consequent upon a reduced state of the nervous system.
No other medicine has received such absolute proof cf its extraordinary properties in
restoring Shattered Constitutions, and in giving back to the prematurely aged New Life and
Energy.
It is the most powerful Nerve and Recuperative Tonic known. It removes Mental Depression,
want of Tone and Nerve Power. It has remarkable Health-Giving, Strength-giving, Energising,
and Rejuvenating properties.


Phne01L1in i nq u I n inni(.rlhx


ROYAL COMMANDS
To the Royal Family.
H.I.M. the Empress of Russia H.I.H. the Grand Duchess Olga of Russia
H.M. the King of Greece. H.R.H. the Crown Princess of Roumania
H.M. the Queen of Roumania H.R.H. the Grand Duchess Serge of Russia
H.I.M. the Dowager Empress of Russia H.R.H. the Grand Duchess of Hesse ,.
H.S.H. the Hereditary Princess of Leiningen H.I.H. the Grand Duchess Xenia of Russia
And the principal Royalty and Aristocracy throughout the World.
Proprietors, Ashton & Parrsons, Ltd., 17, Farringdon Road, London, Eng.
Price in Great Britain, bottles, i/11, 2/9 and 4/6. Sold by all Chemists, Stores, &t,
T e 2/9 shze contains nearly four times the 1/i5 size.



THE' BEST NATURAL APERIENT WATER.


Ifu yad i Janos

For CONSTIPATION.
Professor D. LAMBL, of Warsaw, Professor of Clinisal Medicine at the University, writes-
Hunyadi JAnos Bitter Water, besides being an excellent general aperient, has
proved specially efficacious in the treatment of chronic constipation, venous obstruction
and congestion, heemorrhoids and obesity."
AVERAGB DOSE :-A wineglassful before breakfast, either pure or diluted with a similar quantity
of hot or cold water.
Note the name "Hunyadi Janos," the a~gnature of the Proprietor,
i-- ANDREAS SAXLEHNER, and the Medallfon, on the Red Centre Part
U of the Label.


S0


PREVENTS THE ATTACK OF MOSQUITOES.
S.- i wBans ana' ^? 4


Removes and
prevents all
ROUGHNESS,
REDNESS,
IRRITATION, TAN, &c.


1 EFRESfHEBD6j A SOFT YELVETY SKI
Se H At all Seasons of the Year.
In the HOTTEST m|
SLIMATES, andTpre- BOTTLES, 1/- & 2/6.
vents it from becoming a J (In England.)
Dried up and
Shrivelled. Sole Makers-M. BEETHAM & SON, CHELTENHAM, ENGLAND.


SURVEYOR,
ARCHITECT.


Office;
Reid St., Hamilton,


and


Office Hours:
10 a. m. to 3 p. m.


TELEPHONE No. 111.
Aug, 1 1903-3m pd.

MARTIN'S


A French Remedy for all Irregularities. Thousands of
Ladies keep a box of Martin's Pills in the house, so that on the
first sign of any Irregularity of the System a timely dose may
be administered. Those who use them recommend them,hence
their enormous sale. At all Chemists and Stores, or post free 5/-
MARTIN, Chemist SOUTHAMPTON, ENGLAND.


FREDERICK
SOUTH ROAD -


CHAMPION,
DEVONSHIRE


I11 SE AGENT AND DEBT l.-llEl; OR,

Accounts collected throughout Bermuda.
Personal calls and prompt atten-
tion to all matters entrusted to me.
First class references.

Tlhe Shilling Green.
Price 2s. each.

NOTICE TO STAMP COLLECTORS
NO SET of Bermud Stamps Complete, without
the obsolete Shilling Green, to be had only


at the


ALIMANACK-Sept.-Oct.-1903.
Sun.
High Remarks.
Sa 9 Tide.

ITH. M.
T 295 56 544 8 1 54 St. Michael
W 30 5 56 543 9 2 42
T 15 57 54210 3 30 St. Remigius
F 25 58 54211 4 18
S 35 59 54012 5 06
S 46 0 5 3813 5 54 17th after Trinity
M 56 0 537 14 6 42

Full Moon: 6 day 11 h. 04 m a,m.
THE. BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE-Lee & Ce
Proprietors-is published every Tuesday and
Saturday Morning at the Royal Gazete Press,
Office, North-West Corner of Reid and Burnaby
Streets, Hamilton.
JOHN F. EVE, Printer to the King's Most Excel-
lent Majesty.
Business Communications to be addressed LEE &
Co.
Communications for The Royal Gazette to be
addressed to The Editor of the Royal Gazette?'
Blanks, Hand-bills, &c., printed at the shortest
notice.
Cable Address "Gazette:" Bermuda
TELEPHONE No. 144.
Agent at ST. GEORGE'S for the Royal Gazette "
MR. GEORGE D. BOYLE, Market Square.
Agent at SOMERSET, J. B. ZUILL, Esqr., J.P.
The Bermuda Royal Gazette "is on file
IN LONDON-At the Imperial Institute; and at
the offices of Messrs Hopkins, Ford, Lee & Co.,
35 Great St. Helen's, London, E.C.
N PHILADELPHIA, PA.-At the Museum 13tk
South Fourth Street.
NEW YORK.-At the offices of Messrs. Middle-
ton & Co., Morris Building, Corner Beaver &
Broad Streets; and at the Law Offices of Messrs.
Patton. Stillman & Patton, 40 Well Street.


29,


1903.


Wh


EVERY MAN
1 UFFERING from NERVYOUS and PHiYSICAL
..f DEBICITY should send for a valuable Pamphlet explain-
.-3how all Nervous and Organic Derangements may be success-
y treated without stomach medication. The method is easy t
0I pleasant, and will effect a perfect and permanent cure.
in m a plain sealed .. I-, -. free of charge. E.
'TON,,59 & 60, Cl1 NCc i i i TOrnO. Over ;9 ears'
tenuous SicCCsC g


EUROPEAN AGENCY
[ESTABLISHED 1814.]
WE wish to open accounts with
all bona fide Colonial Buyers who are not already
in our books, and on receiving precise details of
their exact requirements, we shall be pleased to
forward quotations for any European or American
goods. Our reference books contain several mil-
lion names, and our extensive connection enables
us to make special terms with the most suitable
wholesale manufacturers of each class of goods, so
that even after adding our shipping commission of
1l to 5 per cent. (according to amount) our prices
will compare favourably with those of the manu-
facturers.
We supply goods made specially to any style,
quality or price ; and on receipt of intent, with
full and clear instructions, and remittance of cash,
or produce to cover, our knowledge of the trade
enables us to place the order at once in the best
hands, and the goods are promptly forwarded.
We make up sample cases of most goods from
5 upwards ; and, as we utilise our long experience
in choosing such goods as are most likely to suit
the market for which they are intended, we confi-
dently recommend buyers to order these sample
cases, for by doing so they will obtain the latest
nd most taking novelties.
Consignments of produce receive careful atten-
tion, and we give advances to any extent.
Prompt and painstaking attention to the in-
terests of correspondents together with exceeding-
ly moderate charges, and plain and straightfor-
ward dealings, have enabled us to maintain for the
greater part of a century, a reputation which we
value too much to allow it to be tarnished by the
unsatisfactory execution of a single transaction.
ADDRESS :-
WILLIAM WILSON & SONS,
Merchants & Manufacturers' Agents,
25, Abchurch Lane, London, E.C.
Correspondence Invited.
October 18, 1902.-12 m

[FOR OVER SIXTY YEARS.
AN OLD AND WELL TRIED REMEDY
MRS WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP has been
used for over SIXTY YEARS by MILLIONS o
MOTHERS for their CHILDREN WHILE TEETHING
WITH PERFECT SUCCESS. It SjOTHES the
CHILD, SOFTENS the GUMS, ALLAYS all PAIN;
CURES WIND COLIC, and is the best remedy for
DIARRH(EA. Sold by Druggists in every part of the
world. Be sure and ask for
MRS WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP.
AND TAKE NO OTHER KIND.
2m. T. & S. 1-1-03.

W. D. Wilkinson,

CIVIL ENGINEER,


ROYAL GAZETTE OFFICE.




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