Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00280
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00280
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text


TRlE


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.
ADVERTISE{~AD~REODE-.-.a- B


Vol. LXIX.--No. 12.


STATE SITPEIM VIAS,


- T gIQfJAS


24s. per Aunnuma


______________ -~ -- ------------ -

Mm alto],Bermnuda, Tuuesda,, March 24, 19OG.


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Postp0 eeiit of Ith ROeaOta.

The R. B. Y. Club Regatta ap-
pointed for 27th Instant,
Has Been Postponed
To FRIDAY, 17th APRIL Next.
Entries may be made up to 6 p.m., 10th
April. M. S. HUNT,
Hamilton, 16th March, '96 See. Saily. Corn,
Colonist 18th & 21st inst.

Valuable Real Estate,
In the Town of St. George.

TO BE SOLD
BY PUBLIC AUCTIO Y,
', ON TilE PREMISES
6n 0 sda, lio 31st of Mirch, ill t,
at 12 o'clock, noon.
Two DWELLING,

tl HOUSES,
AND THE
In parcel of Land he Town of
8o~~f 1 ST. GEORGE.
Bounded on, the North by a Public Street,:
called York Street, and there measuring 66 ft.
3 inches, more or less. On the South, by a
Public Street called Water Street, and there
measuring 9 ft. 9 -iLches more or less, and by
,land and buildings of. the heirs or devisees
of Robert Boggs,; on the East, by a Public
Lane or Alley, and there measuring 32 ft. 2 in.
.more or less, and by land and buildings of the
,heirs or devisees of Robert Boggs; and on the
West, by land now or lately 3f the heirs or de-
visees of the Hon. A. J. Musson, and there
,measuring 75 ft. 9 inches more or less.
For further information apply to Ormond T.
Middleton, solicitor for the owner, or to
W. T. ROBERTS,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, 16 March, 1896,
24th, and'31st inst.
BAZAAR

In connection with St Andrew's Church will be
held in the
Mechanics' Hi:all on.
Wednesday, Mardh 25th'
The Bazaar will be opened at 3.30 by
MR. RALPH WELLS, N.Y.
There will be a large variety of useful and
Fancy Articles for sale.
Supper will be served from 5 to 7 o'clock. Re.
freshments of all sorts will be found on the
refreshment table.
Choice Candy, Ice Cream, Bermuda Pound
.Cake, Strawberries and Cream will be among the
attractions.
A Fish Pond for the Children.
By the kind permission of 'Messrs Mead &
Brooke the Hamilton Hotel Orchestra will play
both afternoon and evening.
Addmission 6d. Children 3d.
March 17th and 24th, 1T96.-2
Colonist copy.


Notice to Contractors.

TENDERS are invited for the supply for a,
period of three years from 1st July, 1896,
of the undermentioned articles to the Royal
Naval Hospital, Bermuda, viz:--
FRESH, MILK,
POTATOES,
CARROTS,
TURNIPS,
ONIONS,
CABBAGE,
PUMPKIN,
CHICKENS,
FINE SALT,
FRESH EGGS.
Forms of Tender to be obtained on applica-,
tion to the Deputy.Inspector-General, Royal1
Naval Hospital, Bermuda.
Sealed tenders to be deposited at the ofihce
of the Deputy-Inspector-General, R.N, Hos-
pital by 12 o'clock, noon,
On 28 March, 1890.:
THOSE. BROWNE,
Deputy Inspector General,:


11th March, 1S96.-2

ESTATE O
T. "W".


F TH E LATEi


TENDERS
Will be received from the Undersignel up to
31 ST M ARCH, Instant.
From persons desirous of purchasing that well
known and desirable property.
THIE GUN",
Situated in the Town of St. George's.
Bounded on the North by York Street; on
the East by an alley; on the South by the
property of T. W. Foster; and on the West by
other property of the late T. W. Kelly.
Possession can ba given at once.
The Undersigned do not bind themselves to
accept the highest or any tender.
CLAUDE W. McCALLAN.
CHARLES GRAY BUTTERFIE LD,
\ Executors and Trustees under the
Will of the late T. W. Kelly.
Hamilton, March 7, 1896.

0 1




DURING the warm weather in March the
Blight is sure to attack the Potato Fields,
and, unless you take the precaution to spray
the plants with Bordeaux Mixture, the crop
will be lost.
8traw SOnite has been found to"
be a most convenient and economical form of
this mixture, greatly facilitating the whole
operation.
Sprayers
and
Strawsonite.
T. J. PEARMAN,
Shelly Bay.
March 2nd, 1896.


R. F.


DOWNING


'* T



j, 11A REA vtIP LINE.

CARRYING CANADIAN MAILS.

PROPOSED ITINERARY.

PORTS. i Duart Taymouth
Castle. Castle.


St. John ... Leave
Halifax ...Arrive 280
do .. Leave "
Bermuda 70
St. Croix.... 896
St. Kitts.... 132
Antigua .... 67
Dominica .... 132
Martinique.. 35
St. Lucia..,.. 45
Barbadoes .. 417
Trinidad.... 190
Demerara Arrive 356-
do. .... Leave
Trinidad. ... 1' 356
Barbadoes .. 190
St. Lucia .. 117
Martinique.. 45
Dominica .. 35
Antigua .. 1,32
St. Kitts.. .. (i7
Bermuda 1007
St. John Arrive 780


First Class


pass-, a.'1*er
W.


41 & 42 Front St.,


1896.
Feb. 20(
(" 22
27
March 3
9i
<( 10
11
12
12
13
14
16
19
21
23
25
26
26
27


.\pril 4
8


1896.
dfar. 19
21
26
31
April 6
1 7
8
6" 9
C6 9
10
11
13
16
18
20
2" 22
23
S23
24
25
27
Xay 2
4 6


Accommodation.
T. JAMES,'
Agent,
Hamilton, Bermuda


211 -11ch 7, PiX6-tf


rl % G iU'E -,)S O


LIL UM HARRISSI.

CARTER & CO., the Queen's Seedsmen,
High Holborn, London England,

Ilvitd Offrs of Lilinim Harrissi.
Write, stating sizes, prices, delivered C. I. F.
London, giving full particulars, terms, pack-
ing, &c.
Registered Cable Address:
CARTER, LONDON.
Postal Address :
JAMES CARTER & Co., High Holborn, London.
10/3/96.-3


MAPS 1,iF BOfI IOMJDA
IN HA,\ DY POCKET IFORM.


& Co.,


FOREIGN EXPRESS


Custom House


Brolk-ets,


Forwading and Confmmniiioi
Merchants.
20 Exchange PJace,
63 & 05 Beave' St,, New York.
P. 0. BOX 3550,


RICHARD F. DOWNING.
THOMAS ,. DOWNING.
M. MOLONEY, Manager Foreign
1 Department.
BERMUDA REPRESENTATIVES,


Expri -s


'lHOOMPs60N & RGLi;R I t.
May 9th, 1891.


bic yCle


(I ~pai r ing.


JjKOR Cycle repairs of any kind, also fittings,
-'- viz., LAMPS, RACKETET, BILLLS.
SADDLES, FLOO PUMPS with universal
coupling, etc., go to
A. C. THOMAS,
The Factory, Reid Street, Hamilton
And for Sale one LADY'S BICYCLE, new
26 inch wheels, 11-also, one second hand
' COLU BIA," in fair condition.
Feb, 24th, 1896,-6 pd


A New and Prctictal
G I I) S

DRIVING,
WALKING,
& CYCLING,


JAMES M. FARNSWOR.TH,
New York,
PRICE ,s .


' ROYAL GAZETTE' MAP


Published at the.*
" ROYAL GAZETTE &
JoB PRINTING
Es 8 TA UL 1s I 34 S
Bermuda.


PiticE 1/6.


lso0, Aldmiraty ilir aa Sholiet as
Wf the Islands.

ON SALE AT' THE

" ioyalI Gazette" Stationery Store.
"

At the R)yal Gazette" Stationery
Store.
4In addition to our usual supply of Horse
Condition Powders, Purgative Balls and Blis.
t3ring Ointments we have received-
Cough Balls, Cordial Balls, Worm Balls
and Dog Pills for Distemper.


EL W[IfATLEY JON1ES,
Ri,: P RES RENTING
A DAMS & HOWE Wholesale Grocery House,
Titus, Wells & Willett's Wholesale Grain,
House,
Irwin, McBride, Chatterwood & Co., Whole-,
sale Tea House.
ALSO AGENT FOR
The Finest Victorias, Extension Tops,
Buggies ana .1'-arket Waggons, all made to
order.
And importer of Jersey Cows.
Novr. 11, 1895.


NOTICE!


NOTICE!


Only Six Hliundr'ed bSiares to Ibe Sold.

A Chance to make Large Profits on a Small
Investment, by purchasing (5) FIVE
POUNDS Sterling, shares in the net
- profits of the
BERMUDA LIME COMPANY.
The certificates of shares will be made so
that they can be transferred, assigned or sold.
Any person desiring one or more shares can
obtain the same by applying by letter or in
person to
CAPT. MARK GOLINSKY,
Manager of the Bermuda Lime Company,
St George, Bermuda.
Hamilton, Nov 6th, 1895.--6m

ON SALE.


Valuab lRdal Estate in the Town
OF HAMILTON.
The Undersigned offers for. sale his proper


ty


corner of


Wesley and Victoria Streets,
Consisting of a Lot bounded on three streets,
WITH TWO HOUSES THEREON.
r HESE HOUSES are new, well built and
in thorough order, conveniently arranged,
pleasantly situated in one of the best streets
in Town and very desirable residences and
always command good Tenants Are at pres-
ent occupied Can be inspected and further
particulars given by communicating with or
applying to
EBENEZER BELL,
53 Front Street
Hamilton, Feby 25th, IS95.



THE BERMUDA POCKET
A TY/EA-lTA-OC,
GUIDE AND DIRECTORY,
ALSO-


THE


1 IHIERET I


May be obtained of
Mr. George D. Boyle, St. Georges,
Mr. R. Galloway, Inspector of
Police, R. N. Yard,
Mr. J. B. Zuill's Store, Somerset,
and the Royal Gazette Store.
Hamilton, January 27, 1896.

Real Estate,

For Sale in Warw ick Parisl.

30 Lots, 100 feet square
being a portion of the well known property
formerly owned by Daniel Astwood, Esquire.
These LOTS will be sold very cheap, and on
accommodating terms to suit purchaser. For
further information apply to
CHARLES T. CONYERS,
Queen Street, Hamilton.
February 25, 1896.-tf
P. S.-Remember next General Election,
eoure a vote.

Notice.


A
de
re(
de
IN


Scotch Whisky.

N old -established Firm of Scotch Whilay
I Distillers and, Mrchants, want a Firm
of goo.1 standing as.Wholesale Buying Agents
for Bermuda, for their finest quality seven-
year-old Whisky in case. Must be able to
correspond in English. References given and
required, State full particulars.
Box 30, McMURTRIE'S.
Advertising Offices-Glasgow, Scotland.
March 4, 1896.-3

PITCH PINE,

FOR SALE


BEAMS, BOARDS, SCANTLING
and SLATS of almost any dimensions
required,
Special terms can be made by purchasers of
20 M, or upwards, for delivery.
JOHN S, DARRELL & JAMES.
St. Georges, January 10, 1896.
COLONIST please copy.


ISOTICEl.


House & & Sri
AT THE OFFICE OF
WM. JAMES HENEY, Actuary,
-AT HIS RESIDENCE-
"' BEAUCEANT" PEMROKE,
For the Collection of Debts, notes of hand,
Bills of Exchange, and other securities, under
authority of Powers of Attorney and other
powers,-
ANKERS :-THE BANK OF BERMUDA, (LTD.)
February 18th, 1896.-tf

NOTICE.

pROFESSOR LUEBEN having still some
few hours vacant, would like to fill same
with lessons either Piano, Violin, or Vocal,
For terms, etc, apply to Professor Lueben, at
his office, Parliament Street, next to Melbourne
House, Hamilton.
IIamilton, Octr 22nd, 1894.

DIr. HORNE Dentist,
Of New York.
IUTS his services at the command of ;his
L Friends.
OFFICE :-Reid Street, Hamilton.
March 17, 1896.--3 ,














SOFT, DELCATE HANDS,

HAMAMELIS-SULPHUR SOAP.
HAMARMELSWlTUBGR ATET UIi ,<


(WITGOOD C OMP :L HEALER.
SLHR1IS TIlE GrEATEST
SULPUR ) PURIFIER.
FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS. ,
D1. ROsA Co.. MoVTrr.Ain, N. JI..U.8.A.

ON SAL E)
AT THE ... :-
1Royal Gazetto Stationery Stor6

Richmn esd Hors onitiierf o l O en,
Dr. Jaimes' Blistering Ointment,


&c., &c., fee,
ESTATE OF THIE : Small and frequent iuportatios. !

Late James Anthony Alwood. LO 0 POISON
LL PERSONS having just claims against A 5PECIALTYondaror
L the estate of James Anthony Atwood, L iary BLOOD IPOISON permanently
S,0cured in15 to 35 days..You can be treated a$
ceased, late of the Town of St George, are "horefd r>o ri eunerBamesuara-
rqested to render their accounts to the Un- Ifyou, fer t,(..meherewewllo-.
rsigned on orbefore the 30TH DAY OF MARCH, : r if we fall to cure. tyu have taken uer-
TANT. ." : Ol',d, oldo potasli, _nd. ill have achel-vant
Ml~ h IV I .I U L'.i'ir *- .i- .- II i l- l U .- -- l- L I. ESTr- .I


All persons indebted to the above estate are
required to make payment to the Undersigned
on or before the same date.
T. J. PEARMAN,
Administrator (with the will annexed) of the
said Estate.
Shelly Bay, March 9, 1896-3


I'Lpd4 Copper Colored Spots. Lilcerpora
.y -.rt(,Zt(habody,.IIhaitr t.r Eyebrows f11 n~
Ouat, i it S thliaSecaiidlry 11.10O13POISOX
v,-o -uarantpe to ciirvi. Wo rs..licitLhe most ob~tg-
zj~ fai-. rrd cl-allewire.theli world for a
cat, !'"'r~an~ioteu~rc. 'Es ui-c-aqe bnsalaways
~ai1e th* ~!c~iottlie ni-st esxineut physi-
tional-a!'-uranty: AI~soI riele 1.Ilb'..4 lrit stpnled o,
auplictiCon. Addrues C(i'l. I:~~vj
80 lfan.ic Temple, Chicago, Ill., U. S, A,








BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTe.


WEEKLY REPORT OF THE WEATHER
at Gibbs' Hill Light Station at Bermuda be-
tween 15th and 22nd March, 1896; height
above the Sea being 246 feet at base, where
the Register is kept.

Date '0
1896 CJ
0 0 o General
.goA 0 U Remarks

Noon Q ( (
16 SE 4 68 61 30.170 0.00 Fine
17 s 570 67 29.900 0 25 *
18 NE 4 66 63 30.010 0.00 Fine, overcast
19 E 466 63 30.040 0.00 Fine
20 s 570 67 29.870 0.47 f
21 Nw 465 61 29.9500.00 Fine
,2a B 2 62 59 30.230 0.00 Fine, cloudy
Overcast, unsettled, evening squally.
T Overcast, heavy, evening equally.
W. S. PERINCHIEF,
Principal Keeper.



-'te-o- S

Hamilton, March 24, 1896.

Colonial Secretary's Office,
HAMILTON, 23th March, 1896.
1 IS EXCELLEN'Y the Governor has been
pleased to appoint the following gentle-
men a commission to inquire into the condition
of paupers receiving parish aid, and of the
poorhouses in the colony, and the working of
the Acts for the relief of the poor:
The Hon. Richard Darrell Darrell, President,
The Hon. Thomas N. Dill,
The Hon. Joseph M. Hayward,
Nathaniel Vesey, Esquire, M. C. P.,
Eldon Harvey, Esquire,
Medical Officer of Health.
Ormond T. Middleton, Esquire,
and,
Charles V. Ingham, Esquire.
By His Excellency's command.
ARCHIBALD ALISON,
Colonial Secretary.

Custom House-Hamilton.
ENTERED
March 19-R M S Alpha, Hall, Halifax, N S; as-
sorted cargo to W T James.
CLEARED.
March 18-88 Algonia, Cumming, Delaware
Breakwater; inward cargo of sugar.
19 -R M S Alpha, Hall, Jamaica; 2 brls potatoes,
vegetables, I box and inward cargo.
Custom House.-St. George's.
ENTERED.
March 18-Am schr Thomas W Hyde, Carver,
Darien, Ga, to Bath, Me, with a cargo of lum-.
ber-(in distress, vessel leaking). Agents, W,
E Meyer & Co.
23-Am tug C W Morse, Blizzard, from Norfolk,
Va to this port to tow from hence to New York
the Am bars White Cloud.
CLEARED.
March 14-Br SS Humbert, Honey, to New York;
cargo of fruit (had cargo re-stowed).
21-Am schr Carrie Buckman, Stubbs, to Guada-
Sloupe; cargo of lumber.
21--Am bark White Cloud, Carter, to New York;
cargo of sugar-in tow of tug C W Morse.
22-Br schr Clayola, McDade, to St John, N B ;
80 pun molasses, part cargo of schr Olive.
2 1-Br 8S Oakdale, Whiteman, to Charlotte Har-
b hour, Fla.
VtSSELS IS PORT OF ST. GEORGE'S, MARCH 23, 1896,
SeGrman ship Ida-awaiting orders.
Nor bark Schweigaard, to be sold at auction.
Amer schr W H Skinner, to go on Marine Slip.
Br brig Acacia-ready for sea.
Amer schr B C Cromwell, undergoing repairs.
,Br schr Olive-awaiting orders.
Br SS GlanJiry, ready for sea.
Am schr Chas Mooford, discharging cargo.
Am schr Thos W Hyde, discharging cargo.
SPOKEN,.-March 16-Schr Jennie F Willey (by
tug Gladisfen about 20 miles S W of these islands)
from Boston to Porto Rico, All Well,"-desired
to be reported.
REPORT.
Captain La Vash, of the Br. schooner Olive, on
avoyage from Porto Rico bound to St. John, N.B.
with a cargo of molasses. Reports having left
Porto Rico on the 24th Febry., had fair weather
Up to the 2nd instant, then experienced a heavy
gale of wind from the N W, which soon increased
to a hurricane, had bulwarks washed away, and
the vessel started leaking badly. On the 4th, the


hurriea6 still continuing, shipped a heavy sea
wieh carried away the cutwater, split the foresail
tsw~p th6 decks; at 4 P M on the same day
shipped another tremendous sea over the stern of
the vessel which broke the rudder short off to head
(the lower part drifting clear of the vessel), leav-
ing the vessel at the mercy of the sea. All hands
constantly at the pumps, found it necessary to
jettison a portion of the cargo to keep the vessel
from foundering, which was done by knocking in
the heads of the puncheons and letting the con.
tents run into the hold und then pumping it out
with the water.
On the 17th instant, the weather abating a little,
the crew set about clearing the wreck and if possi-
ble to make a temporary rudder. Some planks
were procurred from the hold and after great diff.
cult a crude rudder was made. The weather
coming on again bad it was found impossible to
attempt to ship it. On the 10th the weather sub-
siding a little the attempt to place the rudder in
,paltiom was made, it required the greatest skill
and ingenuity in carrying out the work as a tre-
mendus sea was still running. After almost super.
human effort on the part of the Captain and crew
it was placed in position and the vessel brought to
the wind and headed for Bermuda, which she suc-
ceeded in reaching on the 11th and was towed into
St. George's by the tug Gladisfen.
Captain La Vash deserves the greatest credit for
his very plucky and courageous conduct in making
nad placing in position the temporary rudder, in
Sfac of the hurricane that was blowing at their
me, and his crew in a nearly exhausted state
inm being at the pumps for such a length of time.
Those who have seen the vessel since her arrival
in port and examined the work done, can hardly
credit that it was possible to have been doue under
the cirumetances as described above.
.Wp trust that Capt La Vash's pluck and judg.
Xpt will be taken into consideration by the own.


Capt Carver, of the American schr Thomas W
Hyde, on a. voyage from Darien, Ga, bound to
Bath, Me, with a cargo of P P lumber, reports
having left Darien on the 9th Febry, had fine
weather up to the 16th, then met with very heavy
and dirty weather, from the 16th up to the date of
her arrival at this port, had a continuation of very
heavy :gales of wind, had the deckload washed
overboard carrying with it one of the crew, owing
1o the tremendous sea running at the time it was
found impossible to attempt to render any assist-
ance to him, and the poor fellow was drowned.
The sea swept the deck smashing the boats and
carrying away the water barrels, leaving them
with only about 10 gallons of water on board. On
the 16th the weather abating a little managed to
clear wreck and bore up for Bermuda, made land
on the 17th instant and was towed into St.
George's by the tug Gladisfen.
The above schooner is one of the finest of her
class in the American marine. Capt Carver states
that during his experience of 22 years as a Master-
mariner he has 'never before seen anything like
the weather that he encountered during this voy
age and that thisis the first time that he has ever
been compelled to put into any port in distress.
Arrived off St George's on the 19th for orders-
the Br ship Herat, Home, master, 109 days from
Calcutta. The mate left on the tug Gladisfen
(about 12 miles from St David's Head) to come on
shore for orders and the ship stood off the land
again. On Sunday the 23rd she came in sight
again and the mate was placed on board (with the
orders) and she resumed her voyage.

Naval.
H M S Pallas sailed from Dockyard on Thurs
day last for West Indies.
H M S Mohawk arrived from Barbados yes-
terday.
Extracts from Brigade Orders.
March 23rd, 1896.
Duty Boat.--The Duty Trips on Wednesday
will be made as follows to and from St Georges:-
Leave Hamilton at 11 a m, calling at Boaz Island,
and Ducking Stool (weather permitting). Leave
St Georges at 4.30 pm., for Hamilton, calling at
places as above. The morning duty trip from St
Georges on Thursday will not be made. The after.
noontrip from Hamilton will be made as usual.
Notice.-With reference to the notice publi-had
in Brigade Orders of the 16th inst the meeting of
members of the Lawn Tennis Club at the C R E's
Office, Prospect therein announced is postponed
till Wednesday, 25th inst.

Accident on Board the S. S. "Oakdale,"
at St. George's.
On Tuesday last, the S S Oakdale, while coming
up St George's Harbour to take her berth at
Penno's Wharf, came in collision with the school
er Clayola, the bowsprit of the schooner taking in
the mainstay of the steamer, broke the topmast off
at the crosstrees, the broken spar coming down on
to the steamer's deck. A gentleman (by the name
of W B Phelps, a passenger on board), who was
sitting aft at the time, reading, seeing the spar
falling, (the supposition is) attempted to rush for-
ward to get out of the way of it, and in doing so
he must have come in contact with the port guy of
the derricks and the spar (at the same time) falling
across the starboard one ; he was thrown up about
8 feet and dashed violently down on the deek. He
was not discovered until about 10 minutes after
the accident as all hands were forward at the time
trying to get the anchor out. Fortunately, the
accident was seen from H M S Rambler, lying in
the harbour, and pinnace with the ship's doctor,
Alfred H Jeremy, on boar], was immediately des-
patched to the Oakdale, and the unfortunate gen-
tleman was placed in the pinnace and removed on
shore and from thence to the Military Hospital.
On examination it was found that he had sustained
three severe fractures of the skull and had six ribs
broken. At the time it was thought there was but
little hope for him, but since then there has been
a decided improvement in his condition.
Mr Phelps, with a party of three friends (Messrs
C F Hancock, M Wilson and A Williams) had
booked their passage by the Oakdale to go as far
as Charlotte Harbour, Florida, and from thence to
New York by rail. Mr Hancock takes this oppor-
tunity on behalf of Mr Phelps and family in ex-
pressing his appreciation, gratitude and heart felt
thanks for the very prompt assistance that was
rendered (at the time of the accident) by the Offi-
cers and Doctor of H M S Rambler and also to the
Army Medical Staff for th Ar kind attention after
his reception into the Military Hospital.

New York Weather Report.
March 17-Clear, wind North-westerly, temper-
ature 28 0.
18-Clear, winds Westerly, temperature 32 .
19-Rainy, winds Easterly, temperature 40 0.
20-Cloudy, winds Westerly, high winds along
the coast, temperature 32 0.
21-Clear, wind North-west, strong, tempera-
ture 28 0.
23-Cloudy, winds Easterly, predicted snow or
rain follow, temperature 30 .

Cathedral Notice.


Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday-Matins 9.30
a m, and Evensong 5.30 p in
Wednesday and Friday-Matins and Litany 11
a m ; Evensong, Wednesday 5.30 p m, Friday
7.30 pm
Wednesday-Annunciation of Virgin Mary-
Holy Communion after Matin@.
Thursday-Holy Communion at 8 a m
March 29th-Sixth Sunday in Lent.
8 a m, Holy Communion; 11 a m, Morning Ser-
vice and Holy Communion; .7,30 p m, Evening
Service.
S The Rite of Confirmation will be admin-
istered by His Lordship the Bishop to the can-
didates of Southampton and; Sandy's Parishes
to-morrow (Wednesday) Parish Church of
Southampton at 12, noon, and the Parish
Church of Sandy's at 4 p.m.
The Bishop of the Diocese administered the
Rite of Confirmation in the Cathedral on Sunday
afternoon, a crowded congregation witnessing the
service.
o We are pleased to learn that Miss Annie
Margiret Keith Jenkins, a resident of Ealing, has
successfully passed her Examination for the De-
gree of L.R.A.M. at the recent Metropolitan Ex.
amination at the Royal Academy of Music, Lon-
don.
. The London Gazette of February 20th, 1896,
has the following of interest to West India resi-
dents: Major J. Shakespear, D.S.O., who for the
last four years has done service as superintendent
of the South Lushai Hills, is under orders to va-
cate his appointment and to return to duty with
his regiment, the 2 Battalion Leinster, now in
Bermuda.

OW A Supplement of 9 columns
a noswnuoulAn t i a1!,. i mA in4* A PMV A T A Aw7.UTIr


The Ball at the Hamilton" on Thursday
last.
If it were possible for the Hamilton Hotel pro-
prietors to outdo themselves in the season's dances
that fact was accomplished on Thursday last.
It has been our good fortune to attend many of
these dances, but never before have we witnessed
such a gay and joyous gathering from all parts of the
Island at the Hamilton." In fact, in certain
parts of the corridor, the space was too narrow to
hold anywhere near the mass of human beings
surging towards the ball-room for programmes.
The chief feature in the decorations was the pre-
dominance of yellow. Long festoons of white
drapery hung from the centre chandelier to differ-
ent parts of the room and fastened close to the top
of the many doorways and gave to the room a soft-
ened light which helped to show off the many
beautiful costumes of the ladies.
The excellent hotel orchestra was comfortably
hidden behind the usual leafy bower, and did not
fail to bring forth the many well merited encores
which, on this occasion, was particularly noitce.
able.
The splendid band of the 2nd Leinster Regiment
was provided with a large space off the Western
end of the verandah, covered in by a marquee, and
and also serving the purpose of allowing more of
the spectators sitting room on the verandah, as
the latter space is always used by the military
band and is so frequently crowded at this particu-
lar spot. The regimental band played capital se-
lections during the promenades.
The hotel was, everywhere, thrown open to the
guests, and the many little nooks and sitting-out
places were innumerable, both inside and out, the
large yards making capital promenades, and
which were well filled during the intervals, and on
the first strains of the orchestra were perfectly
deserted.
The arrangement of the programme, and the
order of the different dances, especially the supper
ones, was especially good.
As usual, the supper was excellent; comprising
a varied menu, which was justly attended to; as at
the opening ball sweet music was wafted from the
adjoining room. Probably this was one of the
largest crowds ever there.
At about 2 a.m. the gay scene ended with the
National Anthem, and all retired with something
to think of and talk about for a week to come.

To the Editor of the Royal Gazette.
SEAWARD, Bermnda.
Dear Editor,-In March, 1893 ;I came to this
lovely Emerald Cluster "a perfect wreck. I was
unable-and had been for months-to take any
solid food. My physician in America said he only
knew of one place :in the world, within reach of
me, where I might be benefitted. That was '" The
Bermudas Hence my visit. I remained on
these beautiful islands for five' weeks. Breathing
constantly the sweet perfume that is wafted from
one portion of the cluster to the other. I was on
every island that has any inhabitants and some
that do not have a house upon them. I viewed
the cluster from the top of both lighthouses, and
from every eminence I could reach, I visited every
cave on the islands I could hear of. I drove over
every driving public or military road and walked
over the smaller islands, I boated over the beau-
tiful waters of the Great Sound, Harrington
Sound, Castle Harbour, and "The Reach." I
circumnavigated the group: starting westward
from Bailey's Bay, passing entirely around and
coming to Bailey's Bay from the East. I have
talked with scores of people, natives, here. I have
attended some of the leading churches, Sunday
schools and day schools, hence I feel I am in a
position to say I have seen something of these is-
lands. When I was ready to return to my own
home I was fully restored to health, and have so
remained until the present time. My daughter
and I fairly revelled in this land of perpetual
bloom. To the kind, courteous, cultivated Chris-
tian"people whom I meet in Bermuda I shall ever
feel like extending the most cordial welcome to
the City: of Brotherly Love (Philadelphia). My
visit was one (to me) continual round of pleasure.
lait any wonder that when I wanted to take a
rest and feel perfect freedom from care and thought
I should bring Mrs. Passmore and my daughter to
this land of the lily and oleander. Here I am
again pleasantly located at Seaward," where I
would be pleased to have any of my former ac-
quaintances or any other Bermudians call and see
us. There is much yet for me to learn about your
dear little island home. 'Yours,
'JoHN A. M. PAsSMORE.

To the Editor of Royal Oazette.
MARCH 28rd, 1896.
DEAR SiR,-Will you kindly allow me to ac-
knowledge in your paper the offerings (up to date)
of Hospital Sunday, as well as some additional
subscriptions to the Cottage Hospital, received
since the report was published.
The Cathedral of Bermuda........ 6 12 3
Church in the Dockyard.......... 5 0 3
Sandys ...... .................. 1 9 1-
Southampton .......... ....... 1 8 6
Warwick ......................... 4 4 3j
Presbyterians of Warwick........ 4 6 11
Paget ....... .... ... .... .. 10 3 0
Pembroke ...................... 16 0 0


Roman Catholic of St. Edward's.. 3 0 0
Devonshire .................... 4 10 0
Smiths ......................... 9 2 6
Hamilton ....................... 6 18 6
St. George's ................... 1 15 0
74 10 4

Amount of annual subscriptions 9 7 0
already acknowledged ........ j
Mrs. Lyons ..... ............. 2 2 0
Mr.J. H. Jackson............. 2 2 0
Mrs. J. H. Jackson............ 1 1 0
Revd. George Tucker .......... 1 10 0
Mrs. George Tucker .......... 1 10 0
Mrs. J. H. Harvey .........., 1 0 0
Miss ClaraJackson .... ,,...., 1 0 0
19 12 0


Subscriptions to new ward al-
ready acknowledged ......
Mrs. Llewellyn Jones ...........
Wentworth Gray, Esquire ......
Hon. S. B. Gray, c.M.. .....
A Friend.......... ... ..... ..
Mrs. Truair.... ................
The Misses M. E. and S. K.
King and G. Crosby, Mas-
ter L. Aspinwall, Princesa
Hotel ....dt....... ... .......
T. D. Middleton, Esqr.,.......



165
5
10
5
10
2


1 0 0

2 0 13
X200 13 3-1


Yours very truly,
ROSALIE BUTTERFIELD,
Secretary and Treasurer.

CALAIS, Me., Mar 23-A severe shock of earth-
quake occurred here last night passing from West
*-- 0 .-&. f- .-_ ^",.- A- A. aannn^ Vn _aa


Ninth Annual Report of the Hamilton Coffee
House.
Complaints, from time to time, having been
made that the Coffee House was too small to meet
the present requirements, application was made to
the Mayor and Corporation of this Town to allow
improvements to be made. A special committee
was appointed to see if the alterations could be
carried out under the plan submitted to them.
this was speedily arranged and the work quickly
completed; and I am very pleased, in submitting
this report to the subscribers, to state that there
is a small balance still to the credit of the house
after paying 11 7/1 for these improvements, as
well as the running expenses for the year. The
increase in width of six feet in the Coffee House
gives a much larger space for the men who are
very much pleased -with their new and better ven-
tilated quarters. *
Below will be found statement for the year.
1895.
Mar. 13-To balance in hand to date 5 16 6
1896.
Mar. 13-" amount of sales
received this year 47 5 10
EXPENSES.
Mar. 13-By amount paid for
Groceries, Meat,
&c., 19 8 0
-" Coal & Cartage 3 16 0
-" Cost of Stove
Utensils, Repairs
to Stove at 2 4 9
-" Caretaker 15 15 0


41 3 9

" -" Coffee Stall Improvement
including Painting
Balance to credit this day


6 2 1
11 18 7
11 7 1
11 6


CHARLES GRAY BUTTERFIELD,
Hony. Treasr.
March 13, 1896.

4K Through the courtesy of Messrs Richard
Kempe & Son, we have received a basket of
Bermuda Strawberries which will compare
most favourably in appearance and quality of
berries of other climes. It will be seen by
advertisement that Messrs R Kempe & Son
have strawberries on sa'e at their stores, Front
Street, Hamilton.
a" Commander Cheyne has requested us to
express regret that the entertainment as adver-
tIsed in another part of this issue appears at
a time when so much sadness prevails the com-
munity assuring us that had not the matter
been all under the press before the 20th, and
other financial arrangements made, it would
have been withdrawn until a more suitable
season.

DIED, at the Rectory, Paget, on Friday last,
March 20th. John Francis Burnaby Lumley
Lough, Archdeacon of Bermuda, and for 80
years Rector of Paget and Warwick, in the
64th year of his age.
......, in Sandy's Parish, on the 2nd instant,
Anna Augusta, the beloved wife of Eldon
Brownrigg, in the 24th year of her age, leaving
one child and many sorrowing friends to la-
ment their loss. Rest in peace.
......, at St Davi.l'.: Island, March 11th,
1896, of Pneumonia, Joseph Frith, only son of
Joseph 0 and Mary Matson Hayward, aged
2 years 5 months.
L .e., on the 21st instant, at Ireland Island,
Leila Margaret, the beloved wife of Harry
Hookings, aged 39 years.
....... at Hill House, Pembroke, after a
short illness, Jane Albouy, aged 6m, leaving
four sisters, one grandson and many relatives
to mourn their loss Her end was peace.


Bermuda

Gymnasium,


AND ASSEMBLY


ROOMS.


THURSDAY MARCH 26TH.

A MATINEE ENTITLED:

A PIC NIC ABROAD,
-BY-

COMMANDER CHEYNE, R. N.

150 Magnificent


Lime Light


Views,


(WITH TRANSFORMATION SCENES)

A VISIT

TO ENGLAND AND

OTHER COUNTRIES.


RESERNED SEATS 2/-


Children 1/-


UNRESERVED SEATS 1/- Children 6d.
Doors open 3 p.m. Commence 3.30 p.m.


PLAN


and


Tick o at Royat ol Ga ett"
March 21, 1896.

NTOTIOIE.

Hon & Land Am & Scrinr,
Ar THE OFFICE OF
WM. JAMES HENEY, Actuary,
-AT HIS RESIDENCE-
"BEAUCEANT" PEMROKE,
For the Collection of Debts, notes of hand.
Bills of Exchange, and other securities, under
authority of Powers of Attorney and other
powers,
BANKERS :-THE BANK OF BERMVDA, (LTD.)


By Public Auction
In front of the Stores of the Un-
dersigned,
On Thursday Next,
the 26th instant, at 1 o'clock.
25 SMALL TUBS NEW YORK BUTTER,
10 Barrels Yellow Turnips,
50 Boxes Choice Smoked Herrings,
10 Boxes Soda and Pilot Biscuits,
30 Tins Pure Lard, 5 lbs each,
300 lbs Fresh Shredded Oats.
20 Tins English Mixed Tea Biscuits,
10 Boxes Good American Cheese,
10 Pieces English Bacon,
12 Boxes and Half Boxes Layer Raisins,
20 Boxes English Blue Mottled Soap,
10 Drums Halifax Codfish,
20 Tins Choice Table Butter,
10 Boxes Lemon. Sugar and Tea Biscuits,
2 Hhds English Stout,
800 lbs Jamaica Green Ginger.
1 Brl Hickory Nuts, in lots,
10 Boxes Valencia Raisins,
30 Pound Packages Cut Tobacco,
6 Caddies Gold Leaf Tobacco,
12 New Strong Wheelbarrows,
Large Fire-Proof Safe with Combination Lock
in good order,
300 lbs Washing Soda,
100 lbs Clean Currants,
50 lbs Table Salt,
1 Box Macaroni,
1 bbl White Yams. in lots,
5 Men's Overcoats,
Fine Merino Hose,
Ladies' Jackets and Mantles,
Men's Felt Hats,


B. W. WALKER


& CO.,
Auctioneers.


Hamilton, March 24, 1896.
For Benefit of all Concerned.


By Public Auction
TO BE SOLD,
In front of the Stores of the Un-
dersigned,

On Thursday Next,
the 26th instant, at 2 o'clock.
viz:-
6 CASES Pickled Red Cabbage,
5 Casks Jam, 8, 9, 11,12, 13
MARKED 1 Cask Marmalade 10,
DIAMOND I Cask Seidlitz Powders, 15,
I 2 Boxes Candles,
1 Box Carbolic Soap,
2 Boxes Carbolic Powder, 3, 6.
DIAMOND 1 BOX Sauce, 25,
W. T. J. 6 Chests Tea, 1, 2, 5,7,9, 10,
8 Chests rea, 11, 12, 14, 15. 16, 17,
1.22, 23.
The same having been damaged on board S.
S. "Oakdale," Whiteman, Master, while on a
voyage from London to this port and on sur-
vey recommended to be sold for benefit of all
concerned.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, 4th March 2, 1896.

AUCTION SALE
-OF-



TO BE SOLD AT
areenfield, Somerset,


(The Residence of Mrs. J. Mce
---ON-
ON SATURDAY


D. Wells,)

NEXT)


the 28th instant,
At 1 o'clock, p.m.,

Her Household Furniture
Consisting of
1 SOFA, 6 Cane Seat Walnut Chairs,
1 Cane Seat Arm Chair,
3 occasional Chairs, 2 Gypsey Tables,
I Marble-top Table, 3 Small Tables,
Walnut Whatnot, Foot Stool,
Milk Stool, Brackets, Pictures,
Carpet. Mats, Table Covers,
Cushions, Draperies, Ornaments, etc.,
Extension Dining Table, 4 Uph'tered Chairs,
Dinner Wagon, Side Table, Easy Chair,
Dinner Set, (large) complete, never used,
Desert Set, Tea S6ts, Decanters,
Wine Glasses, Finger Glasses,
Plated Tea Pot, Trays, Clocks,
Cutlery, Cruet Stands, Biscuit Box, etc.,
Hat Racks, Ice Chest, Meat Safe,
Iron Bedstead, American Bedsteads,
Wardrobe, Hair Mattrass, Feather Bolsters,
Mattrasses, Feather Pillows, Chests,
Drawers, Mahogany Commodes,
Mosquito Nets, Dressing Tables,
Looking Glasses, Double Washstand & ware,
Towel Rack, Screens. Chairs,
Crockery, Mats, Rocking Chairs,
Carpet. Clothes, Baskets,
Stretchers and Mattrass, Cedar Chest,
Hammock, Benches, Corner Cupboard,
Lamps, etc., Stove, Kitchen Utensils,
etc., e*t, etc., etc.


Hamilton,


B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
March 18th, 1896.


.896.

THE BERMUDA POCKET
AT T1VA..N.A.OEK,


GUIDE AND


THL E-


-ALSO-
SHEET.


May be obtained of
Mr. George D. Boyle, St. Georges,
Mr. R. Galloway, Inspector of
Police, R. N. Yard,
Mr. J. B. Zuill's Store, Somerset,
and the "Royal Gazette" Store.


etc, etc.


etc,


DIRECTORY,







BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE,


RATES TO
JOHN, N.B.


EXCURSION SALOON TICKETS WILL
BE ISSUED AT
$40 EA.C 0,
For the following sailings:-
S. S. ALPHA"
FOR HALIFAX, N.S., ON OR ABOUT
MAY 2ND, JUNE 2ND, JULY 2ND,
AUGUST 2ND, SEPTEMBER 2ND, OCTO-
BER 2ND.
STEAMSHIPS
"Duart Castle"
-AND-
STaymouth Castle,"
FoR ST. JOHN, N.B., oN OR ABOUT
MAY 2ND, MAY 30TH, JUNE 27TH,
JULY 25TH, AUGUST 22ND, SEP-
TEMBER 19TH.
Good for Return from Halifax, N.S.,
Until October 15th, 1896,
-BY-
S.S. "Alpha," on the 15th of May, June,
July, August, September and October,
-OR BY-
S.S. Taymouth Castle," on or about May
21st, July 16th, and September 10th,
8.S. "Duart Castle," on or about June 18th,
August 13th, and October 8th.
For further particulars apply to
W. T. JAMES,
Agent.
41 & 42 Front St., Hamilton, Bda.--3

MARSHAL'S SALE.
Under and by Virtue of Sundry Writs of
Execution issued out of the Court of
General Assize against


Wi


lliam Tongues Crawfc
THERE WILL BE SOLD AT


)rd.


PUBLIC AUCTION
-ON-
Weunesday, the first ay of April next,
AT 1 1 O'CLOCK IN THE FORENOON,
At his Residence in Pembroke
Parish, the whole of the
Household

Furniture
of the said William Tongues Crawford,
consisting of:
DRAWING ROOM.
4 Tables. 6 Chairs, 1 Rocking Chair,
3 Folding Chairs, 3 large Pictures,
5 Wall Brackets, 1 lot Ornaments,
1 Book Shelf, 1 lot Books, 1 piece of Carpet.
DINING ROOM.
2 Tables, 1 Sideboard, 1 Sewing Machine,
6 Chairs, 1 Eight-day Clock, 1 Coat Rack,
1 Stick Rack, Crockery and Glass.
BED ROOM.
2 Bedsteads, l Crib, 1 Chest Drawers,
2 looking Glasses, I Wash Stand,
1 Cedar Chest, 3 Coat Racks.
WRITING ROOM.
1 School Desk, 1 Set Book Shelves,
1 Small Clock.
Kitchen Utensils, Meat Safe 2 Cupboards,
Old Lumber and second hand corrugated iron,
and at 12 Noon of the same day,
The whole Stock in Trade of the
Dry Goods and Millinery Store of
the said William Tongues Crawford in
Queen Street,
Consisting of:
Ladies Straw Hats, Feathers, Flowers, Fronts,
Collars, Cuffs, Jackets, Ulsters,
Mackintoshes, Underclothing, Childrens do.
Costumes, Capes, Jackets,
Robes and Long Slips,
Bootes & Short Slips, Bibs and long Flannels,
Pinafores, Collars, lace and embroidered,
Ulsters, Hose, Ladies Corsets,
Corset busks and lacings, Shawls,
Wool, Boas, Handkerchiefs, Belts,
Beaded Capes.
MEN4.
Hard Felt, Tweed and Straw Hats,
Shirts and Collars, Under Shirts and Pants,
Braces, Ties and Scarfs,
j Hose, cashmere and brown cotton,
Dress Goods, white and coloured,
White and Brown Cottons, plain and twilled,
Table Cloths and Napkins, Towels,
Embroidery, Edgings, Trimmings,
Ribbons, Hair Pins, Hooks and Eyes, Pins,
Thread, Braid, Toilet Covers, Quilts,
And a variety of other goods usually found in
a Dry Goods Store.
Store Fittings, Four Show Cases, One Mirror,
One Desk, One Clock, One Safe,
This sale will continue from day to day until
finished.
CLARENCE PENISTON,
Provost Marshal General.
Prnvnat Marshal (Gneral's Offina


UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF
His Excellency the Governor


An OpnD Air Cponcrt

WILL BE GIVEN BY THE

Warrant O acers, .Non.-Co. OIcers & Meon


Of the


G-arrison,


IN AID OF THE
Funds for the Soldiers' & Sailors' Home,
Hamilton,

THURSDAY EVENING
26TH MARCH, INSTANT,


IN VICTORIA PARK
-AND-
By kind permission of Lt. Col. Glancy & Officers
of the Battalion the

Splndidj Band of the Leinster g eiit
(ROYAL CANADIANS,)


Will


Perform.


TICKETS WILL BE FOR SALE AT


THE
THE
THE
THE
THE
On M(


" ROYAL GAZETTE OFFICE,
HAMILTON HOTEL,
PRINCESS HOTEL,
WINDSOR HOTEL,
AMERICAN HOUSE,
monday, 23rd Instant after


er


11 o'clock, a.m.,
And also at the Gates on the night
of the Performance.
Price 2/-
Soldiers" and Sailors inLUniform Free.
Performance begins at 8 o'clock.

03* Should the weather be unfavourable pro-
vision has been made to have the Concert
in the Mechanics' Hall on same evening.
Notice will be given of this change of
place.
Hamilton, March 17, 1896.-2 3p.
Colonist copy 21 and 25.


EASTER TUESDAY,
1896.


A CHILDREN'S


FANCY


FAIR


(in aid of the Bermuda Cathedral,)
Under the Patronage of
His Lordship the Bishop of Newfoundland
and Bermuda and Mrs. Jones,
Will be held in the

BASEMENT OF THE


MASONIO HALL,
T-T A MT1TILTOiT,
(kindly loaned for the occasion.)

On Tnesday, April 7th, Opoin at3 P.m.

A VARIETY OF USEFUL AND FANCY
ARTICLES WILL BE OFFERED FOR SALE:
Indian Baskets,
Candies, Ice Creams,
Fruit and Vegetables,
Tea & Coffee, &c &C.

Through the kindness of Messrs. Mead & Brooks,
The Popular Orchestra of the Hamilton
Hotel will give Choice Selections of Music
during the afternoon.
ENTRANCE:--
Adults 6d. Children 3d.
IN CONNECTION WITH THE ABOVE


NOTICE.

BormolldaHitWl Rlaeos. Sarah' Rittlew8y ChuIm81, Deoeseo1.


Pickford & Blacks _Stoamship Linos.


SUMMER EXCURSIONS
POPULAR ROUTE.


THE

SS. 'TRITON


WILL LEAVE
Hamilton, at 10 a.m.,
AND
Mangrove Bay, Somerset,
at 10.30 a.m.
FOR THE RACES.

ROUND TRIP 2s.
THE

SS. 'INTREPID'
WILL LEAVE
Hamilton, at 10 a.m.,
AND


Ireland Island,
FOR THE


at 10.30
RACES.


a.m,


ROUND TRIP 2s. Od.

TICKETS FOR SALE AT
A. E. BOURNE'S ho Cream Parlours
AND ON BOARD OF BOATS.
A. E. BOURNE,
Propr.
Queen Street, Hamilton, March 23, 1896.
BY SPECIAL REQUEST
COMMANDER CHEYNE, R. N.
Will give his
Popular Lecture
-ON-
SEGYPT AND THE WAR
WITH ARABI PASHA,"
AT THE
TOWJ"T T-TAT.T7,,

ST7. GEORGE'S,

On Monday 30th March.

Sixty eiit MAGNIFICENT VIEWS
of Egyptian Cities and famous War Scenes.
Doors open at 7.30 p.m.
Commence at 8 o'clock,
PLAN OF HALL may be seen and tickets
obtained on and after Monday 23rd at the
Store of Mr. J. I. Smith, St. Georges.
Reserved Seats 2s. Unreserved Is.
JsAAWIAT I~F BJ


ON TUESDAY,


31ST,


AT THE GYMNASIUM TOWN "TATALL ST. GEORGE'S,


A.T 7 P.M.,
The Fairy Play entitled:
"The Land of Dreams,"
Will be reproduced by Children.
"WELL WORrH SEEING."
ENTRANCE:-
Adults Is. Children 6d.

AT 8.30 P.M.,
THE CELEBRATED
Bermuda IChristy Minstrel Troupe
Will make its first appearance for the Season.
Entrance 1/-
Hamilton. March 28, '96-3 3p.


A PICNIC ABROAD.
150 Views in England and various
parts of the World, with transformation
scenes.
Adults 1/- Children 6d.
Doors open 2.30 Commence at 3.00.

ON SALE,
AT THE
" Royal Gazette Stationery Store

Richmond Horse Conlitio Fowders,
Dr. James' Blistering Ointment,
&c., &c., ece.


SHELLY BAY RACE COURSE.
Friday, 27th March,
To Commence at 12 noon.
SUBSCRIBERS TICKET 1.
LADY'S SUB TICKET 10/-
May be obtained at Messrs. Gosling Bros.,
Front Street, Hamilton, to admit to all enclo-
sures and reserved members' enclosure.
GRAND STAND ENCLOSURE Tickets 4/-
Admit also to Hill Enclosure and Paddock
Free.
HILL ENCLOSURE TICKETS 1/-
Carriages at Hill Enclosure 1/-
Booths at Hill Enclosure 10/- each.
Enclosure in Front of T. J. Pearman's:
Admission 6d. Carriages 1/-
For Booths apply to T. J. Pearman.
CORRECT CARDS of the Races for sale on
Thursday afternoon-6d. each.
HONY, SECTY.
March 23, 1896.

FOR THE RACES


r~~~n~ ItI K~B)


SAMUEL A.
Hamilton, March 24, 1896.


Suitable


MASTERS.


Vessel Wanted


-TO-

CHARTER,
S ,,TO CARRY FORWARD THE
CARGO Ex BARQUE
SCH WE/GAA RD
Of about 415 M. sup., sawn P. P. Lumber
to load at St. George's, Bermuda, for Brake,'
Germany, on General conditions of original
bill of Lading.
Apply to the master on board, on or before
26th March.
W. E MEYER & CO.,
Agents.
St. George's, March 21, 1896.-1
BERMUDA

Fresh Strawberries!
CAN BE HAD AT
R. KEMPE & SON,
27 & 28 Front St.
Hamilton,
23 March 1896-4 3p

UNCLAIMED LETTERS IN iTHE POST
OFFICE, HAMILTON, MARcH 20, 1896.
Mrs H B Atha, A R Atkins, A E H Baker,
Robert T Burt, J Bance, G N Barrett, Miss E
Brosnan, Anna L Balen, Mrs D L Bartlett, Flora
Brangman, R P Brown, Miss E M Baxter, Ralph
Braudreth, Jos Berret, John Boydell, Mrs L S
Bates, Mrs Bird, Miss A Marie Balen, Chas W
Bissell, W A Barnes, JohnECrows, Mrs Florence
Crain, William Campbell, P L Clark, H W Crook-
er, B M Caldwell, Mrs Samuel Colt, Mary Caisey
Herbert Copeland, Alfred W DuBois, James Dear,
George Lord Day, Jos F Darrell, T J Dinnell,
George Douglas, James S Evans, A R Fleming,
H Fleming, Mrs B Gorman, David S Garland,
Lewis Grant, John W Godet, S Gardner, A S
Horn, Guy S Humphrey, Lena Hutchinson, Geo-
H Harrower, J Johnson, Mrs C A Jordan, James
R Laughlin, Win A Lockwoed, M A, Emmelius
Locklin, Russell W MoKee, John Mackay, Alice
McOonnell, Mr S MoOurdy, Mrs;Geo H Mauin,
Anna Mcllvain, Mrs CharlesI IMcllvain, Samuel
Musson, K M Manning, Jas Aegood, Mrs E G
Flowers, John A Peters, jr, Mrs Peck, Pearce,
formerlyy of H M S 'Rambler'), Mrs Fred Pyle,
Mrs H C Robinson, Hon Robt B Roosevelt, Jesse
M Smith, Mrs Geo F Spinney, Mrs Sarah Smith,
D L Simmons, Rev E L Spaulding, Chas W Snow,
Dr I E Smith, Ada G Smock, Frances Smith, J M
Smith, Mrs Oliver 0 Townsend, Joseph Tucker,
John Tilford, Esther Thompson, Mrs I Wise, Mrs
WT R White. Dr A F Wilson. R S White,. Col. A


REDUCED PASSENGER
HALIFAX, N.s., & ST.i


,VOTICE is hereby given that all persons
L- having any claims or demands upon or
against the

Estate of Sarah Ritfgeay ChaiJwa n,
late of Warwick Parish, deceased, are hereby
required to send in particulars of their claims
and demands to the undersigned.
Andi Notice is h ereby also ivn
that all persons indebted or under any obliga-
tion to the above estate are required to make
payment or communicate to the undersigned.
H. VILLIERS SMITH,
Attorney for the Executors.
Hamilton, March 21, 1896.-3
.189
Remington Bicycle.

Strictly High Grade,
Large Tubing 11 inch.
With all the latest improvements, and up-
to-date in every respect.
PRICES :-
Racer No. 22, weight 18 to 20 lbs., $110,00.
Gents' Model No. 20, Light Roadster, weight
23 to 25 lbs., $100.00.
Ladies' Model No. 21, Light Roadster, weight
23 to 25 lbs., $100.00.
Boys' Model No 26, Light Roadster, weight
21 to 23 lbs., $60.00.
Girls' Model No. 27, Light Roadster, weight
21 to 23 lbs., $60.00.
A FEW 1895 WHEELS CAN BE SUPPLIED BELOW
LIST PRICE.
Purchasers of wheels have several options, viz :
in models, tyres, rims, gear, handle bars,
handles, brake, pedals, saddle, etc.
SUNDRIES :--
Tyres, saddles, tool bags, luggage carriers,
childs'Iseats, bells, handles, 20th century lamps,
search-light and best English lamps, also
Tally-Ho, (to burn either kerosene or vapor
from benzine), pumps, wrenches, spokes, spoke
grips, pedals, coasters, toe clips, axle and fork
lamp brackets, rubber cement, wood rim
cement, tyre cement, chain lubricant, friction
tape, patching rubber, lubricating and burn-
ing oil, graphite, trouser guards, repair kits,
cyclometprs, bicycle stands, locks, oilers, etc.
The REMINGTON Bicycles are made by the
Remingtan Arms Co., and the name is accepted
everywhere as a guarantees of superior design and
workmanship.

The Bliclnsdfl orfi Typewriter No. 5.

84 Letters and Characters. Weight 6 pounds.
Price $35.00. Full Key-board.
Equals any of the high-priced Machines in
capacity and quality of work and EXCELS
them all in CONVENIENCE.
Speed- One hundred words per minute have
been written on these Machines.
Each machine packed in a neat polished oak
hand carrying case. (Just what a business
man requires.) CALL AND INSPECT.


Notice.


TENDERS :-
For nme rental of the Old Ferry
House and Lands in Ham- -
ilton Parish,
WILL BE RECEIVED AT THIS OFFIQ
Up to 12 o'clock, 1noon, of Welafi ,
1st proximo.
Forms of tender embodying the conditions
of the letting may be obtained at this Office.
The Board of Public Works is not bound to
accept the highest or any other tender.
W. CARD HALLETT,
Colonial Surveyor.
Colonial Surveyor's Office, .


4 .


Colonial Secretary's Office, '
Hamilton, 28th March, 1896.

Supplies to the Lunatic Asylul.
THE TENDERS of the undermentioned per-
sons have been accepted by the Governor
in Council for supplies for 12 months from the
1st proximo:
CONTRACT No. 1.
GROCERIES-Messrs. Thompson & Roberts.
CONTRACT No 2.
UTENSILS, &c.-Mr. William Bluck.
CONTRACT No. 3.
CLOTHING, &c.-Messrs. Trimingham Bros.
CONTRACT No. 4.
DRUGS, &c.-Mr. F. W. Grantham.
By Command,
ARCHIBALD ALISON,
Colonial Secretary.

Notice

To Holders of Treasury Debentures
issued for the purposes of the
New Government House.
RECEIVER GENERAL'S OFFICE,
March 16, 1896.
O 'ICE is hereby given to the holder or hold-
ers of Treasury Debentures numbered from
ninety one to one hundred inclusively, issued for the
purposes of the New Government House, dated
April first, one thousand eight hundred and eighty
seven, that the Receiver General will pay off the
said debentures on TUESDA.Y THE THIRTY FrIsT
DAY OP MARCH instant, if payment be then claimed,
and that interest thereon will cease from that date.
J. TUCKER,
2 3p Receiver Generall

Short Hand Reports of
THE DEBATES,.
Of the House of Assembly for
Session of 1896.
THE Committee of the House of Assembly
appointed to obtain a prompt and regular
publication of the debates of the House dur-
ing the regular Session of 1896, and until the
end of the Session if it shall continue into the
following year, invite persons who are pre-
pared to contract for the service
to send in Sealed Tenders
marked on the outside cover "Tender for
Reporting Debates,"


Oil or lore thi e 31t llarch eit.
The tenders must state within what time
after the debates they will be printed and
published for general use in a local newspa-
per, or if in any other mode of publication in
what mniode or form and at what price they
will be issued to the public, and must be ac-
companied by a specimen of the type or print
to be used. The Contractor will be required
to furnish to the Clerk of the House within
thirty days after the Close of the Sessionor
service three printed copies of the debates
bound in cloth and leather, and suitably let-
tered, and during the Session a sufficient num-
ber of copies in sheets, folded and paged as
they are printed off in the form and size used
in 1895 for the use of the members on paper of
approved quality, a sample of which must ac-
company the tender,
A forfeiture for non-compliance with the
Contract with respect to the time of publica-
tion of the debates will be provided for there-
in.
The amount at the disposal of the Commit-
tee being limited any claim beyond the amount
granted will, if the cost shall exceed that
amount, have to be referred to the.Legislature
Tenders must be addressed to the Hon. S.
Brownlow Gray, Hamilton.
S. BROWNLOW GRAY,
M. S. HUNT, Committee.
N. VESEY. 1
Hamilton, 7 February, 1896.-3p. 11th 25th
Feb. & 10th & 24th March,
V. 1

HEAD QUARTER OFFICE,
20 March, 1896.
BERMUDA.
IN accordance with the London Gazette of
Tuesday, 25th February, 1896, it is noti-
fied for general information that the commis-
sions of the undermentioned Officers of the
Bermuda Militia Artillery, have been ante-
dated to Deer. 30th, 1895.
Captain C. H. Tucker,
... Lieut. A. Smith,
2nd Lieut. B. Gosling.
F. C. MORGAN,
Col. R.A.
Commanding Royal Artillery, Bermuda.







BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


4 ... ..


BIAARDS A D BACTERIA.

The. teriology of the beard -has not yet, so
far as we are aware, been exhaustively studied;
this might be a new.world for one of our young
Alexanders of pathology to conquer. That it is
possible that disease can be carried in the man-
na' suggested will hardly be denied, but we can-
not say that we think the danger so Q great that
doctors need sacrifice their beards on the altar of
Hygiene. I
* Most will think even the careful sterilization of
the beard on leaving a sick room a counsel of per-
fection. If the scrupulous hygienist thinks such
a precaution necessary, he should be consistent,
and insist on doctors shaving their heads, and
even their eyebrows, How would our professional
sigtlej lke this ? To live in the odour of antiseptic
sancticity we should, after due purification, clothe
ourselves in cotton wool, wrap our heads in steril-
ised gauze, and go about like veiled prophets of
Khorassan.--British Medical Journal.

FADS ABOUT FOOD.

It has never been scientifically demonstrated
that fish and other phosphoric foods can apprecia-
bly improve the brain and mind. Fishermen, for
example, and fishmongers, ,who may be supposed
to live largely upon fish, have never shown them-
0elves to be in any measurable degree more intel-
lectual than their neighbours. Indeed, it may be
plausibly argued that they are a little less so.
The truth:is, that that particular food which
best agrees with the particular individual, and
which best maintains his general health at a high
levl, is-he best for the brain and every other
organ of the body, as well as for the whole man.
Common experience has long ago formulated the
saying that what is one man's meat is another
man's poison."
Science now comes forward to tell us exactly
the same thing, and to impress upon everyone of
Us the necessity of finding out the diet best suited
to ourselves, and sticking to it.-IHospital.


The Admiralty have done a good deal lately in
the way of commissioning new ships, but still fail
to see the wisdom of the policy which keeps mod-
ern ships rusting in the Reserve. Such obsolete
old traps as the Tourmaline, Pelican, Acorn, Satel-
his, Wild Swan, Swift, 'Linnet, Pylades, Rapid,
.yalist, and several slow gunboats of no fighting
power, to say nothing of the Cordelia and Canada,
are not fit to represent the power of the British
Empire abroad in the eyes of foreigners, who in
sobte parts never see anything better belonging to
us. These weak vessels would simply fall into the
hand of any modern cruisers that came across them
in the event of war, and which we may be sure
would come across them if only for the sake of
inflicting a blow to our prestige.
Only the other day, as a correspondent pointed
out, our West Indian Squadron was pretty much
at the mercy of the United States Fleet, under
Admiral Buncoe, and more recently while we were
represented at Monte Video by the Retribution and
Beagle, the Newark, Castino, and Yantio were flying
the stars and stripes in the same port. What a
howl of exultation there would arise if in the first
days of a struggle half-a-dozen British vessels had
to haul down their flags. Surely it is unfair to
our officers and men to place them in such an in-
vidious position. -Army and Navy Gazette Feb. 15th.


THE UP-TO-DATE WOMAN.
The town of Decatur, Michigan, may well be
said to be run under petticoat government, and the
men folks are not in it. They have taken a back
seat and are watching the proceedings with much
interest.
The population of the town is 1500. The presi-
dent of the village council is Mrs. Alma Sage, and
all the town offices, except that of the official dog
catcher, are filled by women.
Mrs. Dr. Kinney is one of the leading physi-
cians. Mrs. Ada Gregg is a preacher, and her
church--the Advent-is taken care of by a jani.
treas-Mrs Barrett. The restaurant of the town
is conducted by Mrs. Crane and Miss Haines.
The biggest store in the place is owned and kept
by Mrs. Mary Schood. Mrs. Nicholson is the
postmistress. Miss Clara Hatoling is a shoemaker
and a good one. May Percival is a furniture maker.
Miss Anna Pardnett makes harnesses. Mrs. Car-
penter is a carriage painter.
There are several women painters, weavers and
brokers. The women have a secret society run on
the endowment plan. There is also a women's
-literary olub. The women control the saloons,
and the only things to drink are soda and pop.
In a village near by there is a woman undertaker
who can attend to all the details of a funeral, even
to driving a hearse.
W whether or not the women support the men and
allow them to stay at home and take care of the
domestic affairs, we have not as yet learned ; but
judging from the official positions filled by them
and the business interests which they represent,
we should infer that there was not much of a
chance fbr the lords of creation "-,that the var-
ious billets are filled.
H1ow this will terminate is the question. Whet.
her or not the men folk$ willl be got lid of entirely,


orJn due course of time be allowed some few pri-
.vileges, 14 what the public are anxiously enquir.
uig. But certain it is, the women have the reins
and are 4riiang along very comfortably and man.
aging afitrs quite successfully.-American Paper.


A WONDERFUL SEA-TALE.

A lad was found begging in Plymouth, Eng.
land, some years ago, who told a most wonderful
tale of woe. 'According to his statement, given
withIt straight face and an apparently clear con.
science., ho had been a cabin-boy upon an Ameri.
*,gqn;^shyilp For some misbehaviour, as a tern.
porary punishment he was headed up in an empty
water-cask, and left to reflect upon his wickedness,
with only the bunghole of the cask to breathe
through.
On the following night a terrible storm came up and
the vessel ianti down with all on board, excepting
himself, the cask having rolled over into the sea
*t the first lreh tof the sinking ship. Fortunately
for its unhappy occupant, the cask floated with
the boughole free from the water, and in the course
of a day or so wa cast upon the coast, where the
lad, after making numerous vain attempts to re-
l bbislft, settled back to die.
Some cows, however, he said, came strolling
#l4g the beach, and one of them, while switching
MINae about, accidentally let the end of it into the
bunghole of the cask. The boy immediately seiz-
ed upon it; the cow electrified, jumped, stood still,
_tidI jumped again, and then rushed bellowing
dpwu the beach, the boy hanging on like grim
debh,gad the cask, consequently, bunging the
hind legs of the frightened bovine as she fl'd.
FinaUli4 as the boy had hoped, the hoops of the
catkiw~ae loosened, and striking upon a rock, the
4;lolVCting -was shattered, and the boy, letting
go'of the cow's tail, found himself free once more
After wandyriug about for several days he hailed
a vessel, and was carried' to Plymouth, where his
wonderful experience first became common talk, -
1at-per's liound Tablf.


STHE WONDERS OF TRANSPOSITION.

The word time" admits of a very peculiar ar-
rangement of its letters. The four letters of the
word transposed and read backward and forwards
and up and down give us four perfect English and
Latin words. It is said to be the only word in our
language that will admit of so many transposi-
tions and arrangements, Note the oddity in the
square below:
TIME
ITEM
M E T I
E M I T
The above words, in English, as well as in
Latin, are all complex, and the curious part of it
is that reading them backward ani forwards and
up and down give thl same result, that transpos-
ing the letters in the original words does. There
significance as Latin words is as follows: Time,
fear, thou; item, likewise ; meti, to be measured ;
emit, he buys.-Philadelphia Record.

I have before me a letter from a Persian friend,
a gentleman of some literary note in his own
country, who informs me that he is learning Eng-
lish by the aid of a small text-book and a diction-
ary, without any other instructor, and he adds :
" In small time I can learn so many English as I
think I will come to the America and go on the
scaffold to lecture."-Methodist Herald.

A liquor case was on trial, and one of the officers
who had made the raid testified that a number of
bottles were found on the premises. What was
in the bottles ? asked the judge of the witness.
Liquor, your honour." What kind of liquor?"
"I don't know, sir." "Didn't you taste it or
smell of it ? Both, your honour." What!
IDo yo mean to say that you are not a judge of
iquor ? No, sir : I'm not a judge ; I'm only
a policeman." The witness was excused from ans-
wering any further questions.-Green Bag.

THE BURNING TREE OF BURMAH.

There has lately been added to the collection of
plants at the Botanic Gardens, Madras, a tree
bearing on the under side of its leaves, stingrs
which leave no outward sign when they pierce the
skin, though the sensation of pain persists some-
times for months, and is especially keen on damp
days or when the place which has been wounded is
plunged in water. The natives in the parts of
Burmah where this tree grows are said to be in
such terror of it that they fly in haste when they
perceive the peculiar odour which it exhales, and
if they happen to touch the tree they fall on the
ground and roll over and over on the earth, shriek-
ing meanwhile; and dogs and horses touched by
it run wildly about, biting and tearing the parts of
their bodies that have been touched.

The enormous strain on the propellor-shafts of
our great steamships has recently been illustrated
by measurements taken on a twin-screw steamer
belonging to a well-known cargo line. It was
found that in a heavy, confused sea, with the ship
heavily loaded, a maximum deflection of 1- in. in
112 ft. repeatedly occurred. The greatest deflec-
tion took place when the stem was elevated, and
the crest of the wave nearly amidships. The
measurements taken on the shaft itself were con-
firmed by measurements of the deflection of the
decks. The vessel's frames were strengthened,
whenthe breakage of her shafts, which had been
frequent, wholly ceased.

A trial will shortly be made of a new vessel de-
signed to outstrip everything on the ocean. It has
been built at Alexandria. Virginia, and is named
the Howard Cassard. The designer's object has
been to reduce breadth without decreasing
length. The dimensions are 122 ft long by 16 ft
beam. A heavy keel is provided ; the stowage of
machinery is all below waterline, which is expect.
ed to keep the vessel steady. It is anticipated by
the owner that the voyage across the Atlantic will
be reduced by two-fifths of its present record. It
would seem that the power of machinery has near-
ly reached its limit, and there can be but little
doubt that the model of Transatlantic vessels will
now become the object of serious thought, and
that the next recorded progress will be largely due
to the work of the designer. ^,

THE PEDLAR NUISANCE.

The Beverly Times has the following, which
fits a good many other communities besides, Bev-
erly, and is a subject which concerns every well
wisher of his city or town:
i"The itinerant dealer isa of no earthly use to a
city. He never gives anything to churches or
public enterprises. lie has no interests in com-
mon with the community. He can swindle and
quite frequently he does so with impunity. Con-.
trast him with the home merchant who has a re-
putation for honesty and fair dealing to maintain.
Ho also bears his share of the public burdens and
he deserves your patronage. If the authorities
won't keep the pedlars our, be loyal to your town
by not patronizing them."

SWEDISH DOCTORS SEND NO BILLS.


Sweden has doctors, bur no doctors' bills. If
you have occasion to call a physician, you will
find him not only skilful, but a highly educated
and most honourable gentleman. You will also
have another proof of the honesty of the Swedes
and thefr friendly confidence in each other.
Swedish doctors send no bills to their patients.
When you shall pay your physicians is left en-
tirely to your own choice. The rich pay him lib.
erally whether they have need for his services or
not, if he has been once retained by them. The
poor pay him a small sum, and the very poor pay
him nothing. Yet he visits the poor as faithfully
as he does the rich.
On the last day of the year you put into an en,
velope, addressed to your physician, a sum of
money which you think not only sufficient to com.-
pensate him, but in accordance with your position
In life, and enclosing your card with the money,
send the envelope by a servant to the doctor. the
servant returns with the card of the doctor in a
sealed envelope directed to you. This shows that
, he has received your money, and no word about the
matter ever passes between you.
Should you send him nothing, he will come and
prescribe for you all the next year, and as long as
you live, and he is too dignified to ever say a word
about it.

A London contemporary, which takes note
of literary and historical items of passing in.
terest, speaks thus of the recent conflagration
at Kiublethmont Hear, near Arbroat i :-A no-
table house has just been destroyed by thai
arch destroyer fire. Kinblethmont, near Ar-
broath, the seat of Mr. Lindsay Carnegie, was
the "Kinblytbmont" mentioned in Sir Walter
Scoltt's" Antiquary." Tile grounds occupy the
site where was fought,, in. 7*8, the battle of"
Drumderg, on which uccx.iia the Pictish king
was slain.


1BSLAIR, CAMPBELLL & McLEAN,

SCOTT, A -NTID STIEEWT COOPEI .?


GLASGOW,


WOcRxES


SCOTLAND.


spAKERS of Distilling and
1'- Sugar Boiling Plant of
every description ; Blair's
Patent Continfous Working'
Steam Stills to produce rum
and spirits of best quality
and strength in one operation
guaranteed to extract all the
spirit from the wash. TThese Stills are the most economical and best
made: Coffey's" Patent Stills, Pot Stills for direct firing or steam jacket-
ted, Vacuum Pans in iron or copper, Open Sugar Pans or Teaches, Defecators,
Clarifiers, Wetzel Pans, Boilers, Centrifugals, &c., &c.
SPECIALTY :-Copper and Brass Work of every descriptioL.
ESTABLISHED OVER HALF A CENTURY.


TEULEI 1 PHIC ADDRESS-" Blazon," Glasgow,
Enquiries invited.
31/7/95.-6m.


NEWSPAPER FILES UNDER GUARD.

A complete file of each of the newspapers that
have been published in Chicago since the fire-in
fact. more complete than is to be found in many
,iIf the newspaper offices-is one of the features of
the Chicago Public Library.
When the editors of the various newspapers are
appealed to in regard to articles that have appear-
ed in their papers, they with one accord, refer the
applicant to the Public Library. In addition to
persons so referred, hE r.-are a large number of
people, who, knowing of these files, are constantly
wanting the whole or a portion of the articles they
have read, but failed to preserve.
Many of these requests are for articles of very
recent date, and the area from which they come is
only limited by the circulation of the Chicago
papers, together with such papers as make ex-
cerps from them.
There is probably nothing in the library that is
the source of more request than these files of Chic-
go newspapers, and there is certainly nothing more
closely guarded. This latter fact accounts for the
file in the public library being more perfect than are
many of those in the offices where the paper is
published.
It is not quite easy to understand why a person
who would not think of tearing a leaf from a book
will ruthlessly mutilate a newspaper file that is far
more valuable. But the fact, remains, and for
this reason the newspaper files at the Public Lib-
rary are constantly guarded. No one is permitted
to examine them save under the surveillance of the
guard.-Chicago Tribune.


THE USE OF HORSEFLESHI IN PARIS.

The statistical bulletin of the French Ministry
of Agriculture, dealing with the consumption of
horseflesh in Paris last year, givesjthe number of
horses killed for consumption as food at 23,186,
this being exclusive of forty-three mules and 3q3
donkeys. The total weight of meat sold was 5,130
tons, and this was sold at 186 shops or stalls,
which are not allowed to sell any other kind of
meat. The maximum price ranged from fS cents
a pound for the fillet to 4 cents a pound for the
necks and lower ribs. The report adds that not
more than a third of the meat is sold at the stalls,
the remainder going to make sausages.

NOT A PRECEDENT.

A well-known naval dignitary had a beautiful
daughter. A young ensign, with no resources but
his salary, fell in love with her, and asked the old
gentleman for her hand. The father at once taxed
him with the fact that he had only his salary-
hardly enough to koep him in white gloves and to
burnish his brass buttons.
Well, Admiral, what you say is true. Butwhen
you married you were only a midshipman, with
even a smaller salary than mine. How did you
Let along?" asked the ensign, who believed he
had made the most diplomatic of defenses. But
not so. The crafty old sei-dog thundered forth:
I lived on my father-in-law for the first ten
years, but I'll be d--d if you are going to do it !"
-Argonaut.

MARK TWAIN ON PROHIBITION.

Mark Twain has just concluded a lecturing
tour in New Zealand. He said good-bye to the
New Zealanders at Christchurch, and in the
course of his speech made reference to prohibi-
tion, which he said he approved, but which
would put them inio most difficult straits. He
then told the following story:
In our country several years ago there was a
man came into a prohi!>item town, and unlike
you savages here, thlv said to him: "You
can't get a drink anywhere except at the apoth-
ecarv's." So he went to the apothecary, who
said; "You can't get a drink here without a
prescription from the physician," but the man
said. "I am perishing. I haven't time to get
a prescription." The apothecary replied "Well,
I haven't power to give you a drink except for
snake bite." The man said, "Where's the
snake?" So the apothecary gave him the
snaka's address, and he went off. Soon after,
however, he came back and said, For good-
ness' sake give me a drink. That snake is en-
gaged for six months ahead."--Westminster
Gazette.

A NOVEL CURE FOR COLDS.

A good many new cures for colds have lately
been published. Perhaps the most novel and
the most hopeful is Dr Schnee's. Schnee em-
ploys what may be considered a massage var-
iant. He percusses the terminal branches of
the nerves supplying the mucous membrane of
the nose with a small hammer made of india.-
rubber. Slight shocks upon terminal nerves
have the effect, as has been experimentally
demonstrated, of contracting the blood vessels.
That is they excite the activity of the vaso-
motor nerves. Stronger shocks produce dilata.
tion of the same blood vessels, no doubt, by
over stimulating and so exhausting the vaso-
motors. Here, then, we have a method of


exercising a great deal of control over those
nasal blood vessels, whose altered condition
constitutes the initial stage of coryza. In the
inception period of a cold, what is want-
ed is to set up contraction of nasal and naso-
pharyngo-laryngeal blood vessels. For this
purpose slight "rtappins" with the india-
rubuer hammer are to be resorted to. The
Jocality to which the percussion should be ap-
plied is the forehead, just above the root of the
nose; and the taps should follow a line ex-
tending horizontally outwards over the eye-
brows. The method is interesting, and based
on physiological reasoning. -Hospital.


A.B. (7. Code used


A CIGAR FACTORY IN HAVANA.

One does not get a very pleasant impression
from a visit to a cigar factory. In the large
factories the plumbing and sanitary arrange-
ments are unusually bad, and the buildings are
filled with bad odours, which, mingling with
that of the tobacco, have anything but a pleas-
ing effect. Two or three hundred men will be
at work in a poorly ventilated room that does
not afford proper breathing space for more
than 100. Neatness and cleanliness are not
conspicuous characteristics either of the men at
work rolling cigars. or of the hundreds of girls
and children engaged in stripping tobacco. If
one wants to enjoy thoroughly a fine Havana
cigar, if he has ever visited one of the factories
he will have to obliterate the memory of the
visit from his mind. The very finest cigars
made in Havana come to England. Some of
them cost 4s. each in Cuba at wholesale. The
men who make these cigars get one shilling
each for the making of them. They are made
with the greatest care, every bit of leaf in
them being selected and especially treated,
and the rolling and wrapping being done by
the most skilful of cigar-makers. He is sup-
plied with a certain amount of tobacco when
he begins work in the morning, and when he
turns in the product of his labour at night,
must account for all the tobacco. The cigars
are carefully inspected, and if any defect, the
slightest crack, or any variation in colour is
discovered in a cigar, it is rejected. The cigar-
maker is paid only for the perfect cigars. In
some factories, where cigars not of the vey
finest quality are made, the rejected cigars are
boxed and sold as seconds."

At a meeting of the Royal Botanio Society lately
the secretary called attention to a fruit of the
vanilla plant which had been grown in the gar-
dens. The plant very rarely bears fruit in this
country owing to the fact that a certain insect is
necessary to fertiliz) the flower, but another
method has been u i p'l)*" with success. It was
incidentally mentioned that a vanilla fruit kept in
a cigar case will impart its fragrance to the con-
tents and cause a delicious aromwi when the cigar
is smoked.
WHAT TO AVOID IN COLD WATER
SPONGING.
A man who rises from bed at a temperature of
95 deg, and plun;ige, without any interval of cool-
ing, into a bith but little over the freezing piut
must be very iiuwi-e, indeed. Very few men try
this experiment; they go through passages into a
cold bath-room, or stand about in a bedroom, he-
fore taking the plunge. Even those Spartans who
bathe daily in water, even when ice-covered, are
exposed while undressing to a temperature lower
than that of the water itself, But the cold morn-
ing plunge is not to be t iken by a wise man. Nor
will a wise man stand in a cold room and con-u
scientiously wash the surface of his body with
soap and water, exposing his skin to air 40 deg or
50 deg cooler than itself, for several minutes. -
Health.

Mr. Stirling, the Engineer of the Great North-
ern Railway Co., of England, recently deceased,
was an expert in his work iand did much to ensure
perfection and safety in railroad equipment. The
adoption of an accon )iodating axle in his engines
reduced the liability to accident from engines
leaving the rails, at one time not uncomn non Fiie
improvements which h" introda,'ad have come into
general use, thus conferring very great benefit on
mankind.
Dock-side thieves have been a source of consid-
erable loss and annoyance to shippers and others
in Hull, where they havd been carrying on their
operations with no little success for several months,
conducting the larcenous business in a way su-
gesting much care and cir-umspeation, and a lively
appreciation of the advantages of wholesale deal.
ing. But a capture has at length been made
which will probably lead to the enforced retire-i
ment of the principal members of the firm from
active business pursuits of the kind in question, a
result which will be hailed with satisfaction by
the merchants, shipowners, and captains at the
East Coast port. The subject of quay loungers
and idlers many or whom are professional
or amateur thisves-is one in which shipping peo-
ple generally are -m ,-" or lsss interested. At every
port in the United lKingdom the tetterdemslion
fraternity hang about the quays, ready and willing
at a moment's notice to commit petty or serious
thefts, the moored vessels and the careless way in
which sailors leave property unprotected on shore,
offering these land rsts exceptional scope for the
exercise of their predatory propensitie '.-Fair
Play, Febv. 28, 1890.
The London Athletic Club have abandoned
for the present the idea of sending a challenge
to the New York Athletic Olub.
A circular has been forwarded by the pro-
moters of the Burns Exhibition to be hell in
Glasgow next year to all clubs associated with
the name of the poet. In this circular, it is
stated that the committee of the exhibition do-
sire to have on view portraits of Burns and of
his friends and contemporaries, pictures of the
scenes among which he lived, and of those
which he has celebrated in his poems, personal
relics of the poet and his friends, and, most im-


portant of all, manuscripts and early editions of
his works.

THE LOMBARDIA A PEST SHIP.
BUENOS AYRES, Argentina via GALVESTON,
Texas, March 10.-The Herald's correspondent in
Rio Janeiro, Brazil, telegraphs that the medical
officers of the Brazilian navy have reported that it
is impossible to disinfect the Italian cruiser Lom-
bardia of the yellow fever, and that she must re-
turn to Italy,


CHINESE RAILROAD DEAL.

SHANGHAI, China, Feb 7-A great railroad deal
has to-day been completed here by M R Jefferds,
civil engineer, of New York. He has secured the
contract for building the trunk railway from Han,
kow to Pekin, a distance of more than eight hun-
dred miles, allowing for the necessary detours.
Mr Jefferds, who represents a strong American and
English syndicate, has guaranteed to raise ten out
of the thirty millions of taels required for the
work, which is to be done by a joint stock com-
pany, at the head of which is the Tao-tai Hsu-yin-
Tsiang, who was deputed by their Imperial
Highnesses Princes Kung and Ching, to organize
and carry out the undertaking.
It is understood that beyond giving the conces-
sion to Hsu, the government will have nothing to
do with the railway, which is to be a purely com-
mercial affair. Hsun is a Cantonese of high stand.
ing. His elder brother is Superintendent of the
Imperial Granaries, in Pekin and was lately Vice
President of the Board of Revenue. The news
that Mr Jefferds has won in this gigantic deal has
created excitement among the many railroad con-
tractors who have been working hard to get into
the scheme.
Hsu leaves to-night for Canton, while Mr Jef-
ferds goes in the steamer which carries this to
make the necessaryy arrangements. Hsu only
arrived here, with a large retinue, from Pekin last
week, having travelled overland. Since he came
here he has been busy completing the deal with
Mr Jefferds.

BARON TOLL DOUBTS NANSEN'S SUCCESS.
CHRISTIANIA, March 4.-The Swedish Minister
at St. Petersburg reports that in an interview
which he had with Baron Toll, the Arctic explorer,
who e'itablished lthe Nansen provision depots on
the New Siberian Islands, regarding the recent
despatch from Irkutsk showing that Kuchnareff's
letter regarding Nansen was dated Novemnber 10,
Baron Toll expressed the opinion that the date di-
minishes the probability that the report of Dr.
Nansen's discovery is true, inasmuch as Dr. Nan-
sen or a comrade must have reached the inlandd
at the same time, in which case a direct commu-
nication from the explorer ought to have been re-
ceived long ago. Kuchnareff's communication,
therefore, Baron Toll thought, lacked a positive
foundation.

SMALL NEED TO DROWN.

Few realize how little can sustain the body
in water. One finger on a camp chair or small
box or board will easily keep the head above
water, while the feet and the other hand are
paddling toward shore. One need not know
how to swim to keep from drowning. Faith
in the buoyancy of water is all that you need,
and children and all others should have prac-
tice to gain it; it will serve better in moat
emergencies than even expertness as a swim-
mer. When pleasure boats capsize, everybody
wants to get on top of the overturned or half-
filled boat; but it is generally not large
enough to keep all entirely above water, and
nearly all are drowned. If they would trust
the water to bear ninety-hundredths of their
weight and the wrecked boat the other one-
hundredth, they might all be saved. An up-
set boat will keep the heads above water of as
many people as can get their hands on the
gunwale, though it would carry very few,
Some day these simple facts may save your
life.

ALiJMANACK.-Ia8-arch 1896.


SUN.





6 2 6 10
6 1 6 11
6 06 12.
5 59 6 12
5 58 6 12
5 57 6 13
5 56 6 14


High

Tide.

H. M.
3 80
4 18
5 06
5 54
6 4,
7 30
8 18


R E.MAiMS




Annuncia ion


Palm Sundag


6'h i,6
I Lent.


Full Moon 29 day 1 h 02 m a.m.


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Snppleient too the Bermnda "Royal Gazette," Hamilton,


March 24thi 896.


~- -~ ~


Recent Improvements in St. John's Parish
Church, Pembroke.
In 1874 the Parish Church, Pembroke, was en-
larged by the building an apse of native stone,
with the tracery of the windows (the centre in
three lights and the two side ones in two lights),
cut in Bath stone, fitted with plain glass, and with
a roof of cedar, the floor being of wood in three
levels covered with carpet. The lower part of the
walls under the windows was painted in a decorat-
ed diamond pattern design and Miss Lefroy paint-
ed on zinc an appropriate text. The altar rail in
walnut with iron supports, finished in gold and
colour was obtained from Halifax, N.S., and Bishop
Feild presented the Credence Table, among his
last Church gifts in Bermuda. In 1876 Mrs. Thos.
S. Reid placed the cenre window as a memorial to
her family, and in the following year by subscrip-
tion the side windows were fitted as memorials to
Rector Ligh lbourn and Bishop Feild, the stained
glass being all from Jas. Ballantine & Son, Edin-
burgh, in a high style of art. In 1883 the carpet
and wood .floor of the apse gave place to a tile
pavement of Minton's well known floor tiles, placed
as a memorial to the Hon. Jos. Wood, Samuel Sal-
tus and Donald McPhee Lee, firm friends in life
and resting in death near each other and near the
apse. This was a marked improvement. Though
the wall decoration mentioned had been twice re-
newed it began again to look shabby, Miss Lefroy's
texts were beginning to scale, and further renova-
tion and substitution were becoming necessary to'
support the orderly appearance of the sanctuary.
Accordingly a movement was set on foot last Octo-
ber which has resulted in the further improvement
of the apse internally and externally. A tile dado
has been put up under the line of' the apse win-
dows to the floor levels, supplied by Geo. Woollis-
croft & Son, Limited, Hanley, North Stafford,
England. The masonry of the apse, from bad
construction, required extensive .and expensive
treatment, inside and outside, to admit of tiles be-
ing properly placed, and fortunately the work has
been well done by workmen from' Trinity Church
under the efficient direction of Mr. Adam Grant,
the Foreman of Works of Trinity Church Restora-
tion by arrangement with the Building Committee.
The exterior of the apse has been rendered
in Portland cement and sand, the,.work being ac.
curately done, securing the stability of the mason-
ry and improving the general appearance of the
whole. The walls inside required special treat-
ment to prepare them for the tile setting which
has been accurately done. The upper portion of
the walls inside has been cleaned and coloured and
the roof cleaned and finished in hard oil Ifinish,
and generally the entire apse has been renovated
and vastly improved in appearance, and a unity of
fitness is now at length apparent. Attention is
drawn, as it ought to be, to the apse as the central
point of attraction. The old Parish Church has
gained largely by the work just completed. While
we progress with new works in church extension
we must remember the claims of the old venerable
piles whose associations are deep recessed, and
whose due preservation is really an imposed duty
on uw.


The Late Archdeacon Lough.
On Friday morning last, the tolling of the bell
of St Paul's Church, Pagets, and also of the Cathe-
dral bell, Hamilton, made known the death of the
Venerable Archdeacon Lough, at the Rectory,
Pagets, an event which was looked for from the
reports of his condition for some days previously.
We feel that we voice the sentiment of all Bermu-
da in giving expression to the sense of public loss
sustained by his death, in bearing testimony to his
eminent personal worth, and in the general sym-
pathy which is sincerely entertained for his fam-
ily. In order that as many as desired should be
privileged to view the remains, the body was
removed to the Parish Church of St Paul in the
early morning; and very many availed themselves
of the opportunity, so thoughtfully given them, of
taking a parting view of a face on which they had
so often gazed with no small satisfaction. Fortu-
nately, the weather was favourable, although sultry
and slightly breezy, to permit of the large attend.
ance at the Funeral Service, held at 4 p.m., from
all parts of these islands. His Excellency the
Governor, General T C Lyons, C B, attended by
Capt A J W Dowell, A D C, and Vice-Admiral
James E Erskine, attended by Flag-Lieut Halsey,
were present at the service, as also the Hon J M
Hayward, Mayor of St George's, and representa-
tives from every parish. The Bishop and thirteen
clergy robed in the School House and' entered the
Church by the west door. ;
LIST OF CLERGY PRESENT.
His Lordship the Bishop, Rev F J F Lightbourn,
Rev Geo Tucker, Rev Canon M James, Rev B Mac-
kay, Rev Canon J Davidson, Rev C P K Coombe,
Rev J Cavanagh, Rev C H Murphy, Rev H L My-
rick, Rev R H Cole, Rev R V Wilson, Rev G S
Richards, and Rev H R Gummey.
The Choii s of the Parishes of Paget and Warwick
and the congregation sang the 400th hymn, A & M,
as the Bishop and Clergy proceeded up the Church,
afterwards chanting the 90th Psalm and hymn A
& M, No 401 after the Rev Geo Tucker had read
the Lesson.
The congregation remained in their places
while the Bishop, Clergy, Choirs of Paget


and Warwick, Members of the Vestry of
Pagets Parish, and of the Vestry of Warwick
Parish, the Bearers with the coffin, and the Family
and immediate relatives of the deceased passed out
of the church by the North Transept door to the
vault in the new portion of the Pagets Parish
Cemetery. His Lordship the Bishop then said the
remaining portion of the service at the grave, the
choirs singing hymn 140 A & M before the blessing;
which pronounced, the Bishop and Clergy returned
to the School IHouse, and so concluded the last
rites of the Church over a loved and faithful
servant.
In another month Archdeacon Lough would
have completed his 64th year. His father, the
Rev John Lough, B A, of Queen's College, Oxford,
was, for 22 years, Rector of St George's Parish and
officiating Garrison Chaplain. He died at St
George's on the 15th January, 1839, after a pro-
tracted illness at the early age of 49 ; the Arch-
deacon being one of five young children left to the
care of a loving mother, long spared to witness the
fruits of her earnest maternal zeal, aided by kind
friends in the period of her trial. A nomination
was secured for him and one of his brothers in the
Clergy Orphan School, so that his school studies
were commenced in England and afterwards con-
tinued at the Missionary College of St Augustine,
Canterbury, where (1850) he was among the early
students of that revived ancient foundation. Re-
turning to Bermuda a year earlier than the pre-
scribed regulations permitted of his being admitted
to the Diaconate, he engaged for a short period
in tuition. On Trinity Sunday, 1855, Bishop Feild
made him a Deacon in Trinity Church in the town
of Hamilton, the chancel and transepts of which
had just been consecrated. The Archdeacon up
to 1861 was Curate to the Rector of St George's,
the Rev RT Tucker, D D, Ecclesiastical Commis-
sary ; having been ordained a Priest (1858) by
Bishop Feild in St Peter's Parish Church, St
George's. He was then appointed Rector-of
Hamilton and Smiths, where le remained nearly


5 years, being appointed Rector of the Parisles
of Paget and Warwick in 1866, which livings he
continuously held up to the time of his death. In
1880 (B. R. G., April 20th) Bishop Jones appointed
him Vicar General and Commissary, and in 1894
Archdeacon of Bermuda, thus reviving in.him a
dignity in abeyance since the consecration of
Archdeacon Spencer as the 1st Bishop of New-
foundland. This titular distinction in a measure
marked the value set on the Reverend Gentleman's
services to the Church of England in Bermuda at
a critical period of her history. On the death of
Bishop Feild in 1876, the church was without a
Bishop and without an organization to perpetuate
its life as a branch of the great Anglican Commu-
nion. In the Legislation had to overcome difficul-
ties, (leading to the formation of the Bermuda
Church Society and the organization of the Synod
of the Church of England in Bermuda), the Arch-
deacon worked with energy and marked ability
without wounding sensibilities, securing indeed, by
his actions, the good opinion of every one. If
asked to point out his chief element of success in
life, we should say it was his general proficiency
combined with undeviating energy and honesty of
purpose. Possessed of a clear and powerful voice
and of musical ability, he maintained the services
of the Church with much efficiency. Earnest in
his calling, his parishioners of all classes had in him
an untiring visitor who invariably made himself at
ease in all emergencies. Socially, he was always
of a happy temperament, considering his life in
society conducive to his higher and especial duties.
Were space at command it would be easy to mult-
iply instances illustrative of Archdeacon Lough's
worth and work, outside of his immediate paro-
chial duties, which, in themselves, are usually of a
routine nature allowing but slight latitude. Those
who knew Archdeacon Lough will remember him
with feelings of pleasure, and his work in the
Church with a deep sense of gratitude, while pos-
terity will regard him, in the retrospect, as having
contributed largely to the permanent stability of
the Church of England in Bermuda.


Pulpit References to the late Archdeacon
Lough.
On Sunday the Lord Bishop of the Dio ese
preached in the morning in St. Pauli's Paiish
Church, P'C'tsq, and(in the evenin ia the Cathe-
dral, upp'opriitt discourses, referring in his Paget
sermon to the pastoral labors of the late lamented
Archdeacou, as immediately touchina his hearers:
and in the evening at the Cathedral, speaking of
him in his Diocesan capacity, :as being there spe-
cially appropriate. The Rev George Tucker in the
afternoon, at St. Mary's Parish Church, Warwick,
preached a sermon bearing on the late Archdeacon,
a life long friend of his, and with whom he had
b.en brought in close contact in the course of
his ministerial labours We hope next week to
present a notice of the Revd. Geo. Tucker's Ser'
mon. To-day we are enabled to give a notice of
of the Bishop's Sermons with extended notes of his
Lordship's fitting review of the late Archdeacon
Lough's labours in his parishes and in the Diocese
of Bermuda. We feel sure that his Lordship's
utterances will be widely and attentively read and
fully endorsed.
On Sunday morning last the Bishop preached
in Paget Church as follows :-
"For what is our hope, or joy, or crown of
rejoicing ? Are not even ye in the presence of
our Lord Jesus Christ at His coming ? For ye
are our glory and joy." 1 T'hes. ii. 19, 20.
There is a solemnity in the occasion which
puts me to-day in this place, which-if it were
not very holy, would be very painful. The
most sacred of all the public relationships of
life has been brought to a close, and a minis-
try of upwards of forty years, three-fourths of
which have been spent in this parish, is a thing
now gone by. During the past week the mor-
tal remains of the Archdeacon of Bermuda
have been committed to the silent grave in the
presence of a great concourse of persons gath.-
ered from all parts of these islands, to pay the
last tribute of respect and affection.
The long illness, the progress of which caused
such widespread anxiety, has termin ited as he
from the first predicted it would.
With the life which has just closed your lives,
my Brethren, have allbeen more or less closely
bound up. For thirty years he has gone in
and out amongst you and has been concerned
with the joys and the sorrows of every home.
And within these walls how often and in
how many ways have you received from him
the minibltrations of the Church 1
Perhaps it was by him that you were dedi-
cated to God in Holy Baptism, marked and
signed as Christ's Soldier and Servant: or, it
miay be that it was in his arms at the Font that
your little ones have been given up to the same
service of God.
By him many of you were prepared to re-
ceive the Confirming Grace of God's oly
Spirit in the Apostolic rite of the L. ....i on of
Hands.
Again and again have you pariaken from his
hands of theprecious Bo Iyand Blood of Christ
in Holy Communion at yo ider Altar.
Again and again have you listened to the
Word of God preached by him from this pulpit.
By him, it may be, you have been linked in


Holy Wedlock to the partner of your life.
Aud when you have come to deposit in the
hallowed ground the mortal remains of your
loved ones, who are gone before you, it has
been the same familiar voice which has sound-
ed in your ears the words of hope and comfort
which even in that hour of deep sorrow have
thrilled your heart with joy.
You have indeed heen greatly blesie 1 during
all these years in having such a Rector amongst
you, for these various offices of which I have
spoken have been discharged in no perfunc-
tory, mechanical manner --as alas! is somc-
-times the case: but in all your intercourse
with him, public and private, you have felt
that the mWan who had been set over you in
Spiritual things was the faithful priest, the
wise counsellor, the sympathetic friend. ;
His was the gentle and considerate heart
that knew how to enter into the sorr..' s a ,d
grief of others, and to lighten their '..urdens t-y
sweet words and coiufo:ting assurances. Jo
all who suffered, to all who mourned, to all
who fell under the weight of their cross he was
indeed a tender consoler : and his benediction
bore peace into many a heart lie was po.-
sessed of that bright, happy spirit which re-
commnei.ls religion. No great wurk for God
will ever be done without it. I do not think it
can even exist without soein great traus i:n Viod.
It made him strong and bright, and it enabled
him to draw the hearts of his people as the
heart of one man. iHe had the kind disposi-
tion that never willingiy gives pain, the origh-t
happy look and word for every one, richi and
poor, the large and generous consideration for
opponent as well as for friend. And as a
consequence he was beloved by all with whom
he came in contact, especially by you his pa-
rishioners who knew himi best, and amongst
whom hlie lived and laboured.
In spite of increasing lain and weakness, he
has remained at his post to the last and, dying
as he did in harness, he has lefu to his younger


brethren a noble 'example of self-denying de-'
votion to duty.
Of the valuable help he has rendered to myself
during the last sixteen years in his capacity as
Commissary and administrator of the Diocese
in my absence from these islands-of the loss
which the Church in Bermuda has sustained
by his removal, I will not now speak.
I am addressing a congregation bereaved of
a beloved pastor, and this is the thought to
which I desire that your minds should travel
this morning-the meeting again of a pastor and his
people before the throne of God.
After dwelling at some length upon this line
of thought in connection with the exposition
of his text, the Bishop concluded as follows :
Is not this, my Brethren, a "joy" to live up
to- that you shall see your pastor again, and
that, if only you are found faithful, that pas-
tor's heaven shall be enhanced through you.
Therefore, for his sake permit me to offer
you a word of counsel. Keep a united people.
Do not suffer any good work connected with
this Church to fall off-its services, its schools,
its charities, its Bible classes, its Guilds, its
Missionary associations. Rather let them
spring as from a new date to greater energy.
Is it not God's universal law that death is to
be the seed of life ? Let everything in you
and around you, live the more because the
Archdeacon is dead. And pray-pray individ-
ually, pray collectively, pray earnestly, for his
successor.
This, if you do, the happiness of your depart-
ed pastor, perhaps even now, will be the
greater for it, and at last, the conflict over and
the separation ended, oh, will it not be indeed
a "joy," a "glory," and a "crown," when
he, taking you by the hand, shall say, "Behold
I and the children which Thou hast given me":;
or you, leading him up to the throne of Jesus,
shall say, "Lord, I thank Thee for the man
who brought me to Thee I"

Before pronouncing the Benediction the
Bishop offered the following prayer :-
0 Almighty and most gracious Father, in
Whose hands are the hearts of men, and from
Whom cometh every good and perfect gift:
we pray thee to bestow on these Parishes the
gift of a faithful Minister of Thy Word and
Sacraments in the place of him whom Thou
has called from labouring in Thy earthly
Vineyard. Grant them one who shall labour
diligently for Thee, to the saving of those com-
mitted to his care, who shall be loving, but
fearless in his reproof, and an example of holi-
ness to the flock. Vouchsafe, 0 Lord, that
such good works as ;have been undertaken in
this place for the promotion of Thy glory may
be not only carried on, but :increased in num-
ber and efficiency. 0 Lord, graciously hear
our prayers, and endue us all with Thy Holy
Spirit, for the sake of Thy dear Son, Jesus
Christ, our only Advocate and Redeemer.
AMEN. ,

In the evening the Bishop occupied the .pul-
pit of the Cathedral and preached from the
text : God having provided some better thing
for us, that they without us should not be
made perfect ". Heb. xi, 40.
After enlarging upon the state of the depart-
ed Saints in Paradise, and pointing to the con-
sideration that they are waiting for us for the
consummation of their bliss as an incentive to
our seeking to live a holy life, the preacher
proceeded as follows :--I
That great cloud of witnesses" by whom we
"are compassed about," and who regard us with
intensest interest as we pursue' our earthly course,
is being constantly.augmented. Every day acces-
sions are made to its ranks. One such is in the
thoughts of all of us at the present time. Within
the past week the grave has closed over thb' mortal
remains of one whose honourable career has ended
amidst widespread sorrow. His race run, his war-
fare accomplished, he, too, has joined the band of
unseen spectators who wait till the number of
God's elect is complete.
The loni and faithful ministry of Archdeacon
Lough will ever fill a bright page in the records of
the Church in these islands. With this Cathedral,
and with its predecessor, Trinity Church, that
ministry has been intimately connected, On Trin-
ity Sunday, 1855, he was ordained in Trinity
Church, theu newly consecrated. Forty years
later he c ,uduoted the opening service in this
Cathedral, and was subsequently appointed its
Senior Canon, Almost the last sermon he prea hed
was delivered from this pulpit. -
Of his thirty years' work as Rectorof Paget anp
Warwick I tried to speak to his parishioners this
moroiin. This evening and in this place we think
rather oZ what he was to the Diocese and the
Cathedral. To him, as its Secretary from its in-
ception, the Church Society owes a deep debt of
gratitude for his unwearied exertions to promote
the important objects which it has in view. He
persevered iu what was often a thankless toil: he,
in conjunction with others, laid the solid founda-
tion whereon we must build. In the long and anx-
ious negotiations, extending over many years,
which led to the incorporation of the Synod, he
took an active pirt, and when 'at length that
measure was obtained from the Legislature, and i
the Synod was established, he became its presiding


officer, and through him were carried on those
communications which resulted in my undertakingI
the Episcopal superviion of the Church in these
islands. From that time onward, as my Vicar-
General and Commissary, his relations with my-
self have, of course, been far closer than those of
any other clergyman in the Diodese ; and again
and again,,during all these sixteen years, when
circumstances of doubt or difficulty have arisen,
whether I have been here or elsewhere, I have
had cause to feel thankful that I have enjoyed the
cordial support of i representative so loyal, so gen-
erous, so forbearing. The present circumstances
of the Diocese necessitate my frequent absence.
but I have always been assured that to
his wise and experienced guidance the interests
of the Church in Bermuda could be safely intrust-
ed
For Trinity Church he always entertained the
warmest atfecti.o, and, had health and strength
been continued to him, he;would, I am confident,
as Sm'i.)r Canon of this Cathedral, have afforded
to myv.'If and the other-MInmb-rs of the Chapter,
invaluable counsel and assistance in the framing
of oune statues and other cognate undertakings.
But God has wilb d it otherwise: his stall is va-
cant, begirt wiLh the insignia of mourning.
My Brethren, not only ourselves but the times
are ch:uigiug. Trinity Church-the Chapel of
Ease, in which he was ordained is gone for ever,
but from its ashes has arisen this beautiful Cathe-
dral, ere long, we humbly hope, to be completed
and consecrated to God's greater glory as the
Mother Church of the Diocese. Tasks new and
unknown lie before us But. our duty and our
hope remain the same. And still our motto is
Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with
thy might." That was what he whom we have
lost from among us, so long as strength was
granted to himp, did according to his light and ac-
cording to his capacity. All of us, through all
our degrees, have to do the work of edifying,
beautifying, elevating enlarging the Church of
England in Bermuda through this its most august
an:d characteristic, edifice. All of us have a high
calling before us which every difficulty, every


obstacle, ou-ght to stimulate us: to fulfil. The
voices of the dead, the claims of the living, the
far-reaching future of the Everlasting Gospel of
Christ our Lord, entreat us not to be weary or
faint.
Our Arc1ic-acon "rests from his labours," and
his works do follow him." They follow him in
the memory and the affections of the good. They
follow him in the results, seen ahd unseen, rami-
fying through many hearts, results to be measured
only when no secret shall be hid." They follow
him in that pattern of devotedness to duty which
he haszbequeathed to us his survivors. They fol-
low him in that love to Christ. They follow him
to be his g,-oater joy for ever and for ever. They
follow him to adorn his Master.
And now, my people, what shall you do? I
would that every one that hears me would be
stirred up to some good work. Why should not
every one of you do something for God while you
live which shall follow you, even as his work has
followed him ? Do not live that aimless life. Live
for a purpose. Let every day see some definite
work done for the Lord Jesus Christ. And, either
going before or following after, I know not which
-traced or untraced-even that work, good in
Christ, will meet you in reflections you little
know, again and again, and will follow you with-
ersoever you go, for ever and ever,


The Defence of the Colony.

Manceuvres of the Regular Troops and
Volunteers.
On Friday last, 20th instant, the defences
in all parts of this Colony were manned by the
troops in readiness to repel a supposed invasion,
Early in the day the state .of siege wasde-
clared and immediately troops and heavy field-
guns were moved to their respective posts, a
very short time being sufficient to have every
man and gun in position. A boat attack on
the Eastern end of the islands was .then carried
out to ensure the efficiency of the St George's
defences. The troops at Tucker's Town, Devil's
Hole and Warwick, were encamped at those
places during the night and on Saturday the
whole of the troops in this command, including
the Bermuda Volunteer- Rifle Corps took part
in a sham fight in accordance with a general
idea which had been previously circulated.
As far as can be gathered it would appear that
the invading force, represented by the St.
Georges Garrison and commanded by Major
Champion, 2nd Leinster Regiment, having af-
fected a landing near Tucker's Town, forced
the portion of the defenders at Devil's Hole to
fall back upon Prospect Camp, while, at the
same time, a second body of invaders (the
troops from Boaz) had' landed on the South
side of the Sound and threatened Hamilton.
The defending force, commanded .by Lt-Col
Glancey, 2nd Leinster Regiment, consisted of
the troops at Prospect, supported by the Ber-
muda Volunteers, who were thus engaged for
the first time since the formation of the Corps.
The principal part of the fighting took place at
no great distance from Prospect Camp and we
understand that the invasion was successfully
repelled. The only accident which resulted
from the Field day was a severe kick from a
horse to a bugler of the Bermuda Volunteer
Rifle Corps but he was promptly attended by
Surg-Lt Harvey, Volunteer Medical Staff, and
was subsequently removed to his home where
he has since quite recovered. The weather
being fine the operations on Saturday were
witnessed by a large concourse of people, prin.
cipally visitors.


St. Patrick's Day.
FESTIVITIES AT PROSPECT.
With the 2nd Battalion the Prince of Wales'
Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians) the 17th of
March is not only look.,l upo: as a holiday but as
the greatest and most festive occasion of the year,
and every endeavour is made in the regiment to
make the festivities as complete as possible, and
to show a desire, in every way to do honor to the
patron Saint of dear would Ireland". On Monday
16th inst., St Patrick's Eve, Lt. Glancy and his
officers gave a grand ball in the Theatre Royal
which had been transferred into a veritable fairy
land and nothing which could add to the pleasure
and comfort of the guests was left undone. The
R. A. Gun-Shed on the opposite side of the road
had been converted into a magnificent supper room
to which access was obtained by means of a cover-
ed way from the stage door of the Theatre. A
large number of guests were present including
most of the Naval and Military Officers and Civil
officials of the colony. On the 17'h (Tuesday)
the Head Quarters company marched to Hamil-
ton and attended a special morning service at the
Roman Catholic chapel, conducted by the Rev.
Father Hamilton, the accommodation of the build-
ing having recently been augmented and improved
the large number attending was thus comfortably
provided for ; luter on the annual athletic sports
of the battalion were held on the cricket ground,
where the thoroughness of the arrangements were
everywhere apparent and notwithstanding that the
-.'eather was threatening all the morning a large
number of people assembled on the ground and in
the Qtticers and N. C. Officer's enclosures. Un-
fortunatl; the rain commenced to fall soon -fter
4 o'clock and to very great extent spoilt what
would otherwise have been a most brilliant and
enjoyable affair. One of the most noteworthy
events of the day was the Bayonet exercise and
physical drill competition which was done in a
manner eliciting considerable applause and many
favourable comments on the high state of efficien-
cy which as been attained; there were many novel
items in the day's programme and the greatest of
credit is due to all concerned. On the 18th the
festivities were brought to a close by the "St Pat-
rick's Ball", given in the Theatre Royal by the
Warrant Officers, Staff Sergeants and Sergeants of
the battalion, and was one of the most successful
.and enjoyable ever given in the Prospect Camp.
There was a large number of guests, civil and nav-
aljas well as military, &c., including the Officers of
the regiment and many of those'of other corps and
departments; the arrangements were most corn-.
pletoe in every ivay and the decorations which had
remained since the previous Monday called forth
expressions of pleased surprise from 'nearly every
guest. At each of the balls and also at the sports
the splendid band of the regiment was present and'
performed a selection of music of the most charm-
ing description, and contributed in no small degree
to the general enjoyment. Taken as a whole the
St Patrick's day rejoicings may be looked upon as
having been, weather excepted, a most unqualified
success, and those who enjoyed the privilege of
taking part therein, even though they may not
previously have regarded the 17th of would Ireland
as an exceptional occasion will now most certainly
look back upon it, in 1896, as a red letter day in
their calendar.

g The Bermuda Gymnasium has taken the
place of the Mechanics' Institute for the coming
", Matinee" on Thursday afternoon, in view of
the difficulty that would be encountered -,in
excluding .daylight from the numerous large:
windows of the latter hall. I


Amusementsal this Week.
"Caste" the performance last night at
Theatre Royal, Prospect, by the B G D Club
was nicely put on and highly appreciated by
the large audience. A dew desirable tickets
for to-night's performance may still be had at
the Box Office.
To-morrow (Wednesday) St Andrew's Church
Bazaar at the Mechanics' Hall, Hamilton, com-
mencing at 3.30 p.m.
Matinee: A Pic-Nic Abroad-a beautifully
illustrated lime-light entertainment at the Ber-
muda Gyninasium and Assembly Rooms on
Thursday afternoon at 3.30 o'clock by Com.
Cheyne, R.N.
Open-air Concert at Victoria Park, Hamilton,
on Thursday evening commencing at 8 o'clock.
Proceeds in aid of Soldiers' and Sailors' Home,
Hamilton.

Bermuda Hunt Club Races.
On Friday next the Annual Spring Meeting of
the B H Club will take place at the Shelly Bay
Race Course, weather being fine. The track is in
good condition the accommodation has been
much improved and enlarged for the benefit of
patrons. The large number of new members and
the general interest exhibited by all concerned
tend to mike the event of Friday next an unpre-
cedented success. The number of entries is prob-
ably the largest ever made and the eight different
events on the programme will be hotly contested.
Theladdition of several new horses, which have al-
ready arrived and a couple of more expected by
Orinoco and Trinidad this week, throws an uncer-
tainty as to the probable results against the old
favourite Hurry, who has won so many laurels on
this track.,


Bv the Halifax & Bermudas Cable.
OTTAWA, March 20.-The figures of the
trade and navigation returns for the past
months are most gratifying. The exports
show an increase in the produce of Canada of
$132,000 for the eight months. The net in-
crease in the exports of the" produce of Canada
alone is $28,000,000, similarly both imports and
duty collected are equally encouraging. The
imports for eight months increased $5,225,000
and the duty. $2,000,000.

OTTAWA, March 20.-Hon Mr Foster gives
notice of an important resolution regarding the
scheduling of Canadian cattle by England and
affirming that the parliament, whilst not wish-
ing tointerfere terfere in any way with legislation
considered necessary by the United Kingdom,
desires respectfully to protest against the per-
manent exclusion of Canadian cattle on the
ground of the existence of pleura pneumonia
in Canada and to express in the strongest pos-
sible manner its belief that pleura pneumonia
has not in the past and does not at the present
time exist in Canada.

LONDON, March 20.-The Times publishes a
despatch from St Petersburg saying the papers
there are having a lively discussion over
schemes for obtaining information about Dr
Nansen,who who was reported to be returning to
civilization after discovering the North Pole.
Baldwin's proposed journey, it is judged,
would probably be quite quiteuseless for the discov-
ery of Dr Nansen. If it were necessary to go
in search of him the journey could be made
nmora quickly and more easily by way of St
Petersburg thence by railway to Krasno Yarah.

NEW YORK. March 18.-Cardinal Satolli will
leave America for Rome early in May. His
successor will be Archbishop Averadi, Titular
of the Ancientsee in Tarsus, it is said. Arch.
bishop Averadi is now in America.
MONTREAL, March 20.-The greatest snow.
storm Quebec province has known for twelve
years is now over. Trains were delayed or
cancelled in all directions. The storm will
cost t:'-e city $20,000.

LONDON, March 23.-The position of the Brit.
ish Government is easier under official news
from Paris that France will either not oppose
the first credit for 500,000 from the Egyptian
funds for expenses of the Soudan expedition or
will confine her opposition to a formal protest
against the use of money for this purpose.
Russia will remain directly neutral and give
no support to France as against the expedition.
The War Office officials here declare the expe-
dition will be only a reconnaissance in force
and will not 'admit that the present phase is
anything beyond the initial step in the Autumn
campaign. The Army Intelligence Department
possesses only the most vague information re-
garding the strength of the Madists. Military
experts distrusts the estimates made by Slatin
Pasha, though, as a matter of fact, his long
captivity among the Mahdists should, on the
face of things, have made him an authority on
the subject. These experts consider the report
made by the Russian traveller, Elissief, recent-
ly elected a member of the Russian Geographi.
cal Society, more reliable than that of Slatin
Pasha. He says"the Khalifa's forces number
400'00 men, including 10,000 cavalry and cam-
elry. They possess 100,000 rifles, of which
20,000, Remington, are really fit for service.
The artillery is poor. There are twenty guns
at Dongola and five Krupp guns and ten seize
guns at Ondurman.

LONDON, March 23.-Baron De Courcel,
French Ambassador, had a long interview this
afternoon with Prime Minister Salisbury at the
latter's London residence. Subject of the in-
terview was the Anglo-Egyptian expedition.

: VANCOUVER, March 23-The Canada-Australian
:steamer Warrimoo has just arrived here andre-
ports the destruction of Suva, the capital of the
Fiji Imlando, by an aWful hurricane on March 6th.
The storm was the post tremendous ever known
'n the Southern seas.

MoNAco, March 23-Most or all the yacht racing
on the Riviera thus far this season has been char*
acterised by strongntistrals or almost fat calms,
Theo racing on.Saturday was perfectly uninterest.
ing owing to the fact that there was not enough
wind to permit: the yachts to finish before sun-
down. The regatta opened with the sun shining
brightly and a faint breeze stirring. Soon after
the start the wind died away and there was scarce,
ly a ripple on the face of the sea. The Britannia
was the first to cross the line and held the lead
throughout the day. She won the race as dusk
was closing in. The Ailsa was second. The race
for twenty-raters was won by Ogden Goelet's Sap-
phire. The prize won by the Ailsa yesterday in
the race from n annes to Nice was 500. The
priz won'by the Sapphire in the 20.rater class
wass 400. ,. ,:

MACHIAS, Me, March 23-There was a violent
shock- of earthquake last evening. House trem-
b:ed dishes and windows rattled, clocks stopped
and people rushed from houses into the street ia


alarm,





Supplements to, the Berinuda "Royal Gazette,


Hamilton, March 24th, 1896.


BERM UDA AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.


LIST OF PRIZES offered for the Agricultural and Horticultural


Show


to be held in


"Rose Bank Grounds, Pembroke, on 7TH


AND 8TH


OF MAY, 1896.


Class I.-Live Stock.
HORSES, Etc.

Bermuda bred Colt or Filly, under 3 years
Bermuda bred Horse or Mare, not under 3 or
over 8 years
Roadster and Carriage (imported)
For Farm purposes (imported)
Stallion imported since 1st Jany., 1894
Donkey
Livery Carriage and pair
Livery Carriage and single Horse
HORNED OR POLLED CATTLE.
Bull imported since 1st Jany., 1894
Bermuda bred Bull not over 5 years
Jersey Cow
Ayrshire Cow
Holstein Cow
Other Breeds
Bermuda bred Heifer under 2 years (not hav.
ing borne a calf)
PIGS.
Boar, Berkshire, imported since 1st Jany., 1894
Sow do. do. do.
Boar, other breed, do. do.
Sow, do. do. do. do.
Sow and Litter
Bermuda bred Boar not over 3 years
Bermuda bred Sow


Class II.-Poultry, Etc.
Bermuda bred.


No. 1-Bramah, (1 Cock and 2
hens) white trio 8s
dark 8s
No. 2-Leghorn white 8s
brown 8s
No. 3-Plymouth Rock 8s
No. 4-Houdan 8s
No. 5-Cochin China 8s
No. 6-Polish 8s
No. 7-Black Spanish 8s
No. 8-Minorca 8s
No. 9-Wyandotte 8s
No. 10-Game Fowls 8s
No. 11-Dorkings 8s
No. 12-Bantams 48
No. 13-Ducks, Pekin, a pair 8s
Muscovy, 8s
other breed 8s
No. 14-Guinea Birds 8s
No. 15-Turkeys 10s
No. 16-Pigeons, a trio or pair, Fancy 4s
Common 4s


No. 17-Rabbits, a pair
Guinea Pigs, a pair


4s
4s


PRIZES.
1st. 2nd. 3rd.
40s 20s Os


20s
20s
20s
20s
10s



20s
20s
20s
20s
20s
20s


30s 15s 10s


15s
15s
15s
15s
20s
15s
15s


Imported.
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
4s 2s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
8s 4s
10s 5s


4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
2s
4s
4s
4s
4s
5s
2s
2s
2s
2s


Class III.-Sub-division 1, Agricultural Produce.
ROOTS.
Artichokes, Jerusalem, 6 in number 4s 2s Os
Arrowroot, sticks, 12 5s 3s 2s
Beets 6 5s 3s 2s
Carrots 12 5s 3s 2s
Cassava, sticks, 6 5s 3s 2s
Eddoes 6 4s 2s Is
Kohl Rabi 6 4s 2s Is
Mangold Wurtzel 6 8s 4s 2s
Onions, white, shipping crate 10s 6s 4s
red 10s 6s 4s
Potatoes, garnets, 1 bushel 10s 6s 4s
Potatoes, other variety 8s 4s 2s
Potatoes, sweet, 30 in number 6s 4s 2s
Parsnips, 6 in number 4s 2s Is
Radish, best long, 12 in number 2s Is Os
best round 2s Is Os
Turnips, Swedish, 6 in number 6s 4s 2s
not Swedish, 6 in number 6s 4s 2s
GREEN VEGETABLES.


Artichokes, green, 6 in number
Asparagus, 12 in number
Beans, Windsor, unshelled i peck
French, "
W Wax, c
Broccoli, 3 in number
Brussels Sprouts, 1 quart
Cabbages, green glazed, 3 in number
other variety 3 in number large
small
Cauliflower, 3 in number
Celery, 6 sticks
Corn, sweet, 6 ears
maize, 6 ears
Cucumbers, 3 in number (long variety)
short variety
Egg plant, purple, 3 in number
Kale, curled, 3 in number
Leeks, 6 in number
Lettuce (cabbage) 6 in number
Coss "
Papaws (green) 6 in number


4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s9
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s
4s


Peas (green) unshelled, 1 gallon 4s
bird-eye 4s
Peppers, collection of 4s
Pumpkins, small or choice, 3 in number 4s
mammoth, S in number 4s
Squash or Vegetable Marrow, 3 in number, large 4s
i" small 4s
Spinach (round), 1 bunch 4s
New Zealand 4s
beet, 1 bunch 4s
Tomatoes, 12 in number 4s
box, best packed 6s


# Vegetables, greatest variety of, grown and
exhibited by one person
# N.B.-Exhibits under this head not allowed
for separate prizes.
Class III.-Sub-division 2, Horticultura
Etc.


FLOWERS.
Amaryllis, collection of
Bouquet, hand
table
Cannas, collection of
Carnations,
Chrysanthemums, "
Dahlias, "
Geraniums, "
Gladiolus,
Lilies, "
Mixed Flowers, "
Nasturtiums, "
Pansies, "
Petunias, "
Phlox, "
Poppies, "
Roses, collection of 12 named varieties
c 6 C C 4 "
unnamed varieties
Sweet Peas, collection of
Sunflowers, "
Stocks, "
Tube Roses "


FRUIT, 5e.
Bananas, bunch of dwarf,
i ,, fig,
red,
Cherries, 1 quart, Surinam,
Gooseberries, Cape, 1 quart
Jams, made from Bermuda fruit 1
Limes, 6 in number
Lemons, common, 6 in number
foreign variety, grown in Bermuda,
6 in number
Loquat Plums, gallon
Melons, Musk, large
Nutmeg
Water
Marmalade, made from Bermuda oranges
Bermuda Lemons
Oranges (Bermuda), sweet, 6 in number
Plantains, bunch
Pickled Fruit, etc.
Preserved Bermuda Fruit (6 varieties) 1
Candied 1
Fruit Syrup
Sapodillas
Strawberries, 1 pint
Starches, Arrowroot, etc.
Sugar Cane, 3 sticks
Variety of Fruits grown in Bermuda-a bas-
ket of


PLANTS.
Collection of
CC
it
"
"
"
"(
"


12s 6s 8s
-d to compete

1 Produce,

2s
2s
2s
2s
2s
2s
2s
2s
S 2s
i 2s
2s
I 2s
I 2s
9 2s
A 2s
3 2s
9 4s
9 2s
1 2s
9 2s
I 2sa
a -2s
8 3s8

3 3s
a 3s
s 3s
s Os
s Os
s 5s 2/f
a 2s
3 2s


4s 2s
4s 2s
4s 2s
4s 2s
4s 2s
6s Ss
6s 3s
4s 2s
5s 3s
4s 2s
10s 5s
10s 5s
4m 2s
4s 2s
4s 2s
4s 2s
4s 2s
6s 3s


f Arums
Begonias
Coleus
Caladimus
Crotons
Ferns
Fuschias
Geraniums
Gloxinias
Orchids
Ornamental Plants
Rose Plants


Class IV.-Dairy Produce, Etc.
Bread, home made loaf, (about 2lbs. in weight) 5s 3s
Butter, in rolls or prints, llb. 5s 8s
Cheese (home made), not less than lib. 5s 8s
Honey, in comb, not less than 31bs. 5s 3s
Class V.-Garden Implements, House Furniture, Etc.
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 4c.
(Exhibits to be made in Bermuda.)
Carriage Harness, single 20s 10s
Donkey Carriage, imported springs allowed, 20s l0s
Express Waggon, imported springs allowed, 20s 10s
Horse Cart 20s 10s
Set of Cart Harness 20s l0s
Wheelbarrow 10s 5s


FURNITURE, Sc.
Book Stand
Tea Table


10s 5s
20s 10s


Bonnet 8s 4s
Basket, hand 5s 2/6
Basket, card 5s 2/6
Broom, ceiling 3s 2s
Broom, mosquito 3s 2s
Dish Mats, set of 5s 2/6
Fans, pair of 5s 2/6
Flowers, etc., (palmetto) 5s 2/6
Hat 6s 3s
Plait, roll of 25 yards 6s 3s
Watch Pocket 3s 2s
CZ- NOTE.-Prizes will in no case be awarded when the
exhibits mentioned in any of the above classes are not deem.
ed worthy.
No article in Classes V. and VI. which was awarded a
prize at either of the former Exhibitions will be permitted to
take one in 1896.
Illuminated Vellum Certificates will be awarded in lieu
of first prizes, at the option of prize takers, in all.Classes ex.
cept III. and IV.
Exhibitors desiring to remove Live Stock at the expira-.
tion of the first day, will be required to deposit 4/ in each
case, which will be refunded on such live stock being again
brought back on the second day.
Hamilton, 20th March, 1896.


~or benefit of Owners Underwriters and all


For benefit of Owners Underwriters and all
Concerned.

BY PUBLIC AUCTION
WILL BE SOLD

On March 25th 1890,
At 12 Noon. at
MEYER'S WHARF, ST. GEORGE'S.


Alb


THE HULL,


Masts. Spars, Sails. Rigging,


Ropes, and all material belonging to

Nor. Bar Sc hwpin.arf,"

Which vessel put into this port in distress on
SIvoyage, from Darien, Georgia, U.S.A.. to
Brake, in Germany, now abandoned on survey
and estimate, and to be sold as above,
H. SVENDSEN, f
Master.
W. E. MEYER & Co.


St. George's, Bda., March 21st, 1896.


Agents.,


WANTED, IMMEDIATELY,

A ?SIALBL BOOM 1
in which to store furniture. Must be dry and
pot on ground floor.
Apply to Mrs. LAMBERT G. PALMER,
Cedar Avenue, Hamilton.
March 23rd, 1896.-1 pd,,


FREIGHT


FROM LONDON.


Direct London Line.


From


S. S. RAVENSDALE,
Will be despatched
London for Bermuda.
April 103.


Orders to come forward by this opportunity
should be mailed by 8.S. Trinidad
on the 26th inst.
Bermuda Agent :-
W. T. JAMES,
41 & 42 Front St.,
London Agents :- Hamilton.
HENRY LANGRIDGE & 00 ,
16 Great St. Helen's, E.C.
Tuesday, 24th March, 1896.

notice.

Estate of the late Anna Maria
Jennings Smith.
ALL Persons having Claims just against the
Estate of Anna Maria Jennings Smith,
deceased, late of the Parish of Warwick, are
requested to render their accounts to the un-
dersigned on or before the 10th day of April
next.
All persons indebted to the sail Estate are
requested to make payment t to the undersigned,
by the above date.
W. R. G. SMITH,
Administrator.
March 23rd, 1896,


QUfEBEC STEAMSHIP COMP Y.

NOTICE.
Owing to a trifling accident to the Trinidad,"
Sailings will be made as follows :
ORINOCO leaves New York 21st March.
Bermuda 24th March.
"6 New York 28th March.
Bermuda 1st April.


TRINIDA



Hamilton,


D leaves New York
Bermuda
New York
TROT'
March 21st, 1896.


23rd March.
28th March.
1st April.
T & COX,


LOST!


On Sunday last in Hamilton,

A ROLL of Americail MONEY BILLg.
The finder will be handsomely rewarded
on returning same at Royal Gazette" Office,
or American House.
March 23, 1896.-1 pd

For Sale,


SA Good Cow.

Apply to Admiral's Steward, Admiralty
House.
March 21st, 1890-1


Tenders Wanted
FOR A LOAN OF ABOUT
4000 Stg.,
On Respondentia,
On cargo sawn pitch pine timbers about 415
M. sup., feet ex Barque Schweigaard." The
said Cargo to be transhipped in a first class
vessel from this port to Brake, in Germany.
The mhney to be applied for Disbursements
on cargo in Bermuda. For particulars apply
the Master on board on or before


AMA.OnC


26th,


when sealed tenders will be opened.
H. SVENDSEN,
Master.
W. E. MEYER & CO.,
Agents.
St. George's, March 21st, 1896.-1




Notice.
ALL Members of ALEXANDRINA LODGE,
No. 1026, G. U. 0. of 0. F. are respe3t-
fully notified to attend the next regular
meeting on Wednesday let April, at 7.30 p. m.
as business of importance is to be transacted.,
By order,
RIOHD. S. SIMONS,
Secretary,
Paget. 21st March, 1896-1
Colonist please copy, send bill.


Couch 20s 10s
Cabinet Maker's Work, suitable for Drawing
Room or Library, 20s 10s
Cedar Cabinet, inlaid or not, at option of ex-
hibitor, not less than 20in x 15in x 8in 10s 5s
Davenport 10s 5s
Loo-Table 10s 5s
Over Mantel 10s 5s
Portable Chairl 0s 5s
Rustic Table 10s 5s
What-Not lOs 5s
Cedar Model of Yacht 10s 5s
Specimen of Engraving on Metal 10s 5s
Wood Turning 10s 5s
Cooper's Work 10s 5s
Wood Carving 8s 4s
Native Walking Sticks (6) 6s 3s
Collection of 12 Bda. Marine Curios 10s 5s
Collection of not less than 50 Bda. Marine Shells 8s 4s
Collection of Fret Work 8s 4s
Specimen of Carved Work in Cedar suitable
for frame of picture or mirror, 80in. x 10in. 8s 4s
Photograph Frame for 4 or more photos 8s 4s
Exhibits of Blacksmith's work 20s 10s
Class VI.--Art and Industry.
(All to be work of Exhibitor done in Bermuda, and declara-
tion must be made when entering Exhibit whether
it is an original or a copy).
WORKS OF ART.
Architectural Drawing 10s 5s
China Painting (fired) 10s 5s
Crayon Drawing 8s 4s
Flowers in Oils 10s 5s
Flowers in Water Colours 10s 5s
Oil Painting, Figures 10s 5s
Oil Painting, Landscape 10s 5s
Photographic Views of Bermuda Scenery, 6
in number 10s 5s
Pen and Ink or Pencil Drawing 8s 6s
Pen and Ink or Pencil Drawing, the work of
children under 16 years of age 6s 4s
Still Life in Oils 10s 5s
Still Life in Water Colours 10s 5s
Water Colours, Figures 10s 5s
Water Colours, Landscape 10s 5s
(N.B.-As a rule, original work will be preferred and no
person may take more than one prize in the same class.)
Needle and Fancy Work.
Bead Work 6s 3s
Crochet Work In Thread or Silk 4s 2s
CrochetWork In Wool 4s 2s
Drawn Work in small exhibits such as
Handkerchiefs, D'Oyleys, &c. 5s 3s
Drawn Work in large exhibits 8s 4s
In Linen 8s 4s
Silk 8s 4s
Embroidery Cotton 6s 3
Wool 6s 3s
MISCELLANEOUS.
Fish Scale Work 6s 3s
Gloves (Chamois) 4s 2s
(Silk 5s 3s
Knitting Thread 5s 3s
(Wool 5s .-s
Lace, hand-made 6s 38
Lace, darned 6s 3s
Macrame Work 6s 3s
Netting 5s 3s
Paper Exhibits 4s 2s
(Crochet 8s 4s
Quilts Knitted 8s 4s
(.Patchwork 8s 4s
Shell Work 6s 3s
Sofa Cushions 6s 8s
Tatting 58 88
PALMETTO WORK.


y


Agents.




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