Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00273
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00273
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text














4


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


Vol. LXV II-No 5. STATE SUPER VIAS ANTIQUES 24s. per Annum.



Ilamilton, Bermuda, Tuesday, January 30, 19'IA.
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NOTICE,#


For Sale


or Rent.


That very desirable
X 30%EXa ::)3D 30IVCO3ES
IN WARWICK PARIS H,
Belonging to Mr, A. J. Frith, together with
the offices and lands appertaining thereto.
The property consists of :-
A TWO STOREY IO1SE,
with a double verandah on the front, and contains
ten rooms; also, bath-room, servant's room,
kitchen, and storerooms, coach house, and stables ;
and, at some distance from the house, a small cot-
tage. There is a little over six acres of land at.
tached to the house, nearly half of which is arable.
This House commands one of the prettiest views
in Bermuda, and is lat an easy distance from the
Ferry, and thirty minutes' drive from Hamilton.
Also,
A TRACT OF LAND,
opposite and near the aforesaid property-contain.
ing about six acres, suitable for building or plant.
ing purposes. This part of the property can be
sold in lots to suit purchasers.
gy For Further particulars and terms,
Apply to
A. J. FRITH,
39, Front Street, tHamilton.
Jany 22, 1894-3 times

For Rent.-Furnished.

THAT WELL KNOWN RESIDENCE

BELMON1,

SITUATED IN WARWICK PARISH,
Commanding a fine view of the Sound and
Islands, the Town of Hamilton and the sur-
rounding country, within fifteen minutes walk
of the ferry, or half hour's drive to town.
It contains five bed rooms, dressing rooms,
dining, sitting and drawing rooms, kitchen
and servants room.
ALSO,-Oarriage House ani Stable, and
sufficient pasture land for one or two cows.
For further information inquire of
MUSSON WAINWRIGHT,
61 Front Street,
Hamilton, Nov. 14, 1893.-tf
Colonist please copy,

FOR KtENT.

SThe 2 Storey Dwelling

"LLANBERIS
Near The Hamilton Hotel.
Now occupied by Mrs. T. H Pitt.
POSSESSION GIVEN 1set JANUARY, 1894.
Apply to
J. B. STEEDE,
Belveders,
November 7, 1893.


BERMUDA WORK EXCHANGE,
DEP6T FOR "BERMUDA SOUVENIRS,"
5 CHURCH STREET,
MRS. S. J. S'owE, General Manager.
Fancy and useful Articles. Sketches in OILS
and WATER COLORS, Palmetto, Cedar and
Shell Work, &c., &c., Cakes in great variety,
BERMUDA POUND CAKE and PLUMH
PUDDING" a specialty. Preserves, Syrup,
"CANDY and COCOA-NUT CAKES," so
MUCH LIKED BY VISITORS. Also Fresh Butter
and Eggs.
N.B.-No Articles purchased for this Estab-
lishment. All work, &c, furnished by subscribers.
January 1st, 1894-3m.

HAMILTON HOTEL

Will op fo eseam, t1893 ay, Dec 10,
1893.


Hamilton, 9-12-93.


J. R. MEAD,
Manager.


I1. Downing & Co.
FOREIGN EXPRESS
Custom House Brokers,
Forwarding and Comnsmission
lfIerchsants.
20 Exchange Place,
63 & 65 Beaver St., New York.
P. 0. BOX 3550.
RICHARD F. DOWNING.
THOMAS H. DOWNING.
M. MOLONEY, Manager Foreign Express
Department.
BERMUDA REPRESENTATIVES,
THOMPSON & ROBER [r.
May 18th, 1891

Notice of Removal.

J. L. CHAMBERS
HAS REMOVED FROM

Queu Strt to 54 Froet Streot,
Under the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club.
Hmilton, Jany ist, 1894-1m.
104.

THE

BERMUDA POCKET ALMANACK,
GUIDE AND DIRECTORY,
-Also-


May be obtained (on and after to-morrow,
WED NESDAY,)
Of Mr. George D. Boyle, St. George's, Mr.
R, Galloway, Superintendent of Police, R. N.
Yard, Mr. J. B. Zuill's Store, Somerset, and
the Royal Gazette Store.
Hamilton, Jany 2nd, 1894.

WANTED.

YOUNG MAN DESIRES
A- POSITION
In the Evenings, such as Book keeping, writ-
ing, &c. Terms moderate. Address to A, B. C.
C/o this Paper,
Hamilton, January 16, 1894-1m

FOR SALE.

A FEW OF THE LATEST

ADMIRALTY CHARTS
Of the Bermudas,
ROYAL GAZETTE STATIONERY STORE.
Hamilton, April 18, 1893.

FOR R ENT.

A FURNISHED
COTTAGE.
Pleasantly situated near the Admiralty House,
Clarence Hill.
Apply to
E. LYON,
TRIMINGHAM BROS.
Novr. 6, 1893,


CALVERT'S CRESOL
DISINFECTANT adl PURIFIER,
8 oz. 6d., 16 oz. 1/-, AND 32 oz. 1/6 BOTTLES ;
1 GALLON TINs 5/- EACH. English rates.
With full instructions for use on each package.
This fluid mixes readily with water in any
proportion; it is much stronger in disinfecting
power than other so-called non-poisonous fluids,
and less expensive. It is very effective and
cheap (in solution) for destroying Ants, wash-
ing Cattle or Sheep, deodorising refuse or
killing Insects, and it is especially useful to
prevent the ravages of Insects on Hides or
Plants, as well as to prevent Fly Bites on
Animals,


To CURE SKIN AILMENTS, ITCH
or RINGWORM use
CALVERT S

INDIAN BATH SOAP.
(Registered).
SOLD IN 3d. TABLETS & I/- BARS (English
Rates).

It contains 15 per cent. of genuine Carbolic,
which is the best known remedy for Sores,
Insect Bites, Stings, Prickly Heat, and para-
sitic complaints.


F. C. CALVERT & CO., MANCIIESIE, E NGLAND.
Awarded 60 Gold and Silver iMedals, SDiplomas, &c., for superior excellence of their
4 Carbolic Preparations, which can be obtained from most chemists and storekeepers.



FOR

3 3 r HOE GENTLEMEN.
Other Specialties
'S5 and $4 Dress Shoe.

$2.50, $2.25, $2
yb W. Dgcfor Workingmen.
pi aetdshsncKe Do $2 and $t175
.... for Boys and Youth.
$3, $2.50, and $2
THIS IS THE BE for Ladies.
\' -3 S $L, . $1.75 for
H:OE .. IN WO'- :. Misses.



3Z, i S A DUJ" you owe yourselt to get the best value for your money. Economize in
your footwear by Varohasing W. IT. Douglas Shoes, which represent the best value at the
prices advertised as thousands can testisy. Do you wear them?






YORK SUILDIiNG, BEIRUDA.
Jany. 2, 1894.


MECHANICS' HALL,
UAMILTON.

Under the Patronage of His Excellency the
Governor, General T. C. Lyons, C.B.,

AN ENTERTAINMENT
for the benefit of the
Cottage Hospital,
will take place
ON T I UR SD it.A Y,
1set February, 1894.

PART I.


Yellow


FOR RENT OR LEASE.

A Large, Two Story

DWELLING -.- HOUSE,
Containing four Bedrooms, Servants Room,
Bath Room and Water Closet upstairs, Draw-
ing Room, Library, China Closet and a large
Dining Room, Eitchen and Store Room down
stairs with Fruit Garden, a fine Flower Garden,
Carriage House and Stabling for one or two
horses, within 10 minutes walk from Hamilton,
on the Serpentine Road. Inspection solicited'
For full particulars you will please apply to


or to


Roses,


A DRAMATIC SKETCH.
CHARACTERS : -


Mrs Peveril
Colonel St.


[a widow, aged 60]
Mrs H D Butterfield.
Clair [aged 65]
Mr Ambrose Gosling.

PART II.


Humorous


Orchestra.


CHARAOTERS:-
1-Toy Symphaay.
2-Song [comic] Mr Hill.
3 -" Brown Paper Medley."
4-Song [comic] Mr Annesley.
5 -Character Song Three Old Maids of Lee "
Mr. Hill
6-Song [comic] Mr. Swinton.


7-Toy Symphony.
8-Song [comic] -
9-Song [comic]
10-" Brown Paper Medley."


- Mr. Hill.
Mr. Annesley.


GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.

Prices of admission :-Reserved Seat 2s. 6d.
Second Seats Is. Gallery 6d.
Tickets for Reserved Seats will be for sale at
the Royal Gazette office, on and after Wed-
nesday 24th.
Doors open at 7.30 p.m. Performance to
commence at 8 pm.
January 22, 1894,


T. J. WADSON,
Saltus Block, Hamilton.
J. H. MASTERS,
Pembroke Serpentine Road.
"Colonist" copy.


tO n 2-%. In :T "S?*.
A PORTION OF A
IS Double COT PAGE
In Hamilton, Near Victoria Park.
Possesion given at once.
Apply at
"ROYAL GAZETTE" OFFICE.
Hamilton, Jany 15th, 1891.

To Let,-Furnished,
S" STANCOMBE"
PAGET,'
Apply at.
VICTORTA LODGE,
Dec 3, 1893.-./. Hamiltorn

For Rent.

Three Cottages
in St. George's,
Two at the Cut and one at Wellington.
Apply to
E. C. JACKSON
Hamilton, October 2nd, 1893.-ttf.
"Colonist" and People's Journal" please
.copy.


Nova Scotia alnd West Ina
MAIL CONTRAO1T.

SEALED TENDERS, endorsed "Nova Sco.
Stia and West India Mail Contract," will
be received by the Undersigned up to and in-
clusive of the 1st March next, for the convey-
ance of all Mails from these Islands to the
West Indies once, at least, in every calendar
month all the year round, and from these Is-
lands on the return voyage to Nova Scotia for
a period of twenty-one months from the 1st of
April next by good and substantial steamships
fitted with appropriate first rate steam engines,
and capable of maintaining an average speed
of not less than 10 knots per hour.
The respective ports in the West Indies and
Nova Scotia at which the tenderer will under.
take to deliver mails must be stated in the
Tender.
The terms of Contract can be seen on appli.
cation at the Colonial Post Office, Hamilton.
The Colonial Government will not bind it-
self to accept the lowest or any tender.
AUBREY G. BUTTERFIELD,
Colonial Postmaster.
Colonial Post Office, Hamilton,
20th January, 1894.

Notice.
A LL persons having CLAIMS against the
Estate of Eugenius H. Caisey, late of
Warwick Parish, deceased, are requested to
forward their accounts to the undesigned on
or before the 7th day of February next; and
all persons INDEBTED to the said Estate are
requested to make settlement by that date.
J. H. THOMAS,
R. I, DUERDEN,
JAMES T. ANDERSON,
Executors
Jany 22nd, 1894.


Colonist copy.

T HE UNDERSIGNED being about to close
his business, would earnestly request 'all
persons Indebted to hili, to settle up
their bills
ON, OR BEFORE THE END FEBRUARY
Next,
A. J. FRITH.
Hamilton, 39 Fiont St., Jany 22, "94
PRIVATE BOARD,

Mrs. Edward P0niston
begs to announce that she can accommodate a
few guests at her home at
Brig'htsile,"
which is pleasantly situated at the Flatts,
being only half an hour's drive from Hamilton,
and two minutes' walk from the Post Office,
TERMS MODERATE,
Livery, Boating and Fishing readily pro.
cured.
Mrs. EDWARD PENISTONt,
BRIGITSIDE,"
FLATTS, BERMUDA,
Telephone 52.
Dec. 27, '93.-2m
PRIVATE BOARD.

Ladies and Gentlemen can be com-
fortably accommodated on reasonable
terms by applying to
X 3 9. 30 o3 rT
SEAWARD,"
HAMILI ,dT PARISH, Bermuda,
AMONG THE ATTRACTIONS
will be found a Tennis Lawn, Sea Bathing,
Fishing and Boating. Within ten minutes
walk of the Caves.
Carriages may be had at the shortest notice.
TELEVIPONE CALL 162 E.
Cable Address "Seaward."
Dec 4, 1893.-4m.

CARD.

Dn. F. W. E. PENISTON,
Veterinary Surgeon.
-I-
'Bfllmot,' gmf ints Parish.
Telephone No. 40
-I-
5 AMERICAN V ETERINAlUV C-LLIEO,
GRADUATE: UNIVERSITY OF THE rATH OF NEW
YORK.
November 28th, 1893.-6 m

Dr. MEIRCER,
VETERIINARIAW.
F*JuasOh ati F'l9,t.lip
TELEPHONEE 43.
July 26th, 1892,-tf,


AL A













PE~R DA ROYAL GA.ZETTft


WEEKLY REPORT OF THE WEATHER
at Gibbs' Hill Light Station at Bermuda be-
tween the 21st and 28th January, 1894;
height above the Sea being 246 feet at base
where the Register is kept.


Date.

1894 ..


Jan.

Noon.
22 N
23 E
24
25 sa
26
23


.6 0.060
g-, P
-- I

61 29.8930
61 30.160
60 30.280
63 30.150
61 30.060
63 29.930
63 30.100


General
Remarks.


Fine.
O're't.


Thick, sq'ly.
Fine.


W. 8. PERINCHIEF,
Principal Keeper.




Hamilton, January 30, 1894.

Colonial Secretary's Office,
Hamilton, 29 January, 1894.
i IS Excellency the Governor has been pleas-
l ed to appoint
the Ilonourab!c Archibald Alison,
Colonial Secret ry,
to be Chairman of the Board of Immigration to
act during the absence of the Governor.1
By Command,
ARCHIBALD ALISON.
Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office,
Hamilton, 25 January, 1894.
IS Excellency the Governor having received
information from the Consulate of the
United States in Bermuda that the President of
the United States has appointed
Marshall Hanger, Esquire,
Consul for this Colony, His Excellency desires it
to be notified that he has recognized Mr. Hanger
as Consul for tho United States pending the re.
ceipt of the notification of Her Majesty's pleasure
thereon.
By Command,
ARCHIBALD ALISON,
Colonial Secretary.

CUSTOM HOUSE,-HAMILTON.
ENTERED.
Jany. 27-R M S Trinidad, W J Fraser, New
York; assorted cargo to Trott & Cox.
CLEARED.
Jany 24-R M S Orinoco, P J Fraser, New York ;
190 brls potatoes, 10u boxes onions, 120 boxes
beets, 42 boxes tomatoes, 33 boxes lettuce, 31
boxes parsley.
29-R M S Trinidad, W J Fraser, New York.

CUSTOM HOUSE,-ST. GEORGE'S.
ENTERED.
Jany223-German ship Friedlander, Bellmer,
1584 tons, fiom Philadelphia to Danzig, Ger.
inmay, with a cargo of 2000 tons iron slack,-
put in in distress. Agents, W E Meyer & Co.
23-German bk Dona Evelina, Tohren, 356
tons, from New York to Mulucca Island, El,
with a cargo 10791 cares refined petroleum,-
put in in distress. Agents, W E Meyer & Co.
26-Br bk Asiana, McLernon, 1185 tons, from
Mobile, via Havana, to Manchester, G B,
with a cargo of timber,-put in in distress.
Agents, W E Meyer & Co.
CLEARED
Jany 26-Br S S Kate Fawcett, Cormack, to
Baltimore, Md, inward cargo of sulphur,-
obtained a supply of 40 tons of coal.

S PASSENGERS
In the R M S Orinoco on Thursday last for
. New York : --Mr and Mrs J L M Cammon, Lieut
A V J Cowell, Messrs Benj Aborn, Edward
Aborn, Ftrdon Buxton, C F Buxton, F W J
Hurst, W A Kerchberger, S 11 Kerohberger,-
2ND CABIN-W C Bean-2ND CABIN FORWAED-J
K Honsell, A Malony,
In the R M S Trinidad on Saturday last from
New Yoik .-Captain and Mrs Ganiville Geddes,
2 children and maid, Mr and Mrs F W Brompton,
Mr and Mrs J Earnshaw, Mr and Mrs H G Grarf,
Mr and Mrs WV F Jagger, Mr and Mrs J D Mc
Inness, Mr and Mrs Clark, Mr and Mrs John G
Peebles, Miss Margaret J Peebles, Miss Mary E
Peebles, Miss Mattie S Peebles, Mr John G Pee-
bles, Jr.. Mr and Mrs J 0 Rymes, Mr and Mrs
Chas D Snedeker, Mr and Mrs Franklin Weston.
Mr and Mrs Rufus R Wilson, Mrs R A Craig,
Mrs James Richardson, Mis J S Simpson. Miss S
. Simpson, Mrs G H Trimingham, Miss Triming-
ham, Miss a Hinson, Miss Volze, Miss Wood,
Captain J L Beckwith. Captain William A Over-
ton, Messrs George 1' Bently, G Blackbourn,
Peter De Baun, Louis Gerardot, Sherwood Gil-
lespy, Charles Le Bihan, Max Meyers, N Me.-
Kerry, J Dennis, M Weir, Daniel O'Brien, A
Robinson, Sumner Robius,., A Steengrafe,
Servis Wallace, H Wood,-2xD CABiN-7-3rd
CANj i2.
In the R.M.S. Trinidad for New York yester.
day :--Revd and Mrs Algernon S Crapsey, Dr and
Mrs R M Fogg, Dr and Mrs B Maycock, Mr and
Mrs H G Ahrens, Mr and Mrs Dwight Blaney, Mr
.and Mrs E L Brady, Mr and Mrs Colmary, Mr and
Mrs P G Cook, Mr and Mrs J G Dunscomb, Mr and
Mrs C E Hodges, Mr and Mrs J D Probst, Mr and
Mrs Franklin Weston, Miss Dougan, Miss Mary C
Foster, Miss Julia Pardow. Messrs Geo T Bentley,
George Burland, A G Earle, M M Foss, J H Grout,
S H Graves, R Hankinson, Michael Keating, P H
Keating, Gustave Linneworth, Wm Mertens, J N
McKerry, Alexander Robinson, John H Rochester,
S H Seward, Chas H Steinway, H W Wadleigh, H
T Wells, Addio S Watson. 2ND CLAss,-Mrs John-
son; W Doddridge, P Lewis.

REPORTS.
Jany 28-Captain Thoren of the German bk
"Dona Evehina" (on a voyage from New York
to Mulucca Island, with a cargo of ker oil)
reports having left New York on the 16th inst,
had stormy weather from the time of leaving.
On the 19th inst, in lat 37.9, W, long 66.44,
experienced a heavy gale of wind from the
N W, which caused the vessel to labor heavily,
in consequence of which she started leaking
badly. After the gale abated decided to run
for Bermuda, made land on the 23rd, and was
towed into St George's by the tug 'tGladisfen."
Agents, WE lMeyer & Co.
Jany SS-Captain Bellmer, of the German
ship '"Friedlander," (on a voyage from Phila-
delphia to Danzig, Germany, with a cargo of
iron slack) reports having experienced very
severe weather from the time of leaving Phila.
delphia. On the lih ilst ha~d a heavy gale of


FREEMASONRY.
. A convocation of the Royal Edward Chap.
ter No. 1890, of Royal Arch masons of England
was held in the Chapter Room, West Water
Street St. George's, on Wednesday last, 24th
inst., when the following officers for the year
1894 were installed:--
M.E.Z.-E. Comp T. Bullock, P.Z., 18n
A.-E. Comp. A. W. Hancock
J.-Comp. R. A. Mageehan
Treasurer.-E. Comp. J. I. Smith, P.Z.
Scribe E.-Comp. G. L. Allen
Scribe N.-Comp. E. Max .vell
P.S.-E. Comp. J. H. Robertson, P.Z.
1st A.S.-Comp. G. Hiogg
2nd A. S.-Comp. C. Taylor
Janitor-C-omp. P. T. Uansen
After the ceremony of installation a banquet
was served of which the companions of the
Chapter and their visitors partook.


wind from the N E, with a tremendous sea, at
times the vessel was completely under water,
had all hands at the pumps. After the gale
abated decided to make for Bermuda, made
land on the 22nd, and was towed to Five Fa-
thom Hole by the tug "Gladisfen." Agents,
W E Meyer & Co.
Jany 25-Put in the Br bk Asiana," McLer-
non, from Mobile, via Havana, bound to Man-
chester, G B, with a cargo of timber. The
Captain reports having been compelled to put
into Bermuda by the crew who refused to pro-
ceed, claiming that the vessel was unseaworthy.
The Asiana" left Mobile on the 31st of
Dec last. While off the coast of Florida got
ashore and remained in that position for 18
hours. After throwing overboard the deck.
load succeeded in floating the vessel; put into
Havana for the purpose of having a survey
held on the vessel and the bottom examined by
a diver. The report of the diver not being an
unfavourable one the vessel sailed from Havana
on the 10th inst. From that date to the 18th
inst had favourable weather; from the 18th to
the 24th had a succession of gales of wind which
strained the vessel and caused her to leak
badly. On the 24th inst the crew came aft and
refused to work the ship unless the Captain
would decide to put into Bermuda (claiming
that the vessel was unseaworthy). The crew
refusing to work the ship, the Captain had no
alternative but to make for Bermuda which was
accordingly done,-made land on the 25th and
was towed to Murray's Anchorage by the tug
",Gladisfen."
On Friday, the 26th, a survey was held on
the vessel, and it was recommended that a
diver be sent down to examine the vessels bot-
tom.
M- Capt McLernon, of the Br bk Asiana,"
reports that on the 24th inst, at 8 p.m., in lat
31.30, long 64.40, he passed a very large dere-
lict vessel bottom up.

VESSELS IN THE PORT OF ST. GEORGES, JANY.
29TH, 1894.
Br sch "Clayola," undergoing repairs.
"6 I "H arry," ." "
German bk Dona Evelina, awaiting orders,
in Murray's Anchorage.
Br bk "Asiana," awaiting recommendation
of Surveyors.
German ship Friedlander," awaiting orders.

THE S. S. KATE FAWCETT.
The investigation of the charge against Pilot
Daniel Smith, for :a breach of the Pilotage Act
on the complaint of Capt. Cormack, of the S.S.
Kate Fawcett,'.for having (in.the words of the Act)
through' ignorance, carelessness or negligence
caused the S. S. Kate Fawcett to take the ground
near the Narrows Channel, was begun on Mon-
day the 22nd instant, before the Wor. W. T. Ro-.
berts, J.P., the Wor. J. I. Smith, J.P., and Cap-
tain W. H. Peniston, a nautical assessor, in the
Town Hall, St. George's, and occupied two days.
The defendant was represented by Mr. R. W.
Appleby, Barrister-at- Law. The complainant
had no counsel. The evidence was not such as
would point to either ignorance, carelessness or
negligence, and the charge was accordingly dis-
missed with costs.
There was a second and similar complaint
against Pilot Cornelius Minors who took over
the charge of the Kate Fawcett, from Pilot Smith,
and in entering the Channel the second time
the ship again grounded. The complaint was
however, withdrawn by the Captain of the ship,
unconditionally, in consequence of the delay
which would be entailed on his ship and cargo
in prosecuting. The dismissal of the complaint
casts no reflection on the Captain or Officers of
the ship, who appear to have carried out very
minutely the directions of the Pilot. The ship
appeared to have been unusually sluggish in
steering, which may have been caused by a
portion'of a six inch hawser which a sub-marine
diver certified to have found wound round the
shaft and propellor with about 25 turns, to-
gether with the strong N. E. gale accompanied
with terrific sudden squalls But this was riot
gone into to any great length by the Court,
which was not a Court of Inquiry except so far
as concerned the particular charge against the
Pilot under the Colonial Pilotage Liws.

W- R M S S Trinidad, Scotland light ship,
New York, Jan 24 to St. David's Head, Jan 26
trip in 48 hours and 35 minutes. Ship detained
by fog Jan 26, 1894.-BENJ J H PENISTON,
Purser.

The R. M. Steamer Trinidad, Captain W. J.
Fraser, arrived at Murray's Anchorage on
Friday last a little before sunset and came to
her Dock on Saturday at 10.30 a. m.
The Trinidad sailed yesterday at 1 p.m. for
New York.
Capt. Fraser, and Mr. Peniston, (purser) have
our thanksfor late New York papers.
HOTEL ARRIVALS.
THa PBIMNCEss, Jany 22.-Mrs A Kempster,
Mrs A Hart, New York City; George T Meech,
Middleton, Conn. ;-Jany 27th, Mr and Mrs F
W Brompton, Mr and Mrs Harry C Gray,
Charles Le Bihan, L B Girardrau, Peter de
Baun, Captain W A Overton, Captain A Steeu-
grae, New York, Mr and Mrs J D Macinness,
Philadelphia ; Mrs Florence W Richardson, St
Loais; George T Bently, Buffalo Austin 0C
Wood, Syracuse, N Y; J N McKelly, Alexander
Rubinson, Boston; Captain J L Beckwith, Chi.
cago; Max Meyers, Baltimore
THE HAMILTON, Jany 23rd.-Marshall Hanger,
Virginia; Miss May E Hanger, Virginia.-Jan.
27th, Sumner Robinson, Pittsburg, Pa.; Mr and
Mrs M G Peebles, Miss M J Peebles, Miss M E
Peedles, Miss M S Peebles, M G Peebles, Jr.,
Portsmouth, O ; [Mr and Mrs Fraklin Wes-
ton, Dalton, Mass; Mr and Mrs C E Rymes,
Mr and Mrs Sherman Clark, Rochester, N
J; Mr and Mrs C D Snedeker, New Brans.-
wick, N J; Mr and Mrs J Enshau, Cinoin-
atie; Mr and Mrs H H Weekley, Dayton, 0;
Mrs J S Simpson, Brooklyn, NY ; Miss L Simp-
son, Sherwood Gillespy, Mrs R & Craig, N Y.
WzisDOB, Jany 27-Mr and Mis Gamble Ged-
des, 2 Children and nurse, Toronto, Canada.


pied, and hundreds were unable to get in at all.
Mr Crapsey has won golden opinions, and he takes'
away with him the respect and love not only of'
members of the Church of England, but of all who:
have had the privilege of hearing him.


63 It will be seen by our advertising columns
that some of the ladies connected with the Wo-.
man's Work Exchange. Reid Street, are organi-
zing an Art Sale and Fancy Fair, for the two-fold
purpose of extending the business of the Ex-
change, and of helping the Cottage Hospital. We
are authorized to request that the many con.
tributions already promised, and all others which
any friends and supporters of these two institu.
tions may care to make,-either towards the Art
Work, and bric-a-brac department, or towards the
refreshment, fruit, flowers and vegetable stalls,-
shall be left at the Woman's Work Exchange,
Reid Street, to be forwarded to the Secretary,
Miss Gray, Paget, or else sent to the Masonic
Hall, Hami!ton, on Wednesday, 21st February,
the day before the sale opens,


The fixedtregulartweekly'service"maintained by
the Quebec Steamship Company, by their steam-
ships Trinidad and Orinoco, during the winter
months was a very convenient and highly satis-
factory one. Sunday, in case of bad weather or
any other cause of detention, was always a margin
to go on. The time in both ports was ample for
transacting any ordinary business by return trip.
Under the ten days' trip schedule of the re-fitted
Trinidad the public cannot enjoy the same general
benefits. But there are other considerations which
counterbalance these. The Quebec Company feel
that the Bermuda passenger business can be pro-
vided for amply by the Trinidad making ten day
trips, and that the occasional detentions are not
likely to interfere with this very seriously. The
public will want to travel with the largest and
fastest boat with safety, expedition, speed and com-
fort, and so the Trinidad will be the favourite. If
this Season's experience shall be found satisfact-
ory to make these ten day trips a regular thing,
then the mail sorting and distributing arrange-
ments will have to be improved on to afford the
general public the greatest benefits. The most
efficient way of securing this would be to follow
the custom of the German Trans-Atlantic steam-
ships and have the mails assorted on the voyage
by a couple of postal clerks. When off St. George's,
all the East end mail to be landed there, all tied
up, and ready for immediate delivery on arrival at
Post Office. All the Ireland and Somerset mails to
be landed from Grassy Bay similarly sorted, and
lastly those for Hamilton and points between
PortRoyal and the Flatts, either by steam tend-
er from Grassy Bay or on coming alongside
the wharf at Hamilton, tide promptly permitting.
And so in despatching the mails let them be des.
patched from Hamilton, Ireland Island, and St.
George's to be sorted on board en voyage to New
York in closed bags to the various cardinal points
of destination. This, of course, would involve a
large additional outlay in Post Office management
in the compensation of travelling clerks and rent
of proper Post Office on board the steamship. Any
thorough system to afford satisfaction must be at-
tended with considerable expense. Every way
Office should be connected with the Hamilton Post
Office by telephone and extra conveyances and ex-
tra sorters provided. The times when it might be
found expedient to land the mails at St. George's
and distributed from there would be so seldom that
the providing of a staff for the occasional work
could not be entertained. The ten day trips are a
new experiment. It would be well to see how they,
work meanwhile, and, from observations, to try
what methods can be resorted to in order that the
public may have the greatest privileges possible
under the present legislative provisions; and fur-
ther to suggest what improvements can be made
and at what cost on existing regulations likely to
meet with Legislative approval. The Post Office
exists for the public benefit, and the public have a
right to expect the greatest possible advantages
within the available pecuniary resources of the
Colony.

$W In our Promenade in Hamilton, No. 3,"
last week, we turned the corner of Victoria street,
into Cedar avenue, just a little too quickly, omit.
ting (quite unintentionally) mention of Mr. A. M.
Oudney's residence, back from the street line,
with neat wall, enclosing the garden and approach
to the house with its double verandah plein midi.
As a preceptor of youth in Bermuda, Mr Oudney
has had a long and successful experience, and is
now resting from his active labours. The late
William Whitney of Mont Clare was wont to ad-
mire Bermuda stone, plastering, and white wash in
landscape adornment as rivalling even Italian mar-
ble in decoration. The neatness of Mr. Oudney's
stretch of walls recallsMr. Whitney's opinion. We
may conclude this noted by remarking that the side
walk in front gives an appropriate base, and that
not far behind is the Brunswick House under Miss
Edgar's kindly care. At the corner of Court Street
and Victoria Street is the A.M.E. Church and Min-
ister's residence, being gradually improved on.
Opposite is Cavendish Cottage, .the nucleus of
which was a school room, built some years back
as a private undertaking, a spirited one for the
time. The transformation is a pleasing one, the
Miss Darrells, by the name, have perpetuated in
Hamilton the old hospitable, family mansion in
Devonshire.

THE PAGET MISSION,
In ourissue of last week we gave some particulars
as to the opening work of the Paget Mission, to-day
we are able to chronicle the close of what is every-
where spoken of in terms of highest admiration
and praise.
The weather, except on Saturday afternoon has
been pleasant, consequently the attendance of
crowded congregations has not been interfered
with. Undoubtedly to most of our readers, the ex-
traordinary interest of Mr Crapsey's work has cen-
tred in the Men's Services. On Sunday afternoon,
the 21st, there was a great gathering of between
300 and 400 men, who, for nearly an hour, listened
eagerly to a most eloquent address. On the follow-
ing Wednesday and Friday nights there were very
large gatherings, but Sunday afternoon last was
the culminating point when Paget Church was full
from end to end with more than 500 men, who had
come from all parts of the Islands. The volume of
sound from this great body of men's voices was
something which those who heard it will not easily
forget.
And only next in interest have been the Child.
ren's Services each afternoon. The church (with
the exception of the chancel) has generally been
-packed. The youug people have shown themselves
most eager and ready learners, and we hear that
the Missioner has been delighted both by their at-
tendance and their intelligence.
The Doctrinal Instructions each morning have
maintained the high pitch of excellence with which
they began, and to thoughtful people they have
rendered a service which will never be forgotten as
long as life lasts.
That the Mission Service each night was appre-
ciated has been shown by the church being full of
people. The interest has gone on growing to the
end; for on Sunday night last, every inch of avail-
able standing room inside the church was occu-


man who is a competent judge of music, that the
practice he was invited to attend a few evenings
ago was highly creditable. We hope the club will
be generally patronized and every encouragement
given to its members.
4W ERRATA.--In our cable report last issue
re. the arrival of the R M 8 Trinidad at New
York, on the 21st inst. at 5.80 this evening,-
read 5.30 this tnorning.

AT THE MECHANICS' HALL IN THIS TOWN.
THIS TUESDAY EVENING.-The Annual General
Meeting of the Bermuda Church Society will take
place commencing 7.30. [See Advertisement.]
THURSDAY EVENING NEXT, 1ST FEBRUARY.-
There will be an entertainment for the benefit of
the Cottage Hospital." [See Advertisement 1st
page of this GAZETTE.]
ON SHROVE TUESDAY, 6TH FEBRUARY.-Mrs. Nu-
gent will give a farewell concert for a charitable
Purpose. [See Advertisement.] :


"CUT THIS OUT."
FOR BENEFIT OF BERMUDA PLANTERS.
Nrw Youx, Jan. 23rd, 1894.
Wx. E. METE, EsQ.,
Bermuda.
Dear Sir,-Your esteemed favour of 17th inst.
was received yesterday and we thank you for your
prompt reply. We note what you say about the
prospective advantages offered by the Bermuda
Islands and about the conditions existing and fully
agree with you that with proper energy and ex-
perience favourable results may be obtained-but
fear the expressed opinion that "the middlemen
reap the benefit abroad is a rather hasty conclu-
sion. There may be exceptions but generally
sneaking first class commission houses in New
York will work for the interest of their patrons to
the beat of their ability and that they charge a
commission surely should not be objected to. The
fact is farmers are often not very particular especi.
ally those who are lacking in energy. Many
farmers cannot raise good crops and many are too
careless in putting up their goods-either do not
grade them properly or fail to make them look neat
and attractive. Very few farmers fully recognize
that they make money by improving their goods
but ship quantity rather than quality and overlook
the fact that not only will goods not properly
graded sell for less money but that they have to
pay additional freight for such as should have
been taken out and thrown away. A Bermudian
farmer should consider that his products are calcu-
lated for the better class of people only (people of
small income cannot afford to buy them), and that
these people expect only such goods as will 'suit
their fastidious fancy. Furthermore, he should
carefully consider what varieties of vegetables will
grow to good form, in sufficient abundance and at
seasons when lit will pay to ship them to New
York. on his farm,-and as we may be able to give
a little advice in regard to this, we would offer the
following suggestions: peas, beans, cucumbers
and beets would probably sell at profitable prices
from middle of December until April first. Globe
Artichokes, Green Peppers, Brussels Sprouts, if it
can be raised in firm and solid heads and Egg
Plants from middle of November until April 1st,
Cauliflower from January 1st to May 1st, and
potatoes, onions and tomatoes as heretofore. Let
tace, sweet-corn,'oelery, parsley and carrots we do
not think will pay as we are getting them from
various home sources. You no doubt understand
that we cannot assume to give the exact periods
for these different products but we think the time
we have mentioned~for each kind is very near cor-
rect. Globe artichokes, Brussels Sprouts and
cauliflower are quite extensively imported from
Southern France and Algiers during the winter
months and if they can be produced to perfection
during the time above mentioned successful com-
petition might be established,-but it must be
considered that there is only limited outlet for such
goods, and overproduction would prove disastrous.
We should think we could handle about one
thousand artichokes and one thousand pounds
Sprouts per week, providing they are as good as
the French and should the experiment prove suc-
cessful future crops might be increased to meet
requirements. We would be very glad to become
acquainted and open correspondence with some of
the planters and we will at any time give them the
benefit of our experience and such advice as may
be necessary.
Respectfully yours,
STARIN & CO.

HAMILTON, 26th January, 1894.
To the Editor of the Royal Gazette:-
DEAR MR. LEE,-In the last issue of your paper,
an article appeared taken from the "Chicago Hu-
mane Journal," which so directly applies to the
many instances of cruelty to dumb animals in
Bermuda, that I should be glad to unite with any
kindly disposed person towards the brute creation,
who would be willing to organize a Society for the
prevention of cruelty to animals.
Yours truly,
CLAUDE W. MoCALLAN.

ART UNION OF LONDON.
We beg to refer our readers to the advertise-
ment relating to the above society on the third
page of this Gazette, and are glad to be able to
say that a local agent has been appointed for this
colony. The society has not been represented
here since the death in February, 1883 of our es.
teemed editor, the late D. McPhee Lee, Esq.,-
who acted for it for many years, and during his
agency many residents of the colony were from
time to time subscribers. We observed by the
prospectus handed to us that the Art Union of
London was established in 1837 to promote the
knowledge and love of the Fine Arts, and their
general advancement in the British Empire. It is
under the direction of a Council, whose services
are honorary. The amount of subscription is one
guinea (or more). This is expended in producing
an engraving or other work, to which each sub-
scriber is entitled, and the surplus, 'after meeting
the necessary expenses is devoted to the acquisi-
tion of works in painting and sculpture, &o.,
which are distributed by lot amongst the subsori-
bers of the year. Every member for each guinea
subscribed is entitled to one plain impression of
one of the annual works produced (for the Society,
or a bronze medal, or by increased subscription, a
bust, or vase, or statuette, or other work. And in
addition, one chance in the distribution of prizes.
Any member having paid his subsoripion for the
current year, may have any number of extra
chances in the distribution at half-a-guinea each-
but without another print. We wish Mr.
Middleton success, and believe that not a few of
our people will be glad to avail themselves of this
new opportunity of becoming subscribers to the
Art Union, and thereby 'confer a benefit on
themselves and families and on the colony of Ber-
muds at large.

THE HAMILTON GLEE CLUB.
We are glad to be able to announce the first en-
tertainment by this recent institution, which will
be held at the Mechanies' Hall, Hamilton, on 21st.
February. The Club consists of about seventeen
of the most energetic young men of Hamilton, who
have b en very carefully trained by Professer
Emil Lueben who is well known to our people as a
musician of merit. We understand from a gentle-


Naw Yonu, Jan 29-88 Oriwe arrived midnight
Saturday night.
L i / ,
Another Dynamite Attempt in Paris.-PARna,
Jan. 23.-It has just been made public that on
Sunday night last a watchman employed at the
Grand Magasins du Printemps. owned by M.
Jules Jaluzot, a member of the Chambe Depu.
ties, found an infernal machine thatl..u been
placed at the main entrance of the stores.
The watchman dipped the machine in a bucket
of water and then turned it over to the "police,
who caused its contents to be analyzed. It was
found that the machine contained chlorate powder
and a number of projectiles, which together
weighed ten pounds. The time at which the dis-
covery was made suggests that the person who
placed the machine where it was found aimed to
damage the building and not persons. The police
think the attempted outrage was the wort of some
person who had, been dismissed from employment
at the stores.


CHARGE OF PERJURY.
Alfred Stewart Perry was charged with perjury
before the Police Court, Hamilton, on Wednesday
last, and the hearing, was adjourned to Thursday
next, 1st February.

WINTER EXCURSIONS TO WEST INDIES
AND DEMERARA.
The following extract from a letter Written by
Mr. W. Blackley, of Messrs. D. McCall & Co.,
Toronto. dated the 3rd inst., on board the Pickford:
& Black S.S. Alpha, will be read with interest by
those contemplating a winter trip at the present
low fares to the West India islands or Demerara
by the Intercolonial railway and the fine steamers
of the Pickford & Black lines: "It affords me
great pleasure to speak in the highest terms of
Capt. Hall and his officers. The trip so far has
been delightful. especially to Jamaica, and much
of the pleasure has been due to the excellent accom-
modation, the splendid cuisine, and the attention
received on board the Alpha. I shall not fail, by
pen and otherwise, to let the Ontario people "Jmow
the excellent service of and the. delightful time I
have had on your line of steamers." Mr. Black-
ley and his son booked at N. Weatherston's office,
York Street, last month for Demerara and return
via Bermuda and the West India islands, leaving
out Jamaica, but when they arrived at Bermudi
decided, to take the trip to Jamaica as well.-Tor.
onto Empire. Tan. 12.


By the Halifax and Bermudas Cable.
JACKSONVILLE. Fla., at 2.26 p.m., Jan. $5.-
Mitchell knocked out in the third round.
1st Round. -End of 1st round honors even.
Looks like being a tough fight.
2nd Round.-End of 2nd round Mitchell blow-
ing, Corbett fresh.
3rd Round.--Mitchell completely knocked out.
Corbett knocked him down three times. Re-
feree counted him out and declared Corbett the
winner, and champion of the world.
Mitchell was badly whipped.

LONDON, Jan. 27.-The last Egyptian incident
is generally regarded as closed by the Khedives
declaration. The gist of the editorials publish.
ed this morning is that the Khedive must un-
derstand the warning that England cannot and
will not tolerate the deliberate defiance of her
authority in Egypt.
LONDON, Jan. 27.-The Daily Chronicle says of
Bismarck's visit to Berlin the meeting does
credit to the Emperor who after escaping per-
haps the most despotic of modern statesmen
might well never have desired to see him again.
It would be an error to suppose that Bismarck's
antiquated political methods will ever again be
in force in Germany." The Daily Telegraph says
These displays of profound regard may shed
balm on the hurts that have rankled in a heroic
soul through weary months of sombre seclusion
and mental depression and physical suffering
but they can scarcely be expected to efface
wholly the remembrance of the past." The
Daily News says It remains to be seen whether
the reception of Bismarck in Berlin yesterday
was merely graceful of courtesy, a tardy but ef.
fusive apology for a slight or an indication that
the Emperor wishes to go hand in glove with
Bismarck and allow the old Chancellor to re-
sume office again. Europe will await the result
with the deepest interest."

BOSTON, Jan. 27.-Weather forecasts until
Sunday night. Snow to day, clearing to-night,
fair and slightly Sunday, north to northwest
winds.

Biamrx, Jany 28-It is now known positively
that Bismarck's private convention with the Em-.
peror lasted but ten minutes. Caprivi did not
talk with him at all. The Prince .did not desire
to talk politics with the Emperor or Caprivi and
refrained carefully during his reception at the
Royal Palace from all allusions to public affairs.

MILAx, Jan 28-The authorities have confiscate.
ed the editions of the Secolo radical organ for its
attacks on Prime Minister Crispi.

BosTox, Jany 28-The Bell Telephone Company
will next week petition the leglslalure for power
to increase its capital stock from twenty to fifty
million dollars.
Rio, 'Jany 28-The reports of argeement be-
tween President Peizato and insurgents to submit
differences to arbitration are falsehoods.
PARIs, Jan 28-The pardons committee after ex-
amining the appeal of Auguste Vaillant, the anar.
ohist sentenced to death for throwing the bomb in
the Chamber of Deputies, has decided to let jus-
tice take its course. President Carnot intimated
that he will not interfere.

BosToN, Jan 28-Reports from New London,
Newport, and points along the Sound show last
nights and to-days snowstorm to be the worst for
years. Trains are several hours late and streets
are blockaded and in some cases cities are in dark.
ness, owing to the electric lights being silut off to
prevent damage from fires. No marine disasters
are reported. --- -
L6NDON, Jan 29-The Portuguese Government
has received information that an insurrection has
threatened to break out in Oporto. A fleet of war.
ships sailed from Lisbon for Oporto this morning
to aid in suppressing any revolutionary movement
that may be undertaken.
TonoxTo, Jan 29-Special probabilities. Winds
increasing to gales from the eastward, increasing
cloudiness with snow and rain.

BOSTOx, Jan 29-Rain or snow beginning this
afternoon, evening warmer with north to east
winds increasing in force clearing by Tuaeday
afternoon with lower temperature and winds shift.
ing to westward.

ST PzwnBsuna, Jan 29-The Czar is suffering
from a severe attack of influenza accompanied with
bronchitis and inflammation of the right lauig.












VIOTII13A ROYAL awAZETTLI


U. -.--~ -w- -wm~


KAISER AND EX CHANCELLOR.
BEniN, Jany 23-Baron Marshall von Biebers-
tein, Minister of Foreian Affairs, in conversation
in the lobby of the Reichstag to-day said that
Emperor William recently sent Prince Bismarck a
case of wine through Count Von Moltke, his
Majesty's aide-de-camp. The Emperor also sent
an inquiry as to the health of the Prince.
Prince Pismarck replied, thanking the Emperor
for his gift, and saying that, when his health per-
mitted he would thank His :\h jcey personally in
Berlin.
The Cologne Gazette says that Prince Bismarck
has informed Emperor William that he will visit
him in Berlin next week.
The announcement that Prince Bismarck had
promised to visit Emperor William has caused a
sensation here. Bismarck's friends in the Reich-
stag assert that the 'ip r,.r was led to invite Bis-
marck to Berlin by the recent Mittnacht incident
in the Reichstag. The Emperor's sense of up-
tightness, according to Bismarck's friends, was
hooked by the public declarations that Prussia
had broken faith with Wurtemberg. Herr von
Kardoff already sees Bismarck returning to power.
Outside of the circle of the enemies of Chan-
cellor von Caprivi, however, a reconstruction of
the Cabinet with Bismarck behind the scenes is
held to be impossible. The Emperor declared a
week ago that he fully stood by the Chancellor.
Both the press and the public areengrossed with
the subject of Prince Bismarck's coming visit to
Berlin. The North German Gazette says that the
invitation to Bismarck was made entirely on the
Emperor's initiative in continuation of the advance
began last summer at Guens, and that the visit
has no political meaning.
The National Gazette rejoices at the rapproche-
ment between the Emperor and Bismarck, and
predicts that the nation generally will be pleased.
The Berlin bourse was favorably affected by
the news of Bismarck's proposed visit.
LoNtON, Jan 24-The Paris correspondent of
the Daily News says that it is believed in Paris
that Premier Crispi mediated between Emperor
William and Prince Bismarck.
The Daily Telegraph's Berlin correspondent says
that Bismarck will be received in Berlin with all
the honor due to his rank and that he will be the
Emperor's guest at the Castle.
Both the Standard and the Telegraph express
pleasure at the rapprochement between the Em-
peror and the Prince and believed that this pleas-
ure will be universal in Europe.
The Daily News prefers to wait events, saying it
is difficult to see how they can become reconciled
without concessions, which neither can be dispose.
ed to make.

DEFENCE OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE.
LONDON, Jan. 22.-Mr. Arthur J, Balfour,
leader of the unionists in the House of Commons,
gooke at length this evening before a meeting in
Manchester on the subject of the imperial defence.
This subject, he said, was at presentrof paramount
interest. Any nation or combination of nations
which was able to wrest from Great Britain her
supremacy of the seas could bring her to her knees
without landing a single soldier on English soil.
He did not believe any government was justified
in expe,:tlng a long era of piece. The French and
Russian governments were pushing forward with
-all speed the work in their dockyards. Certain
movements made of late years in Asia were only
too obviously directed against England. While
there were indications that France and Russia
were earnestly bent upon peace, their main ar-
rangements are evidently prompted by the assump-
tion of a conflict with England sooner or later,
Singly or combined.
He believed that the English people were amic.
ably disposed toward France, tut he must admit
with the deepest regret the conviction that the
French were hostile to England.
Finally Mr. Balfour appealed to the electors to
influence their representatives in Parliament by
all possible means to assist in quickly and efficient-
ly strengthening the country's defences. He
could pledge the opposition, he said, to co-operate
cordially with the government in iti every effort to
increase England's naval and military power.
Sofas are Now Quiet.-LoNDno, Jan. 22.--A
despatch from Free Town, Sierra Leone, states
that the British expedition under the command of
Col. A. B. Ellis, which was sent cut against the
Sofas, returned to Free Town yesterday, the work
of the expedition having been accomplished. The
interior of the country is now quiet.
Almost a Panic at Calcutta.-LONDno, Jan. 22.-
The Calcutta correspondent of the Times says :-
"The money market to-day was almost in a
panic. It is feared that the Earl of Kimberly
may accept any rate offered at the next sale of
bills, It is virtually certain that he can command
fair rates if he holds out a week or so longer."
A despatch to the Times from Hong Kong says
that the last phase of the silver crisis has had a
deplorable effect upon business there. Both in
Hong Kong and Shanghai trade has been paralyz-
ed.
Parnellite Plan of Campaign.-Dunux, Jan. 22.
-Mr. John Redmond, the Parnellite leader, ad-
dressed a meeting at Roscommon yesterday. He
said that he would demand the appointment of
Irish representatives on the commission to inquire
into the financial relations between Great Britain
and Ireland, as he would not trust a purely English
commission.
He added that at the opening of the session of
the House of Commons he would press the gov-
ernment for information on many points. The
attitude of the Parnellites would depend on the
replies to these questions.
Trying to Buy of Lolengula.-LoNDoN, Jan. 23.
-A despatch from Cape Town to the Daily News
says :-" Sir Henry Loch has despatched a mes-
senger to Kiug Lobengula pledging, in the Queen's
name, that if he surrenders his life and interests
shall be assured, and he shall not be deported from
Africa. Sir Henry has arranged with Premier
Cecil Rhodes to provide the King with an adequate
tract of land south of the Orange River, the char.-
tered company supplying the royal income.


DIED, at her residence, in this town, on the
23rd Inst., Mary Ann, widow of the late George
Karkeek Kirkham, a native of Kent, England,
in the 86th year of her age.
......, at Undercliff," Pembroke, on Sun-
day, the 21st instant, Susan Manning, the be-
loved wife of D. E. Seon, aged 48 years.
...., at Woodmont, Pembroke, on Sunday the
28th inst., Miss Jacobina Lewis Tucker, aged 67'
years.
JoHNSON-Jany 6th, at Devenport, Marian,
the beloved wife of Samuel Wellesly Johnson,
M B, R N, of H M S Impregnable, and second
daughter of Robert Barnaby, of H M Dockyard,
Chatham. Aged 29. Interred at Chathamr
Cemetery.
......, INGHAM,-at "Rosenheim," Syden-
ham, England, on the 8th of January, in the
89th year of his age, Surgeon Major William
H. Martin Ingham, Indian Medical Service,
fourth son of the Hon. Samuel S. Inghalw, of
these Islands.


THE ANNUAL MEETING
OF THE

BERMUDA CHURCH SOCIETY
will (D.V.) be held in the
MIechanics' UMall,
(which has been generously lent for the
purpose) on
This Tuesday Evening,
(JAN. 30TH,) AT 7.30 P.M.
His Excellency the Governor, the Patron of
the Society has kindly promised to take the
Chair.
All interested in the welfare of the Church of
England in Bermuda are cordially invited to
attend.
J. LUMLEY LOUGH,
Paget.
January 29th, 1894
[Fifly-Eighth Year, 1S93-94.]

Art Union of London.
112 STRAND.
Instituted 1837. Incorporated by
Royal Charter 1846.

President, -The Most Honourable The Marquis
of Lothian, K. T.
THE COUNCIL of the Art Union of London
are issuing as their annual work for the
current year an important ETCHING, by
R. W. Macbeth, Esq., A.R A., after the popu-
lar picture in last year's Royal Academy Ex-
hibition, by H. Wf. B, Davis, Esq., R. A., en-
titled
SSUMMER TIME."
Every subscriber, in addition to the annual
work, receives for each guinea (1 1 0) sub-
scription one chance of a prize in the next dis-
tribution to be held in April, 1894.
The ordinary impressions of the above plate
will be printed on india paper.
For the current year the Council have deci-
ded to offer as the First Prize the important
original Oil Painting of "REBEKAH AT
THE WELL" by Frederick Goodall. R. A.,
purchased by the Council for the sum of 900.
The principal of combination which forms
the basis of the Art Union, alone renders it
possible to give such works as those now of-
fered, besides a chance of a Prize in the annual
Distribution for one guinea.
A specimen copy of the above Etching may
be seen at the office of the undersigned, Front
st., Hamilton, any afternoon after 4 o'clock,
from the present date to the 8th March.
ORMOND T. MIDDLETON,
Local Agent.
30th Jany., 6th Feby., 6th March. --3p
A FULL SUPPLY OF

Just received, comprising :
WATER MELON-Fine Rattlesnake, direct
from Georgia, Cuban Queen, Excelsior,
Boss, Black Spanish, Citron, for praser-
ving, Florida Favorite, Green and Gold,
Ice Cream, The Jones, Jordan's Gray
Monarch, Mountain Sweet, Mountain
Sprout, Scaly Bark, Seminole, Volga.
MUSK MELON-Baltimore, Banquet,
Emerald Gem, Hackensack, Large Yellow,
Improved Nutmeg, Pineapple.
Also just received,
SUGAR CORN-Country Gentleman,
Crosby's Early, Squantumn, Mammoth,
Stowell's Evergreen.
CUCUMBER,-White Spine, Medium Green,
Long Green Telegraph
SQUASH-Yellow Bush Scalloped, White do.
Golden Custard, Boston Marrow,
Vegetable Marrow, Hubbard
PUMPKIN,-Jumbo, Nantucket, Large Cheese
Sugar
FIELD CORN,-Golden Beauty, White to
arrive
and
The usual assortment of
CARROT, CABBAGE, i EET, LETTUCE,
RADISH, TURNIP, HERBS, BEANS,
PEAS, &c., &C.
60 VARIETIES FLOWER SEEDS.
TLOS. J. WADSON.
Hamilton, Jany 29th, 1894-1
Special Price.

To make room for a large stock of
BOOTS AND SHOES
expected per s/s Trinidad," also English
Goods,
I OFFER
My Large and Varied Stock ot


READY-MADE

CLOTHING,
CONSISTING OF
OVERCOATS, SUITS, PANTS, dec.
AT VERY Low PRICES
FOR THE NEXT T E N DAYS ONLY
F, B, STEEDE,
YORK BUILDING, QUEEN STREET.
Hamilton, Jan. 29, 1894.-1
Colonist" please copy.


ST HAVING come to our notice that our G.G."
Whiskey Bottles are bviug re-filled with other
Whiskies and sold as genuine, this is to GIVE
WARNING that all persons guilty of this fraud
WILL BE PROSECUTED with the utmost
vigour of the law.
GOSLING BROS.,
IHamilton, Jany 29, '94-lm
Colonist copy.

Miss Joanna E. Smith,

Is prepared to wait on and fill orders for Din-.
ners, Luncheons, Balls, &c proper notice being
given.
Satisfaction guaranteed, having had 26 years
experience in Military Service. First Class Refer-
ences, Services daily.
Terms made known on application.
Residence at WIr,. WMI. WHITE'S
The Bakery,
Near S ar Liyery, Hamilton.
Jan 29, 1894-8m


MECHANICS' HALL.
HIAMILTON.
Sf ROVE TUESDAY, 6th Fi1, 1894.

MRS. NUGENP WILL GIVE A
FAREWELL -:- CONCERT
UNDES THE PATRONoXE OFr
HIIS LORDSHIP TilE BISHOP OF NEW-
FOUNDLAND AND BERMUDA,
AND OF MRS. JONES.
The Proceeds will be devoted to placing a little
cripple girl, 2 years old, in a hospital in New York,
where it is hoped a permanent cure may be effected.
By kind permission of Lt. -'Col. Dickson and
Officers, the MANDOLIN BAND of
the 1st Royal Berkshire Regt.,
will perform during
Evening.
The following have also kindly promised to assist:-
Mrs. Knox, Major Edes,
Mrs. Edes, Mr. G. C. Lawrence, R.E.
Mrs. Lynden-Bell, Mr. C. G. Hill, 1st R'y'l
Mrs. A. Gosling, [Berks Regt.,
Miss Murray, Mr. R. B. Swinton, 1st
Miss Fowler, [Ry'l Berks Regt.
TICKETS: Reserved 8s. ; Second 2s.; Back Is.
Reserved Seats on sale at Gazette Office, where
a Plan of Room may be seen on and after Tuesday,
30th Jan.
Doors open at 7.30 p.m. Concert at 8 p.m.
Carriages at 10 p.m.
Colonist copy Saturday.

O'Brien & Golden's Coy.,
BERMUDA.

GYMNASIUM IIALL,
Roid Street, Hamilton, Bermuda,
FOR THE MO1 TII OF FEBRUARY.

TWO NIGHTS A WEEK.


Conimmencing Feby 8, 10.
Thursday & Satimiqay
of each week for Three Weeks.

DAN %RIEH& OLLINSNETTIE
The Great Acrobatic Sketch Teaai,

First appearance here,
WM. The Grat ols MAY
True representation of the Darkie on the Plan-
tation down South.

BERTINE *
The Great Female Contortionist, Wonder of
the 19th Century.

First appearance here of

Bt1LLY DRAYTON,
The Great Comedian.

idiss Loie Atkins,
Beautiful Lady Vocalist.


The Great and Only

BEATRICE,


The Wonderful Skirt Dancer.
Prof. J. F. Hayes, Orchestra Leader.

A CARD TO THE PUBLIC.
It has been the constant aim of Mr Dan
O'Brien to gather around him the most ac-
complished entertainers in his profession, and
how well he has succeeded, the unique success
of this Grand Amusement Company unmistak-
ably shows.
Doors Open at 7 o'clock. Performance com-
mences at 8'15 sharp.
Secure your seats in advance.
Tickets for sale at the Phcenix Drug Store,
Reid Street, Hamilton.
Prices of Tickets 4s., 3s., and 2s.
January 29, 1894.

CONCERN TS
BY THE
Haatmiton Glee Club.
The above Club intend giving a Concert in the
MECHANICS' HALL, HAMILTON,
-ON-

Wdsay Ewflig, FAbraam r 21st,
and in the
MASONIC HALL, SOMERSET,
-ON-

Thtersay Vlig l, Febrlary 22d.
W Partioulars in next We.. .k's issue.
Hamilton, January 29, 1894.

AN ART SALE AND FANCY FAIR
will be held in the

Masonic Hall, Hamilton,
(kindly loaned for the occasion,)
ON THURSDAY AND FRIDAY,
the 22nd and 23rd Feby.,
for the purpose of establishing a Fund to en-
large and extend the business of the Woman's
Work Exchange, Reid St, Hamilton; and also
if the proceeds permit, to give a donation to
the Cottage Hospital.
Particulars as as to hours of opening, price of
admittance, &c, will be given later.
29/1/9a.


To bI sol ld Poblit Auction,
ON THE PREMISES,
On Thursday, the 8th

February next,
At the several times mentioned below,
'The following Parcels of Valuable
Real Estate


in the Town of
Pembroke


Hamilton and in
Parish, viz,,


At 12 o'clock sharp,
LOT 1.
The Warehouse and half Lot of
Land, measuring" 25 x 150 feet, in the Front
Street of the Town of Hamilton, now in the occu-
pation of Messrs. John S'. Burrows & Co.
At 12.30 P. M.
LOT 2.
The Lot or Lots of Land at the
N. W. Corner of Church and Parliament Streets,
measuring 150 feet from North to South and 50
feet from East to West, with the DWELLING
HOUSE and Buildings thereupon, now in the oc-
cupation of W. A. Black, Esq.
At 1 P. M.
LOT 3.
Lots No. 26 and No, 28 of the
Sixth Longitudinal 'rr. I, together measuring 150
feet from North to South and 100 feet from East
to West, and bounded on the East by Lot No. 24
of that street ; on the South by the said Sixth
Longitudinal Street ; on the West by the Fourth
Cross Street, and on the North by the street lof
twenty feet in width, running past the Sunday
School, with the DWELLING HOUSE and Build.
ings thereupon, now in the occupation of the
Widow and family of the late William H. Green.
At 2 P. M.
LOT 4.
The Parcel of Land, of triangular
form, situate in Pembroke Parish and separated
from Lot 5 by the Public Road, containing about
2 roods (more or less) bounded on the North by
an old Public Road which led in an Easterly di-
rection from Spanish Point towards Pembroke Pa-
rish Church ; on the East by land heretofore of
Thomas Edward Connor now of the Heirs or Do-
visees of Thias Tucker; and on the South and
West by the Public Road running from Pembroke
Church Gate towards Spanish Point, with Cottage
or Hut thereupon.
At 2.15 P. M.
LOT 5.
The Parcel of Land in Pembroke
Parish containing about 4 acres and 2 roods (more
or less) bounded on the South by the Canal; on
the East and North by the Public Road leading
from Pitt's Bay towards Spanish Point ; and on
the West by land formerly of William White now
of Cato Smith, with the DWELLING HOUSE,
&c., thereon.
THOSE. J. WADSON,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, 22nd Jan, 1894.-3 3p.


The PREM ISES on Frot Street,
in the Town of Hamilton, next West of the Jewel.
lery Store of Mr Duncan M Doe, consisting of :
Two Stores or Warehouses,
which will be rented either together or separately.
For further particulars apply to
GRAY & APPLEBY,
Agents, Hamilton.
20th Nov, 1893-38p. t.f.n.


Front Street Store
IFOIN RiEcN'T.

STORE No. 53, under the R. B. Y. Club
Rooms, recently occupied by Messrs
Tucker & Co, is offered for rent.
Will be let on very reasonable terms. Pos-
session can be given immediately
For terms, apply to
LOOKWARD & INGHAM,
Hamilton, 23rd December, 1893-3p tf.

We Offr Very Low for 0sh,
50 Bris High Grade

MUSCOVADO SUGAR.
PEARMAN, WATLING TON & Co.
Hamilton, 22nd Jany- 1894.-3 3p.
Colonist copy.

WIIITAKER'S ALMIANACK
1 894.

ON SALE AT THE
ROYAL GAZETTE STATIONERY STORE.
Hamilton, January 9th, 1894-3p tf.

CORRUGATED IRON,
GAUGE NO. 22.
VERY THICK AND VERY
CHEAP.
For sale by P. C. ALLEN,
Under the Windsor Hotel.


Hamilton, January 29, 1894-1

Notice.

TENDERS will be received by the Under-
signed up to
Monday, the 19th February, 1894,
FOR
The Prchase of TwoS hart sin the
Marine Slip Company.
Not bound to accept the Lih.-.t ior any other
tender.
GEORGE D. BOYLE,)
St Georges, 21/1/94-1


Colonial Secretary's Office,
Hamilton, 29 January, 1894.
H~ IS Excellency the Governor has received a
despatch dated 15 December, 1898 from
the Right Honble. the Secretary of State for the
Colonies, forwarding a copy of an Order of Her
Majesty in Council modifying the provisions of the
Order in Council of the 14th February, 1888, in
regard to the mode of estimating the net register-
ed tonnage of Italian ships.
A copy of the Order in Council can be seen at
this office.
By Command,
ARCHIBALD ALISON,
Colonial Secretary,

General Revision
OF THE
Electoral Lists, 1894.
1 N persuance of the provisions of the Registra.
JL tion of Freeholders Act, 1867, I hereby give
notice that I will attend in the various parishes of
these Islands at the times and places hereunder
specified to revise the Registers of Freeholders, at
which Revision I will hear and determine all ap.
plications to register freeholders, and all objections
made to the name of any freeholder being placed
or allowed to remain on the Register.
Except in certain cases specified in the said Act,
no person can be registered as a freehold except
at the time and plaee of the ordinary annual revision
of the Register, and all such registrations must
bear reference to the last day of December pre-
ceeding the annual revision.
st. George's Parish.
At the Town Hall, on Thursday, 1st February
next, at 1.30 p.m.
1Iamilion Parish.
At the Vestry Room adjoining the Patish Church,
on Thursday, 1st February next, at 3.30 p.m.
Smith's Parish.
At the Vestry Room adjoining the Parish Church,
on Thursday, 1st February next, at 4.45 p.m.
Sandy's Parish,
At the Parish Vestry Room, on Friday 2nd
February next, at 12.15 p.m.
Southampton Parish.
At the Parish Vestry Room, on Friday 9nd
February next, at 3 p.m.
Warwick Parish.
At the Parish Vestry Room,] on Friday 2nd
February next, at 4.30 p.m.
Paget Parish.
At the School House, near the Parish Church,
on Saturday, 3rd F]bruiry next at 11 a.m.
Devonishiire Parish.
At the School House, near the Old Parish
Church, on Saturday, *3rd February next at 12
noon.
Pembroke Parish.
At the Town Hall, Hamilton, on Saturday, 3rd
February next, at 4 p.m
The Parish Vestry Clerks are hereby requested
to attend the Annual revision in their respective
parishes and to submit for my information th
Parochial Valuation of the freeholds in the parish,
and to be prepared to inform me of any changes
in the assessed value of freeholds for which free-
holdeis are already on the Registers.
Freeholders of Pembroke and St. George's Par-
ishes whose freeholds are within the townships of
Hamilton and St. Georges respectively, arerecom-
mended to satisfy themselves before the Annual
Revision if their freeholds are so registered, and if
not, to apply at the Annual Revision to have the
proper entry made.
REGINALD W. APPLEBY,
Revising Officer.
22nd January, 1891.-2 3p

REPORT TING
OF THE

Debatos of thi ol of AimbIy.
-o
HE UNDERSIGNED, THE COMMIT-
TEE OF THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY
appointed to obtain, if practicable, a prompt
and regular

Shorthand Report
and Publication
of the Debates of the House of Assembly, in-
vite persons who are prepared to contract for
that service to send in sealed tenders, marked
on the cover "Tender for Reporting Debates,"
on or before the 1st day of March next. The
tenders are to be for the Sessions during the
year 1894.
The tenders must state within what time
after the debates occur they will be printed
and published for general use in a local news-
paper, or, if in any other mode of publication,
in what mode and form, and at what price, they
will be issued to the public, and must be ac-
companied by a specimen of the type or print
to be used.
Tenders are to be addressed to Mr S Brown-
low Gray, Hamiltor.
S. BROWNLOW GRAY,
THOS. J. WADSON, Committee.
N. VESEY. I
Hamilton, 9th January, 1894-3p t. 1st March.
Passenger Notice.


thence by Steamer to Florida,

S. S. ALPHA"


leaves Bermuda for Jamaica about the 19th of
each month, connecting with S. S. "BETA,"
Jamaica to Cuba about the 10th of each
month.
rhe Undersigned will issue Through Tickets
Bermuda to Havana, Cuba, where close con-
nections can be made with Steamers to Tampa,
Florida, and thence by rail to New York.
This route offers a most pleasant excursion
and an easy way of returning to New York.
Saloon tickets, ereanuda to Havana $60.00


Apply to


W. T. JAMES,
41 Front Street.


Hamilton, Jan 22/94-3 3p

UNCLAIMED LETTERS IN THE POST
OFFICE, HAMILTON,, JANUARY 26T, '94
Mrs PE Bennett, J R Burch, James Barde
(Gardener), Oscar Bean, Annie Gant, Rev Dr
Chase H Hall, Charles James, Thoa D Jones, LK
Mitchell, George Otto, Spencer, Daisy Tal-
ton, Ernest Tuzo, Miss Verden, Mrs Mary Viq-
cent, James Wolff, Mrs B Warner, T Williamnu


each.












DERUMr~A ROYAL GAZETTRl


TRAPPED BY KING LOBENGULA.

HOW CAPT. WILSON'S COMMAND WAS MASSACRED.
CUT DOWN TO A MAN, AFTER BEING SURROUNDED-
FIGHTING BEHIND DEAD HORSES-YOUNG ENG-
LISH EN OF PROMINENT FAMILIES AMONG THE
SLAIN.
CAPE TOWN, January 13.-Details of the massa-.
cre of Capt. Wilson's party by the Matabeles were
received here to-day from Buluwayo. They show
that Capt. Wilson and his men made a hard fight
and died gallantly fighting to the last. The des-
patches which bring the confirmation of the re-
port of the utter destruction of the detachment
reached Buluwayo on January 6, but the informa-
tion referred to was not placed on the wire until
to-day, though a brief despatch was received last
night announcing that the worst reports were
confirmed.
According to the Buluwayo advices, some 'na-
tives who arrived there on January 6, in order to
surrender their arms and make terms with the
British commander, admitted that they were pre-
sent when the Wilson detachment was destroyed
to a man. The natives say that Capt. Wilson, who
was in pursuit of King Lobengula, suddenly came
upon a strong detachment of Matabeles headed by
the King himself. The latter, who has now lost
much flesh, owing to the privations he has suffered
and the forced exercise he has taken, was able to
mount a horse and fly before the British advance.
But when the information was conveyed to the
King that the Wilson party was very few in num-
ber, some reports placing the detachment at only
forty British troopers and a hundred or so auxili-
aries, the King managed to got the Matabeles to
make a stand and prepare to take the small Bri-
tish force in a trap.
The King appears to have exercised good gen-
eralship. Instructing the centre of his force to
continue retreating before the British troopers,
who were pressing their horses onward through
the Matabele ranks in the hope of capturing the
King, the right and left flanks of the Matabele
impis were instructed to deploy to the right and
to the left and then gradually to converge inward
so as to take the British force on both flanks and
in the rear. The troopers, under the impression
that the Matabele power was entirely broken, and
that no further determined resistance was to be
expected, pressed onward after the King, keeping
up a running fire upon the retreating natives,
which helped to distract the attention of Capt.
Wilson and his officers from the manceuvre which
the King had planned. In the meantime, the
mounted part of Capt. Wilson's force had become
separated from the native auxiliaries, who, on foot,
formed the rear guard of the small force.
When King Lobengula saw the British were
surrounded on three sides, he made a stand on
some high ground, and at the same time the Ma-
tabeles on the flanks began converging inwards
and the fate of the British detachment was sealed.
When it was too late, Capt. Wilson saw the trap
into which he had fallen. Hurriedly having the
halt sounded, the captain gathered his men to-
gether and, surrounded on nearly all sides by the
advancing Matabele, he prepared to retreat upon
the dismounted part of his command, in the hope
of being able to make a stand against the enemy
or, failing in this, to sell their lives as dearly as
possible.
But it was too late to avert complete defeat, and
the fire of the Matabeles soon became so galling
that the British force was compelled to halt, as
their horses were being shot under them and
nothing but death or surrender was before them.
Then began a fight to the death, which seems to
have been in many ways similar to the stand
made by Gen. Custer when surrounded at the
Little Big Horn. From behind their dead horses
the British troopers kept up a continual fire from
their carbines upon the steadily advancing Mata-
beles, and when the carbines were no longer of
use, owing to the proximity of the enemy, they
drew their revolvers and awaited the last rush of
the natives. It was not long delayed, and then
followed a brief hand-to-hand conflict, during
which sword and revolver met assagai and club,
and the British were swept down beneath the on-
ward rush of overwhelming numbers, the troopers
fighting gallantly to the last. During the latter
part of the stand not a man of the British force
was unwounded. After all resistance had been
overcome, the triumphant natives stripped the
troopers of every shred of clothing and mutilated
the bodies in a horrible manner.
A later despatch says that some natives who
have just arrived at Fort Tuli report meeting a
number of other natives carrying carbines and
revolvers which had belonged to Capt. Wilson's
party, and from the same fort come additional
details of the massacre.
Capt. Wilson's force, outside of a few natives, is
now said to have numbered only thirty-four British
troopers, and the number of natives which sur.
rounded them is variously estimated at from 1,000
to 4,000. The Wilson party included captains
Fitzgerald, Judd, Greenfield, Kierton, and Barrow,
and Lieuts. Hughes and Hoffmeyer. Included
under the command of these officers were a lot of
young men belonging to some of the best families
in England, who had enlisted as troopers, in order
to get their first taste of campaigning. Among
the number was the son of Sir Julius Vogel, for-
merly agent-general for New Zealand in London.
All reports confirm the statements that the young
troopers made a gallant defence, keeping the
savages at bay for a comparatively long time ow-
ing to their excellent marksmanship. The report
says that every man among them had one or more
wounds, and still the Matabeles were unable to
sweep over them until nearly every cartridge was
exhausted, and the whole party was weak from
loss of blood.
Then came the last rush of the Matabeles, and
the last of the troopers fell, pierced in several in-
stances, by four or five assegais. The King, hav-
ing inflicted one serious blow on his enemies, made
good his retreat to the wilderness.


BURNING BANK OF ENGLAND NOTES.
From Chambers Journal,
With the Bank of England the destruction of


its notes takes place about once a week, at 7 p.m.
It used to be done in the daytime, but made such
a smell that the neighboring stockbrokers petition-
ed the governors to do it in the evening. The
notes are previously cancelled by punching a hole
through the amount (in figures) and tearing off the
signature of the chief cashier. The notes are burn.
ed in a closed furnace, and the only agency em-
ployed is shavings and bundles of wood. They
used,to be burned in a cage, the result ofj which
was that once a week the city was darkened with
burned fragments of notes.
For future purposes of reference the notes are
left for five years before being burned. The num-
ber of notes coming into the Bank of England
very day is about 50,030, and 350,000 are destroy-
ed every week, or something like 18,000,000 every
year. The stock of paid notes for five years is
about 77,745,000 in number, and they fill 13,400
boxes, which if placed side by side, would reach
two and one-third miles. If the notes were placed
in a pile they would reach to a height of five and
two-third miles, or if joined end to end, would
form a ribbon 12,455 miles long,


WEDDING RINGS.

Wedding rings were used both by the Greeks
and Romans, but then only at the ceremony of
betrothal and not that of marriage. The Anglo-
Saxon bridegroom at the betrothal gave a wed, or
pledge, and a ring was placed on the maiden's
right hand, where it remained until marriage, and
was then transferred to the left. During the reigns
of George I. and George II. the wedding ring was
often worn on the thumb. The placing of the
ring on the boor is a remnant of the ancient cus-
tom of blessing the ring by sprinkling holy water
in the form of a cross, and this is still done in the
Roman Church.
One of the earliest forms of rings was the gemel,
or double ring, and this was used as a pledge be-
fore marriage. They were generally made in three
parts, and broken in the presence of a witness,
who retained tte thirdpart. In Germany, Sweden,
Norway, and Denmark, it was a common custom
for the engaged couple each to give to the other a
plain gold ring, much resembling a wedding ring.
In the last century wedding rings were frequently
inscribed with posies. Dr. John Thomas, who
was Bishop of Lincoln in 1753, married four times.
The motto or posy on the wedding ring at his
fourth marriage was:
If I survive
I'll make them five."
King Henry VIII. gave Anne of Cleves a ring
with the posy:
God send me well to keep."
It was a general custom in the Middle Ages for
the bridegroom to place the ring first on the
thumb of the bride, then on her second finger, and
then on her third, at the name of each person of
the Trinity, "leaving it," as the rubric direct-,
on her fourth finger at the word Amen, thus sig-
nifying by action, not less than by word, that he
was undertaking the duties of the married state,
"in the name of the Father, of the Son, and of
the Holy Ghost." The reason assigned for the
fourth finger being appointed as the final resting
place of the wedding ring is because on that finger
there is generally believed to be a certain vein
which proceeds to the heart. The left hand most
probably was appointed because the virgins espous-
ed to the Chuch wore the ring of their celestial
nuptials on the right hand.-The WFestminister
Review.

DIFFICULTIES AND DANGERS OF A PILOT.

A Liverpool pilot relates the following in
Cassell's Saturday Journal:-
In 1871 I left port on a vessel. We ran down
Channel until we got off Tuskar, when, seeing
a steamer coming up, I prepared to board her
and return. But a sudden squall struck our
vessel, and it was impossible for me to leave
her. The gale continued to increase until we
got south'ard of Cape Clear, when we put her
head before the wind, and ran away in a more
southerly latitude to find better weather.
Meanwhile, the small-pox had broken out on
us. It began with the stewardess, and it soon
reduced our crew until very few were left to
work the ship. I had to act as pilot, and assist
in every way. In consequence of something I
had once heard, I determined to apply copal
varnish to the woman's face, and I did so every
third morning, with the result that very soon
it had a beautiful polish. The varnish formed
a sort of mask, and this, as she was getting bet-
ter, I managed to get clean off. I kept the
mask as a curiosity ; but when we arrived at
Philadelphia, after a voyage of eighty-one days
-we had expected to make the passage in from
thirty to thirty-five days-and were put in
quarantine, the doctors were not satisfied until
I gave it them. They were much surprised,
and seemed to think the varnish notion a splen-
did idea. One thing is certain-the young wo-
man recovered.
As soon as possible I went to New York, and
took a passage home. To my utter astonish-
ment, when I landed in Liverpool I found I had
been given up as dead, both by the other pilots
and by my family. Talking of that, I have had
a narrow escape from death. I was returning
to port in a tug. I had been down below, and
I was coming on deck again. Just as I got my
head above the hatchway the towing hawser-
a rope as thick as my arm -slipped, and, catch-
ing my neck, pinned me down to the combing
of the hatchway. I was in an awful fix. I
can't bear to think about it even now. I could
not escape, and I knew that if the rope slipped
another two or three inches-as it might have
done at any moment-my head would roll off
in the lee scuppers. I shouted for help. The
captain heard me, and coming down from the
bridge, soon realized my position, Starboard
your helm cried he ; and as the tug obeyed
the helm the rope shifted, and I was at liberty.
My neck was in an awful state, but I did not
mind that.
Then we meet strange crafts at times. My
most peculiar experience in this connection was
this. One night a ship signalled for a pilot, and
I went out to her. When I got alongside I was
more puzzled than ever I had been in my life
before. She looked like an island, and rose
forty or fifty feet out of the water. I hailed
her, and asked how I was to get on board.
Then they dropped me a rope, which ran
through a block at the yardarm. I fastened
myself to the end of it, and the fools on board,
instead of hauling me up gently, ran me up as
if I were a bag of coals, while I twisted round
and round like a bit of beef on a spit. As I
went, too, my clothes caught in nails in the side
of the mysterious vessel. I could not make it
out at all. So when I reached the deck I said,
"What ship do you call this, any way ?" Her
Majesty's ship Clarence," replied an indignant
voice. "The captain," it added, after a digni-
fied pause, "wants to see you, pilot."
You might have knocked me down with a
feather. But I went to the captain who fur-
ther astonished me by giving me a letter of in-
structions from the Admiralty. It turned out
that the strange craft was a frigate, manned
by dockyard men. It had never been in dom.-
mission, never had a gun on its deck, never
been to sea before-in fact, for forty-five years
it had been anchored in one place. As it was


of no use, the Government had given it to
some religious body for a training-ship, and
when I dropped across it, it was making its
way to the appointed mooring station. But
before the frigate was used as a training-ship
it was taken to a graving dock to have its bot.
tom scraped, I went to have a look at it. The
barnacles on it were as big as my two fists.

RUSSIAS REACHING OUT IN COREA.
SHANGHAI, Jan. 11-Reports have been received
here of a fresh Russian intrigue to gain a foothold
in Corea. The Russian representative at the
Crean Court, it is said, is badgering the King to
allow the establishment of an agricultural colony
of 100 Russian families at Keikofu, in the Province
of Kankyodo, some distance from the river Tui.
men, which forms the Russo-Corean boundary.
The Chinese government regards the place as of
great strategic value and, as it is not a fertile
district, it looks with suspicion upon the Russian
demand, which is being vigorously opposed by
the Chinese Minister resident,


"FRESH IS OLD ENGLISH FOR DRUNK.
The Brighton Herald of England states that
in a local collection of pottery there is a large
mug, dating from the last century, called the
Staffordshire Beerometer," upon which is a
representation of a tube of mercury, with the
following degrees of intoxication and sobriety
against it :
50 Drunk as a Lord.
45 Drunk.
40 Disguised in Liquor.
35 As sober as a man ought to be; knows
what he is about.
39 Drunk without, but sober within.
25 Fresh ; worse for Liquor.
20 Market Fresh ; had had a drop.
15 @onsarned in Liquor; had had a drink.
10 Sober as a Judge.
5 Sober as I am now; had had 5 quarts
among 3 of us.
0 Sober.
5 Had nothing since Breakfast.
10 Had nothing to-day.
The *' Beerometer does not exhaust the va-
rious states; a teetotaler might continue the
descending scale with advantage, while there
are few policemen who could not supply higher
degrees than 50."


CHARACTERISTICS OF W. H. SMITH.
At the War Office Mr. Smith's Private Secre-
tary observed that his chief, on leaving office
for the country, used to pack a dispatch box
with papers and take it with him, and suggest-
ed that he would save himself trouble by leav-
ing them to be packed in the usual official
"pouch" and forwarded by post. Mr. Smith,
after a moment's hesitation, was driven to ex-
plain the arrangement.
"Well, my dear Wilson," he said, "the fact
is this : our postman, who brings the letters
from Henley, has plenty to carry. I watched
him one morning coming up the approach with
my heavy pouch in addition to his usual load.
and I determined to save him as much as I
could."
It was inevitable that such a character should
be a favorite object with the clamorous horde
which is ever on the lookout for extraneous as-
sistance. A full half of Mr. Smith's private
correspondence consisted, his biographer tells
us, of begging letters. All received careful
consideration. No man could, when the occa-
sion demanded, act with more lavish generosity.
On the other hand, none had a juster sense of
the evils of promiscuous and ill-considered alms.
giving. Some of the candidates for Mr. Smith's
benevolence must, one would think, have sore-
ly tried even his serenety. "The bearer of
this" so runs one of these appeals, "is an ear-
nest Christian young man. He is at present
employed in a wine cellar, an occupation alto-
gether unsuited to his tastes now that he has
become a new man in Christ Jesus."
Cant of this order was little likely to impose
on the sturdy good sense which Mr. Smith
brought to bear on every transaction, great or
small. Charity I" he exclaims to Sir Henry
Acland, who was talking of giving up his yacht
in order to devote a portion of its cost to char-
itable purposes, how much mischief has been
done in the name of charity !" and he then
went on to point out that to dismantle the ves-
sel, dismiss the crew, and so far diminish the
wage fund, would do far more harm than could
be compensated by any so-called charitable em-
ployment of the money. "Charity," he adds,
is often most mischievous."-The Saturday
Review.

THE INFLUENZA.
All doubts as to the infectious nature of in-
fluenza are set at rest by the further report re-
cently issued under the auspices of the Local
Government Board. According to Dr. Caldwell
Smith, who contributes valuable evidence on
the subject, the vagaries of the disease are best
understood by a study of the life history of
Pfeiffer's bacillus, and the method of infection
is the breathing of recently expired air from
the lungs of an infected person. The instances
collected show that complete isolation will se-
cure perfect immunity. The Brighton sanator-
ium, which is beyond the reach of infection,
passed unscathed through the first two out-
breaks; but cases broke out on the return of a
servant from the town, which, however, were
in their turn successfully isolated.

ELECTRIC COOKING.
The advent of electric cooking apparatus seems
likely to evolve a highly scientific species of cook,
with, we may be sure, highly ap to-date notions
about the living wage." Cookery," we are
told by a daily contemporary in a description of
the electric process, is raised from the rule-of-
thumb level to that of an exact science by the use
of a graduated thermometer. For bread or puff
pastry a temperature of 370 deg Fahr. ii requir-
ed ; for pork, veal, or ordinary pastry, 350 deg. ;
for beef, 340 deg.," and so on. All this must
mean a table of constants in the kitchen, with
possible formula with different coefficients for iamn
tarts, mince pies, and Christmas padding. Per.-
haps some method of integrating the specific heats,
latent heats, and density of the heterogeneous
mass to be cooked will be found necessary before
the temperature can be finally determined. This
will mean Royal Society Papers on the .subject.
Besides all this, the cooking appliances are depict-
ed as being fitted with a whole battery of switches,
various combinations of which, like the stops on aq
organ, will be necessary to produce various effects.
Afterwards," says our contemporary, in an ac-
count of the destructive distillation of a joint,
"four of these switches are turned off, and the
heat is applied from one side only." Just think of
the high scientific knowledge required in order to
be able to manipulate these cookery stops, so as to
produce any given thermal distribution on the
three Cartesian axes of the k'tchen oven i-Eleotri.-
lan.

THE NEW CLOCK AT ST. FAUL'S OATHE.
DRAL


Was made by Smith & Son, of Derby, and is fit-
ted with the double three-leg gravity escapement
designed by Lord Grimthorpe, which has proved
to be the best choice of the kind for large clocks.
The pendulum is 15 feet long, and weighs 7 owt.
The old bell, known from the name of the maker
as the Phelps bell, is again used for striking,
and the old bells for the quarters, but they have
been raised higher in the lantern. The Phelps
bell weighs 5 tons 4 cwt. The hammer weighs 2
owt. There are now three faces to the clock, a
new one having been inserted to look down Can-
non Street. The full diameter of the dials is 17
feet, and the central part-that is, the space with.
in the figure ring-is 10 feet. The figures are 2
feet 9 inches long, and the hands are of copper,
specially shaped to resist wind and snow. The
minute hand is 9 feet 6 inches long, and the hour
hand 5 feet long. The weights are carried on steel
ropes, and weigh half a ton each. The clock re-
quires winding every day, and by an ingenious ar-
rangement the clock itself stops the winding when
about to strike,-English Mechanio.


THE GOVERNMENT'S FELINE EMPLOYES.
From the Chicago Herald.
Some three hundred and odd cats are maintained
by the United States Government, the cost of their
support beint carried as a regular item on the ac-
counts of the Post Office Department. These cats
are distributed among about fifty Post Offices and
their duty is to keep rats and mice from eating and
destroying postal matter and canvas mail sacks.
Their work is of the utmost importance wherever
large quantities of mail are collected, as, for ex-
ample, at the New York Post Office, where from
2,000 to 3,000 bags of mail matter are commonly
stored away in the basement. Formerly great
damage was done by the mischievous rodents, who
chewed holes in the sacks and thought nothing of
boring clear through bags of letters in a night.
Troubles of this sort no longer occur since the
official pussies keep watch. Each of the postmas-
ters in the larger cities is allowed from $8 to $40 a
year for the keep of his feline staff, sending his es-
timate for "eat meat" to Washington at the
beginning of each quarter.

A HERO OF MASHONALAND.

How A BOY RESCUES HIS GRANDFATHER FROM A
LIONESs.
Soon after the British South Africa Chartered
Company's band of pioneers had occupied the
country of the Mashonas sundry parties of pros-
pectors. intending settlers and others were follow-
ing in their wake. Among them was an old
Dutchman who had sold off his possessions in
Cape Colony, and, accompanied by a grandson,
was thus early to the front in looking after the ad-
vantages offered by the company.
Arrived safely at Fort Salisbury, he had out-
spanned his oxen close to~good feeding and water,
neither of which advantages obtained near the
township itself. Unfortunately lung sickness had
set in among his oxen, and for the safety of the
majority, he had drafted the actual sufferers and
was grazing them on an isolated patch of grass
not far from his wagons.
One evening his herder reported to him that one
of the sick oxen was too far gone to be brought
into the kraal. The next morning the herder, up
betimes, sought the sick ox and found it dead.
He discovered, also, that some large beast of prey
had made a meal off it. Off he hied to his master
and announced that a lion had killed and partly
eaten the ox.
South African Dutchmen are not prone to be-
lieve anything they hear, so our trekker in this
instance poo-poohed the notion of a lion venturing
so near the camp. His young grandson, aged 10
years, had a mind inflamed by the wonderful lion
kills he had heard on the way up, and finally per-
suaded the old man to go and see." Catching
up his rifle and handing his cartridge belt to the
boy, off he started. True enough, the carcass of
the ox had been partly eaten. Dutchman-like, he
at once looked for spoor, but the ground was too
dry and hard to receive impressions, He then
made a cast around, beating through several
patches of long grass, but without success.
A little distance to the right of the dead ox
stood one of those large ant hills that are the sub.
ject of wondering interest to nearly every one who
sees them for the first time. Said the boy,
Grand'ther, the shellum might be behind that
ant hill." Leisurely the old man directed his steps
toward the spot, where he, after inspecting the
ground on three sides, wis about to give up his
quest. Look into that bunch of tambookie
grass," suggested the boy.
Turning to do so, he was met with full onset by
a splendid-looking lioness. Her spring landed her
on the old man's shoulder, her weight carrying
him to the ground, where she lay with her teeth
set fast in the Dutchman's shoulder. lie lay
prone with his rifle thwartwise under his body.
Listen. ye English lads, whose souls are fraught
with histories of derring-do.
The boy, seeing the old man's plight, did not
run away or set to blubbering. Not he. Down
he went on his stomach and crawled near enough
to catch hold of the rifle, which he drew away, and
then, looking to see if the cartridge was alright, he
took the best aim he could at the lioness. His
shot took effect through the loins of the beast,
which half rose, and, snarling savagely, somewhat
unnerved the lad.
He withdrew a few feet further back, when he
removed the empty shell from the rifle, and, care-
fully reloading, took second shot with perfect suc-
cess. Shot through the heart, the animal rolled
over on her side, and after a tremor or two was
stilled in death. By this time several natives from
the wagon, hearing the shots, came running up.
They made a primitive kind of ambulance on
which they removed the man to his wagon. A
doctor was sent for and the patient removed to th1
temporary hosiptal. The writer of this article was
a fever patient at the time, and can vouch for the
truth of this act of gallantry on the part of the 10
year old boy.-London Globe.

Frogs' and Toads' Eggs.-Frogs and toads lay
numbers of small eggs. They are dropped in the
water like fish-spawn, in long clusters or strings.
The Surinam toad carries her eggs soldered to-
gether like a honeycomb on her back. The Ali-
phes carries them between her legs rolled up in a
bunch.

Mysteries of Life.-The mysteries of vegetable
life are not all yet explored. An Indian botanist
has made experiments which induce him to say
that some plants can see. Whether the inference
can be accepted or not, these experiments go to
show that.the plants made an effort to reach sup-
ports placed at a little distance, and grew towards
the supports wherever placed. The plant was con-
volvulus, and when a long pole was placed near it,
and in such a way that (the tendrils would have to
turn away from the light to reach it, they invari-
ably did so, and within a few hours twined about
it. That certain plants have the sense of touch is
well known.-New York Medical Times.

KEEP YOUR MOUTH SHUT.

Don't be offended. The admonition is not
meant as a reflection upon your talkativeness,
Talk as much as you please, but keep your mouth
shut when you are not talking.
People who keep their mouths closed except
when they are talking, eating or drinking, rarely
contract colds or coughs. Savages, even those liv-
ing in northern latitudes, seldom take cold.


Scientists say it is because they are close mouthed.
Disease germs floating in the air find a direct
route into the lungs of a person who breathes
through his mouth. They are arrested by the fine,
sieve-like network of hair in the nostrils of the in-
dividual who breathes through his nose. Keep
your mouth shut and you may defy pestilence.
The teeth suffer from too much and t6o frequent
exposure tc the atmosphere. Sudden changes of
temperature, whether liquid or atmospheric, are
hurtful to them. The best teeth in the world are
those of the savage tribes, whose members always
keep their mouths shut except when talking or
eating.
Throat and lung diseases are often contracted
by persons who go about open mouthed. The
frosty air of winter inhaled directly into the lungs
through the mouth is a frequent cause of bronchial
disorders. Taken through the nose it is modified
and sifted of many of its dangers, Keep your
mouth shut I


HOW A VICTORIA CROSS WAS WON.
The tendon Gazette announces that the Queen
has signified her intention to confer the decoration
of the Victoria Cross upon Surgeon Major 0. E.
P. Lloyd, of the Army Medical Staff, whose claim
has been submitted for Her Majesty's approval,
for his conspicuous bravery during the attack on
the Sima Post by Kachins on January 6. last year.
During the attack Surgeon-Major Lloyd, on hear-
ing that the commanding officer, Captain Morton
(who had left the fort to visit a picket about eighty
yards distant), was wounded, at once ran out to
his assistance under a close and heavy fire, accom-
panied by Subadar Matab Singh. On reaching
the wounded officer, Surgeon-Major Lloyd sent
Subadar Matab Singh back for further assistance,
and remained with Captain Morton till the Suba-
dar returned with five men of the Magwe battalion
of military police, when he assisted in carrying
Captain Morton back to the fort, where that offi-
cer died a few moments afterwards. The enemy
were within ten or fifteen paces keeping up a
heavy fire, which killed three men of the picket,
and also Bugler Puma Singh. This man accom.
panied Captain Morton from the fort, showed
great gallantry in supporting him in his arms
when wounded, and was shot while helping to
carry him back to the fort. The native officer and
five sepoys referred to have been awarded the
Order of Merit.


THE SANGUINE SOLDIER,
Hardly a man leaves the colours who does not
answer the anxious query of his officer, as to how
he is vcinv' to earn a living, with the stereotyped
formula, Oh, I've a good job waiting for me,
thank you, sir.'" He has been so long accustomed
to find his food served to the minute, his clothes
found for him, his pocket-money made over at reg.
ular intervals, that he has forgotten that such
things as cold, hunger, or want exist. He goes
light-heartedly from his regiment, where, if he
happens to be in India, he has servants to relive
him of much of the drudgery of existence, to some
place where he learns too late that his deferred
pay, which seemed at one time a fortune, is not
sufficient to keep him till he can find an opening,
and that in place of having everything provided
for him, he has both to think and to work for
himself.-Broad Arrow,

OYSTERS AND TYPHOID.
Several cases of typhoid fever-some fatal-
amongst notabilities are attributed to eating
oysters, which are supposed to be unwholesome
in consequence of the drought of last summer.
One paper says that if there is anything in the
"theory." whitebait would be more dangerous,
as those fish can be seen any day feeding in
I thousands at the mouth of the Thames sewers.
There is, however, a slight difference, for white.
bait are generally cooked before they are eaten.
Possibly it is supposed that microbes can with-
stand the temperature of the frying pan. In
the case of oysters, however, they are generally
eaten raw, and that makes a great difference;
but, after all, dirt" is only matter in a wrong
place.-English Mechanic.



B.B.B.

BOSTON
3x-cOvv-3tax 33 rea4,ca
Commended by the Medical Faculty
Delicious, Nutritious.
1Made at Thiompson's Bakery,


WEDNESDAYS


and SATURDAYS
E. 7. THOMPSON.


April 13th 1891





OF BERMU DA
In Handy Pocket Form,

J UST PUBLISHED,
BY J. M. FARNSWORTH, TEMPLE COURT,
NEW YORK.
Gregory V. Lee, Sole Agent for Bermuda.
For Sale at the "Royal Gazette"
Stationery Store

A New and Practical Guide for Driving,
Walking aid Cycling, compiled by Mr. Farns-
worth during his visit to Bermuda in the
Spring of 1891. Shewing the condition of the
surface of each Road by indicated lines from
a personal Cycling experience.
"Royal Gazette" Office,
December 7th, 1891.

A&LIIANACK-Jan.-Feb.-1894.


6DN.


ru 3
W 31
Th 13
Fri 2
6a 3
S 4
M 5(


0 5 28
59 5 29
58 5 30
57 5 31
56 5 32
55 5 38
54 5 34


High

Tide.

H. aM.
2 42
3 30
4 18
5 6
5 54
6 42
7 -0


REMARKS5


Puriflcation of V. Ml.

Quinquagesima-Shrov*
[ stundayi


New Moon 5 day 5h 26m P.M.


THi BxRtuDA ROYAL GAZxTTr is published every
Tuesday by GRaooRY V Lia, Printer to the
Queen's Most Excellent Majesty,
AT HIS OFFICE,
North.West Corner of Reid and Burnaby Streets,
Hamilton,
Where Blanks, Hand-bills, &c, will be printed
at the shortest notice,
TELEPHONE No. 144.
Agent at St. George's for the Royal Gazette
Mr. G xORGE D. BOYLE, West ELd, Water
Street.
Agent at Somerset, Mu. J. B. ZUILL.

The Bermuda Royal Gazette" is on file at
the Library, "Imperial Institute Road," London,
the offices of Messrs. Robert G. Lee & Co., 8 Jef-
frey's Square, St Mary Axe, London, Messrs Mid-
dieton & Co. 60 and 62 New Street; office of the
Maritime Register 91 Maiden Lane, New York;
and at the Commerolal Newsvaoo.m, Babado,,




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