Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00248
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00248
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text

rF 1


^S'iSi^/ _^_ .&-* ^^ 4H ^


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


No. 27-Vol. LIZ. STATE SUPER VIAS ANTIQUES. 24s. per Ann.


a S illon, Bermuda, Tfes.da'y, Jdayi S, I S79.


[Unavoidably omitted in Gazette of 1st inst.]
For the IRoyal Gazette.
I cannot let the week pass without sending you
a few remarks upon the Theatyical Performances
at Prospect last Tuesday and Wednesday.
It was quite by accident I heard that an
Aniteur Company was going to play Plot and
Passion," and "'The Rough Diamond," for with the
exception of a very modest notice in your paper,
which did not catch my eye, there seems to have
been no advertisement of the performances.
I must confess that it was with a sort of wicked
curiosity that I went to see of whom the bold com-
pany was composed, and how they would pull
through these Pieces, which have tried the metal
offirst-rate Professionals, as well as of the most
practised Amateurs.
Parts in which such actors, as Mrs. Stirling
Emery, Alfred Wigan, and the inimitable Robson
had won hard earned laurels, are generally out of the
reach of what we may call, without offence I hope,
the scratch team of a small Garrison.
,But if it is unfair to young actors to compare
their efforts to the matured studies of the firstranks
of the Profession, ve are led to do so, when they
rise so much above the ordinary dead level of
Amateurs as did the Ladies and Gentlemen whose
acting is now under review. The story of Plot and
Passion is a little complicated, but the diction of
the piece is excellent-there is no padding, all that
is said is necessary to the plot, and is given in
language which could scarcely be improved.-But-
I:am not to write a critique on the play, which
has any time these five and twenty years received
the praise of the most able critics. Suffice it shortly
to sketch the Plot.
JFouchU, Minister of Police under the first Na-
poleon when the whole machinery of Spies and
informers, secret arrests and executions without
trial, kept in check the Legitimist party which
still hankered after the exiled king-was a fitting in-
strument for such a time. Cold and unimpassioned
as he seemed there was however a consuming fire
of ambition beneath the usually calm exterior
which led him to counterplot even against his
Imperial Master, and from this came his fall. All
was fish that came to his net. He," as Desmarets
says, "buys up all affections and all dignities." Into
has toils had fallen a young and well born widow,
Madame de Fontanges, who through her passion
6for play had become his spy at the gambling tables,
ih this lady Desmaretp, a clever designing
undrel, who served Fouche in the secret de-
par ent of Police, so long as it suited his own
purp to do so, was in love with an earnestness
which, a e himself said, might perhaps raise him
to better t gs-but this love Madamq de Fon-
tanges scorne
: monsieur de Neuville, a Creole of Guadaloupe,
where his Father had been Governor under Louis
XV, had written, upder the pseudonym of "Timon,"
a most cutting pamphlet against Fouch6, and his
murderous practices. The Author was discovered
by his handwriting on, a paper given by the Mar-
quis de Cevennes to Foichb, but by a happy acci-
dent, when he was about to be imprisoned in Vin-
cennes he escaped, to Prague.
Now were the attractive graces of Madame de
Fontanges employed by Fouch6 to lure him back to
Paris ; unwillingly indeed, but forced by threats of
public disgrace as a Spy, the lady undertook the
task, but love, which still is Lord of all, frustrated the
plot; her heart, which she "had thought a stone,
became a living, leaping, loving woman's heart,"
and at risk of life, she returned to Paris, and by
means of a secret and treasonable despatch, which
she intercepted on its way to Fouche, she exposed
and ruined that tricky adventurer; saved her
young lover de Neuville, and freed herself from the
horrible position her gambling propensities had
placed her in.
The part of Fouch6 was taken by Mr. Wood of
the Royal Engineers, whilst Captain Pilleau of the
same Corps represented Desmarets. Both charac-
ters were well conceived, and in their delineation
a very careful study was apparent. The widely
differing and yet self contained manner of both
was admirably assumed. The occasional flashing out
of the imperious mind of the one, and of the cun-
ning revengeful spirit of the other showing to ad-
vantage the art with which policy had veneered the
surface,, with a smooth outside for the world's ob-
servation.
The excitement of Fouch6 on the discovery of de
Neuville as the writer of the abusive pamphlet,'and
the scene at the card table, were admirable pieces of
acting, as was also the rendering of the scene with
Madame de Fontanges on her return from Prague,
with Monsieur de Cevennes.
It is seldom that one sees the finer points of action
so well attended to, as in this case where every
movement of the hands even had its intentional
effect.
Perhaps the happiest effort of Desmarels was that
in which he described to de Neuville in the presence
of Madame de Fontanges the degraded condition of
those wretched women who were employed by
Fouch6 to ensnare his victims, which fine acting he
followed up excellently in his appeal to the lady to
accept his suit and not crush out the little good
left in his nature. Possibly the contrast between
these two.schemers would have been more strongly
marked had Desmarets adopted a demeanour of a
more cringing character towards Fouch6. Everything
which could make his nature meaner and more
despicable would add effect to the one elevating


leaven of his love for Madame de Fontaniges.
SMonsieur de Neuville (Captain Farwell, 46th
Regt.) fairly took me by surprise. The part is an
extremely difficult one; a tone too much in his
passionate love making to Madame de Fontanges
would raise a smile, if not a laugh, at his "spoon-
ing"; a shade too little in the earnestness of his
honeyed words would destroy all interest in his
suit; truly the young lover hit off the happy
.mean, and very great credit does he deserve for as
refined and thoughtful a rendering as it has been
my luck to see for many a day.
' After his first entry with de Cevennes, which
was awkward and had a lack of grace which augur-
ed badly for the trying part he had undertaken,
Capt. Farwell's acting improved through every
scene; from the enthusiasm with which he abused
the wretch Fouchb" unknowingly to his very face,
to the last speech in which he asserts the value of
the jewel which in the love of Madame de Fontanges
he has won, all was good. The description of
those signs by which a lover knows that his lady
has a heart and that that heart is wen, was beau-
tifully given. The acting of that scenealone should
win a reputation.


I am told that the lady who played Madame de
Fontanges is about to leave Bermuda; her friends
no doubt are very sorry for it; those who witnessed
her acting last week will certainly regret her ab-
sence. But what have the managers of Amateur
Theatricals been thinking about to let such talent
as this be hidden under the lace cap and silly
speeches of waiting maids ? We have seen some
good acting by Amateurs in these Islands from
time to time, notably that of the wife of an officer
R. E., who left us less than a year ago, but there
has never been in my recollection anything like
this Plot and Passion. Mrs. Gordon is capable of
sustaining the very finest parts. Her acting through-
out was charming. I have no other word for it.
Gifted with a sweet voice, which though not powerful
is so clear that not a word is lost, every modulation
of tone has its full value, and appears as the echo of
the emotion which it represents.
As a piece of "voice acting" her reading of
Monsieur de Neuville's letter was absolutely perfect.
There are many actresses would give a week's hard
study to attain the tone in which she made the
comment on his opening address "Madame"-
"Madame we are distant this morning, Mons."--
whilst the pronunciation of the single interpola-
ted word Pretty" was indescribably touching. Her
first entry like that of Monsieur de Neuville was not
good, nor were her opening sentences to Desmarets
whilst she ordered him to give her money for the
gaming table. More might have been made of the
parting scene at her cottage near Prague. But
with these exceptions little was left to be desired
throughout the part, and if I do not select points of
special excellence it is that the character was ren-
dered with such even ease and attention that the
same grace was apparent in each varied situation.
Such acting as that shewn by these four princi-
pal characters would ensure the success of any
play. Mention should not, however, be omitted of
the other characters.
The only yawn that I indulged in during the
evening was provoked by that forlorn maid Cecile,
whose weariness at Prague, where even her attrac-
tions drew no lovers to her feet, was so well assum-
ed, that it set me off with a gape that nearly dislo-
cated my jaw-"pity it didn't quite," says the
cynical reader. Ah, friend,. that would not have
stopped my pen had it happened.
Mr. Hellard, R.E., as the timid and easily gulled
! tool of Fouch6, provoked many a laugh by his
quaint attitudes and well simulated fears for the
safety and the honor of a de Cevennesi'
The imaginary chase of that regular brute of a
Bee," in which Grisboulle (Mr. Rawson, R.E.,
whose get-up was excellent), was quite a new idea
to me, and shows how much may be made of even
the smallest part; care, however, must be taken that
any such by-play does not interfere with the legiti-
mate business of other actors: in this case it did
not appear to do so, as no doubt the by-play had
been tested by rehearsal.
Of Berthier it will not I hope be considered im-
pertinent to remark, that Cecile need not fret at the
monosyllabic affronts of Karl whilst she can claim
the heart of such a Prince!
Jabot (Mr. Coteswortb, XIX Regt.,) is an actor
upon whom an impresario should keep an eye.
There is acting in that' young gentleman.
I was scarcely inclined on the fall of the curtain
to wait for the "Rough Diamond," especially as
my neighbour told me that the Joe whose name
appeared on the bills was too ill to act, and that
the part was to be taken by a grave gentleman who,
to judge from a very slight acquaintance, didn't
look much like it. However, I did stay, and I am
glad I did, for I enjoyed a hearty laugh myself and
enjoyed hearing hearty laughs all round me.
Everyone knows the Rough Diamond." I have
seen miminy piminy young ladies play it in their
best drawing-room manners-heard angular middle
aged ladies play it with a precision that would
have done justice to a tragedy; I have seen the
original Margery," Mrs. Fitzwilliam, that dia-
mond of the first water, that gem amongst actresses.
Mrs. Randall I will not compare with any of these :
the two first were not Rough Diamonds," the last
was unapproachable in brilliancy-yet there ap-
a peared to me a certain propriety of comparison. At
the first glance-no, that would be an Irishism, it
was not at the first glance, but at the first sound of
her laugh, 1 should have said, when I heard it come
from behind the scenes, that she had copied Mrs.
Fitzwilliam, but she could never have seen or
heard her. To witness in such a character good
fresh untrammelled acting is a great pleasure-that
was the pleasure which Mrs. Fitzwilliam's acting
imparted, and that pleasure was certainly enjoyed
by those who saw Mrs. Randall. The part suited
her exactly, and she played it as if she enjoyed it
as much as we did. Before the close of the even-
ing I was quite sure that the laugh was her own
and had not been borrowed from anyone.
My friend Joe didn't know his part, or at any
rate he "gagged" a good deal, a pardonable fault
in such a character, which is intended to provoke
as much laughter as can be got into ten minutes.
Probably the illness of the original Joe at the last
moment left Mr. Randall scant time for dress and
study, and if he was not successful in the last he
was eminently so in the first; the make-up of his
head, in this place where wigs are not to be ob-
tained, showed a mind fertile in green-room dodges.
It was pretty clear that the boards were much more
familiar to him than to other of the actors. He
alone was able to face the eyes of the house; others,
whilst they fairly showed themselves to the audience,
seldom,. if ever, looked at the faces of those who


gazed at them.
Mrs. Rawson, played Lady Plato correctly,
though not as she has played before. It is
an ungrateful part and like ungrateful parts
is perhaps more difficult to a young actress
than a more lively or more touching one. Lord
Plato (Mr. Cotesworth) and Sir W. Evergreen (Mr.
Hellard) sustained their characters well, as did
Blenheim (Mr. Macartney, XIX Regiment) as the
Irish lover of Lady Plato. The first named of
these 3 1 hope to see frequently again, the second
is an old and deserving favorite and a very useful
member of any Dramatic Corps.

For Sale.

W' C 0- WJf0 S. f P
(By George Veachey, London).
Can be seen at the Residence of8T, KERRISK
Hamilton, Reid St.,July 1st, 1879.


; CHEUUL.E OF DUTIES
Payable at the Treasury
From 1st July, 1879, to 30th June, 1880, in-
clusive.
Arrowroot, unmanufactured, the 100
pounds, 10 shillings 0 10 0
Arrowroot, manufactured, the pound,


sixpence 0
Alcohol
Arrack
Brandy
Cordials the Gallon, four
Peppermint Water shillgs
Shrub
Whiskey )
Rum, the Gallon, four shillings 0
Wine of all kinds, 20 per cent ad va-


lorem


(On each and every Hhd.
Malt Li- j thereof, not imported
quor, Ci- in bottles 1
der, and When imported in bottles,
Perry called qrt. bottles, for each
(. and every dozen thereof 0
Cigars-the Thousand 0
or at the option of the Importer or
Consignee, on every pound weight
thereof 0
Tobacco of all kinds
(other than Cigars) The Pound 0
and Snuff )
Cows, Calves, Heifers and Oxen-
per Head 0
And in all cases where such Duties are
imposed according to any specific
quantity, the same shall be deemed
to apply in the same proportion to
any greater or less quantity.
On all Goods imported, except arti-
cles subject to specific duties, and
those enumerated in the following
Table of Exemptions and such
Books as under the Act entitled
An Act to regulate the importa-
tion of Books and to protect the
British Author," are subject to an
Import Duty of fifteen per centum
-five per centum advalorem.


TABLE OF EXEMPTIONS.
Books, not reprints of British Publi-
cations; Bullion; Coin ; Diamonds ;
Fresh Fruit and Fresh Vegetables,
excepting Potatoes; Horses and
other Beasts and Provisions and
Stores of every description import-
ed for the use of Her Majesty's
Land and Sea Forces or of the Con-
vict Establishment in the event of
Convicts beinghereafter transported
to these Islands, being the property
of Her Majesty, on satisfactory
proof of their being the property of
Her Majesty, and Horses of Mili-
tary Officers brought into these Is-
lands as a necessary part of their
Military Equipment, subject to all
conditions, provisions and regula-
tions contained in any Act passed or
to be passed by the Legislature of
these Islands ; Ice ; Baggage, Ap-
parel and Professional Apparatus of
Passengers'; PersonalEffects of In-
habitants of these Islands dying
abroad and not intended for sale;
Specimens of Natural History;
Trees, Plants, and Shrubs for Plant-
ing; Goods and Animals imported
on account of the Public of these
Islands by any Public Officer or
Committee, being the property of
the Public, or purchased at the Pub-
lic expence; Coals imported for the
use of Her Majesty's Land and Sea
Forces, and consigned to the proper
Officer of the Military and Naval

Departments.
Uniforms and other Articles imported
by Naval or Military Officers being
a part of their necessary Naval or
Military Equipment.
No Goods to be Warehoused unless
the duties amount to 5 or unless
intended for ulterior Market.
No Goods to be taken out of Ware-
house unless the duties amount to
2, &c.
Personal Property sold at Auction,
(property sold under process of any
Court or under the order of any
Judge as such, or belonging to Es-
tates of deceased persons only ex-
cepted) subject to duty of 21 per
cent. less 2- per cent. on such duty
to Auctioneers for collecting and
paying the same.
Parties exporting Goods are entitled
on certain conditions to the whole of
the duty paid on the importation
thereof when the duty on the said
Goods amounts to 2.
Drawback of duties are allowed for
Goods sold to and becoming the
property of H. M. Government.
The Auctioneers' Bonds expire on the
30th June instant, and must then be
renewed. Auctioneers to make their
returns quarterly-within ten days
after the last days of March, June,
September and December, respec-
tively.

Light Duties.
4d. the ton on Merchant Vessels.
Steam Packets carrying the Royal
Mails exceeding 600 tons or
plying with Passengers and
Freight 3


0




4


6




0


4 0



0 0

1 0
10 0

1 0
0 2

4 0


; Do. Do. not exceeding 600 tons 1 4
I Storeships and other Vessels wholly
I employed in H. M. Service are ex-
empt from this duty.
I JA MES TUCKER.


Receiver General's
June 28, 1879.

1Vars1

TO I


Office, } 2


Receiver General.


iapls Sale.

IT SOLD,


JUSe ST RRI E D.


0 0


AT CHILD'S.,


Colonial S&cretary's Qffice,
JUNE 27TH, 1879.
THE following ACT has been passed by the
Legislature of Bermuda during the pre-
sent Session, viz.:-
No. 1.-An Act for raising a Revenue for the
support of the Government of these Her
Majesty's Islands and to appropriate cer-
tain sums to the discharge of the expenses
of Government as therein expressed.
(In force to 30th June, 1880.)
By His Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER,
3 Colonial Secretary.


Bermuda Dockyard,
27TH JUNE, 1879.
TENDERS will be received at
my Office until noon of



The 8th July,
For the Construction of

Four Cart-wheels,
For Service of this Establishment.
Pattern Wheels may be inspected at H. M.
Dockyard during working hours.
J. B. WILKINS,
Acting Naval Storekeeper.

An Entertainment
WILL TAKE *PlACF,


On T hursda y,
10th July,
At the residence of the Late Mr. Mailory, near
the Lighthouse.
The Alexandrina BAND) ill be in attendance.
Tickets 6d. each. Doors open at 4 p.m.
OIrP A BOAT will leave Hamilton at I p.m.
Mana g ers :
MRS. W. II. i. B\RNS,
mMR. II.T.r. UTT'I't FFliI).
Southampton, July 1st, 1879.*

.1 F' eld ntertainmnnt.


By Public Auction,
Upon the Premises in Smiths Parish,
At 11 o'clock

ON WEDNESDAY,
The sixteenth instant,
Under and by virtue of sundry Writs of Execu-
tion issued from the Court of General Assize
against JOHN THOMPSON PENISTON,
THE FOLLOWING
PERSONAL EFFECTS,
Viz.:
12 D NING Room CHAIRS
1 Large Rocking OHAIR
1 PIANO
4 Chairs 1 Hat Rack 4 Mattresses
2 Bolsters 2 Pillows 1 doz.. Towels
2 Table Cloths, 2 doz. Table Napkins
2 STOVES and Cooking Utensils, complete
1 Pickle Stand 2 Cruet Stands
1 Dozen Napkin Rings 2 do. Table Spoons
1- Do. Dessert Spoons
1l Dozen Silver-plated Tea Spoons
1 Fish Slice and Case 3 doz. Forks
2 Mustard Spoons 1 doz. Knives
2 Window Poles with Fittings
3 Painted Bedroom SETS
1 Metal Washstand
1 Water Pitcher and Slop Basin
4 Pair Pillow Cases 1 doz. Sheets
2 Blankets 2 Quilts 4 Bolster Cases
1 Doz. Dinner Knives 2 do. Tea do.
1 Pickle Fork 1 Butter Knife
2 Sugar Spoons 1 Soup Ladle
China Tea SET 2 Large Glass Dishes
1 Glass Water Pitcher 1 Glass Tea SET
23 Preserve Plates 29 Water Glasses
I Dozen Tumblers 18 Wine Glasses
1 White Stone China Dinner SET
1 White Tea SET 2 Hung Bells 4 Decanters
1 Globe Hanging Lamp 5 Hand Lamps
1 CHANDELIER with 3 Lamps
1 Parlor Lamp 2 Chamber Sets
Carpet in 3 rooms Pieces Carpet & Matting
2 Chamber SETS 1 Foot Bath
Water Pitcher and Slop Basin
1 Slop Kettle 4 Carpet Mats
1 Door Mat Lot Empty Barrels
12 Bls. Guano
Onion Box Material 6 to 800 Tomato Boxes
1 Wooden BARN, 82 feet x 16 feet
1 Wooden STORE
Set Scales and Weights
2 Clocks Corn Mill
Lot Manilla Rope
1 Wheel Barrow 1 Doz. Egg CUPS
1 Double Carriage HARNESS
1 Single DO DO.
1 RIDING SADDLE
1 CART HARNESS
1 ROW BOAT
2 MARKET WAGONS
J. H. TROTT,
P. M. G.
June 30th, 1879.

Notice.
THE Undersigned having this day associated
his Son, MR. E. EVELYN WALKER, as
Junior Partner, will continue the COMMIS-
SION AND AUCTION BUSINESS under the
same name and style of
H. W. Wilke' & Co.,
At his own Stores, No. 25, Front Street; and
most respectfully solicits a continuance of the
Liberal support received during the past twen-
ty years.
B. W. WALKER.
Hamilton, July 1, 1879.-2m

G E V E I R L
CO MISSION AG ENY,

AUCTIONTEERIlYG,
&c., &c.
5 i'1E Undersigned having been for many years
the confidential Clerk of B3. W. WA L.KER
Esqr., aid since, for the last eight year,, junior
partner in the late firm of II. \V. \VALKERl &
CO., begs to tender his services as a
General Commission llgent and
Auctioneer,
[loping by strict attention, and prompt returns,
to merit a share of ihat patronage, so liberally
bestowed on the late firm.
'TIHOS. J. WADSON,
23 Front Street.
iamilton, July 1st, 1879.


Hamilton,


B. W. WALKE R,
THOSE. J. WADS ON.
June 30, 18-79.


Wfst End Heid Street.

'j llE Subscriber begs to inform the Public
that he has Commenced a SIMILLAR
BUSINESS to that in which he has had nearly
nine years experience and humbly solicits a
share of their Patronage.
R. F. COOPER.
Hamilton, Julyl st, 1879.-3

For Sale,
Ex CAIN111. .
COlRN FLOUR Corn M IEAL
Superior FEED Oil MEAL
BRAN OATS TAR ROSIN
OARS Canned GOODS all descriptions
TEAS COFFEE &c. &.
1 East Broadway.
0. W. CAS TNER.
Hamilton, 30th June, 1879.-2

FIor Sale,

A Cottage Piano,
By a German Maker, has been but a few Months
in the Island and is in thorough order.
Sold on account ,f the Owner being about to
leave the Island.
Apply to COLONEL (;ORDON, R1, E,
Uarmilton, Jly 1st, 1879,


The Ladies did Society,
Somerset, will ho'd a


No., 3,


FIELD ENTERTAINMENT
AT1 1RM1ON'S B\ Y,


July Ith.
The Alexandiina B \ND will be in attendance.
Gates opened at 2 o'clock, p.m.
Admission- /.
The Proceeds will be in uid of the 1B. P. F.
Sabbath School, Somerset.
MARY H. S. RAT IERAY,
e'e treiary.
Somerset, June 30th, 1879.

SD V 0 0 SOLV 1 T 0N
OF


'1IIE Firm of B. W. WALKIt'lt & CO.,
is this--day Dissolved by Limi:aition. Ei-
ther .Partner is authorised to sign in Liquidation.






BEIR .'f DA ROYAL GAZETTE.


EXTRACT from METEOROLOGICAL OBSEIR-
VA TI ON S taken under the direction of the Pricipnl
Medical Oficer, Prospect, Bermuda. Above the sea
151 feet.
*)


Date.


1879.
Jn. 30
2
4


I Wind 'Temperature previous
2 2 a.m. 1 hours.


o u

0 0 0
30-190 sw 85-9 72-6 145"- -
90-117 sw 1 s,-9 74-0 13'1-0 0
30-164 NF, 1 79-3 8"-G 144-0
30*21 NE 1 80-6 67,0 142-5 %
30*219 sw 1 87-3 71-8 153,2
30-236 Nw 1 84-3 73-2 155-4 c
30-150 sw 1 83 3 72-2 150-8 Z


Total......1'77
Total Rainfall for the month of June 1879...4.64 inches
1578...6-04 "
The heat during the month of June was slightly in ex-
cess of the corresponding period of last year.





Ha milton, July 8, 1879.
1

Colonial Secretary's Office,
7TH JULY, 1879.
IS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR has
* been pleased to appoint
Aubrey G-. Huftt-tfild, sqr.,
To be ACTING COLONIAL POSTMASTER, such
Appointment to date from 26th May, 1879.
By His Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTE R,
Colonial Secretary.


Adjourned Court of General Assize.
Before the Honorable JOSIAH REES, Chief Justice,
and the Honorables EUGENIvS HARVEY and JAMES
H. TRIMINOtGAM, Assistant Justices.
Harriet Tongues vs. Richard Eve. Case sent up
from the Court of Ordinary to try certain ques-
tions of fact as to the validity of a Will. This
case was before the Court on Thursday and Fri-
day last.
The Court adjourned to to-day, Tuesday. 8th
July instant.

CUSTOM H OUSE-HA MILTON.
ENTERED.
July 1-Austrian Barque Cvie', Saitz, Cardiff; 593
tons coal for 'l. M. Government.
4-Barque Egbert, Mills, London; goods for mer-
chants.-Agent. T. F. J. Tucker.
7-Mail Steamer Canima, Liddicoat, New York ; as-
sorted cargo.-Agents, Trott & Cox.
CLEARED.
June 3J-Norwegian Barque Septentrio, Fergerrsen,
New York ; 475 bales and 23 half bales cotton.
July 1-Norwegian Barque Farmiliens Minde, Johnsen,
New York.
3-Schr. Wildfire, Bearse, New York; .00 boxes
onions, 200 empty casks, 25 cases champagne.
Norwegian Barque Nord Cap, Christainsen, Miramichi,
N.B.
PASSENGER ARRIVED.
In the Mall Steamer Canima on Sunday last from
New York :-Mrs. It. C. Robinson, Miss Ward,
Nessrs. John Trierney, Geo. S. Robinson, S. Nelmes,
J. C. Boyle, G. Trimingham, Robert Ward, T. Daven-
port, H. R. Hamilton, 0. Dickinson.-Second Cabin,
C. Martin, James Talbot.
A Schooner of and forHayti out 7 days from New
York, with a general cargo, got among the rocks
to the N. W. of these Islands on the morning of
Thursday last. She was gotten free and proceed-
ed towards St. Georges, but had not reached that
port last evening.-Agent, John S. Darrell.
R. M. Steamer Alpha. Capt. Crowell, hence at Hiali-
fax on 25th ultimo.
The U. S. Ship Dispatch had arrived hence and was
ordered out of commission.
Glance, arrived at Philadelphia on 29,h June with
a full cargo of sugar-all well.
Left London for Bermuda-Fred Thompson June 7th,
and the Greenwood June 11th.
U. S. Training Ship Saratoga, which arrived on 25th
ultimo, sailed again on 2nd inst. for New York. Dur-
ing her stay here the crew were allowed liberty on shore
and appeared to appreciate it much, receiving every
attention from the soldiers in garrison at St. Georges.
Their conduct was highly exemplary throughout their
stay. The S. left the United States in Maich last on
a cruise. and has visited Madeira and the Canary Is-
lands during the same. Shl has a crew of 60 A. B's.
and 180 PBos and 25 Ma!ines, with the following Offi-
cers, viz. :-
Lieut.-Commander................. R. D. Evans.
Lieutenant....................... R.3M. Barry.
M aster ............................H.. L. Green.
..............................G F. W Holm an.
S .......................... .......P. 'usbee.
............................ W Slack.
S ..............................H. S. W aring.
Surgeon... ...................... A. F. McGrudei:.
Asst.- Paymaster............. J. M. Speil.
Lieut. Marines................... M. C. Goodman.

LOSS OF THE TUG-BOAT "ACKERMANN."
We are sorry to learn that the Steam-tug "Ac-
kermann," Captain Lunkenback, which left Som-
erset on Saturday morning last for New York,
sprung a severe leak and foundered when about 60
miles West of these Islands at 9-10 p m. on the
evening of same day. Fortunately Captain Luck-
enbach had on board the Tug a large life-boat
which enabled him and his crew to effect a safe
landing on the Market Wharf, St. George's, on
Sunday night at 11 o'clock. We are not aware
whether the "Ackermann" was insured or not.
We understand that Captain Luckenback was on
his way to New York to bring to Bermuda a larger
and more powerful boat.

HALIAX, July 1.-A dispatch from St. Johns,
N. F., says a fire there has destroyed five houses
on Water street and the largest bakery on the
island, and also three houses owned by Mr. Shor-
tall on Mill Lane, a large coal and flour store, the
property of the Messrs. Browning, and two houses
owned by Mr. C'urran. The total loss about $75,000,
insured for $50,000 in the Imperial Guardian,
Liverpool and London and Globe and Queen.
Biitish Indians in large numbers have crossed
the border into Montana, and are driving the Ame-
rican Indians before tiern with loss of life or. both
sides. The matter has been ncfened to the War and
State departments at Washington.
The single scull race for $500 a side between
Warren Smith, of Halifax, and Evan Morris, of
Pirtsburg, distance of three miles, one and one-half
miles and return, took place at Silvtr LAke Tues-
day, July 1. Smith won by half a h ngtb of clear
water, in the fastest time on record-21 minutes
and 5 seconds; the next best time being that made
by Hanlan at Philadelphia in 1876, viz., 21 minutes,
9 seCCO! d e.
Tuesday, July 1, bding the thirteenth anniver-
sary of the confederation of the North American
Provinces was observed as a gene ral holiday through.-
out the Dominion.


T7E 7'XECUT10 OF EDWARD
SKEETERS.
Edward J. Skeeters, the younger, who was con-
victed at the late Assizes, of the wilful murder of his
wife, Anna Skeeters, and sentenced to be hanged,
was executed on Wednesday last, July 2nd. As the
day fixed for the execution was very generally known,
a numerous crowd of people began to collect about
the precincts of the Gaol, at a very early hour, and
as the morning wore on Court and Church Streets
became so blocked that it was a matter of some
difficulty for a passenger to thread his way along
these thoroughfares. There appeared to be but
little excitement among the mob, who seemed gath-
ered together (as is always the case on such occa-
sions) more from a feeling of mere morbid curiosity
than from any other definite motive. It is to be re-
gretted that there was so large a sprinkling of wo-
men, but let us hope that they were present more
from a feeling of sympathy for the unfortunate
victim of a husband's. malice than from a desire to
take part in the melancholy proceedings that were
to ensue. In strict accordance with the present
law requiring that all executions should be carried
out with as much privacy as possible, a portion of
the space within the Prison walls to the Westward
of the Debtor's Prison had been selected, and was
carefully screened from public scrutiny by being
closely covered in with canvass.
Punctually at seven o'clock the Provost Marshal
together with the authorized Gaol Officials, the
Chaplain and Surgeon of the Gaol, the Parish Con-
stables on duty, and the Reporters for the Press en-
tered within the walls and proceeded to the place
of execution.
The Prisoner during the earlier stages of the in.
vestigations, and subsequently at the trial and in
Prison, affected a most dogged and defiant demean-
our, but as the time of his execution drew near his
conduct underwent a considerable change, and let
us trust that the exhortations of the Chaplain were
not entirely thrown away. On Thursday week
preceding the day on which the sentence was to be
carried out the unhappy man sent for the Editor of
a contemporary paper, and we understand that to
him he made a thorough confession of his crime
together with every detail connected with the per-
petration of his villainous deed. On Tuesday the
1st of July, he seemed thoroughly penitent and at
his own request the Holy Communion was adminis-
tered to him and he expressed much sorrow and
contrition for the heinous offence of which he was
guilty. When the Chaplain entered the condemned
cell on the fatal morning and proceeded to prepare
the Prisoner to meet his fate with fortitude and re-
signation, he was sensibly affected. The exhorta-
tion being over Skeeters walked with a firm step
out of the cell, and facing the gallows, stood in an
attitude of attention and listened to the earnest and
solemn service that followed, with composure.
When asked if he had anything further to state he
replied in a loud clear voice in which there was not
the slightest tremor; he acknowledged the justness
and propriety of his sentence, but said that he
would caution those who then heard him, with re-
gard to the responsibility of giving evidence; that
it behoved him, standing as he was on the brink of
eternity, to be very particular as to the truth of his
statements, but he must nevertheless affirm that
several parts of the evidence given by the Witness
Grant, relative to his visiting the house where his
Mother lived on the night of the murder, also with
regard to the finding of the clothes in his own
house as stated by Constable Siggins and other
minor details of the evidence, were entirely false.
He admitted in the most emphatic terms that he
and he alone was guilty of the crime, and begged
that it might be- clearly understood that he had
neither accomplice nor associate in the murder, and
he trusted that the faults and penalties of his wicked
conduct might not be visited on innocent and un-
offending parties. He concluded by stating that
he had made an entire revelation of every circum-
stance connected with the crime to a person whom
he authorized to publish that confession. We
have been also led to understand that the .Criminal
while awaiting his sentence spent much of his time
in writing, and we presume that these papers which
doubtless contained particulars of his doings, were
handed to those for whom they wore intended.
After finishing these remarks he read aloud a pas-
sage of Scripture in a firm steady voice, and at the
conclusion thereof, viewing' the ghastly prepara-
tions before him, with every appearance of cool-
ness and unconcern he walked quickly to the scaf-
fold and mounted the platform without hesitation
or assistance. The halter was then adjusted, and
with it around his neck he requested to be allowed
to repeat some verses of a doggerel rhyme com-
posed, we presume, by himself; on their conclusion
he said, O GOD, into thy hands I commend my
Spirit." On this signal the drop fell and death
was instantaneous. According to usual custom
the body was allowed to remain on the scaffold the
allotted time, and was then removed in order that it
might be viewed by the Coroner's Jury who pro-
Snounced a verdict in accordance.with the facts of


the case.
The body was then conveyed to one of the is-
lands in the Great Sound, where it was interred, and
the large stone which he used to sink the remains
of his victim to the bottom of the sea in the Blue
Channel, was placed as a head stone to his grave..,
We know that in regard to the vexed question
of capital punishment, there are many and con-
flicting opinions, but that it has'a moral and be-
neficial.tendency in checking the grosser passions
of the more abandoned of the human race, there
can be little doubt; and sad as the unwelcome fact
must be, we fear that the only effectual remedy to
prevent the hand of man being raised against his
brother man, is the wholesome dread of having to
pay the penalty of the crime, by the forfeit of his
own life.

WAR OFFICE, June 20.-19TH REGT.-Lieut. J.
SR. Vincent resigns his commission.
Chaplain of the 4th Class, the Rev. E. A. Alder-
son, M.A., to be Chaplain of the 3rd Class; June 3.
ADMIRALTY, June 16.-Her Majesty the Queen
has been pleased to appoint Admiral Sir A. C. Key,
K. C. B., to be her first and principal Naval Aide-
de-Camp from the 15th instant, vice the Hon. Sir
H. Keppel, G. C. B.
ADMIRALTY, June 6, 1879.-Inspector General of
Hospitals and Fleets on the Retired List H. J.
Domville, C.B., M.D., to be Honorary Surgeon to
Her Majesty, vice Dr. Mackay, deceased.

REDUCTION IN PRICE OF FRESH BEEF.-We un-
derstand that the Beef Contractors have decided
not to charge over I/ per pound for the best joints
of Beef offered in the market.

The barque-rigged steam yacht Jeanette, Captain De
Long, was about to leave San Francisco on an Arctic
exploring expedition. It is proposed that the Jeanette
enter the Arctic Ocean by way of B( hring Strait. She
has a crew of 25 selected men: her equipment is per-
fect. She has supplies for 3 years.

To CORRESPONDENTS.-" T's" communication has
been received. He will perceive that it has been anti-
cipated. We hope to hear from him on some future
similar occasion.
j -e--<------
The Queen has commanded that the troop-ship
Orontee, bearing the remains'of the Prince Impe-
rial, shall be escorted on a part of her voyage by
the Channel fleet. The Duke of Cambridge, Com-
mander-in-Chief of the British army, heads a com-
mittee of leading army officers to superintend the
raising of a memorial to the late Prince.


The United States, Europe, &c.
The Mail Steamer Canima, Captain Liddicoat,
arrived at her wharf in this Town at 3 p.m. on
Sunday-having left New York soon after 4 p.m.
on Thursday the 3rd instant.
We are indebted to Captain Liddicoat, Mr. Pur-
ser Gale, 1st Officer Mr. Whitehurst, 2nd Officer
Mr. Astwood, and Mr. Steward Brown, for files of
New York papers of the afternoon of the 3rd inst.
Stock Del. and Hixdson Canal Co., 47.

The sad tidings comes from Africa that the Prince
Imperial, a volunteer with the British army, has been
cruelly assassinated by the savage Zulus. Full parti-
culars of this unhappy event will be found in another
column of this issue.

Orders have been received at Portsmouth for
three large Indian troop ships to be prepared for
sea immediately for particular service. Consider-
able curiosity is felt-as to whether they are wanted
to convey additional reinforcements to Natal or to
bring home some of the troops lately employed in
Afghanistan.

SOUTH AFRICA-PARTICULARS OF THE
DEATH OF THE PRINCE IMPERIAL-
MILITARY MOVEMENTS.
LONDON, June 19.-Prince Louis Napoleon,
Prince Imperlal of France, accompanied by other
officers, left Colonel Wood's camp to reconnoitre.
The party dismounted in a mealie field, when the
enemy crept upon them and assegaied the Prince,
killing him.
LONDON, June 20.-The body of the Prince Im-
perial was discovered in a field of long grass.
There were no bullet wounds upon it, but there
were seventeen wounds made by assegaied thrusts.
The body was found stripped and the clothes had
been taken away.
LONDON, June 28.-Advices from Cape Town to
June 10 state that according to the official account
the Prince Imperial, after the surprise of his recon-
noitering party, rode during the general flight into
a ravine where a second body of Zulus lay con-
cealed. The independent accounts agree with the
story of the manner of the Prince Imperial's death
heretofore telegraphed in these despatches, The
body of the deceased Prince, after a funeral pa-
rade, at which Lord Chelmsford was the chief
mourner, was removed to Pietermaritzburg, where
it lay in state in the Catholic Church. The body
will arrive at Durban on the Ilth inst., and be es-
corted by the garrison on board the man-of-war
Boadicea for conveyance to Simon's Bay, where it
will be transferred to the troopship Orontes for
transportation to England.
General Newdegate's column has advanced to
the Selefe River, twenty miles beyond the Blood
River, where an intrenchment will be formed.
General Crealock's command will leave for Fort
Chelmsford to-morrow. His division will then
advance and establish a cache at Fort Dunford,
thus obtaining supplies by sea. The gunboat For-
rester will start for Fort Durnford immediately.
The yeomanry have again unsuccessfully attacked
Moirosi's Mountain in Basutoland, losing two men
killed and twelve wounded. Sir Bartle Frere has
arrived at Cape Town, where he was enthusiasti-
cally received.
LONDON, June 30.-More peace messengers have
come in to Lord Chelmsford. The messengers
were informed of the additional terms of peace,
which are: The King's regiment to disarm, Cete-
wayo not to assemble an army for five years, the
King to pay a fine of two bullocks for every male
Zulu, a considerable portion of the cattle to be dis-
tributed to the chiefs who surrendered to the Eng-
lish, and an English Resident to be placed at
Ulundi. The terms have not yet been answered.
Peace Negotiations with King Cetewayo Reprehensible
Treatment of the Prince Imperial.
LONDON, June 30.-It seems certain that the last
peace overtures of King Cetywayo are bona fide.
A special despatch to the Times from General
Wood's camp says: "The messengers of King
Cetywayo have been recognized as important per-
sons by native spies. While they were palavering
with Lord Chelmsford a report arrived that the
Zulu army was advancing on General Wood's
camp. The messengers readily agreed to be shot
if this report should prove true. When it was
ascertained that the report was unfounded the
messengers were released. Lord Chelmsford, after
staying the terms of peace, declared that before
treating further the two cannon captured at Islan-
dula and some hostages must be given up. The
messengers asked Lord Chelmsford to halt pending
an answer, but he refused.
The troopers who were with the Prince Imperi-
al when be was killed declare, in contradiction
to Lieutenant Carey's statement, that the survivors
galloped two or three miles without stopping.
The Times' correspondent, summarizing the va-
rious accounts of the death of the Prince Imperial,
says: The Quartermaster-General disobeyed Lord
Chelmsford's orders by sending the Prince on a
dangerous expedition, the escort of which deserted
its duty. In the whole affair there is not one re-
deeming feature.
Adjutant Frith of the Lancers has been killed
in a skirmish.
The Times' correspondent, writing from Itelezi
Hill, on June 2, says:-" At daybreak a cavalry
patrol, under Gen. Marshall, left to search for the


Prince Imperial, and went to kraals 10 miles on.
The body of the Prince was discovered among long
grass in Dona, 300 yards from a kraal. There was
no bullet wound, but 17 assegai wounds were
found in front. The clothes bad been taken.
Round the neck there was a chain with a locket.
A stretcher of lances was formed, and the body was
borne by Marshall, Drury-Lowe, Major Stewart,
and officers of the 17thb Lancers, to meet the ambu-
lance, by which it was then brought hither with an
escort. There was a funeral parade in the after-
noon. Deep sorrow prevails throughout the col-
umn. The Prince did not mount after the attack,
his horse being restive. He ran on foot. The
corpse leaves with an escort for transport home.',
The following additional details concerning the
burial of the dead at Isandula have been received
by the Daily Neios:-" Captain Shepstone visited
the camp of the Carabiniers who had fallen. The
body of Col. D)rnford was recognized by the mess
waistcoat he had worn, and a pocket-knife with the
name of the deceased on it. Two' rings were also
taken from the corpse. These relics will be sent to
his father. Durrant Scott,of the Carabiniers, had his
patrol-jacket on. His face was lifelike, all the
hair being on it, and the skin, though dried up,
still perfect. Col. Durnford's body was wrapped
in canvas, and buried in a kind of water-cask.
The others were covered with stones, and their
nan es written in pencil 'on a stone close by them.
The bodies of the R. A. and Natal mounted Police
were also buried, but those of the 24th Regt., were'
left untouched, at the express desire of Col. Glynn
and the officers, who hope some day to be able to
do this themselves. Everything of value has been
taken from the camp, and some bodies removed or
disturbed, so as to render recognition impossible."

THE DEAD PRINCE.
Accounts of an Eye Witness to the Death Scene.
News concerning the death of the ex-Prince Impe-
rial of France foterms the great topic discussed in the
English newspapers of the 20th and 21st of June. It
is a sad story, and as more details arrive the interest
grows all the more absorbing. The scenes at Camden


House are described in glimpses. "Thanks to the
foresight of Her Majesty the Queen," says a corres-
pondent, the sad news did not come suddenly and
unexpectedly on the bereaved lady, the Empress.
Precautions were taken to prevent the newspapers, ra
was usually the custom, being sent to Camden House ;
and the servants were warned, in case they heard
anything, to keep their lips closed. So well were the
directions observed that when Lord Sydney-who is the
lord of the manor of Chiselhurst, and the lord cham-
berlain in the government-arrived at Camden House
at ten o'clock a.m., by special direction of the Queen,
he was enabled in the most touching and appropriate
words to impart the news which made the Empress
Eug6nie not only a widow, but childless. The effect
of the terrible information can be better imagined than
described. The bewildered mother, who had been
looking forward to receiving a letter by this mail,
could not at first, believe the intelligence, but Lord
Sydney had to back up his communication by the
official telegrams received at the War and Colonial
Offices, and, above all, a message of condolence from
Lidy Frere. These proofs were too numerous. The
Empress at once fell into a swoon and lay unconscious
all day." Since then the cable has informed us of the
terrible sufferings which the bereaved mother has un-
dergone. The Right Rev. Mgr. Goddard, the Roman
Catholic priest at Chiselhurst, who had an audience
with the Empress, says that not since the Emperor's
death had he seen her in such a condition. The little
church at Chiselhurst, dedicated to the Virgin, where
the Prince's body will rest, had been gayly decorated
for the Whitsuntide festival but was at once denuded
of flowers and decorations and afterward draped in
black.
The Manner of the Prince's Death.-The cable has
given us the facts connected with the death of the
Prince, but some very interesting details are contained
in the despatches from South Africa. The Prince,
who was always desirous to be actively employed, was
anxious to join Lieutenant Carey, of the Ninety-eighth,
who was starting with six men of Bettington's Horse
on a reconnoitering expedition. The staff objected to
his going, but he laughingly overruled their wishes and
started. Lieutenant Carey, the leader of the recon-
noitering party, gave the following account of the ex-
pedition:-
We left Koppie Allein at half-past seven rode to
Itelezi and waited for the Basutos. The Prince being
impatient at their non-arrival we rode on without them
to a hill seven miles and a half this side of Ishlawani
Hill; reconnoitered with telescopes for one hour, but
saw no one; descended to a deserted kraal in the val-
ley below, off-saddles and rested one hour. I remind-
ed the Prince of the time. He said, 'Wait ten mi-
nutes.' At length, as we were about to resadrdle our
horses I saw the black faces of Zulus peering out be-
tween the maize stalks all round. The Prince, looking
aside, maid, I see them too.' We leaped upon our
horses and rode off amid a sudden volley of musketry
from the Zulus, who, as soon as they saw us mounting,
rushed forth on all sides from the maize. All rode
off. On crossing the donga, 200 yards away, we no-
ticed the Prince's horse following, riderless. I expect
the Prince had been killed in the kraal. Two of the
escort were killed."
From all accounts it appears that Lieutenant Carey
and the troopers who saved themselves ran away at
the first sight of the Zulus and left the young Prince,
who had some difficulty in mounting from the tearing
of the saddle flaps, to his fate. Later accounts say
that Lieutenant Carey galloped five miles without stop-
ping after the scare.
English Public Opinion. -The subject of the Prince's
death was referred to in the discussion of the English
Parliament. Sir R. Peel made an inquiry which
seemed to reflect on Lord Chelmsford's care of
[his charge. To this Colonel Stanley said that lie
knew nothing of the precise position held by Prince
Louis Napoleon, and could only repeat that Lord
Chelmsford was in complete ignorance of the fact that
the young volunteer had been sent on the mysterious
mission which proved so sadly fatal. 1" Officials,"
says a London correspondent, no less than independ-
ent members, condemn in fierce terms the foolhardi-
ness of sending young men from the camp, and their
fatal folly of smoking cigarettes in a mealie field in'an
enemy's country. Lord Beaconsfield attributes it to
the same mistaken self-confidence that lost us Isan-
dula." Another correspondent says:--" Part of the
sympathy turns to indignation at the manner in which
a war is being conducted which from Isandula to the
death of Prince Louis has been a series of surprises
for our side. The same message which records the
death of the heir of the Napoleons tells also of another
surprise in Basutoland leading to the massacring of
our men in their tents. It would seem as if everybody
in South Africa were taking things so lightly and
leisurely and contemptuously as to omit the few pre-
cautions which are absolutely necessary. The only
battle which was not a surprise was Ginglihovo, and
the relief of Ekowe is the only matter for English
satisfaction that has occurred since war was declared.
If this sort of thing goes on much longer we shall be
sending out officers and men to simple butchery."

"BERMUDA ROWING CLUB" RACE.
As previously announced, the Rowing Match
between the crews of Mr. W. Masters (Colours,
Red) and Mr. W. Cooper (Colours, Blue) came off
in Hamilton Harbour on Thursday afternoon last,
the 3rd inst.
The hour for starting was fixed for 6 o'clock,
p.m.. but owing to an accident happening to the
boat used for conveying the Starter to his post-near
"Burnt Island"-and he being obliged in conse-


quence to return to the shore and send another per-
son in his stead, the boats did not finally get off
till about 6"30. However, a capital start was at
last affected, and both boats shot away for the Goal
-a stake boat placed in a line with the Town Hall
Wharf.
The Blues at once took the lead and apparently
had the best of it until opposite "Washington's
Point" where the Reds crept up, but the former
with renewed efforts further maintained their
ground as far as the R. B. Y. Club. The superiori-
ty of their opponents here manifested itself, and in
spite of the encouraging voice of the plucky Cox-
swain, and the fresh efforts at spurting and harder.
pulling which his calls elicited, the Blues began to
lag.
Immediately the Reds showed their mettle by
making some splendid spurts, which helped them
most effectually and brought them in winners by a
length and a half, thus finishing a most interesting
and well contested race.
The wind at the time was dead ahead, blowing.
strong from the Eastward, which greatly retarded
the progress of the boats and prevented the cus-
tomary good time being made.
We hope that more of these races will follow and
that the spirit in such a healthy pastime will not
be allowed to flag, as it was quite evident from the
number of people on the wharves and in the nume-
rous boats which dotted the Harbour, that the zest
for such agreeable amusements was clearly estab-
lished, and certainly the beautiful situation of our
Harbour well warrants their repetition.
We are informed that on Thursday next some
scratch races will be rowed in the Harbour over
the same course, amongst the crews who rowed the
above mentioned race, and also between some juni-
ors-to start about 5-30.

LONDON, JUNE 80.-The Lord Chancellor,- Lord
Cairns, introduced in the House ol Lords to-day
the Government's Irish University scheme, which
proposes the dissolution of the existing Queen's
University and the application of its endowment
grants to a new university on the model of the Lon-
don University.


THE ADJOURNMENT OF CONGRESS.

The extra session is ended and Congress has
adjourned. Since the 18th of March, when it was
convened, Congress has been trying to pass the
appropriation bills which it failed in the usual course
to pass at the last regular session. That failure, it
will be remembered, was owing to the extraordinary
character of the bills, which comprised political
provisions not usually included in supply bills. At
the last session the Democrats controlled only the
House of Representatives; now they also control
the Senate, and though their majority in both houses
is slim, they hoped and certainly threatened to have
their way and to pass the appropriations in the
shape they desired, notwithstanding the opposition
of the President. In this they have not succeed-.
They twice passed the army appropriations and they
were twice vetoed. The different bills contained
provisions that the moneys voted should not paid
if any of the armed forces of the Governme ere
used at the polls. The President very -early
pointed out that, both by precise statutory directions
as well as by his general authority and duty, he was
bound to preserve peace at the polls whenever it
became necessary, and that for this purpose the
whole force of the United States, armed or civil,
should be available to him, and he refused his assent
to the bills. They were then modified to suit, or
less decidedly to oppose, his views. All that the
Democrats at last ventured upon was to add a pro-
vision that the troops should not be used "as a
police," and with this lame and impotent effort to
maintain a show of consistency, their bills were
approved.
The Executive and Judicial appropriations were -
also saddled with similar qualifications at first, and
failed. Ultimately they were all passed in a shape
to satisfy the President's objections, except the
Judicial bill. This, in its complete shape, forbade
the payment of fees to the court officers, marshals
and deputies, for any services rendered by them
under the election laws. The bill was vetoed.
Thereupon the Democrats, not daring to shut up the
Courts by failing to vote the usual supplies, split
their bill in two, voting in one all other salaries and
charges connected with the administration of justice,
and voting in the other the Marshals' fees with the
same restrictions as in the original bill. The firet
bill was approved by the President; the second he
vetoed. This left all the necessary supplies of the
Government voted, except those of the Process
officers of the United States Courts, and these last,
amounting, it may be said, to six hundred thousand
dollars, the Democrats refused to vote except in their
own way. It was thought at first that the President
would call a second extra session of Congress to
pass these omitted supplies. But he decided not to
do so. The Marshals are sure of their money, and
very likely some way will be found to pay them as
usual. But they are the victims of democratic con-
sistency, and the loud vaunts and the stubborn action
which made a costly extra session unavoidable, have
at last settled down to this, that all the bailiffs and
constables in the United States must serve the Gov-
ernment on credit and wait for their pay. The same
officers serve process and are employed generally in
civil actions and proceedings, and in this way it is
thought they can in any event pick up fees enough
to keep them from starving.
Any confusion brought or to be brought to the
Democrats by their late action they fully deserve;
and the Republicans, who have been willing enough
to foment the embarrassments of the situation, do
not deserve to fare much better. The extra session
was forced on an issue feigned and fictitious in so0 r
as it pretended to have substance. It is a fi cry,
no doubt, to advocate freedom at the poll, without
the glimpse of a soldier to deter or affrig the voter.
But though a possible soldier is pe iAed by the
election laws, he is in effect nev seen; and the
armed and tyrannical authority whiCh the democratic
vision pictured is as unreal as the formidable ("men
in buckram" of Falstaff's imagination, It was an
attempt to get up a rallying cry 4or the democratic
masses, which might not only halloo them into suc-
cess, but also put aside more embarrassing questions,
chiefly those of finance, which were perilous to unity.
Every effort was made by the leaders of both parties
to limit the action of Congress to the appropriation
bills. In one day, the. first when the restriction to
the introduction of general legislation was re-
moved, over a thousand bills were introduced;
and more than three thousand, including resolu-
tions, were referred to- Committees. But very
few of them have been acted upon One of the
few was a pernicious silver bill making silver
dollars good for more than their intrinsic value.
This passed the house but was kept in Committee by
the senate, and the ablest and most consistent demo-
cratic senator, Mr. Bayard of Delaware, was almost
forced by the caucas of his party from the chairman-
ship of the Finance Committee in the Senate, because
he refused to report the bill. One of the few general
measures passed was the repeal of the duty on
quinine. Singular to say, this is regarded as a most
creditable achievement. The duty was twenty per
cent on the imported value, and yielded about half a
million of dollars to the profit of certain monopolists
of the drug in Philadelphia. Malaria is now the
fashionable type of disease everywhere, and its
familiar form of fever and ague, while prevailing
throughout the country, has its more established
abiding place in the Southern States. The Southern
members are the chief support of the Democrats,
and late in the session they made a strike for free
quinine, and, against a strong opposition, carried
their, point. They have something to show for their
extra session. They may not have been able to keep
the armed hordes of the Government from the polls,
but every sallow-faced voter, who shakes in his shoes


with the malady of the soil, may dose himself with
the drug he believes in without paying a cent of toll
or tax for the blessing.

A Supplement of three col-
umns accompanies this issue
of the Gazette." It contains the Minutes of
Proceedings of H. M. Connoil on the 2nd inst.,
and of the Honble. House of Assembly on 5th;
Communications-" Faith;" Sapper 21st Com-
pany, R.E.; the formation of Lodge ',"I. 0.
G. T.," and the important discovery of Rock
Salt in the United States in which some of our
Bermuda friends are interested.

BIRTH, at Royal Naval Yard on the 3rd instant,
the WIFE of Mr. 0. A. Reade, Dispenser R. N. Hos-
pital of a DAUGHTER.'
S......... at Zephyr Hill, Warwick, June 27th, Mas.
WM. OSMOND DUNSCOMBE, of a SON.

DIED, on the 12th June, 1879, at New Orleans, La.,
where he was greatly esteemed for 30 years, Captain
JOHN WILLIAM SIMPSON, aged 53 years; leaving a
bereaved widow to mourn his demise. The late Capt.
Simpson was a native of Bermuda, and leaves in our
Islands one sister and many other relatives to lament
their loss.


THE Lecture by
Esqr., M. C. P.,
Home" at the Orange
Flatt's, Smith's, has been


J. N. Darrell,
on "'lHome Sweet
Grove Seminary the


Until the Evening of

Tuesday July 15th.
Entrance 1/, to be paid at the Door.
July 8th, 1879.






BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


3 3 nttmttO,
To-Morrow, Wednesday,
9th inst., At 12 o'clock,
t WIlAl %Vi'l0A,
I9T 7'HE OLD T.4.DA
TO CLOSE CONSIGNMENT,
Without the Slightest Reserve,
Viz.:
15 B LS. S. F. FLOUR
10 B1s. Double Extra Family
FLOUR
8 Boxes CHEESE
3 Dozen BUCKETS 4 Nest TUBS
About 150 Lbs. BACON
1000 CIGARS and some Smoking TOBACCO
ALSO,
1 WILL SELL,
BAGS CORN BIs. Bright SUGAR
Bls. WHEAT Half Chests TEA
STATIONERY School SLATES
Dry GOODS &c., &c.
JOHN HARNETT,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, 7th July, 1879.

NOTICE.



WILIL B&A SOL,

On We dnesday,
The 9th instant, at 3 p.m.,
.1t Tucher,' IIasd,

The HULK
"PRENTISS HOBBS."
ALSO,
BOATS ANCHORS CHAINS
ROPE BLOCKS and Lot of LUMBER
One Set Seneca PUMPS
J. T. DARRELL 4. CO.,
Auctioneers.
A Boat Will be despatched from the Upper
Ferry Steps at 2 p.m. to take bidders. to the
Sale.
Hamilton, July 7th, 1879.


Notice !


Notice I


GREAT SALE OF

READY-MADE CLOTHING
At the spacious Rooms over the
Stores of the Undersigned,
25 Front Street,
ON WEDNESDAY,
The9thinst., At 12 o'clock, M.,
The Largest Stock of Ready-made
Men's, Youths' and Boys'


Ever offered at Auction in this Market.
SALE POSITIVE,
The Owner about to leave the Island.
5 00 GENTS', Youths' and Boys' COATS
of every color, description and
quality
500 Pairs do. do. do. PANTALOONS,
of every color and quality
500 Pairs do. do. do. VESTS
500 Do. do. do. White and Colored
SHIRTS
500 Do. Men's and Boys' Half HOSE
300 Do. Ladies', Misses' and Childs' DO.
500 Men's and Boys' Straw HATS
A Large Assortment of Handkerchiefs, Towels,
Collars, Cuffs, Neckties, Stationery, Per-
fumery, Crockery, Glassware, Cutlery,
Brushes, Mirrors, Pictures, Steel Pens,
Pencils, Toys
And a great variety of other miscellaneous
articles that will appear at the Sale.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, July 1st, 1879.

Marine Slip Company.

jfHE SHAEUIOLDERS of the "St.
S'George's Marine Slip Company" are
requested to meet at the Company's Office, St.
George's,

On Saturday,
The 19th Instant, at 12 o'clock, noon,
For the purpose of ELECTING OFFICERS
for the ensuing year and transacting any other
business that may come before the Meeting.
By order of the Board of Directors,
J. TUDOR BOURNE,
Secretary.
St. Geor.s's, 4th July, 1879. 2-3p.

Notice.


A Large Refrigerator to be seen at the Stores
of Messrs. B. W. Walker & Co., to be sold at
Cost and Charges.
B E. DICKlJVSON.
Ilamilton,July 8, 1879.-
TR Y T ROXELL'S
PRIDE OF THE KITCHIEA'

For Scouring, Cleaning, and Polishing.
Ask your Grocer for it.
May 27, 1879.-B 3m.


ByPublic Auction,
Under the Big Shed,
At 12 o'clock, M.


On


Thursday next,
41


10th Instant.
500 LBS. Assorted Philadelphia CON-
500 L FECTIONARY, in 5 and 2- lbs.
Boxes
25 Kegs and Tubs New Crop BUTTER
50 Tins 5 lbs. and 10 lbs. Do. DO.
100 10 lbs. Tins Yellow BUTTER
20 Boxes New Halifax HERRINGS
25 Bags CORN, 2 Bushels each
4 Boxes Compressed CODFISH, 30 lbs. each
10 Casks Kerosene OIL
1 New MATTRESS
5 Boxes STARCH, 30 lbs. each
36 1 Gallon Tins APPLES
2 Bbls. S. F. FLOUR
20 Reams Wrapping PAPER, 15 x 20
26 do. do. DO. 10 x 15
12 Kegs NAILS 10 Bales HAY
Half Bls. Family BEEF
Half Bls. Family PORK
HAMS and Smoked BEEF
Boxes CHEESE 1 Cooking STOVE
4 Doz. Tins SOUP 50 Boxes SEGARS
1 Trunk Fancy GOODS
300 Feet Refuse LUMBER
A Lot of CROCKERY
10 Hlf. Boxes RAISINS
10 Bls. Bright Demerara SUGAR
1 Hhd. English ALE
1 Doz. Wire Dish COVERS, assorted sizes
100 Prs. Ladies White BOOTS
1 Box Gold Leaf TOBACCO
SPADES Garden FORKS SHOVELS
LOCKS RAKES
GRINDSTONES Looking GLASSES
TUMBLERS DRAINERS
Castor OIL Hair OIL INK
Coal BUCKETS SCALES and WEIGHTS
Tin PANS, &c., &c.
ALSO,
1 Bermuda Sail BOAT,
With MAST, SAILS, RIGGING and Iron
BALLAST.
B. W. WALKER,
Govt. Auctioneer.
Hamilton, July 7th, 1879.

By Public Auction
ON WEDNESDAY,
16th instant,
Immediately after the Marshal's Sale
in Smith's Parish,


oil TEE13IZ
X WILL.


Pp~ulana
SELL


AS UNDER,-Viz.:
ONE
Black Mare,
1 Large Bay HORSE
2 Box CARTS 2 DRAYS
1 Double Carriage HARNESS
1 Single Do. DO.
2 Cart HARNESSES
1 Pony CARRIAGE
X-1 Dark Brown COW, heavy
E 9 in Calf, a superior Milker
1 other good COW in Calf
2 Young COWS, one in Calf
3 PLOUGHS
And a Wooden BARN, about 82 ft. x 16 ft.
JOHN HARNETT,
Auctioneer, I
Hamilton, 8th July, 1879. |


I am Instructed to Sell,
3p Public uettaow1


22nd inst., At 12 o'clock,
O.V THE PRE.~ISES,
At the Vlatts,
THE
Dwelling HOUSE
recently occupied by the late Mr
ALFRED PENISTON,
And about Three Acres of LAND attached.
ALSO,
12 CEDAR CHAIRS 1 SOFA
2 1 Side BOARD
1 Lounging CHAIR 3 Wash Stands
1 Clothes PRESS
Nest DRAWERS with Book Case
1 Cedar Chest 3 Bedsteads 1 Wardrobe
Desk with Drawers
1 BUFFET Lot Cane CHAIRS
1 CLOCK 1 Medicine CHEST
A Lot of CROCKERY 1 Liquor CASE
1 Mahogany Gun CASE
1 Dining TABLE, D Ends
1 STRETCHER 4 TABLES, &c., &c.
JOHN HARNETT,
Auctioneer,
* Hamilton, 8th July, 1879.
P.S.-Should it rain on the 22nd inst., the
Sale will take place on the first fair day after.
t J. H.


B. W. WALKER.


E. EVELYN WALKER.


B. WF'. Walker 4* 4


AUCTION EER~S
1 ISSIOAND
vcip SSI N EJRGANTS

11AM ILTON,
IDERMUIDA.


I ttttomt Salt
Of Valuable Household



The Undersigned have Received
Instructions from
S T. Kerrisk, Esqr.,
To Sell.
BY PUBLIC AUCTION,

ON TUESDAY,
15 Instant, At 12 o'clock noon,
At His Residence near the Gazette" Office.
THE WHOLE OF HIS
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE,
KITCHEN UTENSILS,
&c., &c., &c,


Drawing Room.
1 HANDSOME Centre TABLE, Marble
L Top
1 Handsome Centre TABLE
9 Mahogany CHAIRS, with Cushions
1 Rocking CHAIR 1 Easy CHAIR
1 Mahogany SOFA 22 Yds. MATTING
1 Lot of PICTURES

Dining Room.
1 M MAHOGANY Dining TABLE
14 Cane Seat Dining CHAIRS
1 8 day CLOCK 2 Tea TRAYS
1 SOFA LAMPS GLASSWARE
CROCKERY
Bed Rooms.
3 HESTS DRAWERS
S 3 BEDSTEADS
3 Wash STANDS 1 MATTRESS
Looking GLASSES

Kitchen.
1 AMERICAN Cooking STOVE
I Kerosene STOVE complete
And a full set of Kitchen UTENSILS
ALSO,
1 Superior 6-Barrel REVOLVER'
with full set of Fixings
9 Volumes of the TAILOR AND CUTTER,"
one of the most scientific works on the
Profession now extant
And many other valuable Books
AND,
1 First-rate PIANO, if not previ-
ously disposed of
And many other Articles that will appear at
the sale.
B. W. WALKER,
Govt. Auctioneer.
Hamilton, July 7, 1879.

NO TWICE .

T HE Undersigned hereby informs
his Friends and Patrons that during his
absence from Bermuda he has turned his Tailor-
ing Establishment over to Messrs. Lockward
and lugham.
While thanking them for the liberal patronage
bestowed on him, he solicits a continuance of
same for the new Concern.
'P. KER1RISK.
Hamilton, July 8, 1879.--1
Colonist copy once.

Notice.
TpHE Undersigned beg to inform the Public
That they have taken over MR. KER-
RISK'S Tailoring Establishment in connection
with their own business.
The Mechanical part will be conducted by Mr.
Tierney, just arrived per Canma" fropn New
York. Mr. T. haa lately been employed in a
large Tailoring louse in that City, and is highly
recommended as a first class Cutter.
LOCKWARD & INGHAM.
Hamilton, July 8, 1879.-1
Colonist copy once.


Six Specials.
I ciN Quality Japanese CU1S' and SAU-
SERS
New Fancy Pattern MATTING
Gilt and Fancy Colored" Pieture Framing
The New Patent Cotton HAMMOCK
The New Patent Combined Water FILTER &
COOLER
The new Patent Ivory" Handle Table CUT-
LERY-more durable than any white han-
dle heretofore known.
W. BLUCK.
Hamilton, June 30th, 1879.-2 3p

The late Patrick Dan-
iels,
(OTH ERWISE PATRICK O'DONNELL)
(Deceased.)
ALL Persons INDEBTED to the above Es-
tate are hereby required to pay the
Amount of their Debts to the Undersigned for
the Administrator, Mr. John O'l)onnell, on or
before TUESDAY NEXT, the 8th July instant.
SAll Persons having Lawful CLAIMS against
the said Est;te are required to deliver the'r
ACCOUNTS in detail to the Undersigned, for
the Administrator, at or before 12 "o'clock, noon,
on Tuesday next the 8th Instant.
S. BROWNLOW GRAY,
For the above-named Administrator
Hamilton, Ist July, 1879.-2 3p.


Exchange
DR
A

7th July, 1869,


on Aew York GOLD
3FTS at sight.


pply to


S. S. INGHAM.


New York JMlail Steamer.

*. >The Steamer
"CANIM A"

i Captain LIDDIG OAT,
Will leave Tucker's Island, in the
Great Sound, for New York,

At I P.M. 10th inst.
i Freight, Parcels, and Specie will be received
here until 6 p.m. 9th July, and Bills of Lading
will be signed until 8 p.m. same evening.
I BO VTS will be provided to leave the Long
Shed" (the Steamer's regular berth) with Pas-
sengers at 12 noon the 10th instant.
Bagg-ge to be at the Long Shed" by 10
n.m. 10th instant.
The Canima" will leave I lamilton for Tuck-
er's Island at 1 p.m. Wednesday, the 9th.
TROTT COX,
SAgents
liamilton, Bermuda, July 8th, 1879.
Colonist" copy.

Wanted,
*i lo iclive W waiter,
Used to being at sea, and bearing a good char-
acter.
Apply to-day and to-morrow to the Master of
the Canimoa."
TR OTT 0 y COX,
Agents.
8th July, 1879.
*"


JUST RECEIVED PER C.-

From New York and London:
MEN'S Tweed SUITS
SMen's Black and Colored Alpacca S iCKS
Regatta SHII'RTS Flaine Ii II!lTS
Ladies Linen COSTUME ES
Galatea COST. MES
Cotton and Cambric UND)ERWVE \R
ALPACCAS, MOHAI'S and C(OBU1G(S
Black and Coloured HOSIEtRY, ,MBIROID-
ERY, &c., &e.
CHEAP FOR CASH.
At the Devonshire Dry Goods Store, Middle
Road, next East of Pruspect Camp.
NATII. VESEY.
July 7, 1879.--2

Thos. J. Wadson,
OFFERS FOR SALE,
JAt Low Rates for Cash,
Aow Landing ex Canima,
BLS. Family FLOUR
S Barrels K. D. MEAL
Bags CORIN Bags BR N 100 lbs. each
Bags OATS 3 Bushels each
New Goschen BUTTER, in Kegs
Do. Do. 1)DO. in 5 and 10 lbs. Tins
HAMS BACON
OYSTERS P' X(CHES
Hlamilton, July 7th, 1879.-2 3p.

GUNPO W DER.


A Supply of Blasting and other
Gunpowder just received per Egbert"
from London;
AND FROM NEW YORK,
ICRE CiiESTS Water COOLERS
Ice CtI ISELS Ice BREAKERS
FI'RULES for Walking Sticks
Garden FORKS IIOES RAKES
FORKHOES WEEDERS


SHOVELS &e.


W~ig. B LU CK.


Hamilton, July 7th, 1879.--2 3p


The Subscriber
Respectfully calls attention of the community
at large to his new importation of
THE VERY BEST Q U.LITY


FROM LONDON.
He also takes pleasure to inform his Custom-
ers that curing his short absence his Son will at-
tend promptly to all Orders sent to his Fstab-
lishment.
J. E. EVANS,
Painter, &c., &c., 14 Queen Street,
Hamilton.
June 26th, 1879 -33p-i f


For Sale,


An Outrigger


Well built, and copper fastened, with Oars,
Sliding Seats, &c., complete.
May be seen at any time, by applying to
THOSE. J. WADSON,
23 Front Street.
Hamilton, July 7th, 1879.--1

For Sale,
1 Well Toned and acclimatized


Price 30.
A LSO,

A Horse
JAnd Carriage.
Price 30.
Apply to DR. LOUGH, Hamilton.
Hamilton, June 30th, 1879.


Colonial Secretary's Office
5THI JULY, 1879.
NOTICE is hereby given that the Head
S Quarters of the Post Office Department
have been transferred from St. Georges to Ham-
ilton and that all communications relating to
that Department should now be addressed to
the AcTING COLONIAL POSTMASTER, Hamilton,
By His Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER,
Colonial Secretary.

Wanted.
A Competent Person as


AT THE LUNATIC ASYLUM.
Services to commence on 1st August, next.
Salary 30 per annum with Rations.
The nature and duties of the Situation will be
explained by the MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
on application.
Certificates of Character, &c., will be required.
HENRY J. HINSON,
Medical Superintendent.


oth July, 1879.-2

Royal
St.


Barracks,
George's.


460T7 REGIMENT
On Friday 4 Saturday,
I lIth and 12th July,
Under the Patronage of His Excellency
Maj.-Gel. SIR R. M. LAIFF1JV,
K. C. M. G.,
Governor and Commander-in-Chief,
Colonel STOKES,
Commanding Troops St. George's,
Colonel BENNETT and OFFICERS.
Will be Performed in aid of the South Afri-
j can War Relief Fund,
ITl4 LG & TIGE 1,
And,
TO PARIS AND BACK FOR 5.
Doors open at 7-30. To commence at 8.
Theo String Baud will attend.
July 5, i.879.


JUST RECEIVED,
Consiting in part of:
S'PATER and Milk JUGS TUMBLERS
Cake SAINVERS Butter DISIIES
Ice Cream and Preserve SAUCERS
Porcelain and Paper S'A DES
Cheap Preserve JARS, with metal covers, lined
with Porcelain
The Best Keroseue LANTEtRN
Japanese Fancy FANS
Japanese Work -H4SKETS
Ice MALLETS Sardine KNIVES
Cork PR.ESStERS Mincing KNIVES
T IRMO ETERS Paper FILES
Small WEEDERS, HOE and RAKE com-
bined
Fine Wire NETTING, galvanized and painted
for Screene, Safes, &c.
Fly TRAPS Tea STRAINERS
Wire Rat and Mouse TRA PS and C \GES
Wire Moss and Flower BASKETS
Shoe and Clothes BitUSlIiS-a variety
SCYTITES and HANDLES
Lawn R-\KES
Cotton Fishing LINES Coffee MILLS
Kerosene STOVES TINWAItE
Patent Iron PLANES Bracket SAWS
T All eorts of LOCKS
SThe Best Stove COA [,.
I WM. BLUCK.


Hamilton, June 30th, 1879.--2 3p
FOR SCOURIA G, CL EdAING
and Polishing Purposes
USET ROXEILL'S
Pride of the Kitchen,'

Ask your Grocer for it.
May 27, 1879.-B 3m.
LIST OF UNCLAIMED ;LETTERS IN THE
Post Office, Hamilton, 7th July, 1879.
M G Allen, Richard Atwood, W J Adcock, Officers
Agars Island, Mrs Armstrong, Odessa Alexander,
W D Adams, T J W Adams, B T Burrows, Eliza-
beth Beek, W B Bean, Jarjes Butler, Jane Burgess,
Alfred Burch, John Bearisto, Mary Biley, George
Bennett, John Bolan, Edmund Carcy, H Crook,
William Crawford, S B J Cox, Enfield Dill, W S
DarreUll, E A Doyle, John Davis, C I Davia, Her-
bort Eve, Col Eccles, 1st Bau 4th K 0 R, M E H
Gilbert, James Grant, Geoo A Gomes, Mrs A Hollis,
A D Hollis, Mrs Jane Hinson, Win A Jonos, Sarah
Jones, Jas T Jones, Jos Friswell!, Rd Lambert, A
Lament, D Landy H Mark-, M A McCann, Jamtes
Page, J W Place, T D J Place, Rd Place, Jas Pil
ling, W T Roberts, Bessie Richie, M1rs Joanna Sim.
mons, Mrs J 1 Steed, M T S.on, Wm Seon, W J
Smith, J F Smith, Solomon Simmonu, Catherine
Slater, E T Swan, Marthew Stubbs, J Smith, Wm
Shadbolt, L A S Tucker, S R Tucker, Miss F
Fucker, Ruthann Tucker, Private Unwin, 19.h Regt
(Registered,) J Jane Whitney, B C Wood, B A
Whitely, Wilkinson, Mary Wilson, W H White,
Geo W Young.
MAILS FOR ENGLAND, United State, D.-
minion of Canada, and Newfoundland per Steamer
Canima," close at the Post Office, Hamilton, on
THURSDAY NEXT, at 11 A.M. Correspond-
erce received in the Foreon on Mails will be in time.
Late Letters can be posted up to half-past twelve on
payment of double postage
A. G. BUTTERFIELD,
Acting Colonial Postmaster
July 7th, 1879.
UNCLAIMED LETTER IN THE POST OF.
.FICE ST. GEORGE'S, 7th July.
John J Athery, 3George Arnold, Samuel Bassett,
Joseph W Brown, W H Ci oper, David Deal, Abra.
ham Fisher, Mrs Kestrel, '\ C Smith, F J Smith, W
11 Simmons, Perient Trott (3), W Vance, J S We ,
Mrs E Williams.


I


I


Co.,






BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


Notice.
After this date all Contracts for
Stone, Slate or Rubble
rI' thie O;ivo t ill" Quarries, Pitt's Bay
rnmast be iliWldoe with th,! Undersirncd, nIo other
person bei;g authorised to ,i .. of the same.
S3.11,11 .4. L ST 7ER S.
I'embroke, 30th June, 1879.-:3



Six Shillings per Hundred
Pounds
At the Arctic Ice Company's I loses.
G. W. CAS'FNEI?,
Agent.
Hamilton, 30th June, 1879. -4m A
BIEJMUD)., Alias
SOMEI S' ISLAND.
By His Excellency SIR ROBERTM.
LAFFAN, K.C.M.G., Governor,
Commander-in-Chief, Vice Ad-
miral and Ordinary, in and over
these Islands, 8c., ,c., yc.
W II1ER 1AS JOI V FREDERICK
JAMES, has prayed for Administra-
tion on the Estate of .MAIRTii \ JANIE BEEN,
late of Warwick Parish in those Islands, de-
ceased.
This is therefore to. give n iice, thaint if any
Person or Persons can shew any just cause wIhy
the said Administration should not be granted
unto the said J 011 N F lI? EI)NItICK J \,IES,
he, she or they, are to file his, her, or their Caveat
in writing, in the Secretary's Office of these
Islands within Fifteen days from the publication
hereof, otherwise the said A administration xill be
granted accordingly.
R. E. WEBSTER,
Colonial Secretary.
Dated at the -ecretary's Office, 2 d
this 24th day of June, 1879. P

Now Ieady for ,%ale.

The Cage Tairds of Bermuda,
Their Management in Confinement, Breeding
Hearing, Feeding, &c., &c., &c,
By JOHN TAVENIER BARTIAM.
Price 2/6.
This little work will be found useful to per-
sons. who may keep Birds, and will also com-
mendI itself to strangers as containing some in-
tormation in respect of our Native Blirds.
Copies may be hid at the Royal Gazetie"
Stationery Store and at 8. Nelmes', Hlamilton,
and at the Colonist" Office, St. Georges.
Stocks Point, St. Georges, June 9, 1879.


THURBER S
CANNED


RELIVIILE
LW OOS.


REAT progress has been made within a few
years in the art of Preserving Fruits, Ve-
getables, Fish and Meats in tin, and in conse-
quence the consumption has largely increased"
As yet, however, canned goods are not generally
thought to be fresh," and some brands are not,
perhaps, entitled to be so considered. Those
packed by us, however, are Hermetically Sealed
at the sources of supply, when they are in the
best possible condition, by a process which pre-
serves the much-to-be-desired fresh, natural
flavors; and they are really in better condition,
fresher, more palatable and wholesome than
many so-called fresh" articles which are ex-
posed for sale during considerable periods of
time in city markets. All goods bearing our
name are guaranteed to be of superior quality,
and dealers are authorised to refund the purchase
pt ice in any case where consumers have cause
for, dissatisfaction. It is, therefore, to the in-
terest of both dealers and consumers to use
TrIURBFR'S BRANDS.
II. K. & F. B. TiIUHIWBIRl & CO,,
SlMPORTElF \VIHOLESALE GRO JERiS,
And Manufactures of and Dealers in
FOOD PRODUCTS
P. 0. Box 3895-New York.
min
THlE UNDERSIGJVED
Has Just Received from Norfolk,
Va.,
/Per Schooner J. 11. Horton,
A FINE L IOT OF

Oak Fire WOOD,
Which will be sold on the Wharf at 12/6 per
1000 lbs.
Al-o, a Lot of YELLOW PINE
BOARDS AND SCANTLING
Of various sizes.
A. R. THOMPSON.

P. S.-A Discount will be given taking a large
quantity of Wood.
Hamilton, June 3, le79.

FOR SCOURING, C LEANING
and olishing purposes,
USE TItOXELL'S
"P DDE OF TH KITCHilN ,"


Ask your Grocer for it.
May 27, 1879. Smith's Parish.

For Rent.

That desirable Residence in Paget
Parish,

As rnber &A r
A coialortable DWELLING 110USE with
CAlitIA(;E IO1USF, STABLES, BATHIING
LOULSE, &c., a, d about 4 Acres of LA.ND.
L Possession given 1st May next.
Apply to
MR. M. S. HUNT,
Hlamilton.
RllIqt Nn rol .1879.


Notice.


A LIL Persons having DEM ANDS against the
Estate of the late JOSEPHI JOltN OUT-
ERBRIDG{ E, of itamilton Parish, deceased,
will pleas" render their respective Accounts to
the Undersigned on or before the 26TI JULY
Nix'dXT; and all Persons : NDEBTED') to the
sail I state will jl. h-.,: make payment by same
date.
GRACE Gi ATTACH E OUTERBRIDGE,
F ANCES IUGENA OUTERIBRI)(E,
TIllEOI)DOK OUT1ERBiIDG1I)E,
Executrixes and Executor.
Hamilton, 23rd June, 1879.-3



Now Landing ex Brigt. Excel-
sior," from New York,
50 TONS sUJElRIt )R RED ASH
SrO VE C O-AL
Which will be Sold Cheap on Wharf.
W. E. TALBO() '.
tamilton, May 27th, 1879.

E change on Vew York,

OLDA DiA.bTS .
At Sight.


Apply to


S. S. INGHAM.


23rd June, 1877.

"AABKUl BUTTER AND1
CHEESE.
To Grocers and Dealers in Ship
Stores.
oE direct attention to the fact that our fa-
cilities for furnishing Batter and Cheese
of all grades at the lowest market rates are un-
equalled by any House in the United States. Our
very large auxiliary business enables us to handle
these Goods at the minimum of coat, while our ex.
tensive correspondence with all parts of this country
insures us the choicest selections from the most de-,
sirable creameries and dairies. We are Headquar-
ters for distribution and producers here have found
out that we have a demand for the best that can be
p reduced. All orders entrusted to us are filled at
west market rates. For those who supply, ships
going on long voyages we put up our Gilt Edge But-
ter in one, two and four pound air tight tin cans,
elegantly ornamented and guaranteed to retain the
contents fresh and sweet for six months. Write to
us for particularsand quotations. -
H. K. & F. B. THURBER & Co.,
Exporters and Dealers in Food Products,
West Broadway, Reade & Hudson Sts.,
New York City,
United States.

Notice to Farmers.

FHUE Undersigned is prepared to
PURCHASE PRODUCE during the pre-
sent Season at the highest Market Rates.
Persons desirous of shipping to New York
can do so through me free of charge to
,lessrs .' i. Hayward
Co.
Prompt Sales returned.
Cash payable in New York or Bermuda at
Shipper's option.
F. D. S. NASH,
9.3 Front Street.
Hamilton, 10th March, 1879.-tf


Ice! Ice!! Ice!!!

/ The Subscribers are now prepared
to Furnish


Daily (Sundays excepted)
From their Store in Burnaby Street to any per-
son who may desire a supply.
To Customers in lamilton and Vicinity it
will be delivered by CArt daily-from about 10
o'clock till noon-commencing on 1st April.
The price is one penny per pound.
tI Considerable Reduction
made when Persons take a large
Quantity.
Bermuda Artificial Ice Jompany,
'Hamilton, March 24th, 1879.

SPECIAL!

R. P. Atkins & Co.,
PURVEYORS ANDI) CONTRACTORS TO
11. M. ARMY AND NAVY,

To more commodious premises,
1Vo. 24, Fronlt Streel,
Hamilton.
INDIAN PALE ALE
Bass & Cos.
Barclay & Co's STOUT, in hhds. and in bottles
A choice selection of WINES and SPIRITS
and LONDON GROCERIS..
April 22, 1879.


'f E UNDI) IRSIGNEl) having returned from
New York most respectfully informs the
Public in general of Bermuda, that he has re-
opened his
Photograph Gallery,
Corner Church and Burnaby sts., Hamilton,
(ind is prepared to execute in all its branches
and in first class style ; Porcelain Work, Photo-
graph and Ferrotype Views. Old Pictures copied
and enlarged and finished if required in Indian
Ink.
JOHN ROGAN, JR.
hamilton, Feby. 4, 1879,


Onion


ilox MAaterial,.
Ex Canima.
For Sale by
S. S. INGHAM.


23rd June, 1879.




Hard Stone Lime.
WOOD BURNT LIME.

3500 Bushels Hard Stone Wood
IBurnt LIME.
For Sale by 11. C. OUTERBRIDGE, Cause-
way Road, or 61 Front St., Ilamilton.
November 19, 1878.

NOTICE.


''HE UNDERSIGNED will be prepared to
receive and forward

To St. Thomas, W.I., and Halifax, N.S.,
Per Royal Mail Steamer Beta,"
TO SAIL:
To St. Thomas, To Halifax,
Friday, 18th April, Monday, 28th \pril,
Friday, 16th May, Monday, 26th May,
Friday, 13th June, Monday, 23rd June.
A competent person will be on the Wharf to
receive and mark all packages.
The Undersigned will not be responsible for
Proceeds of Shipment until received by him.
ALBERT INGLIS.
St. Georges, Bermuda, April 9, 1879.

Flatts Villa e Boarding,
House.
. |'llIS is a very beautiful place. Is situated
at the junction of the roads at the Flatts,
and is known as Palmetto Grove." Is within
twenty minutes drive of Hamilton, and quite
near the Walsingham Caves. It borders on the
beautiful sheet of water, Harrington Sound, a
famous place for sea bathing.
The Proprietor has a Boat at hand for pleasure
excursions on the Sound and other waters. He
will be pleased to accommodate Lady and Gentle-
men Boarders on very reasonable terms.
JOHN T. PENISTON,
Proprietor.
September 3, 1878.

TRY TROXEL L'S
'PRIDE OP THE KT-CHEN'


I For Scouring, Cleaning and Polishing.
Ask your Grocer for it.
May 27, 1879
1


W YWARO & 0 9
General Shipping and
Commission Merchants,
(P. O0. Box 3709,)
52 Mz-zA-N r. W. HAYWARD, NEW YORK.
F. D. S. NASH.
References:
Messrs. A.,W. PEROT & Co., Demerara.
lion. S. S. INGHAM, Hamilton, Bermuda.
Jos. M. HAYWARD, Agent R. M. S. Pkt. Co.
St. George's, Bermuda.
D. F. SEON, Hamilton, Bermuda.
September 17, 1878.--12m

S'XL

S. H. Cappe,
Licensed diuctioneer'
AND
COMMYIISSIO N MERCHANT,
ST. THOMAS,
D. W. I.
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.
Septr. 31, 1878.-_12m




GUION LINE.

United States Mail Steamers.

FO ? LI VEfRt R 0 L,L
CALLING( AT QUEENMTOWN,
LEAVE NEW YORK


WISCONSIN sails July 1, at 3 p.m.
MONTANA sails July 8, at8-30a.m.
WYOMING sails July 15, at 2-30 p.m.
ARIZONA sails July 22, at 7-30 a.m.
NEVADA sails July 29, at 2 p.m.
The above Steamers are built expressly for
the Trade, have five watertight bulkheads, and
carry experienced Officers, Surgeons and Stew-
arlesses. The Saloon Accommodations are un-
surpassed by any Atlantic Steamers, and the
State Rooms are on main deck opening into the
Saloon, thus securing that great comfort in
ocean travel, perfect ventilation and light.
Smoking Room, Bath Room and Piano on
each Steamer.
The U.. S. Mail Steamer "Canima"from Ber-
muda, Thursdays, generally arrives at New York
on Mondays, and Passengers' baggage can he
transferred direct to the Liverpool Steamer sail-
ing next day.
WILLIAMS & GUION,
Agents,
29 Broadway, New York.
New York, June 19th, 1879.


Money to Loan,
To be advanced on satisfactory real security.
Apply at Royal Gazette" Office.
June 9, 1879.
14 Queen Street, Hamilton.
Between the Stores of Messrs. F. A.
WVITE & E. B. JONES.



Painter,
Dealer in PAINTS, OILS, VARNISIIES,
GLASS, PUTTY, BRIM fSIE,
&c,, &c.
July t5, 1878.-12 m.



S... l l I











dO 0 I o 1-
Z

0-
E-~














Hlorse, marriage Cart



I-E Ur.dersigned having resumed Business
at his old Stand, Corner of Church and
Junction Streets, near liamilton Hlotel, takes
this method of thanking his friends and the pub-
lic generally for past favours, and humbly soli-
cits a continuance of same.
THOJI S H. Hi RVEY.
January 6, 1879.
1 -P ,





Horse Carrage S Car












January 6, 1879.


I











~*'- 'zr,


-A


134.





Zt


IS t "-


RIMMEL'S CHOICE PEttFU-
MERY.
R IMMEL'S TOILET VINEGAR, a pleasant
tonic and refreshing adjunct to the Toilet and
Bath, a reviving scent and a powerful disinfectant.
For warm climates it is lIvaluable.
RIMMEL'S CELEBRATED LAVENDER
WATER.
SRIMMEL'S TUEBLE DISTILLED EAU DE
COLOGNE.
RIMMELL'S .M11CH IMPROVED FLORIDA
WATER.
RIMMEL'S JOCKEY CLUB, and other frag-
rant Perfumes.
RIMMEL'S LIME JUICE and GLYCERINE
gives the hair a beamtiful gloss and imparts an
agreeable coolness to the head.
RIMM1.11EL'S PURE WHITE GLYCERINE
SOAP, TILIA, BROWN WINDSOR, HONEY,
ALMOND, LETTUCE, COAL-TAR, and other
Toilet Soaps in bars or cakes.
RIMMEL'S VELNETINE, VIOLET, RICE,
ROSE-LEAF and other TOILET POWDERS, in
boxes, barrels and packets.
RHI MMEL'S AQUADENTINE cleans, whitens
and preserves the teeth, refreshes the mouth, and
sweetens the breath.
RIMMEL'L AROMATIC OZONIZER, or Na-
tural Air purifier, a fragrant Powder which diffuses
the healthy and refreshing emanations of the Pine
and Eucalyptus. Forests.
E. RIMM.vEL, Perfuimer by appointment to H R.
1'- Princess of Wales, 96, Strand, London, and 17,
Boulevard des Italiens, Paris.
May 27, 1879.


A Supply ont hand at "Royal Gazette" Station-
ery Store.
Hamilton, May 13, 1i79.


Ixchanuge on New York


. On R. W. IIAYWARD & (O.,
Payable at sight.
F. D. S. VASH.
Hamilton, April 7, 1879.*-tf

AMERICAN WATCHESi


THE above WATCH ES for both
Ladies and Gentlemen are kept constantly
on hand by the Undersigned: Any grade Move-
ment not in Stock will be furnished at the
Manufactor's list price. Also, make to order
any style of Case with Crest, Monogram, &c.,
engraved.
Remember the American Watch Co. received
the Gold Medal at the late Paris Exhibition.
E. T. CHILD.
Front Steet, lamilton, U
Deer 16, 1878. S u*oo,


Lost.
tON or about the 18th November, 1878, be-
- tween Prospect and Mount Langton,
A BLACK
Leather Ilelt,
With plated fittings, and monogram E.B.B. on
clasp. A silver mounted leather holder attached
containing a dagger with richly carved ivory
handle.
A REWARD OF 1 0 0
will be given to any one bringing the sama to
the office of this paper.
Hamilton, April 29, 1879.

5. A._NDl ESS A.TlHINSON'S

PERFUMERY,
celebrated for nearly a century past, is of the very
best English manufacture. For its purity and great
excellence it has obtained the following
EXHIBITION PRIZE MEDALS,
LONDON, 1862. PARIS, 1867. CORDOVA, 1872.
LIMA, 1872. PHILADELPHIA, 1876.
VIENNA, 1873.
Only Gold Medal for English Perfumery, Paris 1878
Jtkinson's Choice Perfumes for
the Handkerchief.
White Rose, Frangipanne, Ylang Ylang, Stephano-.
tis, Opopanax, Jockey Club, Ess. Bouquet
Trevol, Magnolia, Jasmin, Wood Vio-
let, Gold Medal Bouqaet,
And all other odours, of the finest quality only.
Itkinson's Florida Water -
most fragrant Perfume, .distilled from the choices
Exotics.
Atkinson's Quinine Hair Lotion,
L very refreshing Wash which stimulates the skin
to a healthy action and promotes the growth of the
hair.
ATKINSON'S
Ethereal Essence of Lavender,
Apowerful Perfume distilled from the finest flowers
ATKINSON'S QUININE TOOTH POWDER
VIOLET POWDER, MACASSAR Oil., GLY,
CERINE GREAM,
And other specialities and general articles of Per*
funmery may be obtained of all dealers throughout
the World, and of the Manufacturers

24, OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, W.
PRICE LIST FREE ON APPLICATION.
CAUTION.-Messrs. J. & E. ATKINSON nmainu-
facture their articles of one and the best quality only.
Purchasers are cautioned to avoid counterfeits by
observing that each article is labelled with the Firm
Trade .lark, "a White Rose on a Golden Lyre."
printed in seven colours.
ESTABLISHED 1799. .

Theodore Outerbridge,

HAMILTON,
Reid Street, West of "Royal Gazette" Office.
Office Hours-10 to 12 and L.o 4.
Will Visit St. Georg.s, Tuesdmys and Fri-
(lays.
:Orders Promptlv-Attended to.
Hamilton, October 26th, 1876.
LV. C-- JUL, 879.
dL 1I1.Y./ICK-JUl.Y, 1879.


SUN'.


ris.


sets.


57 7 3
5 77 3
5 77 3
5 77 3
5 9 7 3
5 9 7 3
5 97 3


Tide.


10 42
11 30
12 18
1 6
1 54
2 42
3 30


REMARKS.





Mail of 24th ult. due.

5th after Trinity.


Last Quarter 11 day, 4 hour, 35 minutes, a.m.


TlE BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE is published
every Tuesday by DONALD M'PHEE LEE,
Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent
Majesty,
AT HIS OFFICE,
Northwest Corner of Reid and Burnaby Street,
Hamilton,
where Blanks, Hand-bills, &c., will be
printed at the shortest notice.-Agents,
at t$1. Georges for the Royal Gazelte,
Messrs. GEORGE BOYLE & SON, West End,
Water Street.








Supplement to Royal


BERMUDA.

Proceedings of the Honorable Leg-
islative Council.

Friday, 4th July, 1879.-Pursuant to adjourn-
ment the House met.
Present-His Honor Josiah Rees, Chief Justice,
President:
The Honorable Augustus J. Musson,
4" James H. Trimingham,
C' Engenius Harvey,
t Joseph H. Harvey,
s" James Tucker, Recr. General,
G. S. Tucker,
Randal E. Webater, Colonial
Secretary.
The Bill entitled "The Audit Act, 1879," was
returned from the House of Assembly with the
following Message :--
Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Legislative Coun-
cil;
We are directed by the House of Assembly to
return to your Honorable House the Bill entitled
" The Audit Act, 1879," and to acquaint your
Honorable House that the Assembly have not con-
curred in the amendment proposed by your Hon-
orable House to be made thereto.
Sessions' House, 27th June, 1879.
Adjourned to Tuesday next, the 8th instant, at-
11*80.

BERMUDA.

Abstract of the Proceedings of the Honorable
House of Assembly.
Monday, 9th July, 1879.-The Bill entitled An
Act to amend the Post Office Regulation Act,
1879," was read a third time.
The Attorney General moved to add to the first
Clause of the Bill, Provided that notwithstanding
anything herein contained all official despatches
addressed to His Excellency the Governor or the
Officer administer the Government of these Islands
or to the Naval Commander-in-Chief or Senior
Naval Officer on this Station shall be delivered im-
mediately on the arrival at the Post Office of every
Sea Mail whether on Sunday or any other Post Of-
fice Holiday,-which was agreed to and made ac-
cordingly.
The Bill was then passed.
The Bill entitled "The Post Office Establish-
ment Act, 1879" was read a third time.
The Attorney General moved to strike out the
6th, 7th and 8th Clauses of the Bill and insert the
following as the 6th Clause, the Sub-Postmaster at
Mangrove Bay and Ireland respectively shall re-
ceive a salary of forty pounds a year out of which
they shall provide for the delivery of letters papers
and packets within their respective Delivery Dis-
tricts, provided that if either of those offices shall
necessarily have any special expenses other than
for messengers in the delivery it shall be lawful for
the Governor and Council to defray the same under
the next Clause of this Act,-which was agreed to.
The Bill was then passed.
The Attorney General introduced a Bill to con-
tinue the Act to appropriate Pe v Rents exclusive-
ly to Religious uses, which was read a first time.
The Attorney General introduced a Bill to con-
tinue the Act providing for the appointment of a
Harbor Master for the Port of St. George,- which
was read a first time.
The Resolve voting 250 for the purposes of the
Bermuda Library, was read a third time and passed.
Adjourned to Monday next.
For the Royal Gazette.
THE BERMUDA CHURCH SOCIETY.

The Third Annual Report of this Society having
just appeared, it seems wise for it to be analyz-
ed and compared to see what progress it is making
pecuniarily, and how far it is gaining the confidence
of our Church. Notwithstanding the "earnestness
with which the Committee have sought to maintain
the number of Members and Subscribers reached
last year, and if possible to increase that number
and the annual amount to be added to the Society's
funds," yet the number of Life Members remains
precisely the same, and although the Ordinary
Members have had (13) thirteen added to the list,
yet upon the whole there is a falling off of thirteen
members from all causes. The total number of
Members including Life Members by the Report of
1877 was 232.
1878 292 exclusive of Life Members.
1879 279 exclusive of Life Do.
and 54 Subscribers of about 2/to 6/ each not con-
stituting membership.
The total collections have been as follow :-
In 1877 721 13 10 including specialties 554.
1878 480 8 11 Do. Do. 333.
1879 394 12 6 Do. Do. 156.


1043.


1596 16 3
Invested 1206 0 0


390 15 3
Dismnts. 27 13 7
Balance 363 1 8 in hand to date by Report.
There are Specialties due in 1880. ......... 110
1881............ 110

220
after payment of which we shall in all probability
settle down to the members' contributions of about
150 to 160 per annum. This will enable us to
- judge what the position will be when we come to
1 thrown upon our own resources in 1882 if noth-
ifig important occurs, viz. :
Present Investments.....................1206
Balance in hand........................... 363
Members *years at 160 ................ 480
Specialties due as above .................... 220
Estimated Endowment Fund...... 2,269
which at an average interest of 31 per cent will
produce an income about 80 per annum for Sus.
tentation." So far as this Society is concerned,
this will be about all we shall have to start with
when the Legislative Grant, according to the pres.
ent outlook, will cease. So much for investing
everything in the Endowment Fund, and it becomes
a matter for serious reflection, whether or not it
is wise to continue the next three years' subscrip-
tions towards that Fund ? Having started with a
fair nucleus as the result of the past three years,
will it not be well for us to devote our energies for
the next three years to building up the Sustenta-
tion" Fund, which is of vital necessity, though by
the Reports it seems to have been almost totally
ignored, the only contributions to it in 1878 and
1879 having been but 2 10/. As we are to com-
mence on the voluntary principle in 1882 will it
not be well for us to begin and educate ourselves to
the necessity of yearly contributions to that Fund
which is to sustain the Clergy ? If so, and we ap-
propriate the next three years subscriptions to that
fund, to which will be added the interest on the
Endowment Fund (that without them will be about
1,800 and produce about 60 per annum) there
will be about 220 per annum to start with, instead
of 80, which will doubtless be much more encour.
aging to the people to add to by their exertions,
and form a much greater stimulus to accomplish
all that will be necessary to keep up our Churches.
And should we be necessitated to apply to the Le-
gislature for some assistance for a short time longer
they will be much more likely to grant it, when
they see that we are helping ourselves at the rate
2 Ac%" "Aft^ -- __ -- + .6nfi+m .J n- n ;&,^


Gazette,


Tuesday, July 8th, 1879.


only 80 per annum. The Endowment Fund will
still be open for contributions from those who are
able and willing to pour into it of their abundance.
If we go on to place all in that fund, which cannot
be touched (except the interest) how are the clergy
to be sustained? 80 per annum will only give
16 to each against 140. 'Tis true we may hope
for its growth, but it will naturally be slow, and
cannot be looked to as much support for many
years to come; so we had better lose no time in ap-
pealing to the liberality of the people, and to their
sense of duty to augment the Sustentation Fund"
for yearly appropriation; and in confirmation of
that idea I will quote from a letter of the Bishop
of Manchester (Dr. Frazer) in the Manchester Cou-
rier on the support of the Clergy, thus: I wish
Churchmen would understand there are better ways
of providing a Clergyman with an adequate income
than by means of rented pews. In Broughton
Park Congregational Chapel all the seats are free,
and yet the Congregation raise for their Minister
.an income of 800 a year. In the Church of Eng-
land, trusting too much to our old endowments,
which are quite inadequate to meet modern needs, we
have hardly yet tried the experiment of appealing
frankly and trustfully, on the simple ground of
work diligently and faithfully done, to the libera-
lity of our people." The 3rd Rule of the Church
Society calls for "donations and subscriptions" to
the Endowment Fund, Sustentation Fund, and
Widows' Fund, according to specification at the
time P FAITH.
July 6, 1879.


To the Editor of the Bermuda Royal Gazette
SiR,-Permit me through the columns of your
influential journal, to draw attention to the following
certainly very laudable advertisement which appeared
in the United Service Gazette" of May 8th, 1879 :
A prize of 5 will be given by the U. S. Gazette,
forthebest essay, written by non-commissioned officers,
on the following subject:-
The best method to obtain a steady supply of ex-
perienced non-commissioned officers under the short
service system.
Its exclusiveness led me to conjecture that the
editor of the above mentioned Gazette, must either
hold a very low estimate of the literary acquirements
of the private soldier, or might have thought it beneath
his notice to take us into account, I however trust
that I may have been mistaken-that !he omission
arose from oversight. I would have sent the above
comments long ere now, but the opportunity did not
offer. By giving space to this and the subjoined,
you will much oblige.
The best method to obtain a steady supply of expe-
rienced non-commissioned officers under the short
service system ?
As short military service has become l'ordre de
jour, the first essential point our chief authorities
must needs direct their attention to, is, the keeping
in their employ those whom they have deemed wor-
thy of being promoted to that non-commissioned rank
to which but steady and experienced men c,n obtain.
But as the means that now-a-days exist for an indus-
trious man to better himself in civil life are many and
multifarious, the question is will the pick" consent to
remain. It is undoubtedly evident they will, if the
authorities hold forth to them equal if not more
advantageous inducements than those which their
several individual capacities might enable them to
obtain outside the service. Now to retain the services
of those experienced non-commissioned officers at the
term of their active engagement, I would suggest the
offering a yearly bonus (graduating according to seni-
ority) in addition to their regimental pay, to those
consenting to remain in the army during the period
which they would, have to pass in the reserve; and
were it found necessary, at the completion of their
12 years, to again reengage them, the yearly bonus
to be slightly increased for a further term of service
to complete 21 years. At the end of which civil
service employment to be given them in the minor
offices, compatible with their several intellectual
abilities. I may add it as my humble opinion that
were facilities for acquiring trades to be offered to
those joining the army, it would be the means of
inducing multitudes of well meaning and intelligent
young men to enlist. Such facilities not to be allowed
them after joining,'until they had acquired at least a
third class certificate of education. Instructors from
the Engineers and the different regiments belonging
to the different trades, to be posted to each battalion,
&c.
Ere concluding I may say, that were the examina-
tion subjects for entrance, I do not say to all, but to6
many of the civil service departments, (maximum
age 42 years) to be offered in a slightly modified form
to soldiers possessing a good conduct badge at their
term of active engagement; it would be the means of
raising the social status of the army, by bringing
to it men of superior education and respectability,
and instead ot the soldier being regarded as the pro-
verbial pariah' having no bright prospect in futurity,
he would command the respect of his civilian fellow
countrymen by the fact, that certain social advance-
ment, the reward of his services and the guarantee of
of his literary attainments, would herald his return to
civil life.


Bermuda, June 28, 1879.


APPER XXI COMPANY.


I. 0. G. T.
(Communicated.)
In accordance with public notices posted in Ham-
ilton and District, A Public Meeting and Enter-
tainment," under the auspices of the Loyal "
Independent Order of Good Templars of these Is-
lands, took place at the Good Templar's Hall, Ham-
ilton, at 8 30 p.m., 2nd instant.
At the appointed hour the Rev. E. B. Moore,
A. B., occupied the Chair, and to an intelligent and
varied audience gave a short and pithy address on
the total abstinence movement-" a fresher and
fuller impetus and a desire to work being much re-
quired here "-he expressed himself an ardent sup-
porter of the cause on broad and Christian princi-
ples, and heartily wished that the meeting would be
the means of forming a nucleus of a new, and a
working Lodge, at the same time giving many prac-
tical hints for the guidance of all temperance work-
ers.
A lengthy Programme consisting of vocal and
instrumental music, Recitations, Readings, &c.,"
was then gone through, lasting until 10-30., in
which the Choirs of Providence Loyal," and
"Star of Hope Loyal" Lodges, acquitted them-
selves creditably, being met with rounds of applause.
Mrs. Tucker, Somerset, rendered her Songs in her
usual feeling and impressive manner.
The "Harmonist," Mr. V. Godsiff, Ireland,
greatly assisted the singers and contributed to the
success of the evening. Messrs. Ward, Somerset,
and Dyer, Hamilton, remarked at some length on
the principles of Good Templary, on the Secession
of 1876, the proceedings of the Representative of the
Grand Lodge of Bermuda threat, and on the sub-
sequent procedure of that Grand Lodge, all of
which remarks were well received.
On the conclusion of the Programme, by singing
the National Anthem,' the success of the endeav-.
ours of the Loyal" members was apparent by the
coming forward of a sufficiency of persons from the
audience to form a new Lodge.
Bro. Ward, D.D., (after the initiating of these
members,) assisted by Bro. Munro, D.D., and mem-
bers of Providence Loyal," Star of Hope
Loyal," and Princess of Wales Own" Lodges,
then proceeded to institute a new Lodge of the
I. 0. G. T. to be called Hope Loyal Lodge" No.
4., situate in the town of Hamilton and to meet in
the G. T. Hall on Wednesday 9th inst., at 7-30 p.m.
The Office bearers for the current quarter being
^hltAil ,Aidulyv installed, as follows, viz:-


Bro, Lightbourn, ....W. C. T.
Sis.J Lightbourn,.....W. V. T.
Br4. Wilson,........ W. Secretary.
Sis. Tucker,.........W. F. S.
Sif. Wainwright,.... W. T.
Bro. Kennedy,.......W. C.
Pro. Iris,............W. M.
%Bro. Jones,..........W. I. G.
Bro. Harrison,.......W. 0. G.
Bro. H. T. Dyer, P. W. C. T., and Lodge Deputy.
All candidates from the seceded party, wishing
enrollment in the "Loyal" order will be gladly re-
ceived, on signing a declaration of adhesion.
[Colonist please copy.]

WESTERN NEW YORK SALT.
AN ENORMOUS ENTERPRISE DEVELOP-
ING.
The Le Roy Salt Well Abandoned,' but there is Abun-
dant Evidence of Great Saline Wealth at Wyoming
15,000 Acres, of the Land Leased by Rochester
Company-The Richest Strata of Salt Rock in the
United States-Preparations looking toward Ex-
tensive Manufacture.
But little conception of the actual importance of
the salt discoveries in Western New York exists,
even in the section most interested. True, the
facts that a fair quality of brine had been pumped
from the bowels of the earth at Wyoming, and that
there was an inflammable, gaseous, briny flow from
the Le Roy salt well, were published at the time
of discovery. Anything like an adequate idea of
the real magnitude attaching to the development
of salt interests in Wyoming county has never yet
been printed. A reporter of this paper while in
Le Roy two or three days since, learned of some
new facts in connection with the salt enterprise
there, which led him to a thorough inquiry into
the details of the whole affair, both there and at
Wyoming. Below we give our readers the result
of his inquiries.
Early in the spring of 1878 observing geologists
advanced the theory that an oil belt as productive
as any that had ever been reached extended through
Wyoming country, in the immediate vicinity of the
Wyoming village. Acting upon this hint, the
Vacum Oil company of this city secured a tract
of land near the village of Wyoming, on the 12th
of April, 1878, commenced sinking what was de-
signed to be an oil well. About the middle of
June, when the drilling had reached a depth of
1,260 feet brine from a salt rock strata was brought
to the surface through the pumps. Dire disap-
pointment followed this discovery, for while it was
still possible that oil might be reached, there was
little hope that anything else than a third layer of
salt, followed by harder strata of salt,would be found
in that locality. Still the drilling was continued,
to a depth of 1,560 feet, and it was soon established
as a fact that the thin layer was instead a strata
of salt rock seventy feet in thickness. Boring for
oil was discontinued on the 3rd of July following.
The brine which was raised continuously through
the pumps for a period of sixty days, maintained an
unvarying uniformity and, upon its submission to
a test, stood at 96 deg. by a salinometer. This was
good. Upon experimenting with the brine in solar
vats from which its moisture was evaporated, it
was found that twenty-two gallons of it made a
bushel of very excellent salt. This was better;
for, by reference to the last official state report
on the subject it was found that forty gallons of
the Syracuse brine were required to make a bushel
of salt of ordinary quality. Analysation of the
Wyoming brine was still more gratifying in its
results, for it showed that without the first approach
to the application of the purifying process the
brine contained 97 1-2 per cent. of pure chloride of
sodium (salt).
This combination of facts was looked upon as
being almost equally valuable with a genuine
*struck oil" bonanza. Of course the latter would
have proven more remunerative for the time being,
but its supply could never have promised to be so
thoroughly exhaustless. Accordingly the oil com-
pany from Rochester leased in the immediate vici-
nity of the well atgWyoming, about 15,000 acres of
land, with the proviso that the leases were to ex-
tend various terms of from ten to ninety-nine
years each. In Each case a stipulation was also
made providing that a one-eighth title to the pro-
ducts, or a royalty, should revert to the land Qwn-
ers.
As yet nothing further than by way of experi-
ment has been done -at Wyoming by the oil com-
pany. To facilitate these experiments the com-
pany constructed a receiving tank with a capacity
for 1,000 barrels of brine. Vats for solar evaporation
were also constructed and put to practical use.
Canada being the only locality on the American
continent where rock salt of equal quality has been
found, the company projecting the Wyoming en-
terprise expect to use the same sort of boiling pans
as are employed at Goodrich and Kincardine Oat.
They now have plans for building at an early day
a boiling vat or pan 25 x 140 feet in dimensions.
With this alone, running at its maximum capacity,
can produce fifty tons of salt daily. As the locality
of the salt works, with its high and dry atmosphere,
is admirably adapted for the slower, though less
expensive process of solar evaporation, the com-
pany will hardly think of boiling the brine on a
very extensive scale. It being a demonstrated fact
that this sort of well is literally inexhaustible, the
enterprise of unearthing its rich products may
reasonably be expected to be still in its infancy ten,
or even twenty years hence. The little cubic crys-
tals of the salt, just as they come from the band of


nature, are as sweet and pleasant to the taste as
it is possible for any saline substance to be. In
fact, the gentleman who has had the practical su-
pervision of the works from the outset states that
no other brine has ever been pumped from salt
rock in the United States, of sufficient purity to
make, without any process of purification whatever
a superior quality of salt. This, taken in con-
nection with the fact that there is imposed a duty
of nearly forty cents per barrel on all imported
Canadian salt of equal quality, gives to the new
project an outlook which ought to be gratifying in
the extreme. The cheapness of fuel, the little ne-
cessity for its use, and the ready means of transpor-
tation at Wyoming may also be considered very
favorable.

EXTENSIVE SALT OPERATIONS TO BE
BEGUN IN WYOMING.
The Warsaw correspondent of the Buffalo Cour-
ier says, that since the abandonment of the salt well
at Le Roy the salt business at Wyoming has taken
another start. There the layer of salt, when the
well was drilled, was found to be seventy feet in
thickness at the depth of 1,200 feet. Twenty-two
gallons of the brine produced one bushel of salt or
nearly one-half the amount required of brine at the
Syracuse wells. Last fall, says the Courier's cor.
respondent, a tank of one thousand barrels capacity
was constructed and placed in position, and the
requisite vats for solar evaporation built in readi-
ness for use this spring. These were filled with
brine some four weeks since, and salt of the best
quality known has been made ever since. The
company have purchased a track of land and a
new building near the State Line railway track,
built for storage of fruit, &c., which will be in
active use this season. Extensive operations will
begin as soon as matters can be put in shape, so
that the best salt known in the world hereafter will
come from the Wyoming salt fields. It is expected
that at an early day, with the appliances now being
perfected, that these works will produce at least
fifty tons of salt daily, with a large margin in re-
serve for increased facilities.-La Roy Gazette, June 4.




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