Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00230
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00230
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text


THaB


IDr1I'I


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GE RAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


Vol. LXXIV.--No. 40 HAMILTON, BERMUD, SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1901. 20s. PER ANNUM
\ ol LX IV.-No.40 AMILON, "


D. CROSSLEYY & SONS,


I~iVer[)()t) I Pl1~'
-' a-'.


COMMISSION MERCHANTS,


I 4*-.TA B 1)], H SEliDL


187H.


Our Specialties :

Ber'muda P rodice uc App les jfo E.port*


76 PARK PLACE,
NEW YORK.


WHITNEY BUILDING,
BOSTON


CONSIGNMENTS to the above firnm are respectfully solicited by the undersigned. Proceed-
of account sales promptly remitted. Advances made on consignments if desired.
HENRY 5, EVE, Hamilton

--4--- --_


PLANTERS AND GiROWERS


Get the full value of your Crop by Shipping the same
on Commission through


THOSE. J. WADSON

-TO-




E. P. LOOMIS & CO.,

NEW YORK CITY.


ESTABLISHED '1868.

For 33 years we have made Bermuda Produce our Specialty.
Account-of-Sales returned promptly.
We can make advances on your stock when desired.

6 E. P. LOOMIS &S Q CO.


ENTERTAINMENT.


A Grand Variety Entertainment and
Daisy Tea
under the auspices of Past.Grand Masters
Council No. 8 G. U. 0. of 0. F. Hamilton,
will be held in .

THE ODDVFELLOWS' HALL
tON -

Thursday & Friday, May 23 & 24 Inst.
Doors open at 4 p.m. Tea will be served from
5 to 7 p.m.
ICE CREAM AND OTHEKRREFRESHMENTS
in variety.
Band of music in attendance.
ADMISSION 6d.
May 13th, 1901-3


FOR RENT.


Furnished or Unfurnished,


' SUNSET VTT.T.A,'

Lately occupied by MAJOR HICKMAN,
Assistarl Military Secretary.
AND -

"Ocean Villa."
Opposite entrance to Government House.
Apply to
MRS. GEORGE 0. WHITNEY,
Pembroke.
Nov. 3, 1900.

WE Are Offering


Special Discounts


On our complete LINE

OF FURNITURE..

For ONE MONTH .

Commencing


To-morrow, Wednesday,

April 24, 1901.

The Bernuda


Furnishing &

Supply Coy.,

45 Front Street, City.


A FORTUNE.


In, the event of a
stroke of good fortune
yolt can win
500,000 Marks.


The payment of the
prize- is guaranteed
Iby Government.
1st drawing
JUNE 13th.


You are invited to participate in the
CHANCES OF WINNING
]I the uGR NI) DRAWINGS OF 'RIZES
GUARANTEIDj BY TIlE STATE OF IIAMBURG
IN WHICH
II MILLIONS 202,000 MARKS
surely have to be won.
In the course of these advantageotus drawings,
which contain, according t6 the propectus only
118.000 tickets, the following prizes will be forth-
coming, viz : The highest prize wil' be event
500,000 Marks.
Premium of 300,000 Marks
1 Prize of 200,000 Marks
1 Prize of 100,000 Marks
1 Prize of 75,000 Marks
2 Prizes of 70,000 Marks
1 Prize of 65,000 Marks
1 Prize of 60,000 Marks
1 Prize of 55,000 Marks
2 Prizes of 50,000 Marks
1 Prize of 40,000 Marks
1 Prize of 30,000 Marks
1 Prize of 20,000 Marks
16 Prizes of 10,000 Marks
56 Prizes of 5,000 Marks
103 Prizes of 3,000 Marks
156 Prizes of 2,000 Marks
3 Prizes of 1,500 Marks
612 Prizes of 1,000 Marks
1030 Prizes of 300 Marks
20 Prizes of 250 Marks
76 Prizes of 200 Marks
96043 Prizes of 169 Marks
9992 Prizes of 150, 148, 115, 100 M.
10880 Prizes of 78, 45, 21 Marks
in all 59,000 prizes which must be surely won
in 7 drawings within the space of a few
months.
The highest prize of 1st drawing amounts to
Mk. 50,000, increase in 2d. drawing to Mk.
55,000 in 3d. Mk. 60,000, in 4th. Mk. 65,000,
in 5th. Mk. 70,000, in 6th. Mk. 75,000, in 7th.
Mk. 200,000, and together with the Premium
of Mk. 300,000 in the most fortunate case to
Mk. 500,000.
The official cost for participation in the first
two drawings amounts to
18s. for a full ticket,
9s. for a half ticket,
4s. 6d. for one quarter of a ticket.
Half resp. quarter tickets will entitle to one half
resp. one quarter of the amount, won by the respect.
tive number named on the ticket.
The stakes for participation in the following draw.
ings, as we!l as the exact prize table, are indicated
in the official prospectus, which I send on demand
gratis in advance. The prospectus is also sent gratis
with every order. After the drawing I shall forward
to every ticket-holder the official list of the winning-
numbers.
Ct v payment and forwarding of tbt amounts won
to those concerned will have my special and prompt
attention, and with the most absolute secrecy.
ig Remittance of m'ney can be made by Bank.
notes by registered letter or by Post Office Orders.
e On account of the approaching drawing of the
prizes, please address the orders immediately in all
confidence direct to
SAMUEL I, ICKSCHER, Senr.,
Banker, at
HAMBURG, GERMANY.


454 "7italiley "n-Aroet


up your hat, and you make a hole through ths
trademark in the crown."
It was a nice, new straw hat. Greville had
sent east for it, and it had come by stage the day
before. It had cost him, express paid, $4.75.
This, too, at a time when anything he had left


ON THE T"LGGER'S PULL.
Hlow A PRIZE 'AS WON ANi) LOST.
By 4GVEN EN OVERITN.

There is always tro c e of one sot t or another
NNlhen a woman ntedd with those things which
do not concern her sex;i
Obviously, carbiiies' e none of Miss Mivart's
concern. If she felt she had to play with
firearms, she should 'e kept to Flobert rifles.
Nothing would do, hg'ever, but that slhe must
learn to shoot a carbinPs -nnd the result was that
the whole post rose upsadl cut Burton to a man,
so that there was no 1iee for him any longer in
that regiment, and h14 had to seek transfer to
another. There were dther results also, but they
come further on. t
Some thought that what Miss Mivart did was
done on purpose, and ue thought that it-was a
piece of idiotic silline-. The latter based their
argument upon the get'ral frivolousness of her
ways and upon the inticeucy of her round, blue
eyes. Tlhe former held to t.heli belief that Miss
Bliva'rt ,..; one of those women favorites of
fortune who ldbk grt'eter fools than they are.
They said, with a certain .show of reason, that
Georgia Mivart was a child of the service and not
an importation from uivil life. She had been
horn in a garrison and',had played with rows of
empty, green rimmed cartridge shells at an age
when most little girls p4Iy with paper dolls. She
had hummed snatches }of the bugle calls before
she could talk, and the person she had admired
the most and obeyed the best for the first dozen
years of her life had been Kreutzer, Captain
Mlivart's twoheaded Atriker. A few years of
boarding school back east could not have oblit-
erated all that.
Besides, the veriest civilian, who has never
come nearer to a carbin. than to watch a Fourth
of July militia parade, imnight reasonably be ex-
pected to know by intuition that in a target prac-
tice competition every tm gger has got to pull just
so hard, whatever the regulation number or frac-
tion of pounds may 1be. otherwise it is plain that
the nearer you come to hair trigger the better
your aim will le. .
However, whether Mids Mivart was fully aware
of what sihe was doing nobodyy ever knew unless
perhaps it was Grevill, and lihe. like Zuleika,
never told. iBut Burton had a bad time of it,
and all his beautiful sitre went for worse than
nothing at all.
That, though, was thl end. And the begin-
ning ought to come firit. The beginning was
when Miss Mivart underiok to learn to shoot a
carbine. There was a ikrget practice competi-
tion going on at the pos -not one which was of
any interest to the servii or even to the depart-
ment at large ; just a litki local affair, devised to
keep up the esprit de cs of the troops and to
lighten the moniotonty fe. There were three
eontests_--one for IroofHrt i-ontpaimn a- sntdli,
onle for individual privitesi nad one for tlie otficeis.
This last was to finish off, and then there was to
be a big hop.
Every one knew at once, when Burton and Grev-
ille ahot with their troops, that the officers' compe-
tition would lie between them. This made it inte-
resting in more ways than one, because the rivalry
was not confined to the target range, but extend-
ed to the winning of Miss Mirvait's hand and heart,
and every one believed that this would settle a
matter she did not appear to be able to settle for
herself. Not that she was to blame for that. Any
one, even a person much more certain of her own
mind than Miss Mivart was, would have
been put to it to choose.
They were both first iieutenautsand both caval-
rymen and both good to look upon. Bturtou was
fair, and Greville was dark, but she had no fixed
prejudices regarding that. Site had often said so ;
also both were as nimuch in love with her ias even
she could have wished stand were more tlan willing
that all tlie world should see it, than which noth-
ing is more pleasant and soothing to a right mind-
ed woman.
The rifle contest lasted ten days, during which
time the air hummed with the ping and sing of
bullets over on the range and with the calls of
the markers in the mifle pits. Only scores and
records and bets were thought and talked about.
Miss Mivart herself had bet with all the daring
wickedness of a kitten teasing a beetle. She even
went so far as to bet on both Burton and Greville
at once. The adjutant undertook to explain to
her that that was called hedging" and was not
looked upon as altogether sporty. Miss Mivart
was hurt. Was it really dishonest? she wanted
to know. The adjutant felt that he had been un-
kind. ie hastened to assure her that it was not
-not dishonest in the least ; only that it took
away from the excitement of the thing to a
certain extent. Miss Mivart smiled and shook
her head. No, she didn't think that it did, be-
cause, of course, she knew herself which one she
wanted to have win. The adjutant admitted that
that might possibly be just as interesting for her
self and the fortunate man. And which was he ?
if lie might ask. Miss Mivart shook her head and
smiled again. No, she didn't think ble might
ask. As the man himself didn't know, shie could
hardly tell any one else just yet, could sie ? She
had her own ideas about fair play.
I can shoot a carbine myself," she told the
adjutant, with her cleft chin proudly raised, "and
my shoulder is all black and blue. Mr. Burton
is teaching me."
"Oh said the adjutant. And what does
Grivelle think about it?" The adjutant was
married, so he was out of the running.
"Mr. Greville is teaching me too," said Geor-
gia; "and here he comes for me now."
Burton was safe on the target range, over be-
hind the barracks. Miss Mivart and Greville
went in thle other direction, by the back of tIhe
officers' row, over in the foothills across the creek.
Greville nailed the top of a big red pasteboard box
to the trunk of a tree, and Miss Milvart hit it
ouce out of 16 times-when she was aiming at the
head of a prairie dog at least S20 feet away to the
right. The other 15 shots were scattered among
the foothills.
Then her shoulder hurt her so that she was
ready to cry. Greville would have liked to have
her cry upon his own shoulder, but as she didn't
he did some fancy shooting to distract her. He
found a mushroom can and threw it into the air
anmd filled it full of holes. She had seen Bur-
ton do the same thing that morning with a toma-
to tin. In fact, from where she sat now on a lich-
an covered rock she could see the mutilated can
glittering in the sun over beyond the arroya.. So
shte thirsted for fresher sensations.
"I'll tell you," she said to Greville as he held
up the mushroom can for her to inspect the eight
holes he had made with five shots, "let me tose


to all smokers. They are strong and.du'able, but
unless oiled or varnished now and then they are
apt to split in a dry climate. Collectors make it
a rule to oil them on the inside once a year.-Uhi-
cago Chronicle.


after settling his mess and sutler's and tailor's
bill, went into stickpins and candy and books and
music and riding whips for Miss Mivart. But he
took off the hat and gave it to her without even a
lingering glance that high priced trademark with-
in. And he felt that it was worth four times $4.7*5
when she picked up the tattered remains at last
and asked if she might have them to hang in .her
loom.
Then she looked down at her grimy hand and
considered the first finger, crooking it open and
shut. I think it's going to swell," she pouted.
" That is r perfectly awful trigger to pull."
Greville did what any man might have been ex-
pected to do-he caught the hand and kissed it.
Miss Mivart looked absolutely unconscious of it..
Shie might have been ten miles away herself.
G reville therefore thought that she was angry, and
his heart was filled with contrition. Yet lie was
old and wise enough to be a first lieutenant. He
walked beside her back to the post in a state of
humble dejection she could not understand.
The next morning it was Burton's turn. Gre-
ville was over on the range now, vainly trying to
bring his record up to where Burton's was. This
time Miss Mivart fired at a white pasteboard Iox
cover and hit it three times out of 20. She was
jubilant, and so was ).a ton, because she was
making, such progress under his tuition.
That's an easy carbine to shoot, isn't it?"
she asked as they wandered home. It isn't ait
at all hard to pull the trigger."
Burton glanced at her, and site met his eyes in-
nocently. It's just like any other trigger," he
told her.
Yes, of course. And is that the very same
carbine you use in the competition-the one you
shot with yesterday and will use this afternoon
when you finish up ? "
lie told her that it was.
Well," she said complacently, I think I'm
doing very nicely, don't ycu ? I hit the target
three times, and my first finger doesn't hurt a bit
-this morning."
That afternoon the competition came to an end,
with Burton a go d many points ahead of Gre-
ville, and that night there was the big hop. It
had been understood from the first that the mania
who won was to take Miss Mivart to the 1hop.
So she went over with Burton and gave him one-
third of her (lances. Greville had another third,
and the rest were open to the post at large.
Greville did not look happy lat all. It wasi
not the target record lie minded. le never
thought about that. It was having to go
down the board walk to the hop-rooni behind
Burton and to watch Miss Mivart leaning on his
arm and looking up into his face from under the
white mists of her lace hood. lie was not con-
soled at all when she looked up into his own face
even more sweetly'at the beginning of the second
dance and whispered that she was so sorry."'
Now, as the second dance.had been Greville's,
the third was Burton's. Tliatntf s the way,.itIL
been arrang6l. As atie banTi egamn the waltz t
Miss Mivart stood beside Greville in the centre of
quite a group. The commanding officer was in
the group, so eas Button's captain, and so was
the adjutant. There were others as well, and al-
so some women. Miss Mivart may have chosen
that position, or it may simply have happened so.
Anyway just as the waltz started Burton, light
hearted and light footed, came skipping and slid-
ing over the candle waxed floor and pushed his
way into the midst. Ours," he said trium-
phantly.
But Miss Mivart (lid not heed him at once. She
wais telling them all how she had learned to shoot
a carbine as well as any one, and they-the men,
at any rate-were. Ianging on her words.
Mr. Greville taught me," she said, and so
did Mr Burtoin." This was the first either had
known of the other's part in it, and they exchang-
ed a look. They taught me with their own car-
bines, too, the very same ones they used them-
selves in the competition. But I shot best with
Mr. Burton's carbine. lie must have fixed his
trigger to pull more easily. It was almost like-
what do you call it, a hair trigger ? "
Shie looked about for an answer and saw on
their faces a stare of stony horror and surprise.
They had moved a little away from Burton, and
the commanding officer's steely eyes were on his
face. The face had turned white even with the
sunburn, and Burton's voice was just a trifle un-
steady as he spoke.
This is our dauce, I think, Miss Mivart,"' he
said.
The innocent, round, blue orbs looked just a
little coldly into his. No," she told him, I
think you are mistaken. It is Mr. Greville's
dance." And she turned and laid her hand on
Greville's arm.-Argonaut.


SMOKED BY AZTECS.

PIPES, THE LIKE O' WHICH ARE STILL USED IN
HONDURAS.
The increasing commerce with Honduras and
Nicaragua is bringing to this country many of the
old implements and curios of those lands. The
Spanish population has a large admixture of Az-;
tee or other aboriginal blood, and preserves many
of the implements im well as customs which pre-
vailed in the time of Montezumas. One of the
queerest survivals in this regard is the long pipe
which is still employed in the rural districts of
both republics. It is made from a shrub or a sap-
ling which grows somewhat like the elder. The
bush is out down and the pith extracted from the
stem, which is afterward peeled, polished, dried
and painted with primary colours iu barbaric style.
The simplest form is a straight stem from three to
six feet ir. length. A more expensive kind is
made from a stem with two terminal branches.
This demands much more care in extracting the
pith, and enable the owner to offer a friend a
mouthpiece on one branch, while he is enjoying
another on a second. Three stemmed sticks are
also made, and very rarely, four stemmed ones.
These are kept as curios rather than as usual ar-
ticles, and are supposed to have been employed
upon especial occasions in the days of the ineas.
The bowl is of red clay, gray clay or sandstone,
and the mouthpiece may be of bone or horn, or
decorated silver amber. The length of the stem
causes the tobacco smoke to cool appreciably in
its passage from the bowl to the lips, and gives a
taste almost as mild as that produced by the Ori-
ental nargile. Thie tobacco used with it is of a
rich red brown colour, about intermediate in fla-
vour and appearance between Virginia and Hava-
na leaf. These pipes make very pretty ornaments
for a mantel or for a Wall, being much more pleas-
int to the eye than the "church warden" familiar


Prince Adelbert of Prussia, third son of jlth
Kaiser, who is to be the "sailor prince" for his
generation, is about to begin his naval career on
the training ship Charlotte.


GLASS USED IN BVTISH CANDY.
From' the Lancct.
The production of modern sweets is undoubted-
ly a fine art judging from the innumerable varie-
ties made and the countless ways in vogue of
making them attractive. At one time the most
deplorable practice prevailed of employing suoh
poisonous substances as chromium, lead, copper,
or even mercury and arsenic, as colouring agents
in sweets. The use of such objectionable colour-
ing agents became happily absolute, and, speak-
ing generally, modern confectionery is now pure.
True, the colouring agent is often an aniline dye,
but so great is the tinctorial power of such dyes
that it is probable that several pounds of the
sweets would contain at most a few grains of the
dye and then the dye may be perfectly harmless.
A somewhat unexpected and most objectionable
method of manipulating sweets has just been
brought to our notice. Sweets are made to glitter
by means of splinters of glass, so that the sweet
has the appearance of sparkling crystal sugar.
We have in our laboratory at the time of writing
some specimens of even high-class confectionery,
said to be of French make, which all contain a
liberal sprinkling of glass splinters. When the
sweet is dissolved in warm water the splinters
tumble to the bottom of the fluid into a miniature
heap of broken glass. The splinters present both
sharp points and sharp edges which are eminently
calculated to cause an injury to the walls of the
digestive canal. It is difficult to imagine a more
powerful mechanical irritant than jags of glass
which might easily cause laceration and hemor-
rhage, not to mention other disturbances such as
are set up by foreign bodies less jagged than glass
in the alimentary canal.
The sweets to which we have referred were sent to
us by a correspondent with a request for analysis,
and he relates that these sweets were partaken of
by two little children who shortly afterward suf-
fered from severe abdominal pain, in the one case
in the region of the appendix. The pain persisted
for several days. The effect of sharp glass particles
lodging in the appendix could, of course, be easily
disastrous. Our analysis enables us to say most
positively that these glittering particles are glass.
They are quite unchanged in boiling water or in
boiling acids and melt into beads at a red heat.
On analysis we obtained silica, line, soda, and a
little lead, which are the constituents of common
glass. From their appearance on the sweets the
flakes might easily be taken for gelatin of mica.
The glass is probably prepared by crushing glass
bubbles.
It is probable that the practice is adopted in or-
der to compensate for the absence of any crystal-
line appearance in glucose which is now so much
used as a substitute for cane sugar in confection-
ery. In such a case the practice is not only mon-
strous because it is likely to lead to serious in-
jury to health, but because it is a fraud also.
Sanded sugar was badaenoughb, bqt to put glass 'j
aspinrere in iivets-I'aIgS rhi- -


SUPERSTITIONS ANENT MOVING.
Oh, how the superstitions of the years agone
cling to this enlightened age. It is especially
noticeable at this time of the year when the gar-
dener will or will not plant potatoes and such
garden truck in the new moon or old.
It is moving time with many and there are
many who are careful to watch and observe these
superstitions.
If an old broom is taken in along with the
household goods the new home will always be dirty.
The Irish saying is that if window shades are
moved the sorrows of the past will go too.
Upon entering a new house if the owner passes
some one on the stairs a disappointment will fol-
low.
If a jar of honey is the first food to be taken in
there will always be plenty on the board, but be-
ware of a loaf of read getting there first! It
augurs that the occupants will some day want for
bread.
Salt sprinkled on the hearthstone, the Welsh
believe, will keep out the unwelcome guest.
To take peacock feathers, it said, means death
in the house within a year.
To break a mirror in moving foretells not only
seven years of bad luck, but seven successive dis-
appointments within twelve months.
To take a cat means good luck, and it is espe-
cially fortunate if a black cat comes in the first
night.
In some parts of Cuba a piece of tobacco is put
over the front hall door to keep out enemies and
false friends.
Even the matter-of-fact New England housewife
will tell you that-to see a chicken on your door-
step when you arrive means too much company.
If a knife be dropped the first night, violence
and even murder may take- place there within a
year; if a spoon falls it shows that the wealth that
should come to that house will be lost.
To drink the health of the absent at the first
meal in the new dwelling insures their speedy re-
turn.
Some see that a bag of salt is carried in first,
as that means goo'l luck, together with a Bible,
but a bed must be the last thing taken. in, as its
early advance entails much illness.

CRAMP FIRM IN A NEW DEAL.
London, May 8.-The Daily Ecpress says that
new negotiations that have been going on between
the Cramps of Philadelphia and Viekers Sons &
Maxim for a consolidation of business interests
have been successful, and that the papers are
ready to be signed. This is the reason, the paper
says, why the Cramp Shipbuilding Company did
not join the shipbuilding trust.
The difficulty has been to find an arnmormnaking
firm to join the combination. The arbitrary po-
sition taken by the Midvale Steel Company pre-
vented a deal hitherto. This difficulty has been
overcome, but the name of time thirJ party is not
stated.

Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus," the second
edition 1611, brought $3,100 at a recent London
book auction. It is a quarto of forty leaves. A
copy was sold in 1812 for $ and another, thirty
years ago, for il57. A copy of the Geneva Bible
of 1588, which had belonged to Elizabeth Mina-
hull, John Milton's third wife, and on which Mil-
ton's tare signature had been pasted, brought
$1,15. A third edition of Shakespeare's "Peri-
cles, P1rince of Tyre," 1619, unbound, was sold
for $i.500. For an uncut copy of the first edition
of Shelley's Alastor, or the Spirit of Solitude,"
$330 was paid.








THE ROYAL GAZETTE-SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1901


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inimto oval 6rearte,

Hamilton, May 18, 1901.





BERMUDA, Alias
SO3MERS' ISLANDS. }

By His Excellency SIR GEORGE
[L.S.M.] DIGBY BARKER, Knight
Commander of the Most
G. DIGBY BARKER, Honourable Order of the
General, Bath, General, Governor,
Governor and Commander in Chief,
Commander-in-Chief. and Ordinary in and over
these Islands, &e., &e, &c.

A Proclamation!
WHEREAS An Act entitled The Princess
Hotel Act 1890 was passed during the year 1890
by the Legislature of this Colony with a clause
suspending the operation of the said Act until the
Governor should notify by Proclamation that it
was Her Majesty's pleasure not to disallow the
same and enacting that subject as aforesaid it
should come into operation on the first day of
February one thousand eight hundred and ninety
one.
NOW I the Governor and Commander-in-Chief
do hereby proclaim that it is His Majesty's plea-
sure not to disallow the said Act, and the said
Act shall come into operation on the day of the
date of this Proclamation.
Given under my hand and the
Great Seal of these Islands
this 16th day of May, A.D.
1901, and in the first year of
His Majesty's reign.

By His Excellency's Command,
ALLAN F. SMITH,
Acting Colonial Secretary.

GOD SAVE THE KING!




BERMUDA, Alias )
SOMERS' ISLANDS.

By His Exccellency SIR GEORGE
[L.S.M.] DIGBY BARKER, Knight
Commander of the Most
G. DiBY BARKER, Honourable Order of the
General Bath, General Governor,
Governor and Commandcr-in-Chief and
Commander-in-Chief. Ordinary in and over these
land.ds, &a., &c., &e.

A Proclamation!
WHEREAS an Act entitled "The Princess
Hotel Act 1900" was passed during the last Ses-
sion of the Legislature with a clause suspending
the operation of the said Act until I the Governor
and Commander-in-Chief should notify by Pro-
clamation that it was Her Majesty's pleasure not
to disallow the same and enacting that subject as
aforesaid it should come into operation on the first
(lay of February last.
NOW I the Governor and Conuninder-in-Chief
aforesaid do hereby proclaim that it is His Majes-
ty's pleasure not to disallow the said Act, and the
said Act shall come into operation on the day of
the date of this Proclamation.
Given under my hand and the
Great Seal[ of these Islands
this 16th day of May, 1901,
and in the first year of His
Majesty's reign.
By His Excellency's Command,
ALLAN F. SMITH,
Acting Colonial Secretary.
GOD SAVE THE KING !

Ouar (lnIsilenge'r.

The chapter of accidents which the yacht in
petticoats underwent before her contest with the
Columbia was bad enough ; but the most sanguine
must feel some sense of disappointment at the in-
itial performances of Shamrock II, upon which so
much treasure has been expended, and upon
which so many fair hopes were founded. Not
long ago we were jubilantly informed that the
Shamrock II was the finest thing that had ever
glided off the slips into British waters ; that the
brains of Britain had been laid under an extra-
ordinary contribution in her creation ; that every
possible contingency had been foreseen and provid-
ed for with a power of calculation amount-
ing to little short of a prophetic instinct ;
and that finally this marvel of the shipbuild-
er's art lihad been launched amid the plaud-
its of assembled thousands who were how-
ever kept at a respectful distance with a jeal-
ous care lest any of the mysteries of her construo-
tion should escape to enrich the minds of the
builders of the Constitution.
And lo upon her trials the Shamrock II. has
been beaten by the petticoat yacht of 1899 by five
minutes over a course of 20 miles !
If a modest reticence had been observed and ex-
travagant panegyri altogether avoided as beneath
the dignity of the greatest shipbuilders in the


-OAOEU PUIUOZ1JOH

'puI0ult O UIOam4J


a? The Memorial to Queen Victoria, to be
placed in Hereford Cathedral, says "Church
Bells" will take the form of a new West Window
to be filled with stained glass. The ladies of the
County are providing the necessary funds. This
is precisely Alderman J. E. Lightbourn's propo-
sal for the Bermuda Cathedral, for which a Sub-
scription List has been opened at this office.


Naval Notes.
The experiments commenced with H. M. S.
"Scorpion are still in progress, and this ship
now lies moored near the coal hulk Shah in
Grassy Bay, looking very battered and minus
paint, but still seaworthy and formidable. We
hope to be able to give some particulars of these
experiments in Tuesda3's issue. H. M. S.
" Crescent is to leave for Halifax on the 28th
inst.
H. M. S. '" Tribune" proceeds to Murray's
Anchorage for target practice on Monday. She
will accompany the Flagship on the 28th.
H. M. S. Indefatigable and Proserpine "
remain for the present.
The Report of the Tribune's" anniversary
has been accidentally delayed, and will appear
next week.


'XjpplamnH 9Al IOUI

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mnmiuuiN
w (ouDmmA uiq~nq
) Ioulq) uns oqj
t ur nmmlxsw






-aopaiiip tpull pa
-poauoo ajqqdSo~umI
30 oaussaid uvmalsi


C 4) P C4 g
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Englishman or or any person appertaining to the
name of one to attempt to take advantage of co-
lour, by such cowardly attacks through the press.
No, no, Ex Private it is very mean, and I
should have thought that an Englishman, especi-
ally an old service man would have scorned such
an action. Do unto others as you would have
them do to you is the advice of
ROYAL ENGINEER,
Prospect.

Lecture,
(From our St. Geore's Correspondent.)
The Lecture on the "Reformation in Germany"
by a Naval Officer, advertised to take place in the
Town Hall, St. George's on Thursday evening,
came to a successful issue on that date. The lec-
turer was aided by lantern views which added
very much to the interest of the lecture. The sub-
ject was well handled, the lecturer clearly de-
monstrating the object of the Society which lie re-
presented-namely that of combating the ritualis-
tic movement which exists in the Church of Eng-
land to-day.
The Hall was well filled with an appreciative
audience. The Chair was taken by the Hon. J.
M. Hayward.


world those who earnestly desire to see the Amer-
ica's Cup travel eastward might have been spared
some humiliation and experienced less disgust
while at the same time less occasion would have
been given to the enemy to blaspheme.

A Fleet of Whalers.
During the past two weeks five whalers have
arrived in Hamilton Harbour from the south.
They all hail from New Bedford and fly the stars
and stripes. On the 4th, the schooner Ellen A.
Swift, Capt. Dyer, dropped anchor in the stream
after a voyage of 11 months, having on board 150
barrels of sperm oil. This is Capt. Dyer's second
visit to Bermuda, his first having been on the
schooner Cetacean in 1869. The schooners Gol-
(den City, Capt. Morris, and E. B. Conwell, Capt.
M. F. Gomez came in on the 6th. The former
had a cargo of 144 barrels and has been cruising
one year: the latter is out 8 months, and had 300
barrels. Both report severe weather during the
winter.
The barque Greyhound, Capt. Joseph T. Ed-
wards, which has been cruising for 34 months,
arrived on the 8th. The Greyhound's catch for
the cruise totalled 2,500 barrels, of which 500
barrels are to be re-shipped hence. Her second
officer, Mr. Win. J. Peters, lost his left hand by a
gun accident about a year ago. On the 12th the
schooner Pedro Varleo, Capt. John P. Praro,
came in after a cruise of three years. Her total
catch was 2,100 barrels. Two months ago she was
at Brava, Cape Verde.
All these vessels come for provisions, stores, and
to ship oil. They expect to leave here about a
week hence to continue their fishing. About
2,800 barrels of oil altogether will be sent to New
Bedford by -the schooner Samuel B. Hubbard.
Mr. John A. P. Pitt is agent.

Accident at Ireland Island.
A man named Claud Basden employed at the
Royal Laboratory Ireland Island, met with a
dreadful accident on Tuesday last, at noon. It
appears that Basden was using some explosive for
the purpose of killing fish, and that for some un-
explained reason a premature explosion took
place, resulting in the loss of both hands, a severe
cut on the side, and another on the face. The
sufferer was removed immediately to the station
Hospital at Boaz Island, and in the absence of
Major Hall R. A. M. C., Surgeons Robinson and
O'Regan, from the Royal Naval Hospital perform-
ed a successful operation, and we hear the patient
is doing remarkably well.
Undoubtedly lie must have a wonderful consti-
tution to stand the shock and the terrible suffer-
ings lihe must have gone through. No authentic
particulars are obtainable and pending the official
inquiry it would be wrong to insert the different
rumours which are current as to the immediate
cause of the accident.
-- ^^.^ -
Naval Warlike Experiments.
(From our St. George's Correspondent.)
The experimental gun practice with the old
Scorpion as a target, commenced on Tuesday
last. She was towed down to Murray's An-
chorage and anchored off about 3 miles from
" Fort Catherine," the Crescent" being moored
about 1,500 yards from her. A large number of
craft of all descriptions filled with sightseers were
attracted to the spot, among which was the tug
" Gladisfen with a large party on board, guests
of W. E. Meyer, Esq. The hills and slopes of the
No; tih Cow:st were also plentifully sprinkled with
onlookers eager to get some idea as to how a
modern naval engagement would be carried out ;
to a l:.rge extent they were doomed to disap-
pli:itment ; the first part was very interesting
but hie long waits between the firing (to enable
the Naval .\Athorities to examine the vessel and
take notes of the effect of the practice) grew very
mponotonous, but as the experiment was not car-
ried out with a view of entertaining the public,
-but to obtaini valuable information, no grounds
existed for complaint.
On Wednesday the Scorpion was towed
back to the Dockyard where further experiments
will h!) carried out with her.

Concert in Pembroke Sunday School.
The Concert given in the Pembroke Sunday
Schoolroom last Wednesday evening under the aus-
pices of the St. John's Guild, was not largely at-
tended and the amount realized was, in conse-
quence very small.

C. P. P. C.
A special meeting of the Central Parishes Plant-
ers' Club was held last Wednesday evening in the
Whitney Institute. Some matters of importance
were put forward for discussion ; but it was finally
determined to reserve a full consideration of them
until a subsequent meeting.

Sacred Concert In Wesley Cinurch.
A Sacred Concert is to be given in Wesley
Church on Monday evening next. The tickets
are rapidly being booked at this office, and there
is every prospect of a very large attendance. The
programme which is an excellent one appears in
this issue.

Church Services.
CATHEDRAL.
Sunday after the Ascension.
8 a. m.-Holy Communion.
11 a. m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
12.15 p. m.-Holy Communion.
4 p. m.-Children's Evensong and Address.
7.30 p. m.-Evensong and Sermon.
N. B.-Other services throughout the week
will be as usual, Morning Prayer at 9.30, Even-
song at 5.30, except on Thursday, when there
will be a celebration of the Holy Colmunion at
7.30 a. m. followed by Morning Prayer at 8.10
a. m. Evensong on Friday will be as usual at
7. p. m. with Sermon.

WESLEY METHODIST CHUR.iun.
Sunday, May 19.
11 a.m. Rev. J. Strothard.
7.30 p.m. Rev. J. Strothard.
WARWICK METHODIST CHURCH..
3 p.m. Rev. J. G, HIockin.
GRACE CHURCH NORTH SHORE.
11 a.m. Rev. J. G. Hockin.
7.30 p.m. Rev. J. G. HIockin.


inl two sIums of 300
anld n11e LL11 of 400,
on011 good iortgagC secLulrity.

Apply to

REGINALD GRAY.
May J5th, 1901-1

A Meeting
Will be held in LILY HALL, llamilton, at 8
p. ii. on the 24th inst., for the purpose of forming
an Army and Navy Veteran's Association.
All men who have served our late beloved
Queen are invited to attend.
J. CAMERON WILSON,
JOHN MULLIN,
EDWARD WILLIAMS,
H. W. MEER,
Comm i ttee.
18th May, 1901-2 -


SACRED

CONCERT,

Wesley Church.

MONDAY EVENING MAY 20TH,
1901.
PROGRAM E:
PART I.
1 Organ Solo Overture A. Hollins.
Mr. A. Gordon Mitchell.
2 Song Sweet Spirit, hear my prayer," Wallace.
Miss M. Strothard.


With the publication of the three following
letters we close the colums of The Royal
Gazette" to correspondence on this subject.-
[ED. R. G.] t

-To the Editor of The Royal Gazette ;
Dear Sir,-The letter sent you by the Ex. Pte.
of the 2 Wore. Regt. We beg to inform him that
we are not making an apology, we can, if the peo-
ple of your class were of an exemplary character,
the estimates of Bermuda as far as we know is
about 15,000, we know as a rule such as your class
make up the population of Bermuda. We may
admit that we are savages, that is if you will
return from whence you canie. It is very peculiar
that husbands and wives walking a few yards from
each other, we ask them in future to walk side by
side as it may lead to the prevention of assaults.
T. ATKINS, 1st W. I. R.

Prospect, Bda., 17th May, 1901.
The Editor of Royal Gazette,
Gazette Office Bda.
Dear Sir,-Be good enough to enter this in one
of the vacant columns of your Saturday's Paper.
Perhaps it may not be amiss for me to retalli-
ate on the correspondence of the Ex-Private, 2nd
Wor. Regt., who has pleased himself in elaborat-
ing on the conduct of the men of the W. I. R.
He speaks about apologizing, I cannot see why
any one should apologize for them as I am made
to understand that it is tlh-'best behaved Regi-
ment ever landed on the shores of Bermuda.
I can see no manliness in his quotation re:
"the Self belief ruing power of the Regiment,"
since he has maliciously kept it in his heart un-
til now.
Again, when pearls are cast among swine they
will be trampled under foot not knowing their
value, thus when good q(alities are being exer-
cised where they are not known they will be con-
sidered abuses. I am led to think that the great-
er part of these feelings are due to a prejudicial
selfishness to emigrants in-general in this island,
and that these scandalous rumours are simply ap-
paritions caused by the recent dawn of civiliza-
tion among the population. I consider that Ber-
mudiins should confer a high appreciation to the
West Indians who has dawn civilization upon
their dark island, laid the foundation of educa-
tion to the degenerate population, open to light
all the recesses of ignorance, and torn up by the
roots all the weeds of vice instead of cherishing
feeling of disgust.
Since assaults are of common occurrence and to
prevent soldiers from coming through his kitchen
a second time, I would advise the Ex-Private,
2nd Wor. Rcgt. to hasten back to his country
where lie will be free from being molested.
Please oblige
yours in hot haste,
W. D. PALMER, L.co.
1st W. I. Regt.

Prospect Camp, Bermuda,
May 16th, 1901.
lo the Editor of The Royal Gazette.
Dear Sir,-I was very much surprised whilst
perusing the Gazette of 14th inst. to notice a let-
ter from a person signing himself Ex Private "
Worcester Regiment, in which he attempts to dis-
charge the characters of the men of W. I. Regt.
Surely a man who makes such mean remarks
and base assertions, never served in the much re-
spected Worcesters, it can hardly be credited.
He says that it isn't safe for a woman to go out
of her house after dark for fear of attack (presu-
mably by the W. I. R.).
Now Mr. Editor, I would like to ask, of what.
assaults have these men been guilty during their
stay here to cause this fear ? and on how many oc-
casions has it been proV4I that these are the in-
dividuals who attack' Ex Private's harmless
women ? Were no assaults ever committed before
these men arrived, and was this always an I. land
of Perfect Peace before their arrival ? I say that it
isn't right or proper to attribute all the crimes
committed in the Island to the West India Regt.
Ex Private also says that "lie has served in
some of the biggest garrison towns in the world
and he hasn't seen such conduct amongst troops,
even when they have been drunk." Poor Ex
Private "; I pity him, his is a sad affliction, to be
so short-sighted must indeed be bad. I too have
served in a few large garrison towns, and I have
never yet met a perfect regiment, and I will go so
far as to say that the W. I. Regiment now in Ber-
muda, are just as well behaved and in some cases,
better so, than some of the European Regiments
with whom I have had the honour of serving at
home.
If Ex Private will only pause to think and use
a little common sense with his thoughts, he will
come to the same conclusion as any other sensible
man, and that is, that just as many Black
Sheep" exist in any European Regiment as the
1st W. India ; and it would be almost a matter
of impossibility for him to point his finger at any
Regiment or Corps under the British Flag, or any
other flag for that matter, which does not contain
its quota of wasters," in fact they are to be
found in almost every family, so it is certainly
very mean of him to attempt to blacken the
characters of the whole Regiment for the actions
of a few. Give respect where it is due and you
will get it returned, that is my experience.
Ex Private" in the latter part of his letter
makes a few remarks and offers it as advice, but
please "Ex Private" do not forget that Char-
ity begins at home" ; don't attempt to give any-
thing away, which might be useful to yourself or
your immediate surroundings.
His letter generally is very mean and contemp-
tible and I sincerely hope that the men of 1st W.
I. R., will treat it as such and take it from whence
it came.
If the people of Bermuda wish to win t':e re-
spect of these particular~troops or any other troops,
learn to treat them more as men and less as dogs,
it will pay in the long lun, as the time may
come when the protection of this particular Regi-
ment may be required.
And now "Ex Private" a word please; you
quote "Obedience is the first duty of a soldier,"
quite correct, it is, but in this phrase the word
"'obedience" refers to a soldier's duty to his su-
perior officer, and not obedience to their equals or
perhaps their inferiors (which can be found here).
In no case is a soldier taught to obey a civilian,
and it is the duty of any civilian to look up to
and respect a soldier and not look down on him.
I should have thought Ex Private," that you
would ha"e known this, and another thing you
should know is, that it isn't the duty of any


Extracts from Brigade Orders.
Head Quarter Office,
Prospect, 16th May, 1901.
Officers Commanding and Heads of Departments
will forward to the Commanding Royal Engineer
for submission to His Excellency the General Comn-
manding, not later than the 27th instant, state-
ments, in duplicate for new services proposed for
the ensuing year, 1902-03.. The C. R. E. will sup-
p.y the necessary forms.
A Board of officers wil: assemble at Prospect at
10 a.m. on the 18th instant, for the purpose of ex-
amining 2nd Lieut. A. U. Mitchell, B.V.R.C., in
accordance with para. 341, Volunteer Regulations,
1901.
Proceedings will be forwarded to the D.A.A.G.
Summer dress will be taken into wear from Sun-
day, the 19th instant inclusive.
Eight men 1st West India Regiment, will em-
bark on the S. S. Beta about the 20th instant for
passage to Jamaica.
17th May, 1901.
Summer mess dress will be worn from to-day
inclusive.
Lee.-Corpl. A. G. Cooke, 3rd Coy. Royal Engi-
neers, is appointed School Assistant in the Garri-
son School, Prospect, front the 15th instant, in-
clusive.
A Board of Officers will assemble at the Station
Library, Prospect, at 11 a. in. on the 20th inst.,
to verify the library accounts and the number of
books on charge, and to condemn such books as
are unserviceable.
-- --- --'** --- .
Fr'eiglnt F'ronm London.
The s. s. Cayo Romano which arrived here yes-
terday brought hither the largest cargo ever con-
signed to this port from London. It amounts to
about 2825 tons of which 2450 tons are for the Im-
perial Government. Previous to this, the largest
cargo sent hither from England was about 1950
tons.

Custom House, Hamilton.
ENTERED.
May 13.-American Schooner Pedro Varelo,
Paris, whaling voyage.
11.-Br. Steamship Pretoria, McKenzie,
New York, assorted cargo to Jas. A. Conyers.
May 16-Ss Cayo Romano, Widgery, London;
assorted cargo to W T James.
14-Ss Cairo, Clyde, Newcastle ; Coal to HI M
Dockyard ; W T James, Agent.
CLEARED.
May 16-R M S Pretoria, McKenzie, New York ;
potatoes 1334 bbls, onions 24031 crates, vegeta-
bles 25 pkgs, etc., etc., etc.
17-Ss Cairo, Clyde, Chatham, N B; water ballast.

PASSENGERS.
In the R. M. S. Pretoria for New 'York on
Thursday last :-Mr and Mrs H R Butler and in-
fant, Mr and Mrs B K Ellis and infant, Mr and
Mrs G Osius, MAr and Mrs J B Rountree, Mi and
Mrs A Sharpless, Mr and Mrs John McGinnis, Mr
and Mrs J L Bright, Mr and Mrs C W Sanderson,
Mrs A W Hollis and infant, Mrs 0 L Hazard,
Mrs E A Willard, Mrs M Doran, Mrs Chas Eliot,
and two maids, Mrs E G Glenn, Mrs M K McNal,
Mrs B A Boyd, Mrs Harry R Kirby, Mrs G D Pat-
ten, Miss Constance King, Miss Hazard, Miss M
Marcrum, Miss Willard, The Misses Eliot, (4),
Miss Glenn, The Misses Lowrie, (2), Miss M Mc-
Nal, Miss A Todd, Miss C Jacquelin, Miss E Rice,
Miss N Varley, Messrs W H Meier, D Melnues,
W S Hutchings, T H Woolford, J A Ambler, J W
Gibson-Second Class-Miss J Santucci, R Davis,
Chas Butterfield, W Fozrad, Mrs S Hilgrove, Mr
and Mrs J Wilson, Mr and Mrs A J.1 Rogan, W
Weiss, A Rose, J D'Olivera, E Dowling, H Dow-
ling, James F Kelly.
In the Cayo Romano from London on Thursday
last : Mrs Shaw and 4 daughters, Mr Bigland
and daughter, Mr B Holroyd.

St. Kitts, May 14-S S Erna sailed here at 4
p m. on Monday.
New York, May 16-S. S. Trinidad sailed from
dock at 11.50 p.m. to-day, six cabin passengers.
New York, May 16.- -S S Bratsberg sailed dock
at 4.30 this afternoon.

ENGLISH CORONETS AND COACHES.
From the London Onlooker.
There seems to be a good deal of misapprehen-
sion on the subject of coronets, which are, after
all, prosaic things, trammeled as to shape and
make by the strict regulations of the Earl Mar-
shal's office. They are made in three diffeletnt
materials, at three different prices. A coronet of
pure gold costs 84; but even the richest peers
seldom incur what is entirely a useless expense,
as silver gilt, which costs only 18, looks just as
well and is much lighter. A coronet of baser mc-
Wal, gilded over, runs to 17, and the reason that
the difference between the last two mentioned is
so slight is caused by the present extreme cheap-
ness of silver. The coronets worn by Peeressess
are the same as Peers' coronets but smaller. Be-
fore a coronation carriage builders receive a notice
from the Earl Marshal directing them to be care-
ful as to the exact correctness of all coronets and
armorial bearings painted on the panels of carriag-
es, and apropos of these Lord Carysfort's coach is
one of the most splendid, and Lord Spencer's is
very handsome, but I know none more noticeable
than the one belonging to the Duke of Portland,
and I remember often seeing Lady Caledon and
her sister, Lady Margaret Jenkins, looking very
smart in the former's pretty chariot.

The United States contains nearly 6,000,000
separate farms.
Indian Territory has more than doubled its pop-
ulation in ten years.
Africa contains 80,000,000 Mohammedans to
about 200,000,000 inhabitants.
Among tmhe 670 members of the new House of
Commons two are above 80 years of age.
Lord Brougham commonly spent three or four
weeks in study before writing a great speech.
There ere about 30,000,000 acres of unoccupied
public land yet remaining in Montana.
The Queen of Holland has an enormous fortune
only a part of which belongs to the crown.
During thie year ending June 30 last, Jasper
County, Mo., produced zink and lead worth $5,-
339,629


WANTED 1000


Gavotte," I
Mr. S. S. Toddings.


Eieltherg.


lo


5 Song There is a green hill far away," Gounod.
Miss M. Dickinson.
6 Trio Evening Ilymn, Leslie.
Mrs. Grant, Mrs. Ferguson, Mr. Ward.-
7 Organ Solo (a) Melody, E. H. Lemaire.
(b) Andante Batiste.
Mr. A. Gordon Mitchell.


PART II.
I Violin Solo "Largo,"
Mr. S. S. Toddings.


Handle.


2 Bass Solo But who may abide, &c.," Handel.
Mr. F. Tite.


3 Song


" The voice of Jesus,"
Mrs. Grant.


Stelife.


I Trio Praise to our Great Creator," Belcher.
Mrs. Grant, Miss Dickinson, Mr. H. Ward.


5 Song


" Forget all thy sorrows,"
Miss Strothard.
The Star of Bethlehem,
Mr. H. Ward.


Adams.


7 Quartette As pants the hart," Thomass
Mrs. Grant, Mrs. Ferguson, Mr. Ward, Mr. Tite:
8 Organ Solo Fugue in E minor IV. 'T. Best.
Mr. A. Gordon Mitchell.
Doors open at 7.30. Concert at 8.
Silver collection to be taken in Church.
Tickets of admission (Free) at Royal Gazette "
Office.
Colonist copy.

Under the patronage of
REVEI!END CANON DAVIDSON

Ti Lopyl od oT mi il phds
(ASwHTON UNITY)
will give a

Bazaar and Concert
IN

The City Hall, Hamilton
ON
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY,
MAY 28 and 29, 1901.

There will be a variety of useful, ornamental and
fancy articles for sale; also refreshmienits, etc. ;
and among the numerous attractions at the Bazaar
will be a fine fruit stall, ice cream stall, Rebecca
at the Well, gipsy tent, post office, etc., etc.
'I'lThe Concert will be a very attractive one
being composed of vocal and instrumental solos
and duetts, dialogues, plays, recitations, etc.
Don't miss the concert, as there will be a SPECIAL
FUNNY MAN who will give some SPECIAL FUNNY
THINGS, which will highly amuse the audience.
Band in Attendance.
ADMISSION-To Bazaar, 6d.; to Concert, 3d.
A few reserved seats at .l.
The Bazaar will he open from 3 p. -in. to G p.m.
each afternoon, and from 7.30 o'clock each even-
ing.
The Concert will commence at 8 o'clek sharp.
Ifahmilton, May 18, 1901-25th.-2


NE W GOODS.

Just received at



Sosling Bros.

CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S

Pie Fruits,

Pine Apple Marmalade,

Apricot Marmalade,

Bombay Chu1tney,

Candied Ginger Chips,

Sardine Paste,

Aspic Jelly in glass jars,

Leaf Gelatine,

Queen Olives,

SPickles.

Furniture Polish,

Boxes Cutlet Frills,
Smoked Sardines '7
Oil.

IHamilton, March 22/01.


Auction of Real Estate
In Sandys.

I am instructed by the executors to the estate of
the late William Siggins, to offer

At Pubic Auction
on the premises at 4 p.m. on
Saturday, 25th May Inst.
A comfortable cottage with about one-half acre
good land attached, formerly Mrms. Shirlaw'p
situated on new road near Mangrove Bay, and
within ten minutes walk of the Ferry.
This property, as will be seen, is desirably lo-
cated, and in consequence valuable.
J. B. ZuILL,
Auctioneer.
Sandys Parish, May 8, 1901-3 3p; 11, 18, 21.


3 Song

4 Violin So


" The Mighty Deep," IW. H. Jude.
Mr. 0. L. Dickinson.






THE ROYAL GAZETTE.-SATURDAY, MAY


18, 1901.


Lockward & Co.


CONTINUANCE


OF


CASH SALE.


WE HAVE ADDED A VARIETY OF


New Goods to our


AND OFFER THEM AT


large andl~ well AS.3() j tcd~


Stock,


Cash Sale Prices.


MEN'S BLACK DIAGONAL, Tweed and Serge Suits,
Youths' Tweed and Serge Suits,
DRESS GOODS in Silk and Cotton,

EMBROIDERIES, and many other Goods at unusually LOW PRICES.

Hamilton, May 18, 1901.-2 3p


H. A. 4- E. SMITH, Reid St,

Warm Weather," did you say
That's true; but this is nothing to what we muay rc.pectt. Unfortunately we can't
avert it, but we can help you to be con furlable at very small expense to yourselves
*0


MEN'S COLORED SHIRTS.

Percale, Soft Fronts, Collars and Cuvffs de-
tached, 2/6, 3/9.
Percale, Soft Fronts, Collars and Cffs at-
tached, 2/3 each.
Percale, Stiff Bosom.s, Cuffs detached,
2/6 and -4/- each.


MEN S SUMMER HA TS.
-! 111I 4 1 111 1111111114++
Boaters Feather weight" Rough Straw,
very styli?,h, 3/8, j/6 each.
Boaters (For Men and Boys) Jap Straw,
were 2/3, 26, 3/6, 4/6,
l selling now for 1/-, 1/6, 2/G, 29.
Alpine Shape, Fine Straw, 4/6 each (suit-
able fir men ,f all aye).
Alpine Shape and S'o/t 1'ohliny Panama,
15/1 each.


BATHING COSTUMES FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN.
Ladies two piece Suits, Fine Knit Cotton, Trimmed Braid 10/6 each.
Ladies two piece Suits, all Wool Serge, Trimmed Braid, 15/6J each.
Gents two piece Suits, Fine Knit Cotton,, -/'1 each.
one '" '/ 6, )/each.
Bathing Drawers for both Mlen and Boys at 6d. each.



NEW E A MEYER. Low
GOODS. ** PRICES


CASH


BARGAIN


SALE.


We are offering our complete Stock of. the following articles at exceptionally
low prices for one week beginning
Monday, May 20th, 1901
LAMPS MARTIN(;
STOVES CAR PET
GLASSWARE DOORMAT',s
CROCKERY BOOKS
GRANITE & TIJN WA RE WALL PAPER
FANCY ARTICLES OF EVERY )DESCRIPTION AND TOYS.
Our Special Discount on Furniture will continue until May 26th, 1901.
THE BERMUDA FURNISHING & SUPPLY CO.
Hamilton, May 17, 1901-2 13p.


Good





Shoes




For Cash



This is our offer to you, without being
punctuated with exclamations about
"Bargains" and Sales," and it is open
to you whenever you feel inclined'to in-
vest. We sell for "Cash" year in and
year out, and the Special Cash Sale"
prices of other stores are, of necessity,
merely every day events with us.



The Hamilton Shoe
FOR MEN


Mon' s Black Lace-a


8,11oes


9/3, 11/6, 13/-, 141/6


T AliI s Brown ilj,-ce Shoe,,)


9/'6, 11 /6,


Shaped Belts,
in Patent, TIan & Blhck.
SILK RIBBON-Washable.
A new lot LADIES' SHIRT-WAISTS,
SILK PARASOLS & UMBRELLAS. *,
DRESS GOODS. 1
STRAW HATS, FOR BOYS & MEN,
AT 1/6 UP.


JUST RECEIVED A GREAT''
VARIETY OF

Ladies' Silk Ties
Fringed and knotted :uals, Embroid-
ered, also
LADIES' BOWS IN CHIFFON,
SILK WINDSOR TIES IN
AIL COLOURS.


SEAGRAM'S


Canadian


Rye


WHISKEY


is the Leadng Case


Whiskey


in Canada


Mild Pure and Mellow.


INO. F. BURROWS &


Co.,


Sole Agents for Bermuda.


LIGHTBOURN'S
FINE OLD

HIGHLAND MALT WHISKY
J. El<. L

P^FI.tRSOrNAl
3s. 3d. per Bottle.

36s. C ase.

-, VP 2 3W I M:V *V'!


11/6'


Children's Shoes
OXFORDS


Here is our Little Princess" line in Ox-
fords, either black or brown. Good neat
shapes, stout soles, and every pair war-
ranted satisfactory.

Children's Black and Brown Shoes,
Sizes, 5-8 4/-: 8a-10 4/6- : 11-2 5/3.


Pearmans' Cash Stores.


HAMILTON.


- SHELLY BAY.


Fish Pot Wire Netting.

The undersigned has just received from Londoni
a full supply of Fish Pot Wire, and Wire Netting,
which he offers at a very low price.
PAINTS mixed and unmixd
OILS, Varnishes, Woodlillers,
Brushes &c.
Estimates given for Painting in all branches of
the trade. All work neatly and promptly exe-
cuteil. Satisfaction guaranteed.
I. 11. PETTY.
H-ouse-, Ship &. Sigl Paiiliter.
Windsor Bhloc, ( ueeii Streel.
Hanmilton, May 18, 1901-3 3p. 3 o. i. pd.

For Sale.
1 GRAY FARM HORSE, true to
collar.
1 BOX CART and WHEELS, near-
ly new.
1 DRAY and WHEELS, nearly
new.
1 CORTLAND WAGON.
1 CART HARNESS in fair order.
Apply to
E. W. MITCHELL, Haniiltoni Factory.
Hamilton, May 18th, 1901.-2


PICKFORD & BLACK
STEAMSHIP CO. LTD.

$35 Summer
Excursions


Bermuda
TO
Halifax, N.s. A .St.John, N,B.
ieturninig from Halifax

3utt, 3July, uAgust,-

S, September, October.
/- STrEAAMSHIPS --


ORINOCO
BETA
OCAMO


ORURO


ERNA


$35 Round Trip.
Tickets i.isued Ibgiliiiiing vith
S. S. Orinoco 6
due ;it Berinuud
.A May 31st.
aud all ships bountl north from and after this
date. Good for return uni . .
S. S. Oruro
Sailing from Halifax
October 21, 1901

For passage and other particulars
apply to

W. T. JAMES,
Agent,
Hamilton and St. George's;, Bermnudha.
May is- ;p t f
PICK FORD & BLACK
Steamship Co., Ltd.
Halifax, Bermuda, Turks' Islands,
Jamaica Service.

S. S. BETA,
Will Sail 'from Halifax, N. S.,
SUNDAY, May 19th, due at Ber-
muda, to sail for Turks' Islands
and Jamaica, about WEDNESDAY
May 22.
W. T. JAMES,
Agent.
Hamilton and St. George'r lBermuda.
May I, 1901.-2 3p

PICKFORD& BLACK
Steamship Co., Ltd.
PROPOSED ITINERARY.
Canada, Bermuda, W. Indies, Demerara Service
(SouTHBouxD TRIPs.)
Leaves | Leaves Due Idai.
STEAMEUS. St. John, Halifax, to sail for
SN.B. N.S. W. Indies
OCAMO May 11 May '20o May 21
EUNA '25 June ; June 7
ORINOCOI June 8 17 21
ORURO ul 22 July 1 Jul y 5
OCAMO |July 6 15 19
(NoRTnuBou1 D TaIPs.)
Steamers are due at Bermunda to sail for St. John
and Halifax :-
ORINOCO May 31 : ORURO, June 14 ;
OCAMO June 28 ; ERNA July 12;
ORINOCO July 26; ORURO Aug. 9.


PORTS OF CALL :-lermuda, *St. Kitts, iAn--
tigua, *Montserrat, *Doi.iinica, St. Lucia,
Barbados, *St. Vincent, "Grenada, "Tobago,
Trinidad, Demerara.
Steamers marked do not call at ports
marked on the Southbound trip nor at
Tobago and Grenada on the Northbound
bound trip.
Halifax, Bermuda, Turks Ids., Jamaica Service
|S Beta sails from Halifax, N.S., on the
15th of each month, due at Bermuda to sail
for Turks Islahds and Jamaica on the 18th ;
returning from south is due at Bermuda to
sail for Halifax, N. S., about the 2ud of each
month.
W. T. JAMES,
Agent,
Hamilton and St. George's, Bermuda.


UNCLAIMED LETTERS

E G Adaums, A E Allen, Jane Albuoy, Martin
Alfred, Karl Anderson, Mrs Arthur, Vesta Baird,
Mrs E S latenman, John Basden, Caroline I[ Ba-
ker, Joseph Bell, Mrs Bennett, Otanier Ienjamiin,
S S "Cain", F A Caleb, Miss S II Clarkson, Ro-
bert Cooper, A R Cox, Alfonso Cox, Mrs Robert
Cyder, W F Davis, J G Darrell, Herman Darrell,
Mrs S ) 1 Davenport, Nellie Douglas, H L Doug-
las, John J Dorset, Win Eastman, Albert L Ed-
dy, Thomas Eminmnuel, M Evans, W S Fraser,
Louisa France, Win Frederick, George Gilbert,
Edith Gibbons, Alice Gibbons, Jane Gilbert,
llenry Geen, Win Grant, Abraham Gieenaway,
Helga Halkgvist, Samuel Harper, Mr L HI
Hayes, Mauassah lHayward, Delia K Hallock, Mrs
Perry E Hall, Mary 1I Hans, Mrs Jos Harvey,
Samuel Harvey, J R Harvey, Mrs James Harvey,
Escott Harvey, Thonuis Henry, Joseph S Hen-
drickson, Margaret Hood, Mrsi I Horan, Mrs A
M Howard, S S flydaspas", J Ingrain, C lnnis,
Joseph James, J E Jenson, S Jennings, Chas Ht
Jones, Delia J idge, I loughton R Kervey, CKoblin,
it L Landly, WV I' L-.iurie, Louis., Lee, Josephiune
C Lee, F 1'luiley-Le. John Lewis, Dodmouth
Leverock, Mary Lightbourne, Win Benj Lloyd,
Daniel Matthew. Mrs John McKergon, John
McKininon, Isabella McKenzie, Alfred E Miles,
Tihomais Mingo, Ellizlbeti Moralh, Becnj A Mor-
tor, George Mouro, Mlichael Niagle, Patrick 0
Newton, S S O(live," Mrs Win araii, rAlbert
Os.tertag, John I'iiii, ( F I) I'aine, Thonins Pen-
Iny, ,Jame'iis P 'hiilipps, .Jaimes WV Phiiipps, Mrs
l'lae, Robertr Poppett, Andrew Powell, Lingi
1 saila, C S Raynor, .Joscph Raynor, Katherine P
Riley, Henrietta Iiley, Jane Richenson, Diana E
Rit.lhardson, Margarrt l'oilce, R J IRobinsoni, H R
Robinson, P D Saunders, Amos Sliarpless, Sami-
tiel C Sinimos, Joe F Simniuions, Chailes 8 Si-
mons, Lazarus Silimons, Win Silimons, Theop C!
Solomon, Mary Si8mli, Elizabeth Smnilth, Alice
Sinith, Elizabeth nitli, Edward Smith, E F
Smith, Frances Smith, Johlin Smithli Yacht
Sultana,'" Fithe Stone, Susnu Stowe, Hariet
Stowe, Mr. Stephens, Carpenter," Anna L
Sullivan, Mris Stokes, Will Stdtedin, George L
Sunlier, Mr Sieatg, N tH Swan. Miss BC Swans,
Mrs L Swan, Charles Tatemi, J Thoimson, Charles
S Trialtetian, SS '* Trungate, Win Tucker, Jo-
seph Tucker, A M Tucker, Wood Vallance & Co,
James A Waner, Mary Ann Warner, G IH Wald-
ron, A Waeteer, J 0 Welch, Ritchie Wilson, N H
Williams, IB J Williams, Hilton Wilson, Mrs
Woolridge, R It Wood ward, Gerorge Wray.
PORTUOUiiEi :-Emanuel Vera, M Gonmez John
Rose, Frank Dcsilva, N S Olcv'ta, Joze de Lima.


Ber muda Pocket Almanack Guide and Directory for 1901.-Price Is. 9d., on sale at Royal Gazette Office.


NOTICE.

BERMUDA ISLANDS I
Town of St. George. )
The Freeh Iders of the Towu
of St. George are requested
to meet at the
TOWN HALL
On Tuesday next the
21st day of May, 1901,
at eleven o'clock in the forenoon,
for the purpose of nominating and electing an
ALDERMAN to serve in the room and stead of
the late George Spurling, Esqr., decezawsd, tIr the
unexpired portion of the year ending first Monday
in January next.
By order of the Corporation,
JOSEPH M. II.\YWARD,
Mayor.
Town Hall, St. George's,
16th May, 1901-21

JAMAICA and NEW ORLEANS.

s8.. "Cayo Romano"
will sail for

JAMAICA
AND
NEW ORLEANS
ABOUT

FRIDAY, MAY 24.
Superior Passenger Accommodation.
For Freight and Passage,
Apply to
W. T. JAMES, Agent,
Hamilton and St. George's Bermuda.
May I8, 1901.

Notice to
Importers.

Direct
London
Line.
Steamship
G AYO MONO,
Will Leave

LONDON
FOE

BERMUDA
On or about

31st May.
First Class Passenger Accommodation
Freight and Passage for Jamaica and
New Orleans, solicited at usual rates.
W. T. JAMES,
Agent.
Hamilton and St. George's Bda.
HY. LANGRIDGE & CO.,
Agents,
16 Great St. Helen's,
London, E. C.,
England.
3p.


-








THE ROYAL GAZETTE.-SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1901.


Thi Greatt Of


Miss [ J131I) suffered for ilearly] (wo
years from0111 a ever illness whirhl
she attributed to heart trouble. It
proved however, to be flatulence
11(1and wind over the heart. IThese
distressing complaints, and tihe ac-
comipanying mental depression, were
cured by)' Phosfe ine,' in which Miss
Bird states she has every cov11li-
(lence. Many of her friends also
spCeak ill the highest terms of its re-
cuperative powers.


All Tonics,


M I- J. A. l1111), 9, Stanwick Rfoad, West Ken-
'.ih::;in', W., writes :-" For nearly two yeals 1I
mw Ia terrible suffered from an illness %vhich I
thought was due to an affection of tile heart. I
%as not ;il;tle to leave nly room for a long time,
and any exertion was positive agony. Of course
I h id no appetite, and my mental condition was
,iot painful. I felt always so depressed and
nrivouis. and thought I never should get well.
At last I discovered that imy illness was due to
llitiulen.y and wind over the heart. It was at
lhi. juncture that I tried I'iosferinc,' and found
it suchl a valuable remedy. After three large hot-
tlcs I felt quite a wonderfull relief. My appetite
ietilun'ed, and best. of all I got rid of that terrible
depression. I went on with the remedy, and am
niov atlli to gIt about with ease, and take an en-
jynleut in life. I have every confidence ill
Slihoferine,' an'l have recommended it to many
V'ienllds who speak in the highest terms of its rc-
tiple.rtivt. powers. If you think my letter would
lIe of any service you are welcome to publish it."


MISS OLGA NETHERSOLE.
iMiss Olgai Nethclsole, the beautiful and gifted actres-s, writes :-I lind your Phosrerine a most excel-
lent nerve tonic.. It is both invigorating anld fortifying, and I shall take pleasure in recommend ing it.


L0YA-L ( -C-)L M A INDs
Pllosferine enjoys the distinguished honour of having received connuands from
MEMBERS OF THE BRITISH ROYAL FAMILY.


H.I.M. the Empress of Russia.


1.1. IL.. the Grand Duchess Olga


H.M. the King of Greece. II.R.H. the Crown Princess of Ri
1I.M. the Q(ueen of Rounania. 11.1I.1. the Grand Duchess Serge
HI.I.M. the I)owager Empress of Rlus.ia. lf.I.tl. the Grand Duchess Xenia
And the leading aristocrac- y and puhylic generallyy throughout lihe universe.


Sciatit 1ca.
Lumibrago,

R111 c raImlIt ~i s A ,

Vitality,
Dei-li Fty,
Braf t i t(' s, s
Otakizss

Nervous~lCE


of Russia.
ounlialin.
of Russia.
of Russia.


lomalic



,Nit-%vLife



i-; mergy

101114,

Ellifiu- t seam


10I()SFEtIN l,' is the most powerful Nervo and ecunp.-ri tive 'Iolic known. It removes Mential
depression, want of Tone and Nerve power. It has riemarkille Ilealh-giiring, Strength-gi ing, En(r-
gising, and Re]juvenating properties.
No other Medicine has received suchli absolute proof of its ; extraordinary properties in rtestoriin
Shattered Constitutions, and in giviiig back to the prematiielyv-el NEw LiIFE AND ]';ENf:ifG.
Pal', weakly children and people suffering from broken down health, brail-fafr, ine v(us exlihaustion,
the weakenin after-offcets of severe illnesses, drive benefit florn te first dose; it gives a ie'w Iasetf (
life.
Proprietors: ASHTON & PARSONS, L.td., 17 Farringdon Road, Lontdon, EIng
Price in Great Britain, bot tles 1/1 1, 2/3) ai d 4'. Sold by all Chemists, Stores, &c. The 2/9 siz.
contains nearly four times the 1/1.



SMOKE


J. Taddy &


Co's.


(London)


(ESTrABItSHED 150 Y'EARIS)


TOBACCO


and CIGARETTES.


The Goods are Manufactured from the Highest Grade of Bright Virginia
Leaf.

Coaccos ar Packed tn fir Cigbt $$ns.

THE FOLLOWING BRANI)D WE HAVE IN STOCK:


Preonier Virginia Tobacco
Myrtle Grove
lFlaked Gold Leaf "


Orbit
London Flake
PREMIER NAVY
Mild,


Myrtle Grove Cigarettecs.
Premier "
Flaked Gold Leaf "


Picaroon "
Pure Virginia
CUT TOBACCO, in three Strengths.
Medium and Full.


FINEST LATAKIA
A tobacco especially adapted for mixing purposes.

SOLE AGENTS :-

The Bermuda Furnishing & Supply Co.,
45 FRONT ST., CITY.


HIiGH CASH PRICES
For used or unused obsolete Bermuudian aud
West Indian
"---- POSTAOG STAMPS.
If you area collector write for stamp sheets.
J. C. CRISSON, Ji.
P. 0. Box 17 Hamilton,
April 6, 1901-- m. s.o.


T'he Shilling Green.

NOTICE TO STAMP COLLECTORS.
NO SET of Bermuda Stamps Complete, without
the obsolete Shilling Green, to be had only
at the
ROYAL GAZETTE OFFICE.
Hamilton, Bermuda, December 18, 1900.


PAPER COFFINS.
"iTHE INVENTION OF A PHIYSIl'IAN SAID TO BE A
SI'CCESS.
One of the latest things in paper,'' said a deal-
rr, is collins. The manufacturers are now pre-
pared to turn out anl article in the way of a collii
which meets all the requirements expected from a
piece of furniture of that kind.
The paper coffin has stood all thle tests. It
has been demonstrated to be water-proof, fire-
proof, acid-proof-in fact, indestructible. In its
cheapest form it is 50 per cent. cheaper than the
plain pine boxes used for the Potter's lield inter-
Inents and it is 50 per cent. better.
Then a'l gain very handsome paper coflinls are
nale. You c:in make the prepared paper stock
take any for n you wish and adorn it with all va-
rieties of mountings and ornanientalismn. An air-
tistically treated paper coffin may be illidc to
look like the tinest rosewood or oaken c'skit.
It was a Brooklyn physician who lirst con-
ceivsd the idea of leaking coffins out of paper.
In addition to being a physician this gIentliItian
w-as a speculator. lie made a good deal of money
dickering in real estate in Brooklyn. With this
lie went lip into the Adirondack region to spend
the rest of his days and tinker at chemistry,
wl ich was one of his hobbies.
It was in that way that lie got filled up willth
the paper coffin idea. Studying the paper stock
inll te niMills up there hle convinced himself tlhait
could be so treated iith chemicals that it Nwould
make capital coffin material. People laughed at
Ilim at liist. They thought lie wats only throw-
ing his money away with his expeoiimeints. But
he knew what hle was at and kept on at his work.
The result was that lie won out and hiis made a
lot of money. He has just sold his patents to ;
large manufacturing combination for a handsome
num o( ready money anlld a royalty on every paper
coffin made. It. means a big fortune to ,hii,."
-.V('w )i r/: Smn.


l'FAITHl IN SOU' ll AFRICA.
Cape Town, May 7.--Sir Alfred Milner, (Gover-
nor of tlie Transvaal and Orange IRiver Colony,
who is going away on a leave of absence, was the
guest of honour at a luncheon given by citizens
to-day, and an address supporting his )policy,
signed by about 10,000 of the residents of Cape
Town, was presented to hiim.
In replying to a toast Sit Alfred said that the
loyalists must resist like temptations of the evil
one the constantly recurring panics caused by i u-
niours that there was or would lie a change in the
policy of the King or Governiment or a wveaken-
ing on their part. Neither change or weakening
was possible. Nothing in the whole dreary busi-
ness of the war in South Africa was more remark-
able than the manner in which the British
throughout the world had set their teeth in un-
mistakable earnestness to put an end to the un--
certainty and conflict, which made peace and pro-
gress in South Africa impossible. An end would
be made of the business for once and all, and the
country would be brought under one11 ttg and one
liberal and just system of law and government.
No room would 1e left for a revival of certain
ambitions. Of this lie was absolutely confident;
otherwise lie would not be taking his return tick-
et to-day.
Contilluing, Sir Alfred said that the perma-
nence of the settlement, when it was achieved,
would be in no danger whatever. He believed
that many who had been the sturdiest in their
allegiance to the old Boer flag would, when the
conflict was over, be equally faithful to their new
allegiance. It must be shown that the British
were not actuated by vindictiveness, b't that
equal rights and privileges would be extended to
all. The old and new must fuse into one nation.
In conclusion Sir Alfred said that he was leav-
ing the Cape happier than lie was at. the time of
his departure for Pretoria two months ago. He
had seen the remaining enemy's strength dimin-
ishing under the iron grip of Gen. Kitchener.
He had also seen the first steps in establishing the
new civil government and the first modest steps
in the resumption of industry. lie felt confident
that on his return he would see great progress and
the happy inauguration of a new era.-Timc,
WeeklIy Edition, April .O.


TO FORT AMSTERDAM.
NEw CUSTOM HOUShE EXCAVATIONS GET ])OWN
THREE CENTURiES.
The excavations made for the foundation of
tlhe new custom house at Bowling Green have laid
bare traces of masonry which competent histo.ians
believe were parts of the old Fort Amsterdam,
erected soon after the Dutch brought the Island of
Manhattan from tile Indians in 1626. The labor-
ers found masonry 15 feet below the lowest found-
ations of thle buildings whlicli hlad occupied the
south side of Bowling Green of thle last century.
They were under tlhe Whitehall streett roadway
and about 90 feet soutli of the building line o0
Bowling Green where the steamship offiees used
to lie.
In thle process of removing the ordinary earth
and sand which there underly the street
a strong wall was discovered. It was built of rock
and bricks and the joints were of mortar made by
compounding burned clamlshells with sand. Bits
of shell were found all through the mortar. The
bricks had been so much discolored in the cen-
turies that it was hard to tell what had been their
color when they came from the skilns. The
shape, however iwas that of the .Holland
baked bricks of wlicli many of the early buildings
of New Amsterdani were made.
But it was not without corroboration that the
conclusion was reached that the wall was a part of
the Dutch stronghold. In the centre of the square
on which the nliew Custom House is to
stand was found a rounded piece of stone
which was recognized as undoubtedly a part of
the buttresses of the ancient fort. It was at the
same depth below the present street level as the
wall. The relative position of the two has con-
vinced antiquarians that the two were part of the
same structure. The old fort stood, or at least
parts of it stood, until 1790, when the last races
aboye ground were cleared away to make room for
the buildings which have but recently given way
to the new custom house.
The New York Historical Society has obtained
one of the bricks. Another has been presented
to the Holland Society by Cass Gilbert, the
architect of the new custom louse.-yew IYnork
Slon.

One of the smallest parishes in Wales is tlhe
historic parish of Sher in the Brigend Union. It
lias only a population of eight or ni ne souls. Nash
and Stembridge, two other parishes, only number
14' inhabitants between them.


For Sale

AT THE PRINCESS HOTEL LIVERY.


1 SURRY 1 CANADIAN DOG CART
1 BUCKBOARD.
and 1 MIKADO.
also
A number of Second-hand Victoria Carriages.
Prices moderate.
Apply to,
H. W. KING.
March 29, 1901.


From H.R.H. PRINCESS HOHENLOHE.
The German Ambassador as Daughter.) ,i cniincsited and Used byH.U.The
OKO' for the Hair is the BEST Dressin I e, Princes Vitoria
know. It keeps the head cool, promotes gro. th pp, Pr
and is in EVERY way excellent." ". Hohen 1 oh, e, Princess Marie
PRINCE HHENLOHE. of Greece, Princess Henry Realg,
PhINCE'S HOHENIO 1Rear-Admiral Tinklar, &o., ha.
KOKO FOR THE HAI ?
lis a tonic cleansing I th, hair to grow. keeps it soil and pliant, import
to it the lustre and .. :, ,. ,,,. andriff, prevents hair from falling, is these
I cleanly of all hair preparaton,t, .' I cilecli-tim'rmlcss.
QLD PEOPLE _LIKE I"r
for its wonderful power to ill % i;orate decayed hair, and induce an enitirnew growth when that is ponmllb.
MIDDLE-AG.ED PEOPLE 2IBKE ITr,
I because it keeps dandcif ay. and makes the hair grow thick and strong.
YOUlNG LADIES I.IKE IT
,a? eir-in, ,ecauc 'die haira beautiful glossb lustre, and enai :es them to dream It ia'whe.
CHILDREN LIKE IT,
III because it keeps the hair and scalp cool and clean, allays irritation, and keeps the hair In whatM
position desired.
THEY ALl. LIKE IT,
| because it is pure as crystal perfectly colourless., ontains no poisonous substances, dye, sugar ad
sulphur, nitrate of silver, or grease, and does not soil or colour the scalp, face, or the most deliicA
fabric in clothing, produces a wonderful, pleasant and cooling effect on the head, and no other dressing
is needed to give the hair the most elegant appearance possible. Try it once, and you will use no other.
In Three sizes, of all Dealers, Stores, &a., throughout the World.
CAUTION.-See that this Registered Trade Mark is on every bottle.
Sole Proprietors: THE KOKO-MARICOPAS CO., LTD., 16, BEVIS MARKS, LONDON, ENG.
*] Orders to lbe [sent to WiEsT INmnXN Bra-'ib O.1i e Hutuial Inlsuraliie Bailding-
Btubaldot, B.W.1


i,oo reward

IF NOT TRUE.
An advertisement may induce a person to try an article a
FIRST time.
But an advertisement won't induce a person to use that article
a SECOND time unless it gives satisfaction.



Sunlight Soap

has a sale larger than the combined sales of any other thb
soaps.
An advertisement may induce people to try SUNLIGHT SOAP
once.
But it is quality, and quality alone, that makes peop awe
SUNLIGHT SOAP continuously and always.

i EVER BROTHERS LIMITED,
Soapmakers to the Queen. Port Sunlight, Cheshfe.


Ask your Grocer for



BOMIA
The Great Clealnsr.
Wholesale Agent R. ATKINS,
Reid Street, Hamilton.


POL STEEL

A Framedy for all Irreguiarpites,
uipc'-scdtli.g litt) r Apple, I'enii yro l, li I t .:
1cliJ by WEST INr:i[A EDOIC:L DE- P.-,
Io, l(K.n t treeo, Vii iTO;'l t i.
';;iri t t 5 'AR' jN. CA i .:.itt. E "T;iAr'p: :,';. I':'-

BOARDERS

WANTED.

Large and Small Rooms
by Day or Week.
CENTtRAL LOCATION,
307 West 14 Street,


New York City.

May 4-2m


MI1S. DUNLOP.


Strawberries T

Can be had by applying at

Belterre."


Or at
R.


TELEPHONE


185.


KEMPE & SON,
TELEPHONE 81.


,January 14, 1901.


ALfIMANACIN.-MIuy-R9OI.


I- \
S




'r 14 5
\V 15 5
T 161 5
F 171 5
8 180 5
t9 1! 5
M1 20 5


un. gh

Tide. cunaiks.


8 6 45!2(. 4 18
7 6 -.1537, 5 06
S6 46(i28 5 54 Asceniimin Dayi-
; 6 46!29. 6 42 [Thu
6 6 46 01 7 30
5 6 47 11 8 18 Suitndlfy aflj'r As.
5 6 47i 21 9 06
i I


-Holy
itsdffy.


New Moon 18 day 1 h. 18 m. a.m.

Tio BEaVIUTDA ROYAL GAZETTE-Lee & Co. Pro
-i'eors-is published every Tuesday and Satur
i ty Morning at the Royal Gazette Press, Office
North-West Corner of Reoid and Burnaby Streets
Hamilton,
JoHN F. EVE, Printer to the Kirg's Most Excel.
1 'nt Majesty.
Business Comemunications to be addressed LEE &
Co.
Co-oiinunications for The Royal Gazette" to be
a dressed to The Editor of the "Royal Gazette.'
Blatii, Iatnd-bills, &c., printed at the shortes
notice.
Cable Address "Gazette:" Bermuda
TELEPHONE No. 144.
Ag nt at ST. GEORGE'S for the Royal Gazette'
Mi. GEORGE D. BOYLE, Market Square.
Agiit at SOMERSET, J. B. ZUILL, Eyqr., J. P
Tho B rrmnda Royal Gazeltte' is on file
IN LONDoo--At the Imperial Institute ; and at
the omices of Messrs lopkins, Foid, Lee &
Co., 35 Great St. Hlleen's, London, E.
IN PHILADELPHIA, PA.--At the Museum, 133
South Fourth Street.
IN NEW YoRK-At the o3ices of Messrs Middle
ton & Co., Morris B2ilding, Corner Beaver &
Broad Stieets; and at the Maritime Register
Office 61 &63 William Street.


FPH SFERINE
THE ROYAL TONIC AND DIESTIlVE.




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