Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00229
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00229
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text




THE -
Tja.B I


4 ./






Y^^^^ ettr ie^


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENB1RAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


flAMILTO


D. oROSSLEY & SONS,
54 Stanley Street Liverpool, Eng.



COMMISSION MERCHANTS,


ES TABLISHi ED


1878.


Our Specialties :

Bermuda Produce 4" Apples for Export.


8, 10, 12 JAY ST.,

NEW YORK.


WHITNEY BUILDING,

BOSTON.


CONSIGNMENTS to the above firm are respectfully solicited by the undersigned. Proceeds
of account sales promptly remitted. Advances made on consignments if desired.

HENRY 5, EVE, Hamilton


CALL FOR BRITISH POLICY.
MAKE TERMS WITH RUSSIA OR OPPOSE HER
BOLDLY.
London, April 13.-Comedy in high politics is
sometimes more interesting than tragedy, and it
is ~uioh a relief to the nerves to get a respite from
an atmosphere of melodrama that the European
world has been watching this week's flirtation at
Toulon with benevolent amusement.
The principal characters have played their parts
beautifully. It is only the supers or the chorus,
as represented by the local French populace, who
havoc failed to do what was expected of them.
They have not displayed that made-to-order affec-
tion for the Italian visitors which their official su-
periors and stage managers expected. Their
cheers have never had the ring of genuineness and
have sometimes been hisses. This is only natu-
ral.
Diplomacy can change the role of enmity to
friendliness over night, but the popular antipathy
to Italy and the Italians which has been encour-
aged in southern France for nearly twenty years
cannot suddenly be dispelled by a change of the
official attitude at Paris. There is no serious dan-
ger, however, that the Government's new policy
toward Italy will meet with any strong general
opposition in France.
The week's events at Toulon have not thrown
the *least light on the ultimate purpose of France
and Germany. Everything except the merest
-limtides 'ia -eeeateited out'r a retrespeeciesr-
S"' and other utterances, and the political significance
of the recent Franco-Italian compliments and em-
braces is as well concealed as ever.
Russia is undoubtedly well pleased to have the
world's attention diverted for a few days from
the Far Eastern embroglio by the Mediterranean
comedy, and there is no intimation yet as to what
her next move will be toward the inevitable goal
in Manchuria. The Times to-day plaintively af-
fects to believe that the British compliments to
the revolting Viceroys, whose protest prevented
the signature of the Russo-Chinese treaty, carries
the additional significance of the decision of the
British Government to protect these Chinese offi-
cials in the future in carrying out a similar policy.
One is compelled to fear, however, that the wish
is father to the thought on the part of the Times.
British letters of approval bear such a striking re-
semblance to Emperor William's famous telegram
to Mr. Kruger that the conviction is almost forced
that they equally lack a sequel.
The public demand on the Government for a
policy-any policy rather than no policy-grows
stronger every day amor.g all parties and classes
in Great Britain. The Spectator to-day expresses
the views of the Unionists and Liberals alike
when it says i
"We cannot disguise from ourselves the fact
that we may be reaching a situation in Europe
when a definite, even if mistaken, policy will be
better than no policy at all. We would infinitely
rather come to terms with Russia and make a
clear understanding with her than commit our-
selves to Japan and the Triple Alliance. But if
our statesmen will not or cannot come to an un-
derstanding with Russia we would rather stand in
with the Triple Alliance than do what we appear
to be doing now ; that is, barking at Russsa's
heels and giving her the impression that we are
her deadliest foe, and yet making no arrange-
ments with Russia's European and Far Eastern
enemies.
S"That is pure foolishness. We get all time
odium of an anti-Russian policy and yet get none
of its advantages. We are hated by and fear Rus-
sia, and yet if a dual alliance attacked us we
should have no support from th, Triple Alliance.
Rather than withstand Russia in our present
feeble and futile way we should withstand her
boldly and strongly. It will be a bad and unin-
telligent policy, but anything is better than no
policy at all."
---- 4 C

TELEGRAPH ACROSS AFRICA.

THE SURVEY FOR THE LINE HAS REACHED THE
HEART OF THfE DARK CONTINENT.

The telegraph line which Mr. Cecil Rhodes is
extending from Cape Town to Cairo is making
excellent progress. The line, stretched on short
iron poles, has now reached the neighborhood of
the Zambesi River and the Surveyors who are se-
lecting the route are far in advance. It has been
decided to run the line up the east coast of Lake
Tanganyika as far as Ujiji, whence it will be car-
ried northeast to the south coast of Victoria Nyan-
za ; then it will be built along the east coast of
that lake and into the little known country west
of Lake Rudolf, and finally will skirt the western
frontier of Abyssinia and descend the Nile.
Some people may wonder how a telegraph wire
can be pushed through a barbarous country and
be kept in condition for business. It is a com-
paratively simple matter.
The scheme for safeguarding the wire is that
which Stanley suggested long ago, Native chiefs
all along the route are subsidized to keep the wire
in proper position. As far as it extends through
their territory they must see that the wire is kept
off the ground and in its proper place on the
poles. They are well paid for their services if
they fulfil their duty, but of course receive noth-
ing if they neglect their charge. It is therefore
to their interest to keep the wire in good condi-
tion. This system has been found to work well
on the Congo and in other parts of Africa where
it has been tried.


THE VAST BILL FOR SOUTH AFRICA.
From the Saturday Review.
When Mr. Kruger was reported to say that if
the British wanted to take his country he would
make them pay 100,000,000 for it, he laughed
pleasantly. But it was the laughter of fools, and
is already crackling like thorns under the pot of
the ex-President at The Hague. The facts are
that we have already spent on the South African
war 146,000,000, and as it is admitted that our
expenditure is at the rate of 6,000,000 a month,
and we shall have to pay large sums for compen-
sation and assistance to ruined farmers, that the
total probable cost will not be far short of 200,-
000,000. This would be five times what the
Crimean war cost us, and nearly a third of the
debt incurred in the great struggle with Napo-
leon.
It is too late now to ask whether South Africa
is, commercially or morally, worth this gigantic
outlay. Time alone can show whether or not we
have again put our money on the wrong horse.
Some people think that the Yangtse Valley would
have been a better investment, but three powerful
individuals, Mr. Rhodes, Mr. Chamberlain, and
Sir Alfred Milner, seem to have decided that the
future of Great Britain lies in Africa, not in Asia.
So let us hold our peace and pay the bill.

PRINCESS WITH AN ODD HOBBY.
..Princess Victoria of England, the unmarried
daughter of Edward VII., has the most curious
hobby of any in a family that has several unusual
fads. She is deeply interested in book binding.
How she happened to choose that particular
hobby nobody seems to know, but for several
years she has devoted a great deal of time to learn-
ing how to be an expert book-binder, and at last
has become one.
A few months ago several book covers sent to
an exhibition in the name of "Miss Matthews"
were favorably noticed by the judges and received
several prizes. Nobody knew who the exhibitor
was until the prizes were awarded. Then it was
discovered that it was the Princess Victoria.
The Princess takes her hobbies very seriously.
Following the lead of her mother, Queen Alex-
andra, who is deeply interested in medicine and
hospital work, Princess Victoria began to study
nursing some years ago. She took an examina-
tion in theoretical work and when she passed an-
nounced her intention of becoming a hospital
nurse.
It was current gossip in London, at the time
that the Prince and Princess of Wales had great
difficulty in convincing her that it wouldn't be
wise for her to do so and that Victoria submitted
only after many tears.

QUEEN ALEXANDRA'S COMPANION.

ENVIABLE PLACE AT THE ENGLISH COURT OC-
CUPIED BY MISS KNOLLYS.
A very plain and unpretentions woman occu-
pies to-day, in England, a place which the first
ladies of the land might well desire. Miss Knol-
lys has for years been the companion and trusted
friend of the Princess of Wales, and now has as
much influence with Queen Alexandra as any
woman in England.
The Princesses are devoted to the gentle little
woman, and the King is her good friend. It is
said that King Edward will make her a perress,
in her own right, so that she may be eligible to
one of the high places near the person of Her
Majesty.
This question of places in the new court is
causing many heart burnings, and, although the
new Sovereign is too tactful to make speedy and
sweeping changes, there are removals and rumors
of removals. Some of the old incumbents have
been pensioned. Others, who do not need pen-
sions, have simply been dropped.
One of the two East Indian attendants, who
always assisted Queen Victoria to and from her
carriage, has already gone back to India, and it is
said that the other will follow. As a matter of
fact, little that is definite is known about the
prospective changes.
The stock of presentation jewels and trinkets
marked "V. R. I." which was left by the late
Queen, is being conferred by King Edward, upon
his mother's friends and survivors.
4
Lengthening the Florida Tourist Season.-The
Florida tourist season will be fifteen days longer
this year than ever before. This is on account of
the late spring, to a degree, but largely on account
of the wishes of the thousands of visitors who are
yet in the State and who will remain until the
hotels close. On the Gulf Coast the hotels will
remain open from one to two weeks longer than
usual. The tourist trains to the North and the
West will not be taken off until the 26th of April.
Correspondence Atlanta Constitution.

Black Jewelry in England.-Royal mourning in
England has occasioned a demand for black jewel-
ry. Paris and London shop windows are full of
jet ornaments, set in artistic designs, but even
French jewellers are not able to make the mater-
ial particularly 'attractive.
Black onyx is also largely used, and the black
and white eyestones are popular.
Time woman who owns handsome black pearls is
in great luck during this time of mourning ; and
in a humbler way, amethyst is first favorite.


Mf% T ''",1r)-I-iTTm-I A mTTgmICiT\A A TnT iT rCIO~f"-


Vol. LXXIV.-No. 33


So Mary, in the breaking
Of that rare Eastern morn,
From pain to peace awaking,
Knew, with a joy forlorn,
Not hers the Son she cherished,
Not hers the Light that shone;
Hers but the gift that perished,
The suffering alone !
-Hildegarde Hlawthorne in Haqper's Mgluazine fo r
April.


20s. PER ANNUM


N, BEiRMUJ A,'-- J Ai3JXAI AF



GREAT SEAL ENGLAND.

NEW DESIGN REQUIRED 'BY THE DEATH OF
QUEEN VICTORIA
While every loyal Engishman deplores the
deati of Queen Victoria, t p change in monarchs
is nA without its mitiga ng circumstances to a
great many of them, and chief among the class
benefitted must perhaps beplaced-the artists and
designers. It is understood that several artists
are already at work designing new postage stamps,
of which even a greater *riety is used in the
United Kingdom than in the United States.
Some eminent sculptors are also preparing de-
signs for coins, which, art ,overs among the Brit-
ish hope, will be a little %iore artistic than the
gold, silver and copper moley now in use.
In the comment on these matters one very im-
portant piece of work has been overlooked. The
moit elaborate and artistically ambitious design
which is used in counectioO with the business of
governing in Great Britainuis the Great Seal of
England." This is changed for every monarch,
and the seals used from thb time of William the
Conqueror t- Queen Victsuia show among them
some of the finest work tlh die cutter has ever
produced. Sometimes m re than one seal has
been used in a reign. ,
Queen Victoria had three seals, the last of them
having come into use in I S8. None of them was
Sof a quality calculated to i ake art lovers enthusi-
astic. The seal used from 1878 to 1901 was 6}
inches in diameter and rep esented the Queen, as
a young woman, sitting o. a throne, wearing her
crown and carrying her sdeptre. At either side
were figures representing lgice and Christianity,
and the background consj of a design of the
quasi-Gothic style, comm6ply known as "ginger-
bread."
The Great Seal is now Ased, with green wax,
for contracts for royal marriages, the patents of
peers and baronets, and with yellow wax for For-
eign Office treaties, Judges' patents, those of
King's counsels and knights, and for Admiralty
and Treasury commissions
Then, besides the Great'Seal, there is, and has
been since 1877, the wafesfteal. This is smaller
than the Great Seal, but Ies the same design. It
is used for commissions $b open and prorogue
Parliament, for royal asseift commissions, presen-
tations to Crown livings, and a variety of other
purposes. The fact that the design does not ap-
pear so sharply on the red wafer as in the green
and yellow wax makes it, perhaps, slightly less
objectionable than the larger seal.
Who will design the Great Seal has not yet
been announced. Probably designs will be invit-
ed from several sculptors, ,nd the best, or what
is regarded as the best by the officials, who are
not very good judges, will be chosen. If only
the artist produces anything half so good as the
Great Seals' used by H7ury VIII., Philip and
Mary, and Charles .L, -lf1 rk will be a thing
of beauty. '
The engraver of the Great Seal is Allan Wyon,
F. S. A. He is also the greatest authority on the
history of the Seals living, and has written a
monumental work on the subject.

SCOUTING CRUISERS.
The British Navy is in absolute want of swift
scouting cruisers and dispatch vessels. Of swift
vessels she has indeed many in her flotillas of tor-
pedo craft, but these have no bunker capacity,
and could not keep up a high speed for many
hours. The third-class cruisers, with a speed of
from nineteen to twenty knots, would easily be
outrun by a first-class cruiser and destroyed. The
first-class cruiser has speed and coal capacity, but
in war these cruisers would be told off to protect
commerce, and, therefore would not be available.
The second-class cruisers, again, have less speed
than the first-class, and for this purpose would be
useless. Admirals Hopkins and Fitzgerald said
at the meeting of naval architects yesterday that
these scouts and despatch vessels of high speed are
as urgently required to-day as the scouting frigates
were required in the days of Nelson. So much
did Nelson require those frigates to give him in-
formation of the enemy that he said the want of
them would be found graven on his heart. In the
Mediterranean these fast cruisers would be requir-
ed to watch certain points, and these the Admiral
in charge must know are watched very closely.
And they must be able to make and keep a speed
of twenty-three knots. The designs for such a
vessel have been made by Mr. Philip Watts, of
Elswick, the greatest living authority on swift
cruisers. They would require to be of 3,800 tons
displacement, 400 feet in length, forty-four feet
beam, and fourteen feet draught. They would
have two screws and engines indicating 16,000
horse-power. The deck would be protected with
armour 2 in. thick on the slope and 1 in. on the
flat. The armament would be six 4-inch guns,
protected with 4-in. shields. The speed on trial
to be twenty-five knots and a continuous speed of
twenty-three knots at three-quarters power, which
would allow one-quarter of boiler installation to
be under repair.
Russia has a cruiser of twenty-four knots that
could outrun any cruiser in the British Navy.
The demand in the United States is for twenty-
four knot cruisers. Surely it is necessary for the
Admirals to be provided with scouts which would
be safe from the pursuit of these. It appears the
one fl'w in the design is that their armament is
weak. But Mr. Watts is certain that 200 tons
more displacement would give them 6-inch guns,
and for an extra 400 tons 8-inch guns could be
provided. Of course there are the swift steamers
of the merchant service which would be available,
but they, again, are too heavy, would burn too
much coal, and none of them have speed enough
to outrun the swift Russian cruiser. That the
fleets of the British Navy are in need of such
scouts there can be no question ; that they possess
nothing which could outrun the Russian cruiser
Variag is just as certain. Whether it will require
a naval war to convince the Admiralty of the ne-
cessity of scouts, as it required the South African
war to convince the War Office of their value, re-
mains to be seen.--Pall Mall Gazette, March 28.

INSPIRATION.
As sometimes sight is given
The Artist, and he knows
HIis art was born in Heaven
And not through him arose-
His but the holy duty
To clothe the Heaven-lent
In word or shape of beauty,
That witness its descent-


was being sung, and at the line 'Who is the
King of Glory?" the double bass whispered to
the 'cellist in front, Let us have your resin and
I will show 'em who is the King of Glory.",,


PLAINS OF ABRAHAM IN DANGER.

Montreal, April 13 The historic Plains of
Abraham in the city of Quebec on which the de-
cisive battle between Wolfe and Montcalm was
fought in 1759, are again i in danger of being de-
stroyed. Some time ago great indignation was
caused in Canada and the United States by a re-
port that the plains were about to be cut up into
building lots.
The Ursuline Nuns, who are the owners of the
property, leased it to the Canadian Government
years ago and the lease is about to expire. Pres-
sure was brought to bear on the Government to
induce it to purchase the property outright so
that it might be converted into a paik as a per-
manent memorial of one of the most important
events in American history. The Government
favoured the proposal and the sisters offered to
exchange the property for $30,000 in cash and the
Marchmont property, which is owned by the Gov-
ernment in the city of Quebec and is valued at
$50,000. This would make a total consideration
of $80,000 and as the value of the plains has been
placed at $137,00J the bargain seemed to be a
good one for the Government.
It is now learned that the purchase would have
been closed some ,iaie agol had it not been for
the opposition of Mr. Dobell, one of the members
for Quebec city in Parliament, who declared that
he cannot as an honorable man support the pro-
posed arrangement. Mr. Dobell declines to ex-
plain his reasons further, but the fact is that his
opposition has been sufficient to prevent the Gov-
ernment from taking any further action.
Mr. Dobell's attitude has aroused great indig-
nation. There is now every likelihood that un-
less the proposition made by the Ursuline Nuns
is accepted they will carry out their intention of
disposing of the property in building lots. The
Government is being urged to disregard Mr.
Dobell's opposition and save one of the most in-
teresting historic spots in America from destruc-
tion
VICTORIA MEMORIAL FUND SMALL.
London, April 13.-Of the 250,000 wanted for
the Victoria memorial in London, only 59,000
has as yet been received, and the subscriptions are
coming in slowly. It would be quite wrong to
suppose that this indicates any lack or diminution
of respect and affection for the late Queen. The
committee in charge are alone responsible. Their
inaction and action alike have deprived them of
popular confidence. They seem to have disap-
pointed everybody and pleased nobody, and at
present the affair seems to be in a state of lament-
able confusion.
The selection of the Mall in front of Bucking-
ham Palace as a site is not much criticised, but
otherwise the dissatisfaction is general. The ap-
pointment of Thomas Brock, R. A., as sculptor to
act with five architects is especially criticised, and
there is a universal feeling in favour of open com-
petition. Norman Shaw, R. A., -says it seems a
most stupid thing.
"What they are going to design," lie says, so
far as I can gather, no one knows. Either the
work should be thrown open to competition or
placed in the hands of some particular person."
Mr. Shaw, however, expresses despair over Eng-
lishmen's capacity in monumental architecture.
He thinks the Germans and French lead, but does
not advocate foreign competition. He adds : It
seems a most forlorn business, but I suppose we
will have to do it somehow."
Others criticise the selection of Mr. Brook as a
portrait sculptor on the ground that allegory. and
not portraiture, is mere conducive to the grand
and dignified work necessary. Others point out
that the front of the palace is so poor architectur-
ally that it must be rebuilt before it will be ac-
ceptable asa background for the new monument.
But the most serious factor is the dissatisfaction
of the city of London from which most of the
money for such a costly scheme is expected. The
city corporation is in revolt. The Lord Mayor
sent a circular to the Deputy Aldermen for the
thirty-three wards requesting them to call a meet-
ing at which further appeals for money would be
made. The Deputy Aldermen, in view of public
sentiment, have refused to summon the meeting.
Trouble of a somewhat similar sort seems to ex-
ist in India. Viceroy Curzon's scheme for what is
practically an imperial institute for India in Cal-
cutta, though naturally receiving large subscrip-
tions from the Rajahs and others, is already called
Curzon's folly and is lampooned in the local
press. Bombay insists that the memorial shall be
its own. Other cities and districts show a similar
desire.

YACHT SENTA LONG OVERDUE HERE.
Great anxiety is felt for the safety of the yacht
Senta. She sailed from Bermuda for Greenport,
L. I., on March 20 last, three weeks ago to-day.
Four or five days is the ordinary trip for a sailing
vessel between Bermuda and these waters ; a week
is a long trip. It is hoped that the Senta has not
met with accident but has been driven from her
course by the heavy head winds she must have
encountered.
The Senta is a 65-footer, built by Fife. A.
Howard Hinkle, New York Yacht Club, bought
her in England last Winter. She started from
Southampton in January, but ran aground in the
Solent and put back for examination. She then
proceeded to Bermuda in forty-one days After
a week's overhauling she started from Bermuda
for Greenport. Her spars are at Greenport, hav-
ing arrived by steamship a month ago, and every-
thing is in readiness at the basin there to put her
in trim.-New York Journal, April 10.
ORIGIN OF A POPULAR SONG.
One of Mr. Milton Wellings's most successful
songs, "Some Day, was written under circum-
stances perhaps more painful thau romantic. His
wife was out yachting with some friends, and it
was rumoured that the vessel had met with an ac-
cident at sea. Being naturally most anxious to
ascertain the truth of this report, he at once tele-
graphed to Cowes, Isle of Wight, whither he knew
his wife had gone, but received no reply. He
telegraphed again, but still no reply. Eventually
it became too late to telegraph any mn')re
that day, and Mr. Wellings sat up all night in the
utmost agony of mind, awaiting the reply which
never came. During this time of terrible suspense
he by chance picked up the words of "Some Day,"
which had been lying on his table for weeks, and
lie was so struck by the line Or are you dead, or
do you live?" that the melody forced itself
through his mind at cnce, and the song which
everybody has heard sprang into existence. -Cham-
ber's Journal.
4 .
The late Sir John Stainer had a considerable
reputation as a storey-teller. One of his favourite
anecdotes related to the days when there were
amateur orchestras in churches. The Messiah "


NEW GUNS FOR JAMAICA.
BRITISH WAR OFFICE WILL STRENGTHEN FOR-
TIFICATIONS IN ISLAND.
Kingston, April 13.-The British war office has
decided to strengthen the fortifications of Jamaica.
Quick firing guns of the latest pattern are being
sent out, in addition to the heavy guns recently
placed in the forts about Port Royal.
The disappearance of yellow fever from Port
Royal is officially announced.
The direct fruit line to Bristol is now in full
swing and the fruit is finding ready sale every-
where iu England.


Custom House, Hamilton.
ENTERED
April 20-S. S. Oruro, Buchannau, Demerara and
West Indies, assorted cargo to W. T. James.
"-S. S. Beta, Hopkins, Halifax, assorted
cargo to W. T. James.
CLEARED.
April 2o-R. M. S. Pretoria, McKenzie, New
York, Potatoes 1374 bbls., Onions 34466 Crates,
Vegetables 265 pkgs etc., etc., etc.
"-8. S. Ornro, Buchannan, Halifax.
"-S. S. Beta, Hopkins, Jamaica via Turks
Island;'about 600 tons cargo for Turks Islands
and Jamaica.

Custom House-St] George's]
CLEARED.
April 20-Br. Schooner Gypum Empress, McKen-
zie, to New York, cargo sugar, obtained medical
aid, Capt. Gaycon and one of the crew proceed-
ed on to New York by Trinidad, one of the
men still in Cottage Hospital.
a
PASSENGERS.
In the R. M. S. Pretoria for New York on Sa-
turday last :-,Dr and Mrs C Humiston, Mr and
Mrs E Stanwood, Mr and Mrs L J Hart, Mr and
Mrs F Moreley and maid, Mr and Mrs D J Quin-
lan, Mr and Mrs W Longuire, Mr and Mrs E W
Eliot and maid, Mr and Mrs Norman Kelly and
nurse, Mr and Mrs M Morgenthal, Mr and Mrs
G Tomes, Mr and Mrs E B Holden, Mr and Mrs
J P Vandergrift, Mr and Mrs F E Draper, Mr
and Mrs J Cockroft, Mr and Mrs P P Beals, Mr
and Mrs F Dodd, Mr and Mrs E B Hunn, Mr
and Mrs J M Wilson, Mr and Mrs J T Norton,
Mrs E P Johnson, Mrs F R Nicholl, Mrs Beadle,
Mrs F Evans, Mrs A M Da Graaf, Mrs A M
Woodman and child, Mrs A R Stearns, Mrs C L
Westcott child and nurse, Mrs M A Fulton, Mrs
W J Ehrich, Mrs B:Eld.ridge, Mrs G S Terry, Mrs
Lawrence, Mrs H L Britton, Mrs M E Moore,
Mrs H L Ayer, Mrs E Le Brun, Mrs C B Wright
and maid, Mrs C Mank, Miss A McWilliams, Miss
E Tagliabur, Miss C Finneron, Miss F De Graaf,
Miss E Stearns, Miss E H Lockwood, Miss A Ful-
ton, Miss Edith Presly, Miss :Vandergrift, Miss
E G Dusenberry, Miss Mildred Howells, The
Misses Lawrence (3), Miss Cummings, Miss Gal-
braith, Miss L Haydock, Miss Gusken, Miss Brit-
ton, Miss M K Jones, Miss W E Wills Miss E R
Wills, Miss E Gatter, Miss A L Stoddard, Miss
E M Bint, Miss M L Schumer, Miss J Smith,
Miss J Smellie, Miss Dodd, The Misses Norton
(2), Rev T Le Fleur, Dr C S Grendall, Messrs E
C Thornton, L Strachl, T Dowling, W E Durach,
L Nander Vate, J W Nicholl, G Persley, J M
Thomas, J A Fulfbn, A H Fiske, A Fiske, H A
Adams, E Milderberger, J D Bell, R A Lewis, J
H Watlington, Thos Glazier, E C Dran, A Chit-
tenden, H Bartholomar, J A Grendall, H A Loom-
is, J R Bullard, J Widstrom, J Gayton, M Gus-
ken,. E W Herman, G -Donell -Har..
F W Bradlee. Second Class ?-18 WUoeTs.s- '
tants. Second Class Forward :-5 men. .
Ih the R M S Trinidad from New York yester-
day ;-Mr and Mrs Ellis and infant, Mr and Mrs
I B Job, jr, Mr and Mrs H L Booth, Mr and Mrs
H Butler and infant, Mr and Mrs F H Baird,
Mr and Mrs B Mooris, Mr and Mrs C W Sand-
man, Mr and Mrs E C Acherson, Mrs Mary Ker-
rey, Mrs F B Steede and child, Messrs A Sharp-
less, A Schofield, W L Nichols, W
T Conyers, H Lockward, R C Bradford. Second
Class :-Mrs H Basden. Second Class Forward :
2 men.
In the S. S. Beta from Halifax on Saturday last:
J B Chambers. Second Class :-Mr land Mrs
Yule an 1 2 children, Sergeant and Mrs Cahill and
2 children.
In the S S Oruro, from the West Indies on Fri-
day last :-Mr and Mrs W H Chase, Mrs Kong
Ayeing, Mrs Tivong Meng, Rev G E Ross, child
and nurse, Miss L B Chase, Messrs M W Chase,
H Graham. Second Class :-Mrs C T S Cattogen,
D W Ward. 15 Deckers.
In the S S Beta for Turks Islands on Saturday
last :-W R Heney. Second Class :-W F Ma-
hon. Second Class Forward :-1 woman and 3
children.
In the S S Oruro for Halifax on Saturday last:
Dr and Mrs G B Longstaff, Dr and Mrs Mac-
Donald, Mrs Paint, Miss Rankin, Capt. H Ship-
man, Messrs W B Taylor, Chas Archibald. Se-
cond Class :-4 Government passengers. Second
Class Forward :-2 men.
A C
The R M S Trinidad, Capt P J Fraser, arrived
at her dock last evening at 7 o'clock.
Capt Fraser, Mr Fowle (Purser) and other
friends have our thanks for late favours.
MAILS per R.M.S. Trinidad for the United
Kingdom, Dominion of Canada, Newfoundland,
and the United States, closed at the Post Offics,
Hamilton, on Thursday next, 25th inst, at 9 a.m.
Supplementary Mails at 10 a.m.

Jamaica, April 20.--The American squadron
sailed hence for New York on Friday 19th.
New York, April 20.-S. S. Trinidad sailed at
11.45. Twenty-seven cabin passengers.

C. P. P. C.
A special meeting of the Central Parishes Plan-
ters' Club will be held this evening at the Whit-
ney Institute to consider matters of lmport.anco.
4.
Grand Concert in Pembroke Sunday School.
A grand concert will be given in Pembroke
Sunday School on Thursday evening next, the
25th inst at 8 o'clock. Particulars appear else-
where. Tickets will be on sale at this office.
4 .
Little Folks' Concert.
The "Little Folks," whose Concert proved so
successful in January last, will repeat their Eu-.
tertainment on Thursday evening next, in the
Whitney Institute, at 7.30 o'clock. We will
heartily wish the little folks a fine evening-we
think we can promise them a good au.ience.


0


PHIL 23, 1901.








THE ROYAL GAZETTE-TUESDAY, APRIL


23, 1901


WEEKLY REPORT OF THE WEATHER at
Gibbs' Hill Light Station at Bermuda between
the 14th and 21st April, 1901 ; height
above the sea being 246 feet at base, where
the Register is kept.
I I

s ,S 4
a 9 P General Remark
c .2cc


15 s 4 66 65 29.720 0.96 Raining"
16 sw 6 65 64 29.680 0.13 Unstld. sqlly.
.17 w 6 64 6"2 29.530 0.32 "
18 NW 4 66i 65 29.770 Fine.
19 N 466 65 29.950 -
20 s 467! 65 29.910 "
21 ssE,' 8 69i 67 29.820 0.10 Ocst. unstd.t_
15thl Bfternoon Fine.
t Morning and Evening squally.
WALTER S. PERINCHIEF,
Principal Keeper.




Hamilton, April 23, 1901.

A Plea for Knowledge."
It is with sense of relief that one turns from
the dispiriting catalogue of our political, military,
and commercial shortcomings and backslidings, as
set forth by the Author of Drifting in his open
letter to Lord Salisbury published in the current
number of the Contemporary, to A Plea for
Knowledge by the late DR. CREIGHTON, Lord
Bishop of London. It is an address prepared for
the Midland Institute at the time ;he was chosen
President. In comparing these two articles, which
occupy the first and third places in the Review,
one cannot help being struck, not merely by the
remarkable difference in the manner of the preju-
diced partisan and the genial scholar, but also at
the widely divergent conclusions they draw as to
the causes of our recent retrogression and painful
humiliations. The Author of Drifting" charges
everything to account of our rulers or our systems;
the Bishop lays it all or nearly all to our want of
earnestness and our consequent failure to grasp
the fundamental conditions of the political and
economic problems which confront us as a nation.
The Author of Drifting esteems that all would
be well if a certain party were turned out of pow-
er and the opposite party installed, if certain sys-
tems were abolished, or certain practices of other
nations imitated. Dr. Creighton thinks that
above all the people must be in earnest. And in
hardly anything is want of earnestness painfully
more apparent than in the attitude of the people
towards matters educational.
To put it briefly, my opinion is thai the great defect
of England isan inadequate conception of the value of
k knowledge in itself and of its importance in the nation-
al life. I wish to see this remedied; and it cannot be
remniedied until it is recognized. It will not be amend-
ed by improvements in our educational system; for
systems are only so much mechanism, and depend up-
on tlhe force which works them. If there is a desire for
knowledge, it is notdiflicult to find out proper means
of imparting it. If there is little effective desire for
knowledge, the invention of easy means for imparting
a beggarly minimum will rather cheek than promote
the desire."
In short it is folly to talk of thinking by ma-
chinery ; it is idle to suppose that any system of
education, however perfect theoretically, will reun-
der a youth desirous of excelling in tlose pursuits
which the tradition of his home or the example of
the society in which le moves teaches him to de-
spise.
It is exceedingly unlikely that the people who
first enunciated and applied the principles of free-
dom, ho inaugurated the industrial movement
which has revolutionized the world, who are the
pioneer of modern civilization, should be left be-
hind in the race for supremacy, did they but set
themselves resolutely to the task of keeping in the
van. But there has arisen from continuous pros-
perity and the absence of rivalry the disposition
to rest content with past achievements and obso-
lete methods-" We are assured, as a nation, tlat
we have a well-established position. Such as we
are, the wol Id has found the need of us in the
past; and it will find the need of us in the fu-
ture." Such is the easy self-confidence of the
modern Briton. All this might be different did
the nation at large possess more earnestness in the
pursuit of knowledge for its own sake. Did we
but possess this, past achievements, instead of sup-
plying matter for admiring idle contemplation,
would be but a strong incitement to further ex-
ertion.
The pursuit of knowledge, like every other lpurtuit,
is regulated by supply and demand. If we felt greater
need of it we should seek it more diligently. At pre-
sent we do not seek it with burning zeal, because we
are not convinced of its necessity. A liln's market va-
lue does not depend upon his knowledge as of the first
importance."
It is but too true that the marketable value of
knowledge is small. But is not desirability the
first condition of such value ? It is perfectly true
that with even a very limited store of knowledge
a man may become a first-rate workman ; but is
he the better is a citizen for his ignorance, or
would additional knowledge make him a worse
workman ?
A little knowledge is a dangerous thing ;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.
The workman who is comparatively or even ab-
solutely illiterate "learns what he has to do, and
does it ;" but he who has acquired "a little learn-
ing" soon reaches a point where knowledge fails
and doubt begins. There mustbe a middle period
until we can increase the knowledge ; and in the
meanwhile we should lay to heart the words of
the greatest bard of a most practical people :-
Still achieving, still pursuing,
Le;rn to labourn and to wait."'

T'he Editor of thie Royal Gazeltte.


Dear Sir,
A public NOTICE which appeared in the
Colonist last Saturday seems to demand more than
a passing glance.
The "NOTICE "' in question appears over the
name or signature of Violet Dance," and rather
hysterically informs the public that the writer
w.,s not attacked and was not walking out "
on Sunilay night. This part of the "NOTICE "'
is all right asfar as it goes, and we are all very
thitnkfnl to know that Miss Violet Dance was
not walking :out" on that particular Sunday
night, especially in the neighbourhood of the
Ducking Stool on the North Shore road of Pem-
broke Parish ; Miss Violet Dance has a perfect
right to use the press as a means of informing
the inhabitants generally that- she remained at
home instead of going to Church on Sunday night.
But against the latter part of the NOTICE I
protest, and emphatically deny that she or any
other virtuous young lady has a right to expose and
insult by name in the Colonist the poor unfortunate
girl who was walking out." The young lady in
question luis suffered quite enough indignity with-
out being a second time a victim scandalized at
the hIands of Violet Dance." This young lady
(who was not walking out ") would have dis-
played better taste had she refrained from men-
tionitg so unkindly the the name etc. of the girl
who w(' walking out (properly escorted.) It sa-
voi(s If venom.
I think it is rather a. matter of regret that the'
E(dir of the Colonisl did not exercise his right to
ccror the Notice," and thus sympathize within
the unfortunate victims of the outrage.
Thusling you will find space for this protest in
tomorrow's issue of the Gazette.
I remain, Sir,
Yours faithfully
J. H. DALE.
Prospect, :20.4.1901.


The Cathedral Bazaar.
We have been requested by the Venble. the
Archdeacon of Bermuda to correct an error in our
report of the Bazaar Committee published on Sa-
turday last.
It was stated that a vote of thanks was passed
to St. Mark's Guild for donations of Cake. In
reality the cakes and other donations contributed
by the parishes of Hamilton and Smith's did not
come from the Guild of the Church in either par-
ish but from families in each who had been asked
by the Venble. Archdeacon or Mrs. Tucker to
contribute, the two parishes sending nearly equal
quantities.

Concert in St. Andrew's Presbyterian
Church.
A sacred Concert will be given in St. Andrew's
Church tomorrow evening, commencing at 8 o'-
clock. As will be seen from our advertising col-
umns an excellent programme is provided. It is
to be hoped that thile silver collection will yield
a handsome sumi for the benefit of the Sunday
School.

Grace Church.
The first anniversary of this Church is to be
celebrated on Thursday next, the 25th inst. The
Rev. J. Strothard, Pastor of Wesley Church, Ham-
ilton, will preach at 4 o'clock in the afternoon.
A sacred Concert will be given at 7.30 p. m. Ar-
rangements have been made for serving refresh-
ments in the intervals.

Crawl.
On the night of Sunday, or early on Monday
morning, the store of Mr. T. H. Davis was broken
into, and the loose cash in the till, amounting to
about 10/- was appropriated. Money alone was
the object, apparently ; for Mr. Davis did not
miss any goods.
On Sunday night a horse belonging to Mr. H.
A. Smith, while running looss in the paddock, fell
and broke his leg. The animal was shot yerter-
day morning by Mr. Theo. Davis.

8&- In connexion with the suggestion as to the
steam roadroller, Mr. J. W. Harnett, the proprie-
tor, has furnished the following facts regarding
the case of Mr. C. R. Darrell already referred to.
Whilst it is perfectly true that the horse refused
to pass the roller, it is not correct that he after-
wards colted while the driver was adjusting the
load. In point of fact the driver left his horse al-
together to watch the progress of the roller, and
the animal took advantage of his absence. Mr.
Harnett's men rendered all the assistance in their
power to put things to rights.
The British Yacht Consuela of the Royal Yacht
Squadron arrived in Hamilton Harbour on Satur-
day last from Nassau, her owner, the Earl of
Crawford and Balcarris, being on board, accom-
panied by his brother-in-law, Duea di Sermoneta,
and Dr. Hall Walker. The Consuelo after finish-
ing coaling will probably sail to-day for the
Azores.
Savona, April 13.-Sailed, Br. Str. Olive, Capt.
Story, for Bermuda, (and passed Gibraltar 17th).
St. John, N. B., April 16.-Cleared, Br. Schr
Sainute Marie, Capt. McNally, for Hamilton, Bda.

Our Cable Despatches.

SOUTH AFRICA.


Aliwal North, Cape Colony, April 19.-Gen.
Hector Macdonald has been appointed to an iim-
portant command on the Afghan frontier.
London, April 19.-The list of officers accorded
promote ions and honours for their services in South
Afi ica prier to Nov. 20 1900 when Lord Roberts
gave up the command of the British forces in
South Africa 111il sixteen pages of the Gazette.
Lord Kitchener, Gen. Buller, Gen. Forestier
Walker and Gen. White are made Knights of the
Randd Cross of St. Michael and St. George. Gen.
Kelly-Knntmy, Gen. Sir Archibald Hunter, Gen.
Lyttleton, and Gen. Kitchener, brother of Lord
Kitchener, are made Lieutenant-Generals. Gen.
Pole Carew, Gen. French, Gen. Ian Hamilton,
Gen. Chas. E. Knox, Gen. Sir William Nicholson,
Gen. Arthuir S. Wynne, Gen. Chas. W. H. Doug-
lass, Gen. Smith Dorrien, Gen. F. W. Kitchener,
the Earl of Dundonald, Gen. Arthur Paget, and
Gen. Biuce Hamilton, are made Major Genera's.
Col. lhoadwood and Lieut.-Cols. Herbert Plumer
and Thomas Pitcher are among those created extra
Aides-de-Camip to King Edward. The officers
thus promoted have been holding the acting ranks
to which they aie now appointed.
East London, Cape Colony, April 19.-A train
laden with cattle and coal was captured by the
Beers near Molteno, Cape Colony, last evening.
The forward locomotive escaped and ran to Storm-
berg and returned with troops who found the train
on fire. A couple of natives were killed. The
train hands had been stripped and then released.
London, April 22.-The war office has received
a despatch from Lord Kitchener reporting that
size Al ril 18 various British commanders have
taken 81 prisoners together with 100,000 rounds
of small ammunition and many horses, cattle a:;d
wagons. Lord Kitchener reports the surrender of
20 Boers since that date. '
London, [April 22.-Lord Kitchener, in a des-
patch to the War Office, (under date of Pretoria,
April 21st) says : "Since my last report the Bri-
tish columns have captured 242 prisoners, 248
rifles, some ammunition, wagons and carts. A
few men have also surrendered.
Cape Town, April 22.-Mr. Albert Cartwright,
editor of the South African News,-who was [ar-
rested in February, on a charge of seditious and
defamatory libel, in having published in his pa-
per a statement that Lord Kitchener instructed
his troops to take no prisoners-has been conVic-
ted and sentenced to one year's imprisonment.
Cape Town, April 22.-Lord Kitchener has is-
sued a proclamation to the effect that any resi-
dent in the Martial Law districts of Cape Colony
found in arms inciting to fight, aiding the enemy,
or endangering by any act the British forces will
be tried by court martial and be liable to the
most severe penalties. Such persons may be
shot.
CHINA.
Vicca, April 19.-In the Reichstr.ath to-day, the
Premier Dr. Koerber said the increasing commer-
cial interests of China necessitated the establish.
ment of an Austrian consulate at 'Tien Tsin. A
site for the consulate had therefore been taxed,
and payment for it to China was reserved for the
future settlement.
Paris, April 19.-The officials of the Foreign of-
ice say that France's Chinese indemnity claim
amounts to 8,000,000.
London, April 20.-A despatch from Shanghai
to the Morning post says that the Japanese Gov-
ernment proposes to put itself at the head of the
reform movement in China in order to overthrow
the Manchurian dynasty which it considers bound
hand and foot by Russia.
Fekin, April 21.-Brigadier General A. F.
Reid commanding the third brigade of the Indian
Imperial Service troops in China, who is now at
San Hai Kwan, sent a company of Punjab Infan-
ry to disperse a band of robbers in the neighbour-
iood of Fu Ning. A force of Boxers and robbers,
more than a thousand strong, attacked the Indian
roops, killing Major Browning and one Sepoy,
nd wounding others. The company retreated to
Fu Ning. Reinforcements have been sent from
Hai Kwan. The Boxers are apparently well arm-
d with rifles.
Pao Ting Fu, April 20.-This city has been for
he last four days a big military camp of French
nd German soldiers on the way to the front. It
s now estimated that 8,000 French troops and
,000 Germans will form the entire force when
11 the reinforcements have arrived.
There is no truth in current reports regarding
ever fighting between the outpost and the
Chiinese. Three men left yesterday under escort


I



1



t
1
t



t


a
I
e
t
e
i
6
a

s
C


to convey Emperor Kwang Sus' order to General
Li to retire immediately into the province of Shan
Si ; Prince Ching and other Chinese officials say
the Chinese General has already retired but their
confirmations or denials are considered very un-
reliable. The French and German troops seem to
be co-operating fairly well, although until yester-
day, (Friday) there was some doubt as to who
would command the expedition. This question
has been settled by an arrangement under which
the French and Germans arc to work indepen-
dently and yet, at the same time to co-
operate. If the Chinese retire over the Shan
Li boundary, then according to internation-
al agreement, the foreign troops should not
go beyond it. The ministers of tle powers in
Pekin earnestly hope that this will prove to be
the case. They point out that the Chinese force
has not been aggressive and only came a few miles
over the border arguingthtat it might just as well
have been allowed to remain there.
Miscellaneous.
London, April 19.-It is announced in a des-
patch from Paris that M. Delcasse, the French
minister of foreign affairs, who is expected to ar-
rive at St. Petersburg on April 22, will stay there
only four days.
London, April 19.-Answering a question in the
House of Commons to-day, the Financial Secretary
of the War Office, Lord Stanley confirmed the re-
report that all the contracts now made excluded the
supply of foreign meats in the case of all troops in
the United Kingdom. The Under Secretary of
the Foreign Office, Lord Cranborne, replying to a
question said that the Russian flag still flew over
the Custom House of Nao Chwang, and that the
customs were collected by a Chinese staff turned
over to the Russian authorities, and held by them
in trust, subject to future settlement.
London, April 19.-The House of Commons
adopted the war loan resolution by a vote of 196
to 117.
London, April 19.-The executive council of
the mining association of Great Britain represent-
ing all the colliery district in the United King-
dom has unanimously passed a resolution to the
effect that the new export duty on coal will most
seriously injure the principal exporting district,
aud that it will also react seriously to the preju-
dice of the entire trade of the country.
London, April 19.-At the first day's racing at
Derby to-day, the Doveride Handicap Plate of 600
sovereigus for three year olds and upwards, dis-
tance one mile, was one by Mr. J. Rowson's Ichi-
ban.
London, April 19.-A committee of the Cobden
Club met to-night, and resolved to open agitation
against the sugar and&al taxes. Replying to a
deputation of membefiof the House of Commons
representing the coal interests, Sir Michael Hicks-
Beach consented to an arrangement enabling the
coal exporters to execute contracts pending a deci-
sion as to what amount of the duties would be re-
funded.
London. April 19.-It is announced that a tax
of 15 pence per ounce will be levied upon Sac-
charine.
London, April 19.-The Mansion House fund
for the Victoria Memorial amounts to 675,000.
The subscriptions to-day including 1000 from
Mr. Andrew Carnegie and 500 from the Duke of
Cornwall and York.
London, April 20.-The Daily Chronicle asserts
that Sir'Michael Hicks-Beach has agreed to ex-
empt all existing contracts from the coal tax.
London, April 20.-The final of the Association
Football Cup will be played this afternoon be-
tween the.Sheffield United and the London Club
Tottenham hospitals at the Crystal Palace. The
extraordinary interest annually shown in the con-
test is heightened by the fact that not only is to-
day's match between the North and the South,
but that it is twenty years since a London Club
figured in the final. The influx of visitors from
the provinces is estimated td 60,000, sixty special
trains have brought into London thousands of en-
thusiasts from -all parts 'of thle provinces, and
crowds of northerners travelled all night to wit-
nese the match. One hundred thousand is a mod-
erate estimate of the number of spectators who
will witness the jame.
London, April 20.-The reports from the conti-
nental sugar centres received at Glasgow were
taken to indicate that unless a higher bounty on
refined sugar is paid by the respective foreign
governments the British market will be closed to
them.
Glasgow, April 19.-All is now ready for the
launching of the Shamrock II., although this eve-
ning men were working at the yards under Mr.
Watson's vigorous eye, giving the final touches to
the craft. Sir Thomas Lipton when asked what
he thought of his new boat replied, I can only
tell you what Mr. John Henderson who built the
Meteor, Thistle, and Valkyrie, remarked to-day
after close inspection. 'She is the finest yacht
ever built on this side of the Atlantic.' I can
see nothing in the way of resistance. She is a
marvel. This opinion is shared by other experts
who have seen the Shamrock II." The notable
people who will attend the launching ceremonies
will arrive tomorrow; among those expected to be
present is Mr. Fife.
Dunbarton, April 20.-Shamrock II was suc-
cessfully launched this afternoon at Denny's
yards in the presence of many invited guests,
newspaper men and employees. Lady Dufferin
christened the new challenger.
Dublin, April 20.-At a meeting of the Irish
C Battle Traders Association in Dublin yesterday, the
Chairman of the association announced that he had
ascertained on good authority that thie War Office
had decided that iu future troops stationed in
Ireland should be supplied with Irish meat only
instead of foreign, thus removing a substantial
Irish grievance.
Mexico City, Mexico, April 20.-A hill provi-
ding for the renewal of diplomatic relations with
Austria was submitted to Congress to-day. Offi-
cial courtesies have not been exchanged between
Austria and Mexico since the execution of the
Emperor Maximillian. The new Mexican minis-
ter to Austria will be Don Jose De Teresa of Mac-
landa, brother-in-law of PresidentDiaz.


II UNGER AS A TIMEPIECE.
London Telegraph.
Ifunger, according to His Honour Judge Lum-
ley Smith, K. C., is a check upon forensic elo-
quence. Hence when R. J. Drake, counsel for
the plaintiff in the case of Harris vs. Newman,
rose to address the jury at five minutes to the or-
dinary luncheon time his Honour inquired about
the probable duration of the speech, and explain-
ed to the five good men and true in the box : I
like to pin counsel to a time, or they go on for-
ever. We usually rise for lunc'ieon five minutes
from now, and if counsel goes out to luncheon
and then comes back and makes a speech we find
it much longer than when he wants his sandwich
and sherny, and the interval for luncheon del ends
on the length of his speech. Can you do it in ten
minutes?" Mr. Drake: "No, sir-twenty min-
utes." His Honour : "No." Mr. Drake : "Give
me fifteen minutes?" His Honour : I expect
the jury think ten minutes long enough." Three
of the live jurymen : "Ten minutes." Mr.
Drake finished in the time fixed, his Honour sum-
med up the whole case in three minutes and the
jury took four minutes to find for the plaintiff.

NOTICE.

ALL persons having just claims against the Es-
tate of the late HExNRY HALLETT, are re-
quested to render the sameic to the Undersigned
for settlement by the 30th April Inst., and per-
a4ols indebted to the Estate are requested to settle
their amounts by the same date.
The Estate will not be responsible for any claims
after the above date.
A. M. OUDNEY,
Executor.
Hamilton, April 8th, 1901-3p t. d.
Colonist copy.


A GRAND CONCERT

WILL BE GIVEN IN THE

Pembroke Sunday School

ON

THURSDAY NEXT, 25th INSTANT,

('OMMENCING AT 8.30 P.M.

Lady Badford, Miss Elwes, Mrs. A. Emelius
Outerbridge Mrs. Cecil Tucker, Mrs. Bennett,
Miss Gorham, Miss N. Tucker, Miss T. Wain-
wright, will take part.


Front Seats 2/6.


Back Seats 1/-.


Tickets at Royal Gazette and it Heyl's Store.

GRACE CHURCH, NORTH SHORE,
will celebrate its first anniversary
On THURSDAY, April 25th,
PREACHING SERVICE ia the afternoon at 4
o'clock by REV. J. STROTHARD.

Sacred Concert
at 7.30 p. in.
TICKETS l/. and (id.
Special arrangements have been made to serve
Refresh ments during the afternoon and
evening.
Hamilton, April 22, 1901.-1.

Pembroke Parish.

PERSONS liable to be assessed for the mainte-
nance of the Church of England in Pembroke
Parish, are hereby informed that a meeting will
be held

At the City Hall Hamilton
On FRIDAY, 26th Instant,
at 11 a. m.
for the purpose of electing a Church Vestry and
Church Wardens for the said Parish to serve to
Easter 1902.


20-4-1901.


MU0SON WAIN WRIGHT,
J. L. SMITH,
Church Wardens.


NOTICe.


Quebec Steamship Coy.,
-L111ite d.


Pan Aioriif Eull h xJThi.

FIRST CLASS TICKETS Ber-
muda to Buffalo and return by the
Company's Steamers and the
Lehigh Valley R. R. Company,
will be issued from June 8, 1901,
to October 12, 1901, at $48.00.
Railroad Return Tickets are good
for 20 days.
The above rate does not cover
Pulman accommodation, nor cab
fares and baggage transfer at New
York.
JAS. A. CONYERS,


IHamilton, Bermuda,
29 April, 1901.-T.o., 3p t.f.

Colonist Saturday, t.f.


Agent.


Quebec Steamship

Company Ltd.


". ,' 7

Special Notice.

A steamer will sail from New York for Bermuda
on orabout end of April or early in May, to bring

Naphtha, Gasolene, Coal.
It is notified for information to importers that
Gasolene will be carried under deck only when in
drums; when in cases on deck.
JAS. A. CONYERS,
Agent.
Hamilton, Bermiuda,
1st April 1901-t o till 23rd.
Colonist Saturdays till 29th.

Consignments for New York Market

The Undersigned solicits cousignments of
POTATOES, GREEN VEGETABLES
AND OTHER PRODUCE
TO MESSRS.

J. & G. Lippmann,

By whom highest market rates are ob-
tained and prompt returns made.
JOHN BARRITT,
Hamilton.
January, 1901-tf 3p.

Bermuda t souvenir.*
Bermuda V II

GENUINE

BrIMUDA in2lb.
1 & 2 1b.
ARgROWROOT. Boxes.

4 No. Visitor should leave
Bermuda without one.
For sale at
THE FACTORY,
"Bellevue,"
Paget.
And 41, .12 Front Street, Hamilton.
W. T. JAMES
Hlamilton, March 23, 1901.-1m 3p


Notice to

Importers.

Direct

London

Line.
Steamship

^CGAYO ROMANO,

Will Leave

LONDON
FOR


BERMUDA,
On or about

23rd April.
First Class Passenger Accommodation


This Ship will sail for Savannah,
Georgia, direct.
W. T. JAMES,
Agent.
Hamilton and St. George's Bda.
Hr. LANGRIDGE & Co.,
Agents,
16 Great St. Helen's,
London, E. C.,
England.
3p



NEW GOODS.

Just received at



gosling Bros.

CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S

Pie Fruits,

Pine Apple Marmalade,

Apricot Marmalade,

Bombay Chutney,

Candied Ginger Chips,

Sardine Paste,

Aspic Jelly in glass jars,

Leaf Gelatine,

Queen Olives,

Pickles.

Furniture Polish,

Boxes Cutlet Frills,

Smoked Sardines ".
tHamilton, March 22/01.



For Rent,-
THAT CO-MMODIUS
Two Storey

Dwelling House
On Laffan Street in this city, known as "Aber-
ley." Apply to
W. CARDY HALLETT.
12th April, 1901.-3 p t.f.



I ICKFORD& BLACK
Steamship Co., Ltd.
PROPOSED ITINERARY.
Ca iada, Bermuda, W. Indies, Demerara Service
(SOUTHBOUND TRIPS.)


ST :AMERS.

-*E INA
O INOCO
*O!RURO
OCAMO
*ERNA


Leaves
St. John,
N.B.
March 30
April 13
27
May 11
" 25


" 25 June 3


Leaves
Halifax,
N.S.
April 8
22
May 6
20
June 3


Due Bda.
to sail for
W. Indies
April 12
26
May 10
24
June 7


(NORTHBOUND TRIPS.)
Steamers are due at Bermuda to sail for St. John
or Halifax :-


ORINOCO Apl. 5:
OCAMO May 3;
OLINOCO 31 ;


ORURO, April
ERNA May
ORURO June


PORTS OF CALL :-Bermuda,. *St. Kitts, *Anu-
tigua, 'Montserrat, *Dolminica, St. Lucia,
Barbados, *St. Vincent, *Grenada, *Tobago,
Trinidad, Demerara.

Steamers marked do not call at ports
marked on the Southbound trip nor at
Tobago and Grenada on the Northbound
bound trip.

Halifax, Bermuda, Turks Ids., Jamaica Service
Ss. -leta sails from Halifax, N.S., on the
15th of each month, due at Bermuda to sail
for Turks Islands and Jamaica on the 18th ;
returning from south is due at Bermuda to
sail for Halifax, N. S., abcut the 2nd of-each
month.
W. T. JAMES,
Agent,
Hamilton and St. George's, Bermuda.


4--







THE ROYAL GAZETTEA-TUESDAY, APRIL


23, 1901.


BY PUBLIC AUCTION
-TO BE SOLD-
Under the Big Shed,
ON THURSDAY NEXT,
the 25th inst. At one o'clock,
Viz:-


SPARS,
Rigging,


WOOD,
Blocks,


SAILS,
Rope, etc.


-ALSO--
1 Ship's Boat, 1 Whale Boat,
A quantity of Whaling Implements
1 Ship's Galley and Lot of Bricks.
The above is a portion of the
outfit of the whaling Brig Fran-
cis A. Barston."
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, Bda.,
23/4/1901.

FURNITURE SALE.
I AM INSTRUCTED TO SELL
At Public Auction,
at 1 p. m.
On Friday 3rd May,
At the residence of Mr. W. J. Green, Nort Road,
Warwick East, The whole of his HOUSEHOLD
FURNITURE. Particulars of which will appear
in next issue.
THOSE. J. WADSON,
Auctioneer.
Apl. 22nd, 1901.-1

Auction Sale
OF -_
REAL STATE
IN THE
TO WN OF ST. GEORGE'S.
I am instructed to offer for Sale at Public Auction
on the Market Square, at 1 o'clock p.m.,
On Thursday. May 2nd,
the following valuable properties :
No. 1-The large Dwelling House with the Lot
on which it stands, situated on Queen Street
and at present occupied by Mr. William D.
Fox.
No. 2-The Two Cottages with the Lot on which
they stand adjoining the said dwelling house
and occupied by Mr. H. E. Crawford.
No. 3-The property known as Fox's Wharf, with
two eligible stores thereon, calculated for
grocery and dry goods purposes, situated on
Water Street.
No. 4-The commodious House and Shop with
the Lot on which they stand on Water Street,
occupied by Mr. Thorns S. Spicer and used by
him as a Boarding House.
No. 5-The House and Shop with the Lot on
which they stand on Water Street, occupied
by Mrs. Julia Spears, with attached roomy
cellars.
-- THOSE. J. WADSON,
"'- Auctioneer,
April 23, 1901-3 3p. Auctioneer.

J. SCHOLTZ,
4 Front St., Hamilton, York St., St. George's.


Gold and Silver Watches,
Diamonds, Gold & Silver Jewelry,
Silver & Enamel Goods,
For toilet, personal and taqle use,
Silver Plated Goods,
All descriptions of best quality con-
taing suitable goods for Birthday
and wedding Presents and Prizes
for all kinds of sports.

Sole Proprietor of the late
E. T. CHILD'S entire stock
of .
Jewelry &C.
Sole Agent for the
beautiful .
Melodious
Needham Pianos and
Organs,
For Sale and Hire.


Six Pianos received since Jany.
15, and full satisfaction given of
their merits.
WE Are Offering

Special Discounts

On our complete LINE
OF FURNITURE .
For ONE MONTH .
Commencing
To-morrow, Wednesday,
April 24, 1901.

The Bermuda
.Furnishing &
Supply Coy.,
45 Front Street, City.


Cbe asb Stores.
The Negligee Shirt Season has
Sterling opened and we have some surpris-
Values ingly good lines to show you.
Men's fine Print Shirts, Soft
In Men's fronts, Cuffs separate 2/5.
Shirts. Men's Fine Madras Shirts, Soft
fronts, Cuffs separate 3/4.


SMEN'S SUITS.

A few warm days will start the season for
Flannel Suits. We have a capital stock for you
to choose from. All are well cut and finished and
quite above ordinary ready-made goods.
Men's Flannel Suits, Sacs & Trowsers 18/9,
23/6, 27/3, 34/6, 38/6.
Men's Separate Flannel Trowsers 10/9, 11/, 17/6


Cte asb Stores.
Good Styles, Good Values.
Good lWe refer here to our special
line of Wonen's Shoes for 5/3,
Shoes 6/- and 7/0.,
Black Oxfords, Patent leather
toe caps 5/3.
For Black Oxfords, Stock Toe Caps
6/-.
Women. Black Oxfords, Stock Toe Caps
7/6.
Black Button br Lace Boots 7/6.


WOMEN'S WAISTS.

As usual, we have a fine assortment of Shirt
Waist to show you. Here below are descriptions
and prices of some.
At Pretty Coloured Prints in Stripes and
2/6. Fancy patterns.
At Fine Percales, .stripes and checks in
3/3. colours and black and whites.
At Fine Percales and Lawns Coloured stripes
4/6. and Fancies and black and whites.


BARGAIN


Commencing on


MONDAY, April 29th.

Hamilton, April 22, 1901.-2
Colonist copy Wed. and Sat.



NEW LOW
GOODS o* *. I A* PRICES


HAMILTON PEARMAN'S CASH STORES. SHELLY BAY.


Shaped Belts,
in Patent, Tan & Black.
SILK RIBBON--Washable.
A new lot LADIES' SHIRT-WAISTS,
SILK PARASOLS & UMBRELLAS.
DRESS GOODS.
STRAW HATS, FOR BOYS & MEN,
AT 1/6 UP.


JUST RECEIVED A GREAT
VARIETY OF

Ladies' Silk Ties
Fringed and knotted ends, Embroid-
ered, also
LADIES' BOWS IN CHIFFON,
SILK WINDSOR TIES IN
ALL COLOURS.


SMO0KE--->


I. Taddy & Co's.

(ESTABLISHED 150 YEARS)


A SACRED CONCERi
WILL BE HELD IN
St. Andrew's Presbyterian
Church,


To-morrow,


Wednesday,


April 24, 1901.
PROGRAMME:
1. Organ Solo Andante and Allegro Bache
A. Gordon Mitchell.
2. Anthem, Remember Thy Mercies, Farmer,
Choir.
3. Solo, Come Unto Me, Coenen.
Miss Annie Wilson Arthur.
4. Trio Praise to our Great Creator, Belcher,
Miss Dickinson, Mrs Grant, Mr. H. Ward.
Solo, Cast thy Bread on the Waters, Roeckel,
Mr. Dickinson.
6. Solo, Trusting in Thee Coverley,
Mrs. Ferguson.
7. Recitation, The Last Hymn.
Miss Phoebe Kempe.
OFFERTORY.
PART II.
8. Solo A Dream of Paradise Gray.
Mr. H. Hallett.
9. Solo The Toilers Piccolonini.
Miss Dickinson.
10. Solo The Hills of God Nevin.
Mr. H. Ward.
11. Solo By the waters of Babylon Howell.
Miss Annie Wilson Arthur.
12. Organ Solo Marche Solennelle Callaerts.
A. Gordon Mitchell.
13. Solo The Dawn of Redemption Gray.
Mrs. Grant.
14. Anthem Te Deum Millard.
Choir.
DOXOLOGY.
Doors open at 7.30 p. m. Concert will com-
mence at 8 o'clock.
A Silver Collection will be made in aid of the
Sunday School.

Pembroke Parish.
The undermentioned Pews in St. John's
Church, Pembroke, will be exposed for sale at

The City Hall, Hamilton,
On FRIDAY, 26th Instant,
at 10.45 a. in. (sharp)


No. 19.
" 21.
22.
45.
55.
57.
11.
10.


By order,


Nave.

South Transept.
North "
North '
Extension "

C. H. TUCKER,
.Church Vestry Clerk.


20-4-1901.

NOTICE.

PERSONS liable to be assessed for the mainte-
nance of the Church of England in Sandys
Parish, are requested to meet at the Sunday
School Room on Saturday the 27th instant at 11
o'clock a. m. for the purpose of electing officers
viz:-
CHURCH VESTRY and CHURCHWARDENS
to serve to Easter 1902.
W. R. PERINCHIEF, Churchwardens.
R. T. FOWL. w
Sandys Parish,
20th April 1901.-1


New York Mail Steamer.
The R. M. Str.

S"TRINIDAD"
P. J. FRASER, Master,
Will leave the Port of Hamilton direct for
Sea
ON THURSDAY,
25th April, 1901.
At 10.45 a. m.
Specie on freight and general freight (unless pre-
viously filled) will be received until 6 p.m. Wed-
nesday 24th inst., (subject to the conditions of the
Bill of Lading and to delay from circumstances
beyond shipowners control) and Bills of Lading
will be signed until 8 a.m. Thursday 25th ins-
tant.
Baggage will be received between 8 and
9 a. m., and passenger stages will be removed
at 10.30 a. m. on Thursday 25th inst.
Green vegetables for chill room will be received
until 7 a.m on Thursday 5th inst.
Importers are hereby notified
that in future Boots and Shoes
will be carried only at the entire
risk, for all claims of shipper
and consignee.
A reward of $50 will be paid to whoever will
furnish evidence leading to the conviction of any
person or persons broaching cargo either on board
ship or on dock.
The R.M. Str. Trinidad" will leave New York
for return on Thursday, 2nd May 1901.
JAS. A. CONYERS,
Agent.
Hamilton, Bda., 22nd April, 1901.
Colonist copy.

Notice.

SALE OF PEWS
IN ST. PAULS CHURCH, PAGET.
,The following Pews will be exposed to public sale
On Tuesday, 30th Inst.,
at 9.30 o'clock in the forenoon, at the Parish
Church, Paget :
Numbers 14, 20, 29, 32, 46, 51, 55a, 57,
59, 62, 66, 68, 70, 72, 82, 84,
85, 87, 88, 89, 91 and 96.
The attention of Pewholders is called to the
fact that some of the above pews are being sold on
account of the recent deaths of the holders and
others because the persons in whose names they
are held no longer reside in the parish.
Persons occupying pews held in the names of
other persons are requested to note whether their
pew. are among those to be sold.
By order of the Church Vestry,
J. I). M. GODET,
Church Vestry Clerk.
Paget Parish,
23rd April, 1901-2 3p t.o.

Notice.

ALL PERSONS hav-
ing claims against A. C.
Brooks, or the Hamilton
Hotel, are requested to
present same for payment

on or before May second.
April 23rd and 27th, 1901.


TOBACCO


The Goods are Manufactured from the Highest Grade of Bright Virginia
Leaf.


Cobaccos are Packed tn illr Clbt Vins.


THE FOLLOWING BRANDS WE HAVE IN STOCK:


Premier Virginia Tobacco
Myrtle Grove "
Flaked Gold Leaf "
Orbit
London Flake


Myrtle Grove Cigarettes.
Premier "
Flaked Gold Leaf "
Picaroon "
Pure Virginia "


PREMIER NAVY CUT TOBACCO, in three Strengths.
Mild, Medium and Full.
FINEST LATAKIA
A tobacco especially adapted for mixing purposes.

SOLE AGENTS :-

The Bermuda Furnishing & Supply Co.,


45 FRONT ST.,


- CITY.


SEAGRAM'S

Canadian Rye

WHISKEY


is the Leadng Case Whiskey


JNO. F BURROWS &


in Canada.


Sole Agents for Bermuda


LIGHTBOURN'S
FINE OLD

HIGHLAND MALT WHISKY

J. E.L..

PERSONALLY SELECTED

3s. 3d. per Bottle.

36s. Case.


Bermuda Pocket Almanack Guide and Directory for 1901.-Price Is. 9d., on sale at Royal Gazette Office.


TRIMINGHAM BROS.'

1 ANNUAL-


SALE


H. A. g E. SMITH, Reid St.


SPECIAL SALE OF SURPLUS STOCK, REMNANTS
&C, COMMENCES

MONDAY, APRIL 29TH.

ALL GOODS ON BARGAIN COUNTERS WILL BE
MARKED DOWN REGARDLESS OF COST.


(London)


and CIGARETTES.


Mild Pure and Mellow.


Co.,







THE ROYAL GAZETTE.-TUESDAY, APRIL


23, 1901.


Clearance


Clearance Sale. -



The Advertiser will be


COST PRICE FOR CASH


Sale.


Clearance Sale.


offering the


ONLY


Sale to commence on Monday 22nd inst.

Stock consists of

Tin Ware, Enamelled Goods, Galvanized Iron Goods, Plain and Fancy Glass,
Dinner Ware, Dessert Sets, China Tea Sets, Plain and Fancy Earthenware,
Fancy China Goods, Pictures, Baskets, Lined Fancy Work Baskets,
Lamps, Toys, Dolls, Fancy Goods in Variety, Hat Polish,
Dyes for Cotton, Woollen or Silk Goods, Cutlery, A few pieces of Bamboo Ware,
Silver Goods, Photo Frames, Work Boxes and a large variety of
miscellaneous goods too numerous to mention. Also:

I i-e LJIE OF QUE-N VICTORIA By a Lady of the Court-266 pages for I/.
The classes of Stock offered above is well known throughout the Colony being mostly English goods,
so customers will know exactly what they are buying.
We shall be open until 8 in the evening to oblige those who cannot visit us during the day.


A. W. PARTRIDOE,
East Broadwav.


April 20, 1901.


20" CARBOLIC


OA P
Cure alid p;-events Insect
and Mosquito bites.

The stronzSea Carbolic Toilet Soap,


F. C.


Strawberries

Can be had by applying at

"Belterre."
TELEPHONE 185.
Or at
E. KEMPE & SON,
TELEPHONE 81.
January 14, 1901.

FOR RENT.

Furnished or Unfurnished,

'SUNSET VJTT.,A,'
Lately occupied by MAJOR HICKMAN,
-Assista i Military Secretary.
-AND-

"Ocean Villa."
Opposite" entrance to Goverument House.
Apply to
MRS. GEORGE 0. WHITNEY,
Pembroke.
Nov. 3, 1900.

For Sale

AT THE PRINCESS HOTEL LIVERY.

1 SURRY 1 CANADIAN DOG CART
1 BUCKBOARD.
and 1 MIKADO.
also
A number of Second-hand Victoria Carriages.
Prices moderate.
Apply to,
I. W. KING.
March 29, 1901.

BOOKBINDING.

We are prepared to
execute orders for .

Bookbinding, Repairing
and Re-binding
in a neat and substantial manner,
and at strictly MODERATE PRICES.
LEE & Co.,
Royal Gazette Office,

The Shilling Green.


NOTICE TO STAMP COLLECTORS.


NO SET of Bermuda Stamps Complete, without
the obsolete Shilling Green, to be had only
at the
ROYAL GAZETTE OFFICE.
Hqamilton, Bermuda, December 18, 1900.


CARBOLIC


OINTMENT
A Sovereign remedy for
all Skin ailments.

Especially valuable in hot climates.


DR. W. R. LAMB,

Oculist and Optician.
secialist in Testing and Rctrart-
ing the Eye and Fitting Glasses,
will be at his office in the Womans' Work Ex-
change building Reid St. until April 25th. He
is prepare'l as usual with the best and most com-
plete apparatus for thoroughly testing and re-
fracting the eyes according to the most reliable
and approved methods.
IHe has an ample supply of the best quality of
lenses of every kind, including those for the cor-
rection of artigniatisnt which were ground special-
ly to order, and all kinds and styles of eyeglasses
and spectacle frames of the very best quality to
furnish to those requiring them. As Headache,
Eye strain and inflammatory conditions of the
eyes or lids consequent upon abnormal or defec-
tive vision are permanently cured by accurate
refraction and properly adjusted glasses, it would
be well for those having these or any of the symp-
toms of defective vision which necessitates the
use of glasses to avail themselves of the present
opportunity of having their eyes carefully and
thoroughly examined and obtaining glasses of the
right kind-for all glasses furnished to patients
are warranted to be correct
Those intending to have their eyes examined
please call at their earliest convenience as Dr.
Lamb will not be in Bermuda longer than the
time specified.
Charges reasonable. Consultation free.

Private Board
AT

T.T.ATANSTW W Y T'H,"

(Near the Hamilton Hotel,)
Corner Park and Wesley Streets, Hamilton


Is Now Open for the
Guests.


March 25, 1901.-1. m.


Reception of

J. B. BELL,
Proprietor.


BUILDING STONE.

The un'ersigned offers for sale a latrg lot of

Building Stone
of good quality, all sizes, delivered at the shortest
notice.lPrices reasonable.
Addres C. FURBERT
c/o MR. JOHN II. C. JACKSON,
North Shore,
:Devonshire
April 1st, 1901.-1 m.

p OL&STEEL
S PIdia PLLS
A ftamedy for all IrPegularltles.
Superseding Bitter Apple, Peunyroyal, Pil Ccchia. &r
SoIJ by WEST INDIA MEDICAL DEPOT,
io, King street KINCSTON, JAM.
Propri. tor: -MARTIN. Chemist. SOUTHIAflPTON, ENOf


EVERY MAN
UFFERI*G from NERVOUS and PHYSICAL
DFMrITY should send for a valuable Pamphlet explain.
inghowall Nervous and Organic Derangements may be suece-
ully treated without stomach medication. The method Is asy
and pleasant, and will effect a perfect and permanent cure.
Sent In a plain sealed envelope, free of charge, .
NORTON, 59 60, CIANCTEY LANE, LOrDO. Over 80 years'
eontmaums euoces.


B'I.I' DA, Alias
'.OM ERIS':ISLANDS. }

50 REWARD!

By His Excellency SIR GEORGE
DIoBY BARKER, Knight
G. DIGBY BARKER, Commander of the Most
General, Honourable Order of the
Gorernor and Bath, General, Governor,
Conuotander-in-Chief. Commander in Chief,
and Ordinary in and over
these Islands, &e., &e, &c.

H Proclamation!
WHEREAS about the hour of half past nine
on the night of Sunday the 14th instant a most
violent assault was made upon a certain Non-
Commissioned Officer of the Army Service Corps
and a female companion on and near the main
road leading westward from the Ducking Stool in
Pembroke Parish, by two men not yet known.
Now this is to offer a reward of

v.'1i' Y POUNDS
to any person or persons who shall give such in-
formation as shall lead to the apprehension and
conviction of the offenders or either of them; and
a further sum not exceeding

Twenty Pounds,
at the discretion of the Executive, for any infor-
mation helping to discover the offenders.
Given under my hand and the Great Seal
of these Islands this 18th day of
April, A. D. 1901 and in the first
year of His Majesty's Reign.
By His Excellency's Command,
ALLAN F. SMITH,
Acting Colonial Secretary.
GOD SAVE THE KING.


A CARD.





TIlE UNDERSIGNED desires to remind the
Public that the OLD BAKERY has always
held its own against new comers, and to-day it
still leads.
My French Rolls and Family Bread


possess a fineness of quality and flavor not equalled
anywhere. Bread of all kinds and sizes made. Vi-
itors who appreciate good bread are strongly
recommended to ask for ROBINSON'S.
Thanking the public for past favors,
I remain,
Yours respectfully
SAML. D. ROBINSON
Kurnaby Street:
lamilton, Dec. 19, 1898.

R. B. Y. C. REGATTA.

Thursday, May 2.

FIRST RACE,
FIRST PRIZE.
H.R.H. the Princess Louise's Chal-
lenge Cup.
-SECOND PRIZE-

The Madras Cup.
TO BE STARTED AT 11 A.M.

SECOND RACE.
FIRST PRIZE.
Hurst Challenge Cup and Purse.
-SECOND PRIZE-
Purse.
Entrance ten shillings. Each yacht to carry
rectangular distinguishing flag measuring 18 in. x
15 in. Yachts must be measured with all ballast
both shifting and standing on board. Entries for
both races to be made to the undersigned by 1
p. m. Flonday, 29th April, 1901.
The holders of the above Cups are requested to
hand them in to the Club on or before Monday
the 29th Inst.
EUGENE HI. GOSLING,
Sect,. of the Sailing Committee.
April 8, 1901-4 T. o.
Colonist copy 13, 20, & 27.
.I I- I- rn. m Im -. I
I OR. PIERCE'S ELECTRIC BELT. I
It makei 1 6. I the 0
| Weak \ eK w I
strong.. iver.


9 1 ei" com pl- o aete
*a nb an and attach- "--
ment, a lowurn), l Itouraeswak.
an electric cur-. k lss or disease -
rent is carried to B of men and
Sany part of the women wite-
I human body, out Drugs.
*from head to Iills the lbxl
Sf-ot; giving rig- with tlectri-
our to the wear- city, impart-
er, and driving wr i th I
Saway aches and "I \ l s an strength
Spainfs i by [ to all who use a
I msic. t I it. No one in
*- |__r '/ V ill-health I
For fall I should he l.-
information call tte to give it
or send for new atrial.
u"BOOKLET I "E TIt doe the
a No. a." work.
Write to any 1 Can be sent I
office named be- anywhere by
low:- pouft.-N
PIERCE ELECTRIC CO., "
I 10, City Rd., London, E.0., England.
160, Pitt St., Sydney, Australia. met ion
620, Market St., San Francisco, U.S.A. mthos
S1145. Broadway, New York, U.S.A.- t-a -
Don't go Bald-Use :



KOKO
FOR THE HAIR
Sold Everywhere at all Chemists Stores, &c.
WEST INDIES DEPOT: Barbados Mutual Insur-
ance Buildings, Barbados.
6/10/00-tf-T.o.


PHOSFERINE
The Royal Tonic and Digestive.
Sold by all Chemist Stores, &c.
PROPRIETORS : ASHTON & PARSONS, LTD.,
17 Farringdon Rd., London, E.C.
9/10/00.-tf.-T.o.


Rest, Health and Comfort to MY6ther
!nmd Child.
MRS. WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP, for children
teething, softens the gums, reduces inflammation. allays
all pain, and cures wind colic. Perfectly safe in all cases.
We would say to every mother who has a suffering child :
Do not let your prejudice, nor the prejudices of others,
stand between you and your suffering child and the relief
that will be sure-yes, absolutely sure-to follow the use
of this medicine, if timely used.
T. o. 1-1-01-12m.

THE COST OF ENGLAND'S COLONIES.


Whole of His Enormous Stock

AT


Not many nionarcis board their wealth in a
private bank of their own; indeed the Mikado of
Japan is probably alone in this respect. His
creditors are presented with drafts on the Impe-
rial Bank at Tokio, which is conducted solely for
his own use, no other individual being permitted
to deposit money there. -Tit-Bits.

He gave the Department a Trip.-An Oklahoma
country postmaster sent the following notice to
the Postal Department: "Sur i wish to notify
you that on next Wednesday this office will be shet
as i am gone deer hunt. You can fire me if you
see fit, but i 11 give you a pointer that i'm the on-
ly man in the nayborhood that kin rede and rite."
-Kansas City Times.


Although the United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland is not the oldest of the Colonial Pow-
ers, being outclassed in that respect by Spain,
France, and Portugal, her Colonies are to-day by
far the most important, both in regard to their
extent and population, while the commerce of the
British Colonies is greater in volume than that of
all other Powers put together. If we include
India, the Colonies of England cover an area of
9,000,000 square miles; and if to this we add the
area of British protectorates and spheres of influ-
ence, the total area subject to British rule is 11,-
000,000 square miles. The smaller area, that of
the Colonies and India alone, supports a popula-
tion of 367,000, 000; the larger area about 420,-
000,000, or, roughly speaking, six times the pop-
ulation of the United States. As a Colonial Pow-
er, France comes next to England, but at a great
distance behind. The French Colonies, including
Algeria, Tunis, and all protectorates and spheres
of influence, have an area of 3,500.00) square
miles, and a population of 53,000,000. Next
comes Germany, whose Colonies and protecto-
rates have an area of 1,000,000 square miles, and
a population of 11,000,000. The Dutch Colonies
have an area of 800,000 square miles, and a pop-
ulation of 33,000,000. As compared with these,
the Colonies of the United States cover an area of
125,000 square miles, and have a population of
9,000,000.
A most interesting point in connection with the
Colonies of the European Powers is whether they
are a source of profit or of loss to the sovereign
state. In regard to this, we may compare the
Colonies of England, France, and Germany. The
Britilis Colonies receive nothing from the Imperi-
al treasury, and contribute nothing to it. This
does not, of course, imply that under special cir-
cumnstances, such as those created by the disas-
trous hurricane in the West Indies some two
years ago, no financial aid is given by England to
her Colonies, but merely that each Colony raises
its own revenue without depending on England
in any way. Both Germany and France, how-
ever, pay out annually large sums of money for
the administration expenses of their Colonies,
scarcely any of which are self-supporting. France
pays yearly about 2,800,000, and Germany
about 1,000,000.
It has been stated that, although England's
Colonies are not a source of direct expense to the
mother country, they are so indirectly, for it is
the possession of Colonies which necessitate such
enormous expenditures for the British Navy.
This is a mistaken idea. Even if England owned
no Colonies, she would still have to keep her Na-
vy at its present strength, for two reasons ; be-
cause it is her first line of defence, and because
her carrying trade, which forms about sixty per
cent. of the carrying trade of the world, must be
protected.-From the March number of tire
1Wtdrsofr Iragatzine. ,,
RULERS AND THEIR MONEY.
MOST OF THE ROYALTIES KEEP THEIR FUNDS IN
PUBLIC BANKS.
The instinct of economy seems to be as fully
developed in many of those who occupy thrones
as in their subjects following humbler callings;
and, seeing what vast sums of money pass
through their bands, it is not surprising that
their financial affairs require a great deal of look-
ing after. The Bank of England has upon its
books the name of practically every sovereign in
Europe, all of whom deposit their savings there;
even ex-President Krueger realizes that this coun-
try is tile safest in the world for investing money,
and has sent us over from time to time consider-
ably more than a million to take care of for him.
The most thrifty royal family is, and always
has been, the Russian; for, although the Czar
does not allow his economical habits to interfere
with his comforts as did his ancestors, he manages
to put by a large fortune every year, nearly ill of
which finds its way into London or Parisian
banks. His grandfather, Alexander II., though
an excellent monarch, was little short of a miser
throughout his reign, and consequently when he
died he left the enormous sum of six millions.
Two millions were settled upon his family, and
thIe remaining four-invested in Britislh stock-lihe
left to a lady of title whom he had married prior
to ascending the throne, the marriage, by Russian
law, afterward being declared void. His son,
Alexander III., was less thrifty, but he saved a
million sterling during the few years lie occupied
the throne, and bequeathed the whole of it to
Queen Alexandra, then Princess of Wales.
The shrewdest monarch in Europe, from a busi-
ness point of view, is undoubtedly the Sultan.
He does not believe in Turkish banks, so deposits
all his superfluous cash in London, special mes-
sengers being sent over at intervals to pay the
money in. He also has a curious habit of secret-
ing money in all sorts of strange places in the
Palace, and prefers to run the risk of being robb-
ed than enrich the coffers of an Ottoman bank,
but he does not depend on his regal position sole-
ly for his income. He owns one of the main
streets in Constantinople, a sugar plantation in
the West Indies, and draws a handsome dividend
from a line of steamships plying on the Bospho-
rus.
Both the King of Belgium and King George of
Greece are born speculators, and favour tie invest-
ment of money in what may or may not yield a
handsome return, rather than contenting them-
selves with a small rate of interest from the
banks. Tihe first named inherited 1,000,000
sterling from his parents, and by judicious deal-
ing in Panama stock made a profit of four mil-
lions in four weeks. Since then he has laid out
the whole of his savings on lthe Congo Free State,
and firmly believes that he will live to see thIe re-
turn of his momey withl interest. King George
deals ill stocks and shares with excellent results,
and lie once tried to bring about a "' corner" ii
American grain, but was only partly successful.
He follows the fluctuations of thie market care-
fully, and is ever ready to invest money in any
concern that is likely to have a bright future be-
fore it.
The late Empress of Austria was very eccentric
in financial matters, and economical almost to a
fault. It is estimated that she saved at least two-
thirds of her allowance, and left a fortune of over
three millions whlen she died. She would not
permit a large retinue of servants to be employed
at the Palace and always supervised her husband'.s
accounts. The bulk of her money was invested
in British stock, alnd upon her death trouble en-
sued between this country and her successors,
who considered tlhieniselves exempt from success-
ion duties. Thre British (overniment, however,
thought otherwise, and forbade the money being
handed over until the duties were paid.
No mii~ mmiarls ordtei eat i


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Remaiks.


St. George.
St. Mark-CoURT OF
[Qn. SESSIONS.
3rd after Easter.


Qr. 25 day 11 h 55 in a.m.


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KING'S AMERICAN ARTIST.
E. A. ABBEY TO PAINT THE PICTURE OF
EDWARD'S CORONATION.
London, April 13.-As predicted, Luke Fildes,
R. A., whose portrait of Queen Alexandra a few
years ago was so successful, has been commission-
ed to paint an official portrait of the King. The
picture will be life-size and, following the cus-
tom of days when photographic reproduction of
any kind was unknown, thirty or forty replicas
will be made for the colonies and embassies and
consulates.
London, April 6.-The selection of E. A. Ab-
bey, R. A., as the artist to paint the great picture
of the coronation ceremony, which is to be held
in Westminster Abbey next year, makes it sure
that the painting will be something far above the
average of such work. Such a picture is ad-
mirably suited for the brain that devised and the
hand that drew and painted the processional pic-
ture of King Richard III. and the Lady Anne,
which was the picture of the year at the Royal
Academy Exhibition of 1896. There is no deny-
ing that a certain amount of dissatisfaction exists
amoug British artists at this, the first great com-
mission of the reign, being given to an American.
That Abbey is the very best man for the work is
conceded by all, and, as Labouchere reminded
the British artists in this week's Truth, Art has
no nationality.
A peculiar story is attached to a picture al-
ready painted and in the possession of the King.
This is Hubert Herkomer's water colour sketch of
Queen Victoria, taken in the death chamber at
Windsor the day after the Queen's death. Her-
komuer, or Von Herkomer, as he styled himself for
the first time last year, is now one of the most
successful artists in England. A good many
years ago, however, affairs were very different
with him. He had found London a stony-
hearted stepmother" and was about to abandon
his art and his adopted city, and travel with an
entertainment company. The proprietors of the
lWeekly Graphic, however, rescued him, gave him
work and a chance to make himself known.
And after this Herkomer went straight ahead.
After many years he repaid the Graphic for its
good services in an extraordinary manner. A
picture of the Queen as she lay dead was of course
one of the greatest scoops an English illustrated
paper could have at that time. Reproductions of
it would by this time have been hanging up
wherever Englishmen make their homes. But
to get such a picture was beyond the hopes of all
editors save one. The Graphic alone secured the
coveted privilege of sending an artist to Windsor.
Luke Fildes was first thought of, but lie could
not be reached at the moment, and of course there
was no time to lose.
The next choice fell upon Herkomer, who had
done so much work for them, and for whom they
also had done so much. So Herkouer went down
to Windsor and made his picture. But the Gra-
phic and its readers have not yet seen the paint-
ing. Nor will they until the Royal Academy Ex-
hibition for 1901 is opened. Instead of receiving
from their artist the picture which they commis-
sioned him to paint the proprietors of the Graphic
got a telegram from him to the effect that the
subject was too sacred for publication." In
spite of this Herkomer had painted the picture
and taken measures to secure its being widely
seen and noticed. Before leaving Windsor he
saw the King and asked him to accept the draw-
ing as it was too sacred and pathetic, he thought,
for publication. Not thinking that lie was abet-
ting the artist in an act of ingratitude toward his
employers the King accepted the picture, and at
the same time consented to its being exhibited in
the forthcoming exhibition at Burlington House.
Thus when the exhibition is opened in May one
of the pictures which must, if only on account of
its subject, attract universal attention, will be a
striking example of man's ingratitude to man,"
whatever may be its value as a work of art.
RITUALISTS START ANOTHER ROW.
London, April 13-Eastertide seems to have
brought with it a renewal of the extreme high
church ritual practices which the Archbishops amu-
Bishops have declared illegal and havy n"
It is reported that many u~ ine gone back
esnecialv to the r" a use of incense. There
is natu nrewed agitation on the part of the
i nOpatents of high church practices. They are
making a special set against the desire of certain
ritualists to practice auricular confession and ab-
solution.
The most notable case is at Dover, where a cu.
rate, who was responsible for the preparation of
boys for confirmation, refused to present to the
Bishop boys who refused to "confess." The
boys were of unimpeachable character, were sup-
ported by their parents and would not yield to
the moral force that was brought to bea.ir upon
them. The result was they were not confirmed,
Their parents and other members of the church
protested to the Archbishop of Canterbury, who
made a private inquiry, which resulted in the ex-
oneration of the curate. Last night a crowded in-
dignation meeting was held in the Dover Town
Hall. A resolution was passed against the intro-
duction of confession, especially as being essential
and preliminary to confirmation. It was also sub-
mitted that a private inquiry by the Archbishop
was inadequate and that a public investigation,
where witnesses on either side could be produced
in open court, would alone meet the needs of the
case.
ALMTANACK.-April 1-1901


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