Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00225
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00225
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text





THE
T IEF B


BERMUDA. COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.




Vol. LXXIV.-No. 13 HAMILTON, BERMUDA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1901. 20s. PER ANNUM.

] i' '-


Special Correspondence to the

"Royal Gazette." ,
TREES PLANTED BY KING EDVARD VII.
Many visitors to Central Park, this city, have
taken an interest in the trees which were planted
by the Prince of Wales, now the King of Eng-
land, on the afternoon of Saturday, October 12th
1860, when he was being entertained in this city.
The trees are an English oak and an American
elm. Andrew H. Green, who was Controller of
Central Park at the time of the Prince's visit, has,
explained that the Prince was induced t' ;i tut an'
American elm as well as an English oak, in order
to promote good feeling at the time, when many
Irishmen in the city were inclined to make a
protest against the reception to the son of Queen
Victoria by the officials of the city. The trees
are on the west side of the Mall, and almost di-
rectly south of the Eagle's statue.
The elm planted by the Prince has grown to be
one of the finest specimens of that tree in the Park,
but the oak has not flourished, although it has
lived and has had the best possible care and pro-
tection. A policeman in the park said that many
Englishmen had asked to have the oak pointed.
out to them and had expressed sorrow that it had
-not grown larger and more shapely.
HAS PIECE OF QUEEN'S BRIDAL CAKE.
Mrs. S. M. Saunders of Mount Vernon, N. Y.,
has an interesting relic of the reign of Queen Vic-
toria. It is a piece of the Queen's wedlli g- cake
preserved carefully since the royal ene it took
place in St. James's Palace in 1840. The gift de-
scended to Mrs. Saunders from her mothe-, Mrs.
Amelia Kholer, who died in July, 1897, in her
ninety-first year. Mrs. Kohler was the daughter
of a Prussian officer who served on the staff of
General Blucher at the battle of Waterloo. The
cake was given to Mrs. Kohler by Lady Mulgrave,?
one of the maids of honor at the wedding. When
the Queen celebrated her golden jubilee, thirteen
years ago, the cake was enclosed in a silver case
with a glass cover and sent to London, where it
was shown to Her Majesty by Lord Ponsonby.
Queen Victoria was surprised that there was al
piece of the cake in existence in America and,
wrote Mr. Kohler an autograph letter in regard
to it.
POPULARITY OF AMERICAN MULES.
One effect of the Anglo-Boer war in South Afri-
ca has been to exalt not only in market value,
but also in official consideration, the American
mule. There has been a constant demand for
American mules for service in the military opera-
tions of the English. The distinction of the Ame-,
rican mule has become international, and it need
be no surprise, therefore, tha in i-I et ollicial
publications in VaNwlhint',ni [ t ti niuI.1, o linr-ger
the subject of slight ,'Pi' .11 .ir.in .c, .- .,'n--
a p.-ition of dignity and prominence.
As foreign nations become acquainted with the
numerous but modest merits of the American
mule his popularity increases. In 1890 (fiscal
year) the total value of American mules exported
to foreign countries was $516,000. In the fiscal
year of 1900 it was $3,919,000, and as the Ameri-
can mule becomes better known he gets to be more
in demand, and a larger foreign trade in Ameri-
can mules seems to be already foreshadowed.
THE SOUTH CAROLINA INTERSTATE AND W" r
INDIAN EXPOSITION.
Buffalo will have to share with Charleston, S.
C., the honour of being the exposition city this
year. For several months past Charleston has
been busily preparing for an exposition which it
is believed will equal, if it does not surpass in in-
terest, any similar affair previously held in that
part of the United States.
While the scope of the Charleston Exposition is
not so great as that of the Pan-American Exposi-
tion for which Buffalo is preparing, the plans are
already on such a scale as to attract considerable
attention throughout the country, even though
its opening as compared with, that of the one at
Buffalo, is still a long way off. On account of its
latitude Cnarleston's Exposition is to be a winter
one and will open in December and close in the
following Tune.
It is not to be an international exposition,. but
rather an interstate one, although its scope will
take in the West Indies. Exhibits from the is-
lands of the West Indies will form a special Tea-
ture and a decidedly tropical aspect is to be given
to the whole show.
The scope of the Charleston Fair is described in
its name, "The South Carolina Interstate and
Wet Indian Exposition." One object is to ad-
vertise the progress of the South, and South Ca-
rolina especially. Another purpose, which,'
though secondary, is nevertheless, considered to
be of growing importance, is to show by the ex-
position the natural advantages of Charleston as a
port for the West Indian trade, and with this in
view a site at the exposition has been selected on
the Ashley River, five miles from the city, which
will permit warships and vessels of the largest
size to form part of the show.
Two United States battleships will thus be able
to form a part of the Government exhibit for
which a total appropriation of $250,000 has already
been made. There are to be fifteen large build-
ings in the exposition and as many smaller ones,
coveringing in all a tract of 250 acres.
In the midst of the grounds is a lake on which
it is proposed to build an electrical island as one
of the novel features of the show. The prevailing
type of architecture will be Spanish out of com-
pliment to the West Indian and South American
interests.
Contracts for building the structures have now I
been let and the work of several of the larger ones
is under way, while the grounds are fast assuming
the shape they will be in when Charleston opens
her At Home" for her sister States and invites
Buffalo's South American visitors to tarry with
her awhile on their trip home,
THIRD CABLE CHESS MATCH. I
The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge
have accepted the challenge sent by the American
Universitiss of Columbia, Harvard, Yale and
Princeton for their third annual Chess Match by
cable for the Isaac L. Rice trophy, and suggest
April 19 and 20 as the dates for the contest.
In the two matches which have been played for
the trophy the British were victorious, the Ameri-]
can team being handicapped both times by the
absence of some of their best players, notably
Falk, of Columbia, and Peiry, of Harvard.
The team selected at the tournament during the
Christmas holidays is composed as follows :-E.
R. Perry and Claude T. Rice, Harvard ; K. G.
Falk and Frank H. Sewall, Columbia ; James B.


Hunt, Princeton, and James F. Sawin, Yale. It
is thought by the best judges that this team will
be sufficiently strong to defeat the British, and
the American colleges feel more enthusiasm thrnn
usual in the contest.
Each side is represented by six players, and the
match occupies two days. In pa-~ year- the Ame-
rican team has played at the Kniekerbocker Ath-


letic Club in this city, and the British at the Brit-
ish Chess Club, in London.
THE ENGLISH WAR LOAN.
A report was circulated in Wall Street yesterday
to the effect that J. P. Morgan & Co. have been
Sounding their friends on the subject of subscrib-
ing for the proposed $50,000,000 English war loan
with favourable results. While there seems to be
some foundation to this report, it would be a mis-
take to assume that J. P. Morgan & Co. has yet
secured the loan or any part of it.
A gentleman in close touch with affairs in Eu-
rope and in thi' country aid yesterday that there
was little doubt the bonds would be issued. He
said, however, that bankers on both sides of the
Atlantic have been figuring on the loan and that
it is possible the whole amount will be taken by
foreign subscribers.
ENGLISH CRICKETERS INVITED.
Considerable disappointment was manifested in
American cricket circles last Autumn because the
usual, international matches had to be abandoned
at the last moment, asa result of a misunderstand-,
ing concerning the leadership of the English team.
In order to avoid any such undesirable termi-
nation of this year's negotiations the Internation-
al Committee has decided to complete its arrange-
ments at an earlier date, and, with this object in
view, Secretary R. D. Brown has written to C.
Wreford-Brown, a prominent English amateur
cricketer, inviting him to bring a team of English
amateurs to the United States about the middle.
of September.
It is known that Mr. Wreford-Brown is anxious
to bring a team to the United States, and it is ex-
pected that his side will be largely composed of
youngsters who have already gained the blue"
at Oxford or Cambridge, or who have the good
fortune to secure that honour during the coming
season.
Should the committee secure definite informa-
tion to this effect, it is more than likely that in
addition to two matches with the gentlemen from.
Philadelphia and one with the colts, a game may
also be arranged for the visitors with a represen-
tative eleven of the American colleges, composed
of the best players from Harvard, Haverford, and
Pennsylvania, as well as games with picked teams
in Boston, New York and Baltimore. A trip to
England in 1902 by an all-Philadelphia team is
on the tapis, and the knowledge that those ewho
excel in the coming season's games will have the
best chance of selection for the trip of 1902 will
lend additional interest to the contests.
CANADIAN MATTERS OF INTEREST. Two1
HOLIDAYS FOR CANADA. DOMINION
FISHERIES STATISTICS.
Montreal, Jan. 29-The death of the Queen
doei, not cancel the holiday which Canada always.
iakes on the 24th May. Canadians have observed
itjlegul.arly for ixty-four years, a long periodic.
At i-,ry -i.i t :- that ot Canada. Nor is there
merely long usage to sanction to sanction, and,
we Canadians might say, hallow it. There is,
first, the undying memory of the good Queen
whose birthday it was. There is next the pleas-
ant season. The 24th is usually a lively day.
Nature has by that date got herself dressed in her
most attractive colours, and the world smiles.
Undoubtedly no small part of the popularity
the holiday enjoys is due to the time it falls.
That time is usually as convenient as it is pleas-.
aut, plowing having been finished, and haying.
not yet having been begun. Without the obser-
vance of the 24th of May, by sports and gaieties,
it would be felt, not only in rural, but also in ui-
ban parts, that there was a long blank in the late
spring. It is perhaps profitless to attempt to an-
alyse the popularity of the day any further than
to say it is dear to the people as Victoria's birth-
day, and that we have come to have a prescriptive
title to it as a holiday. The habit of spending
it enjoyably has got deeply rooted in our national,
life. Of all the people in this country there are few:
old enough to remember a time when there were.,
no attractions on the 24th of May.
Until the law is changed, the day will continue,
a bank holiday. Many Canadians wish to let the
law remain unchanged. If it is not considered
that there is any remaining raison d'etre for a holi-
day, it will not be difficult to suggest one. A
new holiday has been adopted of late-that is,
Empire Day. It has been twice observed already,
and on both occasions on the 25th of May. The
people now wish to have it transferred to the 24th,
thus perpetuating the observance of the Queen's
birthday, and making one holiday serve for two.
It is fitting that the day of the late Queen's birth,
should be lastingly associated with the inculca-
tion of imperial sentiment.
But the birthday ofthe King must be celebrat-
ed. Here we have another chance to economize
by merging two holidays in one. The King's
birthday falls on November 9th. Could not we
also out of compliment to him, fix that date as
the date for Thanksgiving, instead of continuing
Thanksgiving as a movable feast.
From the report of the Fisheries Department of
the Dominion, just issued, it is learned that 79,-
863 men were last year earning their livelihood
by exploiting the waters of Canada, using 5,500,-
760 fathoms of nets and other fishing.gear, repre-
senting a capital of $10,000,000. The lobster
plant alone is worth $1,334,180, comprising 858
canneries, disposed of on the seaboard of the ma-
time provinces. The salmon-preserving industry
of British Columbia, comprising 69 canneries, and
representing a capital of $1,380,000 gives employ-,
ment to 18,977 hands. The amount of capital in-:
vested in the fisheries last year exceeded that of
the previous year by $289,743. The total yield
of the catch of fish in Canada last year was $21,-
891,706, being an increase of about $2,250,000
ovor the yield of the proceeding year.
The sealing fleet last year numbered 37 vessels,
being an increase of eleven over the previous year,
and representing an aggregate of 22,641 tons reg-
ister. The total number of fur seal shing taken
by Canadian sealers during 1900 was 35,523. This
result is larger by 177 skins than that of the pre-
vious year, which in its turn largely exceeded the
catches of 1898 and 1897.
CANADA'S FOREIGN CREDITS.
Returns of the chartered banks for December
show that accumulations of ready capital in the
Canadian banks has reached at the close of the
year a total of $300,000,000 almost. Call loans
on stocks were $1,546,033 greater than in Decem-
ber, 1899.
Canada's debts in England decreased $69,600
during 1900, and its debt to other foreign markets
$382,792. But, on the other hand, Canada'scred-
it in Britain was $7,829,000 less than a year ago,
and its other foreign credits $10,614,000 less.
The banks have still further increased their hold-
ings of Government and railway securities, the
former being $7,672,000 in excess of December,


1899, and the latter $10,843,000 greater.
GRAND TRUNK'S NEW MOVE.
David Richards, senior member of the Liver-
pool shipping firm of Richards, Mulls & Co., is in
Montreal, and spent to-day in conference with G.
B. Reeve, the Manager of the Grand Trunk Rail-


way. As a result, Por~Lad, Me., will be a Grand
Trunk port 'the year round and the. Dominion
Line will supply a freight and passenger service.
It will however, continue its Boston and Montreal
lines.
The Grand Trunk management. states that it
has been compelled to make this arrangement to
provide for its traffic, which is expanding mouth
by month and week by. week. 'It is understood
that the terfiinal facilities, in Montreal are alto-
gether inadequate to m.pet this expansion, and the
Grand Trunk managei!hane felt that the only al-
ternate left in order tc ensure the prompt ship-
ment of the traffic is t.~get a line of steamers to
handle it at Portland.
Among some -.hippinra men it is stated that the
delay in the contruction of elerators and termi-
nals here has in dl eniee the company in this de-
cision to make- Portlhtil its all-the-year-round
port. This mnay be trts to some extent, but the
activity of its rivals in the grain carrying business
from Chicago and the West. has unquestionably
spurred it ou. ji
MANITOBA R L.L AY PURCHASE.
A despatch from Wipnip g states that negotia-
tions that have been pr.t'eeding for some time be-
tween the Manitoba (hmiernment. and officers of
the Northern Pacific I ailwav ha \e been concluded,
that the C.Goerniment htli piir.hased the railways
of that company in Maoitoba. the intention being,
it is reported, to lea-e the line to Mackenzie &
Mann. The 1anitba i.egisla.turi- meets on Feb-
ruary 21, when full de'.ilk \% ill lie made public
and the railway policy of the Government an-
nounced by Premier Ro1)liun.
PROTECTION OF S*iRGEON ADVOCATED.
Fisheries Inspector ( I. B. Sheppard, of Toronto
warns the Dominion Marine Department that un-
less steps are taken for fihe protection and repro-
duction of sturgeon, that valuable fish will soon
be extinct in various pats of Ontario. He strong-'
ly advises a drastic measure of protection for this
fish for a few years.
NEW BUFFALO TERMINALS FOR GRAND TRUNK.
The management of thle Grand Trunk Railway
Company has arranged With the New York Cen-
tral to operate trami % i.r the International Bridge
into the Union Depot at i Biffalo. effective April 1.
It is also understood thiqt all the through trains
via Niagara Falls, \iill -e thie Lehigh Valley's
station, Washington .'triet, Bnffilo. The Grand
Trunk's station in Eriittreet will be converted
into a freight station.
MEMORIAL L.R--. E FOR QUEEN.
New York, Febh 6-The sidewalk in front of
Trinity Church w %.-owded with men and women
at 2 o'clock oh S.uSai i'fternooii, although the
service there in mmi nmr of Quren Victoria was
_uot.held until 7 .\ jtothe church until
the last ten mIne, .. iigninn, -of tI'
service was onlyby ticket. Long before the doors
were opened to'the people who-had not obtained
tickets, every seat _jxthe great church was filled,
even to the benhtes which were placed in aisles
between the ends bf the pews. In the right of the
nave, at the front, were the representative of all
the foreign consulates in New York other than
the British. The officers of the British Consulate
and all the State and national officials, with those
of the City, who came, were seated in the left of
the nave.
Almost all the foreigners were in uniform.
There were many officers of the British Consular
Sern i.- in dark blue dress uniforms with white
and iiold braid ; some in naval uniforms and one.
or two officers of the King's military service who
happened to be in this city in their regimental
uniforms. General Brooke, the Commander of the
Department of the East of the United States Ar-
my, and all his staff in full uniform came over
from Governor's Island. Sir Percy Sanderson,
some of the other consular officers and a number
of young men from the St. George's, St. Andrew's
and St. David's societies, not all of them of the
Episcopal communion, were the ushers.
The only decorations of the church for the occa-
sion were the winding of the pulpit in the Union
Jack, intertwined with crepe, and three vases of
white flowers on the altar. At three o'clock the
strains were heard of the opening voluntary,
Chopin's Funeral March," for which the Queen
had asked in preparing the plan of the funeral
services at Osborne. The opening sentences were
read in deep and impressive tone by the Rev Dr
J Nevitt Steele, the vicar of Trinity Church.
Felton's chant of Psalm xxxiX. and the Goss-
Beethoven chant of Psalm xc. were sung. The
lesson was read by the Rev. Dr. D. Parker Mor-
gan. The anthem was Barne's Psalm XXIII,'
verse 4: Yea, though I walk through the valley
of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for
Thou art with me, Thy rod and Thy staff comfort
me." The Rev, Dr. Walpole Warren led the in-
toning of the Apostles' Creed and read the prayers
set down for the burial service except the com-
mital. These were followed by the Dead March
in Saul as an organ solo. Croft's arrangement
of the anthem, Man, that is born of a woman,
hath but-a short time to live and is full of mis-
ery," was sung.
The Rev. Dr. Morgan'Dix, the rector of the
parish, read the closing prayers. In the prayer
beginning, "Almighty and everliving God, we
yield unto Thee most high praise and hearty
thanks for the wonderful grace and virtue de-
clared in all Thy saints, who have been the choice
vessels of Thy grace, and the lights of the world
in their several generations," the following was
interpolated after the word generations : "and
especially Thy chosen servant Queen Victoria,
whose soul Thou hast been pleased to take unto
Thyself."
Archbishop Lewis of Ontario, the primate of
Canada, pronounced the Benediction. The choir
and the whole congregation sang St. Anna hym at
the close of the service: "0 O, God, our help in
ages past, our hope for years to come." The
closing voluntary was the second of the selections
made by the Queen for the funeral service, the
Beethoven Funeral March.
The procession from the chancel at the end of
the service was in the same order as that of the
beginning of the service.

Sexton of T initv Church.
Full Choir.
Ceremoniarius.
Chaplains of Consulates,
Chaplains of English Societies.
Curates of Trinity Church.
Vicars of Trinity Parish.
Dean Hoffman oft 1;i: Geie al Theologica Seminary.
Archdeacons Tiffany, Kleeck, Johnson, Thomas
and Evarts.


The Rev. Dr. J. Nevett Steele, Vicar of Trinity
Church.
The Rev. Dr. Morgan Dix, Rector of Trinity
Parish.
The Rev. Dr. G. Worthington, Dishop of
Nebraska.
gArchbishop J. T. Lewis of Ontario, with Two
Acolytes.


VICTORIA.

MAY 24, 1819-JANUARY 22, 1901.
Dead and the world feels widowed !
Can it be
That She who scarce but yesterday upheld
The dome of Empire, so the twain seemed on-,
Whose goodness shone and radiated round
The circle of her still expanding Rule,
Whose Sceptre was self-sacrifice, whose Throne
Only a loftier height from which to scan
The purpose of her People, their desires,
Thoughts, hopes, fears, needs, joys, sorrows, sad-
nesses,
Their strength in weal, their comforter in woe,-
That this her mortal habitation should
Lie cold and tenantless Alas ; Alas !
Too often Life has to be taught by Death
The meaning and the pricelessness of Love,
Not understood till lost. But She-but She,
Was loved as Monarch ne'er was loved before,
From girlhood unto womanhood, and grew,
Fresh as the leaf, and fragrant as the flower;,
In grace and comeliness until the day
Of happy nuptial, glad maternity,
More closely- wedded to her People's heart
By each fresh tie that knitted Her to Him
Whose one sole thought was how She still might
.be
Helpmate to England ; England then, scarce more,
Or bounded by the name of British Realm,
But by some native virtue broadening out
Into an Empire wider than all names,
Till, like some thousand-years out-branching oak
Its mildness overshadowed half the globe
With peaceful arms and hospitable leaves.
But there came to Her an hour,
When nor Sceptre, Throne, nor Power,
Children's love nor nation's grief
Brought oblivion or relief,
When the Consort at her side,
Worthiest mentor, wisest guide,
Was by Heaven's divine decree
From her days withdrawn, and She,
As dethroned by her distress,
Veiled her widowed loneliness ;
And, though longing still to hear
Voice so reverenced and dear,
All her People understood
Sacredness of Widowhood.
Then when She came amongst them yet once
more,
She came in Autumn radiance, Summer gone,
Leaf still on branch, but fruit upon the bought,
Fruit of long years and ripe experience,
A shade of grave bereavement on her face,
Withal more Wise, more pitiful, tender more
To others' anguish and necessities,
More loved, more reverenced, even than before ;
Till .not alone the dwellers in Her Isle,
Buti--the adventurous manhood of its loint,
In far-off seas and virgin mContinents
They won aud wedded to domestic laws
And home's well-ordered household sanctities,
Hailed Her as Mother of the Mother Land,
Queen, Empress, more than Empress or than
Queen,
The Lady of the World, on high enthroned
By right divine of duties well fulfilled,
To be the pattern to all Queens, all Kings,
All women, and the consciences of then,
Who look on duty as man's only right,
Nor yet alone to those empowered to be
The subjects of her Sceptre, proud to pray,
" God save our Empress-Queen Victoria "
But those, our kinsmen oversea, that cling,
With no less pride, to Kingless government,
Honoured and loved her, hailed her Queen of
Queens,
Peerless among all women in the world,
And long and late this happy season wore,
This mellow, gracious Autumn of her days,
This sweet, grave Indian Summer, till we grew
To deem it limitless, and half forgot
Mortality's decree. And now there falls
A sudden sadness on our lives, and we
Can only bow disconsolate heads and weep,
And look out from our lonely hearths and see
The homeless drifting of the winter mist,
And hear the requiem of the winter wind.
But from that Otherwhere man's Faith and Hove,
And mortal need for immortality
Invisibly conceive, I seem to hear
A well-remembered voice, august and mild,
Rebuking our despondency, and thus
Bidding us face the Future, as She faced
Anguish and loss, sorrow of life and debate,
The tearful sadness at the heart of things.
"' Dry your tears and cease to weep,
Dead I am not, no, asleep,
And asleep but to your seeing,
Lifted to that land of Being,
Lying on life's other shore.
Wakeful now for evermore,
Looking thence, I still will be.
So that you forget not me,
All that, more than, I was there,
Weighted with my Crown of care.
Over you I still will reign,
Still will comfort and sustain,
Through all welfare, through all ill,
You shall be my People still.
I have left you, of my race
Sons of wisdom, wives of grace,
Who again have offspring, reared
To revere and be revered,
Those on mighty Thrones, and these
Doomed thereto when Heaven decrees.
Chief amongst them all is One,
Well you know, my first-born Son,
Best and tenderest son to me,
Heir of my|Authority.
He through all my lonelier years
Tempered with his smile my tears,
And was, in my widowed want,
Comforter and confidant.
Therefore, trustful, steadfast, brave,
Give Him what to Me you gave,
Who am watching from Above,
Reverence, Loyalty, and Love !
And these gifts He back will give
Long as He shall reign and live."
ALFRED AUSTIN.
-The Times.

Prof. Reginald A. Fessenden, of Pittsburgh, Pa.,
was recently in Norfolk, Va., making some ex-
periments in wireless telegraphy along the coast
at stations between Capes Hatteras and Henry.
These experiments mark the first attempt of the
government to communicate storm warnings to
vessels at sea when off those dangerous points on
the coast. Professor Fessenden's idea is also to
send storm signals to the life-saving stations


throughout the East by this means whenever the
ordinary telegraph wires are disabled as is fre-
quently the case. The work is being done in
connection with the United States Weather Bu-
reau, with which Dr. Fessenden is connected, and
if the tests are successful the entire Atlantic coast
will be equipped according to his ideas.-Electri.
cal Review, New York, Feby. 2.


We copy from Collier's Windsor Guide the fol-
lowing description of
The Prince Consort's Mausoleum.
This magnificent tomb, erected in the Royal
Grounds at Frogmore to receive the remains of the
late Prince Consort, is situated about 100 yards
from that of the late Duchess of Kent. A more
secluded spot could not have been selected, the
site being surrounded by many different species of
flowering shrubs and trees of a large growth,
while, close by, is a beautiful specimen of the
deciduous cypress, the dark shades of which con-
trast well with the stones of the tomb. The
building was erected from the designs and under
the superintendence of Mr. Humbert, the Archi-
tect.
It consists of a centre cell with four transepts
branching North, South, East and West with a
Porch adjoining the Western Transept. The
whole floor is supported by brick vaults of mas-
sive work, which, at the same time, form cham-
bers, with loop-holes for the purposes of ventila-
tion, and prevention of damp rising to the super-
structure. They are entered by a small flight of
stone steps. The central cell is lighted by three
simi-circular headed windows in the clerestory,
which are externally decorated with Aberdeen
granite shafts and heads. The copper roof of the
central cell (which is octagonal on plan) rises
from the wall head to the apex with a flat pitch
in the manner of an Italian Campanile, and is
surmounted with a gilt cross.%gJThe sarcophagus
of Aberdeen granite occupies the centre of the
building, on a block of black marble, on which is
placed the recumbent statue of the Prince Consort,
in white marble, byBaron Marochetti.
In gold letters on the side of the sarcophagus is
the following inscription :
Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel
Duke of Saxony and Prince of Saxe Coburg and
Gotha
Prince Consort
Second Son of Ernest I.
Reigning Duke of Saxe Coburg and Gotha,
Married Feb. 10th, 1840, to Victoria
Queen of Great Britain and Ireland,
Died at Windsor, December 14th, 1861.
The four transepts are square on-plan and
lighted by windows similar to those in the cleres-
tory of the central cell with pedimented copper
roof. The Porch is entered by a handsome flight
of stone steps, lighted with circular headed three
light windows with shafts and heads of Guernsey
granite, and the front is supported by monolithic
granite columns.
The whole of the interior is faced with coloured
marble and serpentines, with frescoes'and other
decorations. The building is in the Italian style,
reminding one of the Campanile at Pisa';. it is 70
feet in the length and the same in height. -
The f-:.i]iitiiim stone bears the following in-
scription : "Thl foundation stone of this build-
ing, erected by Queen Victoria, in pious remem-
brance of her'great and 'good husband,7 was'laid
by her on the:15th March, A.D., 1862. :'.Blessed
are.they that sleep in the Lord.' The builder
was Mr. 0. Dines, under the supervision of Mr.
Thomas, Clerk of the Works." -
On Feb 4th, 1901, the'.mortal remains of Queen
Victoria were placed in the prepared receptable
alongside those of the Prince Consort.

LIST OF, UNCLAIMED LETTERS IN, THE
POST OFFICE HAMILTON, FEB. 8, 1901.
J D Adams, Clementine Armstrong, Robert Ba-
juns, W C Bascome,!Clementine' Barkely, George
Basden, Ithamer Benjamin, Daniel M Berkel,
James Berkel, Thomas Bertie, Fred L Brathys,
Jose Beneredes, Sandy W Bowers, E Bowker,
Eliza Boyles, Manuel Boros, Mrs Richard M Bur-
rows, Edgar Butterfield, J L Burt, Mr Byme,
Thomas Calder, James Carter, J Caiton, Rosalie
Casey, Felix Caines, Annie L Caines, Fada Carlo,
Jennie Carmichel, D) Catford, Edward Chambers,
Wm H Chippendel, Elizabeth Christopher, B S
Comad, John Coppin, Rosa Corbusier,.W G Dar-
rell, J D Darrell, Reg 0 A Davis, Mrs Dawson,
Joseph Dawson, Raimon Dawls, Angelie Daws,
Thomas Dennison, Brankus DeSilva, C D Dickin-
son, George Dickenson, E Dixon, Messrs Doom-
anys & Kram, W Dooley, T A Douglass, Harriet
M Douglass, Elijah W Douglas, Theo Douglas,
Anna Douglas, S V Duran, Maud Dyett,' WmujDe
Lough Field, J A Firth, Mr Framus Janie French,
Elizabeth Franks, Soloman Francis, GunnerW
Gallawoy, Samuel Gomes, Miss C Grady, Ernest
C Green, Miss D Harvey, D Harris, '.WiAj Hay,
Frances Ann Henry, Wm M Henry, Miss M Hen-
ry, Theo J Heyliger, James S Hobbs, Rhoda Hug-
gins, John Hues, Chas F Ingham, Mrs J H Ing-
ham, Ted Irish, Jos A James, Joseph James,
Jeremiah James, Jane Joell. Maud S Kelly, Mrs
G E Kernochan, Miss W Lane, James W Lister,
Mrs S F Masters, Miss May, Mrs A J Marks, John
W Manuel, Carl McAdams, G B McCabe, Thomas
McKenzie, Walter McHenry, Marie McIntosh,
Mrs W Miller, Stanley Mill & Co, Ethel Mills,
Jacob Mills, A J B Mills, Mrs .Tames Morresey,
Joaquim Moorish, F DaCostalMoore, Ss "Muriel,"
Ebenezer Nicholls, Nathaniel North, P A Noonan,
L B O'Mara, Thirza Panderson, S E Parker, Ade-
laide V Paul, Edith S Paul, Mrs E L Paul, Mrs
Penfold, James P Philipps, James W Philipps,
B L Pinney, Messrs Pinnock & Co, Andrew Pow-
ell, Victor Plegman, Mrs S M Reid, Miss Leve
Ritchinson, Major Chas A Richardson, Jose F
Rodriquez, Osear Roseberry, Joseph Rovan, K I
Roupilort, A L Robinson, Edward Saunders,
James R Schmidt, James Secundus, Daniel G
Simmons, Mrs Simmons, Elizabeth Simmons,
Marian Simmons, Joe F Simmons, Mrs H W Sla-
ter, Mabel Slater, John J Smith, James Smith,
Geo T S Smith, C W T Smith, James Smith, Min-
na C Smith, Frances A Solomon, Richard Stein-
berger, Albert Swan, Albertine Syder, Robert Sy-
der, Eliza Talbot, Miss Tall, John Thomas, Wm
H Tucker, Samuel W Tucker, Sarah Tipon, A
Vale, Ss Wastuater," T Watkins, George Wat-
son, Benjamin Walker, George W Wears, George
A E Wears, Wm A F Willett, Chas B Williams,
I Mrs Russ Whytat, WT White, Albert E Wil-
liams, Ann F William, Edward Willliams, Jose-
phina Woods, Wm Woods, A C Young.
4.
Epworth League Social.
The monthly social at Ireland Island was held in
i the Wesleyan Church on Tuesday last, but owing
to the very boisterous weather prevailing, many
of those taking part in the entertainment were
unable to be present, including the chairman,
Rev. J. Strothard.
Mr. R. Johnson was unanimously voted to fill
the Chair in the absence of Mr. Strothard and he
managed to conduct the meeting to a successful
issue despite the roar of the elements without.
Those who assisted to carry out the programme


are to be congratulated on their pluck amid so
many depressing circumstances.
To-night the Entertainment proper will it is
hoped be successfully presented, there are new
features in the programme which promises to be a
most interesting one in the hands of the Rev. J.
Strothard.








THE ROYAL GAZETTE.-TIESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1901.


WEEKLY REPORT OF THE WEATHER at
Gibbs' Hill Light Station at Bermuda between
the 3rd and L10th February, 1901 ; height
above the sea being 246 feet at base, where
the Register is kept.


Ll


Cw




5WI


General Remark


a- e a

58 29.800 0.05 Fine, cloudy*
60 29.420 0.15 Fresh gale, sq'ly.
53 29.580 "
54 29.730 0.06 "
56 29.840 0.97 Fine, Overeastt
60 29.650 0.08 +
61 29.7501 -- IFine.


--Evening squally.
[ t Evening unstd., thick squally.
Ocst. hazy, night squally.
-WALTER S. PERINCHIEF,
Principal Keeper.


Horundia opal ('N ttr,

Hamilton, February 12, 1901.

SOUTH AFRICA.
Affairs of importance have of late considerably
reduced the volume of South African rumours by
cable ; and the scraps of intelligence which have
filtered through do not very greatly illuminate
the situation.
Skirmishes are of daily occurrence, in' which
valuable lives are wasted to little apparent pur-
pose; the mobility of the Boers seems but little
impaired ; and their intimate knowledge of the
country enables them to assemble, upon the
shortest notice, in spots favourable to ambush, or
against points inadequately defended. General
Dewet is trekking about aimlessly in the. Orange
River Colony ; making preparations, no doubt for
his cherished scheme of invading Cape Colony.
But the Dutch there, as a body, betray no eager-
ness to join his standard, however much their
sympathies may be on his side ; and it is very
questionable if even the presence of Dewet among
them would, as is frequently alleged, induce
them to leave all and follow him. True, he has
signified his intention of annexing Cape Colony,
but, to what he proposes to annex it is not, as
yet, abundantly clear. He is further credited
with urging the Colonists not to join him-and
they seem inclined to follow his advice in this
particular. Reinforcements of troops are Lbeing
prepared ; the enrolment of volunteers is actively
proceeding ; and the most stringent measures have
been taken for guarding bays and landing-places
so as to prevent the introduction of arms and am-
munition.
Meetings have',been held by the "Stop the
War" partly in London ; and certain charges
made by unnamed British officers against the
conduct of other British officers have been brought
to [ths notice of the Commander-in-chief. The
official history of the war, in the shape of Lord
Roberts's despatches, has been issued. It seems,
according to the notice of these despatches in
our cables of Saturday, that, as regards its fight-
ing qualities the British army is still entitled to
respect, whilst its business side is not free from
reproach : consequently the case is not hopeless.
It is satisfactory to learn that the charges
brought against the hospital department have not
been sustained. An exhaustive inquiry has de-
monstrated that in no previous campaign have the
sick and wounded received so much and so care-
ful attention.

The Bernmuda Pocket Alusnuan k,
Guide and Directory, 1901-
58th year of publication.
The above annual publication for 1901 is a wor-
thy companion to its long line of predecessors,
and is a handy compendium of almost constant
reference. Revised to date, its information 's (f
positive value in its general reliability. The im-
portance attached to it may be gathered from the
fact, that, if its issue is a few days late, enquiries
are constantly made when will it be out. The
New Code of Signals (see page 188), in use since
January 1st, is published in 1901 Almnanack and
will be found most serviceable. There are several
additions to the usual description of matter. The
record of the Public Services of certain public
officers of the colony has been enlarged and put in
better shape. On pages 278-280 will be found a
most interesting specimen of the form of Convey-
ance of the site of the town of Hamilton made to
the Commissioners in 1790. In the Record Book
of the Commissioners for the township of Hamil-
ton are contained the Conveyances made to them
in that way of the various lots of land taken up
for the site of Hamilton. This is the first time
that example of such a Conveyance has been made
public, so that, except to a very few persons, the
matter will be quite a novelty. The statistical
information will be found, as heretofore, full and
reliable. The Guide portion has been carefully
gone through, some additions have been made to it
and in order to keep the matter within reasonable
compass old information has been curtailed, and,
where considered of any importance, references
have been made to former issues of the Almanack,
so that persons desiring further information might
the more readily have access to it. The special
information given in the Directory will be found
sufficiently extensive for all general purposes,
supplemented as it is by the Army and Navy and
Colonial Lists which take up considerable space.
The advertisements are not the least interesting
or important section of the Almanack, and to vis-
itors and others convey some intelligent idea of
what Bermuda has in leading commercial busi-
ness and in other lines to exhibit. Altogether
within its standard blue covers the Bermuda
Almanack, in a handy pocket form, contains a
well digested mass of matter, locally useful and
necessary, and to the outside world acceptable as
keeping always to the front what is worth know-
ing and remembering in and about these islands.
It should be in general use, and to visitors to Ber-
muda it is an indispensable Vade Mecum."
4 *
Bushell's Handbook of Bermuda, 1901.
We have to acknowledge with thanks the re-
ceipt on Saturday last of a copy of Bushell's
Handbook of Bermuda, 1901. ,The book is, as
usual, neatly printed, and is of more convenient
size than previous issues.
4
Carriage Accident.
As Mr. H. J. Zuill was driving to Hamilton on
Saturday afternoon, between four and five o'clock,
he saw, descending the hIill just below Mayflower,
a market waggon belonging to Mr. Clarence Dar-
rell, Flatts. The horse became restive, the breech-
ing gave way, and the animal broke out of har-
ness. The waggon left to itself came down the in-
cline at a tremendous pace. Mr. Zuill drew off
to the side in hopes to clear it, but it took a sud-
den turn crashing into his buggy bending axles
and knocking three wheels almost into chips.
Fortunately this was thle extent of thle damage,
which might have been serious, as the wlggon
bore a load of about lO10001bs.


The Woman's Missionary Society of St. George's
will have a Public Meeting on Feb. 27th in the
Lecture Room of the Methodist Church. Mrs.
Covil, Miss J. Strothard and our best local talent
yill take part.


.I


London, Feb. 10-Lord Raglan under Secretary
of State for War informed the correspondent of
the Associated Press to-day that Gen. Sir Evelyn
Wood is not going to South Africa and that no
peace commission is contemplated.
London, Feb. 11--A solemn reaffirmation of the
Anglo Portuguese alliance is pending I am in-
formed says the Lisbon correspondent of the
Daily Mail" that England will require Portu-
guese troops to guard certain points in South
Africa in order to enable the British employed at
those points to join the fighting columns.
Cape Town, Feb. 10-Yesterdey Sir Alfred
Milner reviewed 7,000 men of the new volunteer
force and made a spirited address to the Officers.
He expressed his gratification at the loyal re-
sponse the colony had made to the call, empha-
sized the great value of mounted men and com-
plimented the officers and all concerned upon the
excellent work already done in stemming the
Boer invasion.
It has been said that the enemy would never
come to Cape Town ; but anyone who, in the face
of the events of the last few months, will say
anything is impossible because it seems improba-
ble is too silly to be argued with. I am aware
that I risk being called an alarmist, but it is bet-
ter to be called an alarmist than to run any risk.
There was a time when it was regarded as im-
possible for the Boers to penetrate the extreme
West and South of Cape Colony, but they have


New York Weather Report.
New York, Feb. 9.-Weather-Snowing heavi-
ly. Wind Easterly. Temperature 18.
New York, Feb. 11.-Weather Clear. Wind
Westerly. Temperature 20.
4 a
Extracts from Brigade Orders.
Head Quarter Office,
Prospect, 7th February, 1901.
The yearly inspection of Army Schools will be
held as follows:-
PROSPECT, 7th & 8th inst.-Elder children, pupil
teachers and adults.
12th & 13th inst.-Infants' & Sewing
Schools.
14th inst.-" Books, &c.
IRELAND ISLAND, 15th inst.-Adults at 2.30 p.m.
BOAZ, 18th &:19th inst.-Elder children, infants
and adults.
ST. GEORGE'S, 21st & 22nd inst.-Elder children,
pupil teachers & adults.
26th A: 27th :inst.-Infants', ani
Sewing Schools.
1st March-Books, &c.
The examination for 2nd and 3rd class certifi-
cates of edueation:will be held as follows :--
Prospect 11th inst., at 9 a.m.
Ireland Island, (includ-)
ing candidates from 15th inst. at 10 a.m.
Boaz. J
St. George's 25th inst. at 9 a.m.
8th February.
It is notified for information that 2nd Lieut. J.
Lamont, 1st West India Regiment, passed in sub-
jects (a] and (b):for promotion to the rank:of
Lieutenant on the 29th ultimo.
A Board of Officers will assemble at the Station
Library, Prospect, at 11 a.m. on the 11th instant,
to verify the library accounts and the number of
books on'charge, and to condemn such books as
are:u serviceable.
A Medical Board will assemble at the Station
Hospital, Prospect, at 11.30 a.m. on Tuesday, the
12th instant, for the purpose.of reporting] on the
health of proposed invalids.
1 Coy. Sergt.-Major, wife, and child, and 73
rank and file, 1st West India Regiment, having
arrived by the S. S. Beta on the 5th instant, are
taken on the strength of the command from that
date.
2nd Lieuts. C. H. Harrison and G. W. Rolph,
1st West India Regiment, having arrived by the
S. S. Ocamo on the 6th instant, are taken on the
strength ofjthe-command from that'date.
One Sapper, Royal Engineers, having embarked
on the S. S. Beta on the 6th instant for passage to
England via Halifax, N.S., is struck off the
strength of the command from that date. "* .
Attention is invited to the instructions given
in para. 1231, Regulations for Army Ordnance
Services, 1900. The system laid down will come
into force in this command from 1st April next.
Accountants who'are not in possession of materi-
als used in the carbon process should immediate-
ly put forward demands for the same.

HOPEFUL FOR EMPRESS FREDERICK.
Berlin, Jan. 31.-The Frankfurter Zeitung's
correspondent at Cronberg says he has learned
from a well-informed source that the condition of
Empress Frederick is-not~likely to change'in the
inimnediate future, unless fresh complications set
in. Her Majesty has been fairly free from pain
during-the"last few-weeks. She was in hopeful
spirits until the death of her mother, Queen Vic-
toria,-the news of which, although it at first'pros-
trated her did not affect her health as much as
wes expected. She has been able to take an in-
terest in the affairs of the world. She reads the
newspapers and concerns herself with the pro-
jects for the erection of a monument to. her late
husband, Emperor Frederick. She goes diving
frequently. Her disease seems to have come to
a standstill, and she may live for years unless
there are other complications. The recent gath-
ering of her children at Cronberg was due'rather
to their desire to comfort her in her grief.than to
alarm because of her health.

SALE OF QUEEN'S .LAST PHOTOGRAPH.
London, Jan. 31.-Lafayette, who took the
last photograph of the Queen in Dublin, with a
sprig of shamrock in her bonnet, has sold over
100,000 copies and the demand is increasing.

Our Cable Despatches.

Jamaica, Feb. 11.-The North American and
West Indian squadron arrived here this morning.
The Quail arrived yesterday. She came without
convoy.
Halifax, N. S., Feb. 11-The Admiralty Court
has awarded to steamer Trocas Moses 5,000 for
towing steamer Reresby into Bermuda, Dec. 1
last. The Reresby while bound from Hull to
Baltimore had lost her propellor at sea.
SOUTH AFRICA.
London, Feb. 11-The war office has received
the following despatch from Lord Kitchener,
the commander-in-chief in South Africa. "Pre-
toria Feb. 9th. The columns working Eastward
occupied Ermelo Feb. 6th with slight opposition.
A large force of Boers estimated at 7,000 under
Louis Botha, retired Eastward. About 800
wagons with families passed through Ermelo on
the way to Amsterdam and very large quantities
of stock are being driven East. A peace dele-
gate under sentence of death and other Boer
prisoners were taken away by the Boers. All
reports show that the Boers are exceedingly bitter.
Fifty Boers surrendered. "Louis Botha with
2,000 men attacked Gen. Smith DI)orrien at Orange
Camp Feb. 6th. He was repulsed after severe
fighting. Gen. Spruit and Gen. Randemeyer were
severely wounded, two Field Cornets were killed,
twenty of tmhe Boer dead were left in our hands
and many severely wounded. Our casualties
were 24 killed and 53: wounded.
Our movement to tihe east is reported to have
thoroughly upset all the enemys calculations and
created a regular panic in the district. Christian
Dewet appears to be crossing the line south of
Jagersfontein road to the west this morning hav-
ing failed to effect a crossing by thIe drifts east of
Bethulie.
In Cape Colony, Calvinia has been occupied by
Col de Lisle who entered Feb. 6th. The enemy
retiring toward Kendardt. Col Haig is driving
the midland commando northward past Aber-
deen."


St. Petersburg, Feb. 11-;-The Bourse Gazette in
advocating a Irench-Russian-American-Jalanese
alliance to affect the Anglo-German alliance,
which a portion ef the press persists in believing
real, says the other three,Powers should accept
Russia's leadership and make peace with China
without delay, regardless of the Anglo-Germans.
The Hague, Feb. 8--Queen Wilhelmina and
Prince Henry had an enthusiastic reception at
Apeldoorn Thursday night. Yesterday they stroll-
ed through the Park and visited the Royal stables.
Great preparations are being made at Amsterdam
for the Queen's visit.
Sofia, Bulgaria, Feb. 11.-The elections to the
Sobranje (national assembly) have passed off
quietly, except at Philippo, capital of Kaumelia,
where there was rioting, in which two persons
were killed and several others were injured.
Madrid, Feb. 11.-Martial law has been de-
clared in Valencia.
Washington, Feb. 9.-It was said to-day that
the War Department had made these demands on
the Cuban constitutional convention. The right
to control by military the whole Island until a
native government shall, be formed which the
United States shall approve; the right to interfere
at any time to prevent the Islands coming under


reached one aud are within a few miles of the
other ; therefore it is necessary to take every pre-
caution. Most men prefer to be called alarmists
and to safeguard their property. That is better
than to be called plucky fellows and to lose your
property." SiIFr
Lisbob, Feb. 10.-Portugal, it is alleged, is
preparing to send troops to aid the British in
South Africa. King Charles will remain in Lon-
don until to-morrow. Great efforts are being
made to secure a new-Treaty of Alliance with
England, superseding antiquated treaties.
London, Feb. 8.-Lord Roberts'sdetail of the
mail despatches, ranging from Feb. 6 to Nov. 15,
1900, were Gazetted this evening; they fill 157
quarter pages, and make up the official history of
the war, although without throwing new light
upon several interesting and disputed subjects,
such as the Sannas Post afiair.- Hundreds of offi-
cers, non-commissioned "officers and men are fa-
vourably mentioned, including Lord Kitchener,
who is referred to in warm terms. Sir_ Redvers
Buller comes in for criticism.
London, Feb. 9-Commenting upon the de-
spatch of Lord Roberts, the Times says, the most
vivid impression produceTis, that on its fighting
side, the British army need not fear comparison
with any troops in the world. A second and less
agreeable impression is that the army is less
strong on its business than on its "fighting side.
Its splendid qualities have been largely neutra-
lized by want of foresight, initiative organizing
abilities, common intelligence and common sense
on the part of those whose business it was toluti-
lize their fighting qualities to the utmost.
London, Feb. 9-The-appearanoc of Bubonic
Plague at Cape Town seilns likely to add to the
difficulties of the situatih. The authorities there
have decided upon the a wholesale extermination'of
rats. Should the disease spread it will necessitate
changes in the military arrangements. To-day
Sir Alfred Milner makes another earnest appeal
to employers to allow a.&oany men as possible to
enroll in the colonial mounted defence force.
From Delagoa Bay it is reported that the British
have occupied Ermelo and Carolina, which, until
recently, were Boer depots. The Boers held up
a Natal train near Vlakfontein. The few soldiers
on board exhausted their cartridges and the:Boers
then robbed the passengers, afterwards allowing
the train to proceed. .
Cape Town, Feb. 11.-Ten cases of what is sup-
posed to be the bubonic plague have been isola-
ted. One of the victims is a white person, the
others are natives. A native child has died of
the disease.
CHINA.
Shanghai, Feb. 10-It is reported here, that
the Empress Dowager yielding'to foreign pressure
has allowed Emperor Kwang Sul' to resume the
reins of government. A despatch from Pekin as-
serts that all the fortified passes beyond the terri-
tory held by the allies are being garrisoned by the
Chinese and that Boxers are re-entering Pekin
secretly.
Miscellaneous.
London, Feb. 9-As a result of the visit to
Cowes to attend the naval parade of the German
war vessels, Mr. H. H. Wilson, (Honorary editor
of the Navy League Journal), is writing a series
of articles declaring that-the personnel and man-
agement of the German navy are superior in
many points to the British. His articles are cre-
ating no little comment.
London, Feb. 9-It is rumored that Crown
Prince Frederick Williail of Prussia will marry
Princess Ena of Battenburg, daughter of Princess
Beatrice.
London, Feb. 9-The "' portman under-
stands that for the coming se, on most of King
Edward's race horses in teiyg will be leased to
the Duke of Ievonshire. "
New York, Feb.li-Dricnssing'King Edward's
visit to the continuMidi oni t1mblegmm to the
tribune says, sooneia' We opening of Parlia-
ment the King witl go to Germany to see his
sister, the Empress Frederick and to visit the
Kaiser. It is believed he will spend a week or
two at the Riviera. Naturally events of the last
three weeks have affected, him acutely, and he
may recognize the wisdom of a short rest, but at
the same time there is no 'truth in the report that
his health is far from satisfactory.
London, Feb. 9-The King presided at a meet-
ing of the Privy Council at Marlborough House
this morning to consider 4he terms of the speech
from the throne at the opening of the first parlia-
ment of his reign Feb. 14. Levee dress was worn.
The Duke of Marlborough was among the Privy
Councillors present. -
Windsor, Feb. 8.-The recumbent statue of the
late Queen Victoria, chiselled 30 years ago, is be-
ing prepared for its place on top of the Sarcopha-
gus by the side of the Prince Consort's statue.
London, Feb. 8.-KingEdward, it is semi-of-
ficially asserted, desires iifto be known that the
Duke of Cornwall and Ygrk will not be created
Prince of Wales until after his visit to the Colo-
nies. An interregnum without the title is con-
sidered desirable. Definite preparations are be-
ing made for the Duke's trip.
Berlin, Feb. 8-The report that Emperor Wil-
liam has conferred upon !;ord Roberts the Order
of the Black Eagle, althdigh not officially con-
firmed, is now accepted as true. A number of
confirmatory despatches from London are pub-
lished to-day.
Allahalad, Feb. 9-The belief is held by well
informed persons here, that the Duke of Con-
naught will be appointed commiander-in-chief of
the British forces in India.
Paris, Feh. 10.-The strike in the Paris dress-
making trade has assumed formidable proportions.
The first to strike were the journeyman tailors
employed by a few firms mainly engaged in put-
ting out tailor-made costumes. This afternoon
the strikers held a meeting at the labour exchange
where it appeared that some 4,000 tailors have
joined thie movement.
Rome, Feb. 11.-Accoqring to the newspapers
of Rome, Signor Giuseppe Zanardelli, has been
definitely charged by King Victor Victor Em-
manuel to form a ministry to succeed the Saracco
cabinet.
Vienna, Feb. 10-The condition of former king
Milan of Servia who has been seriously ill for
some time has taken a turn for the worse, both
his lungs are congested, the heart is very weak
and the malady has entered an extremely critical
stage.
Vienna, Feb. 11.-Formher King Milan, of Ser-
via, is dead.
St. Peter.sburg, Feb. 8-Advices from Baku this
evening announce that the fire has been extin-
guished. Ten factories and five depots were
burned containing altogether 35,000,000 roods
(Russian measure) of naptha and naptha refuse.
It is estimated that the loses will exceed 6,000,-
000 roubles.


the dominion of any foreign power and have coal-
ing stations at-Havana, Cienfuegos and Santiago.
Santiago-de-Chili, Feb. 7-Don Pedro Moutt
has been proclaimed in Valparaiso a candidate for
the Presidency.

Custom House-Hamilton.
CLEARED.
Feb. 11-11. M. S. Trinidad, Fraser, New York.

Custom House-St George's
ENTERED. a
Feb. 11-Br S S Runo, Evans, from Sunderland
to Baltimore with 100 tons general cargo, in
want of coals and propellor blades gone,-John
S Darrell & James, Agents.
11-Amr. Schr Luia G. liable, McKowan,
from Demerara to New York, cargo, sugar, in
distress, vessel leaky,-W. E. Meyer & Co.,
Agents.
11-Amr. S S Davia, Durie. from Norfolk,
Va., to this port with a cargo of 901 tons of
coals to W. E. Meyer & Co.
11 -French S S Massilia, Jaubert, from Mar-
seilles to New York with a cargo of 500 tons,
general, in want of coals.
CLEARED.
11-French S S Massilia, Jaubert, to New
York, obtained coals.
AT MURRAY'S ANCuIoIAGE.
Br. S S Castano, from Liverpool to Nex. York,
in want of coals.
Br. S S Lochwood, before reported; returned
for a further supply of coal.
f
PASSENGERS.
In the I. M. S. Trinidad from Bermuda yes.
terday :-Mr and Mrs H C Flower, Mr and Mrs
E S Burnham, Mr and Mrs G E Kernochan, Mr
and Mrs F A Messenger. Mr and Mrs L H
Rubenstein, Mrs M E Blanc, Mrs F D Young-
blood, Mrs Robert Crosbie, Miss S Van Praag,
Miss I M Crosbie, Miss A Dusenberry, Miss L
Wilson, Miss E Seward, Rev Joseph Marchand,
Rev C A Brunauldt, Lt Col J E Margetts, Messrs
W D Richardson, J W Hudson, G Tracey, W
Disley, C A Claflin, E W Dusenberry, L J
Thompson, J N Beach, J F H King, Master B
W King, Master S Burnham,-SECOND CLASS-
Miss 0 K Oldinler.

New York, Feb. 9.-Madiana sailed at noon to-
day with seventy six cabin passenger. Still
snowing. Pretoria is sighted off highlands.
Feby. 11.-S. S. Oruro left St. Kitts for Ber-
muda 2 p. m. Monday.
Feby. 11.-S. S. Eruna arrived at Yarmouth,
N: S. at noon to-day.
New York, Feby. 11.-S. S. Pretoria sailed bar
at one o'clock,-ninety-seven cabin passengers.

WANTED-Young Lady who understands Book-
keeping thoroughly Appply,
BERMUDA FURNISHING & SUPPLY CO-


TELEPHONE 2-27. 5
21
B. J. Hayward & Co. 1
30
50(
HOUSE BUILDERS 10
10
AfNDA 7

GENERAL CARPENTERS. B
300
.


Personal attention given to all orders.

EAST BROADWAY.
Hamilton, January 11th,1901-3p. S.o.-3m.



Hotel Frascati,

FLATTS,

NOW OPEN,

This House has recently been enlarged and
newly furnished throughout.
The sanitary arrangements are up to date,
Facilities for hot and cold, fresh and salt water
baths.
The location is one of the healthiest and most
picturesque in Bermuda. Unexcelled bathing,
boating and fishing.
To driving parties we are always prepared to
serve dinner, afternoon teas in the house or on
the lawn, or a light lunch at any time ; parties of
gentlemen or of ladies and gentlemen can have
suppers to order by telephoning in the forenoon.

ALONZO PENISTON,
Manager.
Telephone No. 230.
Cable Address "Frascati."
February 9-t f.






Gosling



Brothers.



Old Crow RYE WHISKY

Wilson.. RYE WHISKY

Very Old Liqueur

SCOTCH WHISKY

"Special Old Highland"


WHISKY,
(as supplied the N. Y. Yacht Club.,)

Very Old(-- _

IRISH WHISKY,





T Club Cockltails


MIartini,

M anhattan,
rjp0~~~ (3jl


FURNITURE SALE,
Etc.
TO BE SOLD

By Public Auction,
At "Cavendish," the residence of
Colonel Leake, R. A. M. C.,

ON MONDAY NEXT,
The '18th Instant, at 12 o'clock.

Household Furniture, etc.
Consisting of :-.
PIANO (by William Whitely)
Music Rack, Piano Stool,
Fancy Tables, Wicker Chairs, Sofa;
Handsome Cabinet, Chairs,
Curtains, Carpet,
Handsome Cheffioneer, Lamps,
Pictures, Vases, etc., etc.,
Dining Table, Extension Top,
Handsone Sideboard,
Book Case, Cupboard, etc.,
Table Covers, Chairs, Rugs, Mats,
Small Sideboard, Ice Box etc.,
Bedsteads, Spring Cots, Wardrobes,
Portable Chest of Drawers, Baths, etc.,
Lookgi Glasses, Chairs, Crockery,
Towel Rails, Tables, Washstands,
Hair Mattrass, Iron Bedsteads, etc.,
Glassware and Crockery, etc.,
Scales and Weights,
Mincing Machine, Meat'Safe,


etc.,


etc.


etc.


and
HARNESS, Bridles, Saddlery,
One Comfortable CARRIAGE.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Government Auctioneers.
Hamilton, Bda., 12/2/1901.


By Public Auction,
In Front of the Stores of the Un-
dersigned,

On Thursday Next,
the 14th inst., at 1 o'clock.


NOTICE.


The Thirteenth

Annual Exhibition

OF THE
BERMUDA AGRICULTURAL
ASSOCIATION
will be held at the
Rosebank Grounds, Pembroke,
ON -
THURSDAY, 25th, & FRIDAY, 26th
April 1901.
Prizes will be offered for exhibits of live stock,
poultry, agricultural, horticultural and dairy
products, furniture, art and industry, etc.
A bench show of dogs and cats will take -place
on Friday, 26th April.
Further particulars relating to the Exhibition
will be published hereafter.
By direction,
F. LENNOCK GODET,
Secretary Bermuda Agricultural
Association.
Hamilton, February 12, 1901-1


A Sale of Work.
Principally cbildrens clothing made by the Guild
of St. Helena, will be held in
THE CHURCH HUT,

Prospect Barracks,
ON THURSDAY FEB. 14TH,
beginning at 2.30 p. m.
A Fancy Stall and refreshments.
Proc eds in aid of Army Guilds' Home for Soldiers
Orphans.


Consignments for New York Market

The Undersigned solicits consignments ofj
POTATOES, GREEN VEGETABLES
AND OTHER PRODUCE
TO MESSRS.

J. & G. Lippmann,
By whom highest market rates are ob-
tained and prompt returns made.
JOHN BARRITT,
Hamilton.
January 4, 1901-tf 3p.


Barrels choice Table Potatoes,
Small Tubs New York Butter,
Cases Condensed Milk,
3 Boxes pale Yellow Soap,
Bags Table Salt, 10 lbs. each,
Boxes small Lemons,
lbs good Nutmegs, (in lots),
> Caddies Black Tobacco, 16 & 12 lbs.
0 Cases 6 doz. each pints Lager Beer,
0 Medium size Cocoanuts,
0 tins Barley Sugar Tablets,
) Boxes London Wax Candles,
5 Boxes Toilet Soap,
0 Tins English Assorted Confectionery
Boxes Bread Soda, Boxes Salts,
0 lbs. Lump Starch, (in lots),
& Drums.Halifax Codfish,
D Packages Swedish Safety Matches,
2 Barrels Pearl Barley, (in lots,)
) Small Picnic Hams,
) lbs. Green Ginger,
0 lbs Shredded Oats,
Boxes Cigarettes,
Boxes Arrowroot Starch,
ndry Articles Household Furniture,
Etc., Etc., Etc.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
mailton, 12/2 Bda., 1901.






THE ROYAL GAZETTE-TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1901.


H. A. 4- E. SMITH, Reid St.


10 PER CENT OFF WRAPPERS, DRESSING
DRESSING SA CQ UES.


GOWNS AND


This wrapper stock has been officially inspected and gets its marching orders
to-day. There are obvious reasons for this move. The sizes are broken, the stock
incomplete, the spring stiff will be along in due time and we need the room.
In order, that 'a uniformity of value may be ar-
rived at, all garments which are undesirable in color
V &c have been MARKED DOWN; but in addition to
M this the 10 PER CENT DISCOUNT WILL BE
ALLOWED ON THE ENTIRE LOT. Customers
in the country will receive the same benefit of discount
as those who personally visit the store.

The discount will be taken off' these figures:-
FLANNELETTE WRAPPERS AND GOWNS,
S a.6sortedJ!Fancy designs, 6/. 7/. 8/. 8/6. 9/6. 10/.
10/6. 11/6. each.
FLANNELETTE SACQUES, assorted plain
and fancy material, 3/. 3/6. 4/3. 5/3. each.
ALL WOOL FLANNEL WRAPPERS GOWNS,
Prettily Trimmed,, 15/. 16/. 18/. each.
Do. Do. Do. Sacques, Plain cloth,
stylishly Trimmed, 12/.

We beg to advise our AMERICAN CUSTOMERS that we are in receipt of
a fine assortment of TRAVELLING BUGS in SCOTCH TARTAN EFFECT
and are offering same at very close figures.
We allow the usual CASH DISCOUNT and full value for AMERICAN
CURRENCY.


Notice to

Importers,

Direct
London
Line.
Steamship a M o,"



Will Leave

LONDON
FOR

BERMUDA,
On or about
March 9th.

First Class Passenger Accommodation

Freight and Passage for Jamaica and
New Orleans, solicited at usual rates.
W. T. JAMES,
Agent.
Hamilton and St. George's, Bda.
HY. LAMGRIDGE & Co.,
Agents,
16 Great St. Helen's,
London, E. C.,
England.
3p

PICKFORD & BLACK
Steamship Co., Ltd.
PROPOSED ITINERARY.
Canada Bermuda, W. Indies, Demerara Service
(SOUTHBOUND TRIPS.)
Leaves Leaves Due Bda.
STEAMERS. St. John, Halifax, to sail for
N.B. N.S. W. Indies.
*OCAMO Deer. 5 Deer. 20 Deer. 24
ERNA 22 31 Jany. 4
*ORURO Jany. 12 Jany. 17 21
OCAMO 24 31 Feby. 4
*ERNA Feby. 9 14 18
ORURO 21 28 March 4
(NORTHBOUND TRIPS. )
Steamers are due at Bermuda to sail for St. John
or Halifax :-
ORURO Jan. 5; OCAMO Jan. 18;
ERNA Feb. 2 ; ORURO Feb. 15 ;
OCAMO Mar. 5: ERNA March 15.
ORURO, April 2 ;
PORTS OF CALL :-Bermuda, *St. Kitts, *An-
tigua, *Montserrat, *Dominica, St. Lucia,
Barbados, *St. Vincent, *Grenada, *Tobago,
Trinidad, Demerara.
Steamers marked do not call at ports
marked on the Southbound trip nor at
Tobago and Grenada on the Northbound
bound trip.
Halifax, Bermuda, Turks Ids., Jamaica Service
Sa. Beta sails from Halifax, N.S., on the
15th of each month, due at Bermuda to sail
for Turks Islands and Jamaica on the 18th ;
returning from south is due at Bermuda to
sail for Halifax, N. S., abcut the 2nd of each
month.
W. T. JAMES,
Agent,
Hamilton and St. George's, Bermuda.

NOTICE.
TO GROWERS OF BERMUDA
ARROWROOT.
Stick arrowroot will not be received at
THE FACTORY, "BELLEVUE,"
between this date and Monday 25th inst.
On and after that date deliveries may be con-
tinued until further notice.
W. T. JAMES.
Paget.
February 9, 1901-2 3p


FOR


SALE.


200 Brls.


GI arn t SAd PotatoIs,

Just ready for Planting,

At 10s. per Barrel.

Also,

75 Brls.


Triimpil Potatos,
A rare chance for Farmers to get
seed for their early Fall Crop.
...- SCHOONER
h SAINTE MARIE,
will sail for St. John, N.B. Freight for
return solicited.
Am prepared to supply Farmers with
ONION BOXES
At 4:d. per Box, provided they give their
orders before the sailing of vessel.
Parties wanting Lily Boxes have now
a good chance to obtain them at a low
rate.
HY. C. OUTERBRIDGE,
Washington Point.
February 11, 1901.



J SCH-OLTZ.


4 Front Street,
Hamilton.


York Street,
St. George


The sole proprietor of the
entire stock of the late E. T.
CHILD'S Jewelry Business,
Consisting :-
Diamonds (genuine)
Gold and Silver Watches,
Gold and Silver Jewelry,
Solid Silver and Plated Ware,
Fancy and Old Silver Goods,
Souvenirs in Great Variety.
With extensive recent impor-
tations, to replenish my stock
from all correspondents of late
E. T. Child in Europe, United
States and Canada.
All are offered
at more rea-
sonable prices
than ever....

IN CHANCERY
Or NEW JERSEY, TRENTON, N.J.,
DECEMBER, 31, 1900.
CHANCELLOR WILLIAM J. MAGIE,
This Day granted an absolute decree
of divorce to MAUD DELLMERE HALL,
from GEORGE HENRY HALL, of South-
ampton Parish, Bermuda, the decree also
gives the care and custody of the Child
Bratrane Edward Hall, to the complain-
ant and it is further decreed that the
defendant pay costs of suit.
WILLIAM A. LEWIS,
Solr.


2 3p-T.o.


R. & G. Corsets, Never Stretch.

Why e Becauise1 all the stretch is taken out of them in the making.
Every R. & G. Corset is put on an iron frame and subject-
ed to a tremendous strain before being packed up; thus,
every particle of "give" is taken from the materials. Is
... not the" fitd that a Corset retains ith shapliness a specially
go6d point? Hence the popularity of R. & G. Corsets.


R. & ; CORSETS.

At. %3/5
Extra Long and Medium Waisted.
At,.-4/2
The New "'Straighf Front."


S MONARCH SHIRTS.
Here we have the newest patterns in the ,
New Century Coloired Shirts. The best
styles known to Shirt makers-the name
Monarch tells the whole story.
At 4/3 Soft Fronts, Cuffs detached,


or .attached.


Stiff Fronts, "


MEN'S SHOES.

"Hamilton" is the mark on them and
satisfaction must go with them-and no
fancy prices.
-TAN 9/3, 11/6, -13/, -14/,, 17/6.
BLACK 9/3, 11/6, 13/, 14/6.


S R. & 0. CORSETS.

*At 4/5
Extra Long and Medium Waisted.
At 6/8
Medium Waisted, Fine Contd. -


MEN'S COLLARS. 1

Would you see the best styles in the pop-
ular Double Collars ?" Look in here
for them. Fourteen styles to choose
from in heights varying from 2 to 3 inches.
Your choice of the lot, either English or
American, for 7d. each.

BLANKETS.


Don't be caught again with too few
Blankets. Here are prices that will cure
the trouble.
At 5/6 White, wool, coloured borders
64 x 86
At 6/6. 64x 86
At 8/3 72 x 94
At 11/6 72 x 94


HAMILTON. PEARMANS' CASH STORES, SHELLY BAY.
7



LIGHTBOURN'S
FINE OLD

HIGHLAND MALT WHISKY

J.-E.1.-

PERSONALLY SELECTED
S .3s. 3d. per Bottle.

36s. Case.

4s i-


NEW A LOW
GOODS J0.. Ii .t.IJ.MiYR PRICES

Colonial


Sewing Machines.


High Rimn, Automatic Bobbin Winder,
Loose Balance Wheel,
Double Lock Stitch.

Self-Setting Needle, Self-Threading Shuttle,
Beat Materials, Oak; will do any kind of work


A full set of
Tucker, Hemmer,


from'the very lightest to the very heaviest.
self-setting attachment, nickel plated,Tare furnished free of charge:-Ruffler
Binder, Braider, Bolibins, and Needles, &c., with book of instructions.


Price


5 each.


OLD G LENLIVET WHISKEY.


clearg


Pure,


33s. per Case.


Safe,


and


Me allow.


3s. per Bottle


ONCE TASTED, NEVER CHANGED. ABSOLUTELY
RELIABLE-

JNO. F. BURROWS & Co.,
Sole Agents for Bermuda.


I AM


Notice.
INSTRUCTED TO SELL


On Saturday Next,
at 4 p.m. on the Premises,
All that cei tain lot of Landgwith a
COTTAGIE nearing completion situated in
Warwick Parish in the Islands of Bermuda trian-
gular in shape and bounded on the East by a pub-
lic Cross Road leading from the north Longitud-
inal road to the Main or Middle' Longitudinal
road and, there measuringoone hundred and eighty
feet or thereabouts, on the south by land of the
devisees of Thomas Gay Dunstan and there meas-
uring fifty-two feet or thereabouts and on the west
by a tribe road separating.the land intended to be
hereby granted and released from land of George
Roberts and there measuring one hundred and
eighty feet or thereabouts.
THOSE. J. WADSON,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, Feby 8th, 1901.-2
Colonist copy 2.


For Sale By Tender.


ONE HALF-INTEREST
IN RACE HORSE
G" Oar


Avon."


Tenders to be forwarded to the undersigned on
.or before Saturduy next, Feby. i6. The high-
est tender if approved will be accepted.
J. R. BULLARD,
Paget, East.
February 9-2 3 p -pd.

FOR RENT.

FURNISHED ROOMS,
About five minutes' walk to the'.Hamilton Hotel.
Apply at,
ROYAL GAZETTE OFFICE
Hamilton, Feb. 8, 1901.-3 3p.


H. M. DOCKYARD, BERMUDA,
7th February, 1901.
TENDERS
will be received up to 12 noon on
Friday, 1st March, 1901.
For the supply of the undermentioned articles and
services to H. M. Dockyard, Ships and Vessels,
for 12 months from the 1st April next.
VEGETABLES,
FRESH BEEF and MUTTON,
HORSE BEDDING,
FODDER FOR YARD TEAMS,
KEROSENE, [Prospect.
CARRIAGE HIRE between Hamilton and
WASHING TOWELS, &c.,
RECEIVING and STOWING COAL from
Colliers.
PITCH and WHITE PINE TIMBER,
LAMP GEAR.
Forms of Tender can be obtained upon applica-
tion to the Naval Store Officer, H. M. Dockyard.
The right to reject any or all of the tenders is
reserved.
By order of the Captain-in-Charge.
J. N. PALMER,
Naval Store Officer.
Feb. 11, 1901.--4 times.

CON TRACTS
FOR SUPPLIES

To the Lunatic Asylum.

Colonial Secretary's Office,
Hamilton, 11th February, 1901.

SEALED TENDERS
IN DUPLICATE,
Will be received at this Office on or before

WEDNESDAY,
the 6th day of ITIarch Next, at Noon,
From persons desirous of entering into all or
any of the undermentioned Contracts,
viz. :
No. 1.


Supply of BREAD,
MILK,
FRESH MEAT,
6, GROCERIES,
POTATOES and
EUEL,
6, CANDLES and


[Meat,
Salt and Preserved
other Vegetables,
KEROSENE OIL.


No. 2.
CLOTHING and BEDDING.
No. 3.
FURNITURE and UTENSILS.
No. 4.
DRUGS, &c.
A list of the articles to be furnished can be seen
on application at this office.
Probable quantities required to be ascertained
by enquiring of the Medical Officer of Health, who
will also furnish any other information.
Persons tendering are requested to notice that
when quantities are not specified the articles are
to be tendered for by the pound, and they are
also requested to specify the articles in the same
order as the lists in this office; to furnish samples
of material of articles to be supplied under list
No. 2 and to state prices for all the articles enu-
merated.

CONDITIONS.
1.-The Contracts to commence on the 1st April,
1901, and to run to March 31st, 1902, to be deter-
minable upon three month's notice being given
by either party, such notice to be given on the
first of the month.
2.-The Contractors will be required to enter
into bond with two approved sureties in one third
of the approximate value of the articles to be sup-
plied, for the fulfilment of the Contracts.
3.-The articles must be of a quality to be ap-
proved by the Medical Officer of Health and to be
delivered at the Asylum on such days and at such
hours as he may direct.
4.-An invoice regularly numbered, must be
sent with every delivery, and will be retained by
the Overseer, who will give a receipt with corres-
ponding number.
5.-Every delivery is to be covered by a written
Order ; the Orders and Receipts will be produced
to the Audit Board.
6.-The Bills and Books will be made up month-
13 and certified by the Medical Officer of Health.
7.-Payment will be made quarterly, the ao-
counts having been previously duly certified by
the Medical Officer of Health and audited.
8.-If from defect of delivery, or from unsuita-
ble quality, the Medical Officeer of Health is oblig-
ed to obtain supplies elsewhere, the Contractor for
the supply of the articles deficient or unsuitable
will be liable for any expenses incurred.
9.-Each Tender must be enclosed in an enve-
lope addressed to the Colonial Secretary, and
marked on the outside "Tender for Supplies to
the Lunatic Asylum."
10.-Forms of Tender, required to be used for
the services, can be obtained at this Office.
ALLAN F. SMITH,
2 Acting Colonial Secretary.

I. I. C. S., Feb. 11th, 1901.

TO BUILDERS
AND CONTRACTORS.

TENDERS are invited for alterations and addi-
tions to LIME SHED, Ireland Island,
FOR THE
IRELAND ISLAND
CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY.
Flans and Specifications may be seen, and prem-
ises viewed on application to the Grocery Store
during the usual business hours.
Sealed Tenders to be sent to the Secretary en-
dorsed Tenders for alteration to Lime Shed,"
on or before Feb. 23rd, 1901.
The Committee do not bind themselves to ac-
cept the lowest or any tender.
By order of Committee.
E. J. BERNTHAL,
Secretary.
2 3p


Now ready The Bermuda Pocket Almanack Guide and Directory for 1901.-Price Is. 9d.









THE ROYAL GAZETTE-TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1901.


SY UIND

A'A PERFECT TEA,"
Awarded the


ONLY GOLD MEDAL

for Imported Teas at the

SOUTH AFRICAN EXHIBITION,
GRAHAMSTOWN, 1898-99,
Conclusively proving it to be the


PREMIER TEf

OF THE WORLD.

Sole Proprietors: OF ALL
KEARLEY & TONE,
Limited, GROCERS
Mitre Square, AND
LONDON, England.
Buying Depots for Tea in STOREKEEPERS.
Calcutta and Colombo.


KEARLEY & TONGE, Ltd., are Importers, Manufacturers and Export
Dealers in Salmon, Lobster, Sar-dines, larrinis, Canned Fruits, Canned
Meats, French and other Vegetables, Soups, Petted Meats, Pickles, Jams,
Marmalades, Sauces, Confectionery, Dried Fruit4, etc., etc.
Price Lists forwarded direct, or of all leading merchants.


Wanted to Sell

AT WEST SIDE, SOMERSET.



FOUR LOTS oF LAND,

Cheap for Cash.

MEASURING 85 ft. long x 66 ft. wide. Good
position or would sell the whole lot, Bound-
ed East, West and South by three public roads,
on the North by Mr. J. Harvey.

Also -

One Single Lot,
Measuring 120 ft. long x 47 ft. wide.


January 11th, 1901.


H. STOKES,
c/o MR. JONES,
Reid Street, HIamilton.


Private Board.

HARRINGTON HOUSE,

Harrington Sound.


W. S.


PEINIS'I ON,


PROPRIETOR.
SA quiet, comfortable and beautiful ly
t situated house, directly on and over-
a looking Harrington Smund, affording
: excellent opportunities for first class
boating, bathing and fishing.
Within twenty minutes walk of the Devil's Hole,
the Caves, Natural Arch, the beautiful shell
beaches of the South Shore, Castle Harbour and
other interesting spots. Lawn tennis grounds for
the use of guests.


Terms floderate -


Telephone 203a.


Cable Address: Harrington.
26-1-01-1 lm.


The Shilling Green.

NOTICE] TOJ STAMPGCOLLECTORS.

NO SET of Bermuda Stamnps Complete, wit out
the obsolete Shilling Green, to be had only
at the
ROYAL GAZETTE OFFICE.
Hamilton, Bermuda, December 18, 1900.


PRIVATE BOARD.

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN can be comforta-
bly accommodated on reasonable terms by
applying to

J. D. SEONr,
awardd"
Hamilton Parish.

Among the attractions will be found a Tennis
Lawn, with Sea Bathing, Boating, and within
ten minutes' walk of the Caves.
SW Carriages may be had at shortest notice.
TELEPHONE CALL 162.
Cable address "Seaward," Bermuda.
November 20th, 1900-4m.



Private Board
AT

" T.T. A NS'1' W Y '.'ki ,"
(Near the Hamilton Hotel,)

Corner Park and Wesley Streets, Hamilton.
Is Now Open for the Reception of
Guests.


J. B. BELL,
Proprietor.


December 10th 1900.'


QUEEN VICTORIA,
Her Grand Life and
Glorious Reign .
Edited by .
JOHN COULTER and JOHN A. COOPER.
THE HISTORICAL PRESS, Chicago.
This Book is profusely Illustrated by
eminent artists. Sole Agent for Bermu-
da, MISS CLAUDIA DARRELL,
Southampton, East.
Subscribers List at the Bermuda Furn-
ishing & Supply Co., Front St., Hamilton.
CLOTH EDITIONS ...... 7/31
HALF MOROCCO ...... 10/5
2-T.o.

BAZAAR.

WESLEY CHURCH.


A Bazaar and Art Gallery
will be held in
Wesley Church Schoolroom,

ON FRIDAY, FEBY., 15th.
There will be a Sale of
FANCY AND USEFUL ARTICLES,
also of
Potted Plants and Cut Flowers.
REFRESHMENTS.

Doors open at 3 p.m. Admission Sixpence.
February 8, 1901--2

THE

==IMPERIAL--

IHAMIILTON BERMIUDA.

THE eI I 11 I
IMPERIAL < ==

Private Boarding House,
Is now open fqr gewst-1Rooms 5n4
Board frem $14 single) to $25 an4
$35 a week for TWO PERSONS.
TABLE BOARD OIVEN,'---'-
Apply to

MISS MILLER,
Church Street.
Hamilton, January 18, 1901.

Select Private Board.

IN THE COUNTRY.
TOURISTS wishing a comfortable ihome should
visit AZURE LORGE. pleasantly situated
near and in sight of the main Public Road, in
Warwick East.
Within twenty miputea' drive of the City f
Hamilton, or fifteen minutes' walk to Salt Kettle
Steam Ferry, and two minutes' walk from Post
Office.
First class references. Terms moderate.:
|MRS. S. NASHVILLE TACKLING,
Proprietrfea.
January 1st, 1901.-3.,n

Private Board at

STTJ sT.TY T-ATT.a

QG.W. WEST,
SHELLY BAY,
BERMUDA.
I EL.EPM-IONE 96.
This new and Large House possesses
all up-to-date improvements .....
Tennis Grounds,
Boating, Fishing,
1t9. .
Cable Address "WEST."
February 1st, 1901.-1 lm.


Strawberries--

Can be had by applying at

Belterre."


TELEPHONE


Or at
R.


185.


KEMPE & SON,


TE L, PONEs 81.
January 14, 1901.

FOR RENT

Furnished or Unfurnished,

'SUNSET VTT.T.A,'
Lately occupied by MAJOR HICKMAN,
Assistari Military Secretary.
AND -

"Ocean Villa."

Opposite entrance to Government House.
Apply to
MRS. GEORGE O0. WHITNEY,
Pembroke.
Nov. 3, 1900.

Drs. 5'

Watlington & Clark,

SURGEON DENTISTS.

Reid Street Ham Ilton

OFFICE Houns: 9-1
2-5
t.o.


A CARD.

The Hamiltl batEry, slblishtul 1855

THE UNDERSIGNED desires to remind the
Public that the OLD BAKERY has always
held its own against new corners, and to-day it
still leads.
fy French Rolh, and Family Bread
possess a fineness of quality and flavor not equalled
anywhere. Bread of all kinds and sizes made. Vi-
itors who appreciate good bread are strongly
recommended to ask for ROBINSON'S.
Thanking the public for past favors,
I remain,
Yo- pectfully
t-L. D. ROBINSON
5urnaby Street: -
Hamilton, Dec. 19, 1898.



WM H.. J*pKSON

HouSe and Land

Agent, Collector of

Corr IuAcf oi 4 # iri,


Upataia (western door.)
HAMILTON BERMUDA
Personal4t4iRtija given to business in any pert
xthe islands.
E u 8of Legal Documents ex-
ceed with neatness and despatch.
Terms made kqwiA 9o 8pplication.
January 21, l.-4 T.o.


Don't g~ Bald-Uae a



KO KO
FOR TlE HAIR
So14 Everywhere at all Chemists Stores, &c.
VWET INDIES DEPOT : Barbados Mutual Insur-
ance Buildings, Barbados.
9/10/00-tf-T.o.



PHOSFERINE
The Royal Tonic and Digestive.
Sold by all Chemist Stores, &c.
PROPRIETORS : ASHTON & PARSONS, LTD.,
17 Farringdon Rd., London, E.C.
9/10/00.-tf.-T.o.


Rest, Health and Comtlort to Mothe
and Cldg|,
MRS. WINoLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP, for childrerf
teething, softens the gums, reduces inflammation,. allyt
all pain, and cures wind colic. Perfectly safe in all cases,
We would say to every inothtr who thas a suffering child
Do not let your prejudice, nor the prejudices of others
stand between yon and your suffering chiln and the relief
that will be sure-yes, absolutely sure-to follow the usB
of this medicine, if timely used.
T. o. 1-1-01-12m.



&5T3EL

Superseding Bitter Apple, Pentnyroyal, Pil Cccla. &,
Sold by+WEST INDIA MEDICAL DEP T,
1o, King Street, KINGSTON, JAM.
lrruprictor: -MARTIN. Chemist. SOU'rHAlP I'ON, 1:S(


EVERY MAN
SUFFERING frmi NERVOUS and PHYSICAL
D h LITY should send for a va!uOle Pamnphlet explain.
nlug how all Ner-.ous and Organic erangenents may besuccesv
fully treated without stomach medication. The method is easf'
and pleasant, and nill effect a perfect and i eruaent cure.
Sent, in a plain ,seald edme oe, tree or' chae.- E.
NORTON,: CJ L ANCKI A LAANE. I -'M.N. Oti' 'it
couLt:-Jous Auccen-.


Additions to the Anthozoa and Hydrozoa
of the Bermudas.
Additions to the Crustacea and Pyenogonida
of the Bermudas.
Additions to the Echinoderms of the Ber-
mudas.
Additions to the Tunicats and Xolluscoidea
of the Brmudas.
BY A. E. VERBILL, PROFESSOn OF ZOOLOGY,
YALE UNIVErSITY, NEW HAVEN, CONNECTIOUT.
The above, reprinted from the transactions of
The Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences,
Vol. X. Part 2, September 1900, illustrated with
three plates, contains a considerable amount of
scientific observations on the Bermudas.
A partial list of the corals collected in Bermuda
(9 species), was published by J. M. Jones in 1869.
The identification of his species were mostly made
by the present writer, but his collection was very
incomplete, and errors were made in printing the
list. Another list (10 species) was also prepared
by the writer for Prof. J. D. Dana, and published
in 1872. Mr. A. Heilprin also published a list of
the Bermuda coral in 1889. His list included 19
species, of which I consider 8 as spurious or mere
varieties. The most extended list was prepared
by J. J. Quelch for the narrative of the voyage of
The Challenger, (Vol. 1, Part 1, p. 146, foot note,
1885.) This list included 23 species, but several
of the six species of Isophyllia admitted by Quelch
are scarcely more than individual variations of
one species, not even worthy to be called varie-
ties. Probably not more than two actual species
of Isophyllia exist at Bermuda, and even these
may eventually be united into one very vari-
able species. I could detect no constant differ-
ences in the soft parts after a careful study of hun-
dreds of living specimens, including all the varie-
ties, though the color varies extremely, ranging
from bright green, olive green, gray, lavender etc.,
all these colors being often found on a single ex-
ample, distributed in regular patterns, or in ir-
regular blotches of flake white. In some cases
the colour may be clear emerald-green, in others
nearly clear lavender or gray, but *some large
examples were found that were half uni-
form green and half lavender without blotchings,
the two colors being defined by a median plane.
Nor do these colours depend to any great extent
on the station, for in some cases, all these variations
may be found in one place. But those specimens
found scattered in shallow water on bottoms of
white shell sand were usually gray, or pale laven-
der mottled with gray", though the hard parts do
not differ from the darker colored ones. One of
the commonest forms at Bermuda was named
fussa fragilis by Dana. The type of this fr4qn
Bermuda is still in the Museum of Yale Universi-
ty. This, which is the common more delicate
form, should therefore bear the name of Isophyllia
Fragilis. It is possible that the coarser I. dipsacea
is only a variation of the same species due to more
vigorous growth. Quelch also recognized seven
species of Oculina from Bermuda which ii
doubtless too many, for all thle species are
variable in form, thi degree of elevation of the
corallites, &c. Apparently all the Bermuda forms
of Ooulina can be reduced to four species. He al-
so recorded two species of Astroea (A ananas and
A coaretata). We found these two forms common
in tide-pools, but consider them merely variations
of one species (A ananas).
So, likewise, we consider Diploria Stokesii listed
by-Heilprin, as a mere variation of D. eerebre-
formis, with the ridges wider and more deeply
grooved than usual. It is a common form.
Thus at least eight nominal species should be
eliminated from Quelch's list, leaving but 15
species. On the other hand he omitted one of the
commonest species (Porites Astr(eoides) recorded
in otler lists and Sfiderastrwa radians, recorded
by Jones. I have now to add three additional
species of true reef corals, two of which (Orbicella
Annularis and 0 Cavernosa) are not uncommon
and grow to large sizes. Thus the number of true
anthozoan corals now known is about 20.
All these corals, except the Plesiastrwa, herein
described as new, are common West Indian and
Florida species. The" coral-fauna of Bermuda
differs chiefly from that of the Florida reefs and
the Bahamas in the absence of certain prominent
and well known genera and species characteristic
of the latter especially the genera MadrIpora,
Manieina, Colpophyllia, Eusmiha, Dichoewnia,
Dendogyra, Cladocora, and the two very common
species Meandrina clivosa and Agaricia agaricites.
Possibly, some of these may yet be discovered at
Bermuda, but, if found there at all, they must be
very local and rare, for the Bermuda corals have
been extensively collected."
CRUSTACEA.
The collection of Crustacea obtained by the
Yale party in 1898 contains nearly all the species
recorded from there by previous writers, and
many that are new to the fauna. Of marine Iso-
poda and Amphipoda about 50 species were col-
lected, but they have not yet been carefully stud-
ied. Very few of them have been reported from
Bermuda.
Lists of the Bermuda decapod Crustacea have
been published J M Jones,. A Heilprin, and in
the several reports on the Zoology of the Challen-
ger Expedition, but they are all quite incomplete.
Mr W M Rankin has very recently published a
more extensive catalogue of the Bermuda Decap-
oda. His list contains 56 species of this group.
Our 1898 collection and those collected by J M
Jones ; G Brown Goode ; C Hartt Merriam ; F V
Hamlin and others, now in the Yale Museum
include about 20 species of Decapoda not cop-
tained in Mr Rankin's list ; so that the total num-
ber now known is about 75. Nearly all of these
are also West Indian species.
To these may be added G' ryou incertus, Miers,
dredged in deep water off Bermuda by the Chal-
lenger Expedition.
A number of the smaller and more difficult
species have been sent to Miss M J llthbun of the
U. S. National Museum for determination, and
to her I am munch indebted 'for aid of this kind ;
as indicated under particular species. A few are
still undetermined. .
ECHINODERMATA. -
A list of the species of echinoderms known
from Bermuda has recently been published by
Mr. H. L. Clark. In this list he enumerated 28
species, but admitted that 4 or 5 of the holothu-
rians are doubtful ; an opinion in which I fully
concur. Of Ophiuroidea he listed 7 species. Our
collection increases the number of species in this
group to 18. -
Most of these have already been recorded byr
me, and some of them had previously been re-


ml


corded by Mr. Theod. Lyman (Rep. Voy. Chal-
lenger v.)
We obtained nearly all the recorded echinoids
and star fishes, except Luidia ceathrata, and ap-
apparently all the known holothurians, but we:
did not add any species .to, the lists of these,
groups except inm the case of the holothurians.i
Our holothurians have not yet been fully studied
but a small green Synajpta was taken that has not!
been recorded from Bermuda. This appears to be'
the Synapta virildi Pourtales described from the
Florida coast in 1851, but apparently not since re-'
discovered.
Syiapta viviptara was found common in a great,
variety of situations-under stones, in dead coral,
buried in sand, etc. In life it is brownish red.
The large black Stichopus, named S. diaboli, by.
Heilprin, was found very abundantly everywhere,
on the white shell sand bottoms, down to at least.
50 feet deep. It is exceedingly hard to pre-
serve it by any method tried by us, either in alco-
hol or formalin solutions. Probably ice-cold
alcohol might have 'succeeded if there had been
facilities for 'keeping it cold for several days, as
we had successfully done with several large gela-'
tinous deep-sea species of holothurians on former,
occasions.
The spotted Stichopus (S. xanthomela Heilp.),
is much less common, and it is also difficult to
preserve, though we succeeded fairly well with


some of the smaller specimens in alcohol. I am
not prepared to express a decided opinion as to its
specific distinctness, for I have not studied it with
care. It is referred to 8.jMobii Semper, by Clark.
We observed only these two forms of Stichopus. I1
No crinords have been positively recorded,
though Sir W. Thomson (Narrative Voy. Chal-
lenger) mentions seeing a mutilated specimen of
the rare genus Holopus in a local collection at
Berm.uda. Very likely it occurs in deep water,
outside the reefs.
The total number :of ~olinoderms now known
from the Bermudas is abht 40, all of ,wttq seem
to be identical with W tndinMn species,
The small varietyvof tpe str fishesis remark-
able, for only 4 species are known, and two of
these are very .are. Asterias teaispina
is the only comat up Iaes through $ little
polygonal. A#iseina felium is not rely
found under stow.s at low tide. It Is usually
pale blue in life, .vWUry unualeolour among
eekinoderms. Tbhogtkers Luidka cedO staa.and
Luldia Guildingii asw .ery rare."
2Tnicata and Molluiidea.
Most of theg4blished i ttijosa.sqeermuig
the Bermudian Tuujcoptp is by Herdima in the
reports of the ZMoogy ef the C"allqene .spedi-
tion. In these votlnutes seovel asojiias are.dcs-
cribed from Bermuda, viz :
Sjmspegmsa viride.
Md&ema4 inerme.
e*ijryaids nigram.
Ectdiaeidia turbinWtu.
COaWUingwa OiOeaga.
Awidia uiyra.
All these specie&aud many more were obtained
by one party in 1898. The to al member collect-
ed is about 25 species. These have as yet, been
but partially studied.
Among the additional genera are the following
Diazona (D) picta sp. Nov.): Botryllus; Lepto-
elinum, several species; Distalium a new species
forming pyriform colonies of a bluish gray or
smoky brown tint when in formslin,, Distoma,
Amorwciumn ;Styela, and'others.
The most interesting species is that which I
have named Diazona pieta. It forms large com-
pound clusters; usually attachedto gorgonians
and often 6 inches cr more in breadth, awl height.
Each zooid has the oral aperture surrounded by a
carmine red band, and a'stripe of the same color
runs down one side while the ground color is
translucent bluish or pinkish white, giving to the
whole cluster an elegant appearance when living."
ea
Additions to the Idothyolegical Fauna of
the Bermudas.
FROM THiE COLLECTIONS OF THE YALE EXPEDI-
TION OF 1898, BY SAMUEL GAitMAN. RE-
PRINTED FROM TRANSACTIONS OF THE CON-
NECUlCUT ACADEMY, VOL. X, SEPT. 1900.
We quote from the Introduction.
Three species are repwnented by the fishes
sept me for identification. One of them is a
Labroid that is common along the coast of Flori-
da and among the West Indies ; its occurrence in
the Bermuda waters has been noted by Goode and
Beau. The second is a Gobrgid, oof which the
habitat has hitherto been nwietermimied. The
fact that the type locally is unknown gives the
more importance to the specimen in the present
collection. The third species is a Brotuleid,
which has a clowe ally in one from the' Forida
Keys, and in another from the coasts'of Lower
California. Though the differences are slight,
they are such as to make it necessary to describe
and name the Bermuda form as a new species.
The Efollowing* are the species as determined.
They were all taken in ,shallow water by the
dredge."?'
(* i. e. the Catalogue which is appended.)
4 &
The Directors of The Erie Railroad have issued
an official circular to the holders of the Stock
Trust Certificates for First Preferred, Second Pre-
ferred, and Common Stock of The Erie R. R.,
setting forth the circumstances attending the pur-
chase by J. P. Morgan & Co., on behalf of The
Erie It. R. Coy., of The Pennsylvania Coal Coy.,
The Erie & Wyoming Valley R. R. Coy., and
The Delaware Valley and Kingston R. R. Coy.,
and requesting their assent to the terms of pur-
chase to be concluded with J. P. Morgan & Co. ;
the voting Trustees endorsing the action of the
Board of Directors. J. P. Morgan & Co. have
purchased from The Pennsylvania Coal Coy. (ex-
cept Treasury Assets of that Company not con-
nected with their business, and worth over $10,-
000,000) the amount of their Stock $5,000,000 at
552 per cent., equal to $27,600,000 cash. J. P.
Morgan & Co. transfer to the Erie R. R. Coy. re-
ceiving payment as follows: 50 years 4 per cent
Bonds, $32,000,000 (the whole issue of such Bonds
$36,000,000 of which $4,000,000 to be held for im-
provement of the property) and 50,000 Shares of
First Preferred Erie i.R. Stock, to be increased by
that sum, $5,000,000 : the Bonds to be secured col-
laterally by the pledge of all shares of The Eire &
Wyoming Valley R.R. Coy. of the Delaware Valley
& Kingston R. R. Coy., and of The Pennsylvania
Coal Coy., owned by The Erie, and of 51 percent.
of the shares of Stock of the New York, Susque-
hanna and Western R. R. Coy. The Directors
consider the acquisition of The Pennsylvania Coal
Coy. and its Railroads the securing of a perma-
nent large business which was iu danger of being
lost to them.

A LNANACK.-Fcby.--19O


Sun.




6 48 5 40
6 47 5 41
6 46 5 42
6 46 5 42
6 45 5 43
6 44 5 44
6 43 5 45


; High
Tide.

H. M.
23 2 42
24 3 30
25 4 18
26 5 06
27 5 54
28 6 42 lQui
0 7 30


Remarks.


mf(plugesimrt
[Sanday.


New Moon 18 day 10 h 26 m p.m.

THE BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETT--Lee A Co. Pro
prietors-is published every Tuesday and Satur
day Morning at the Royal Gazette Press, Oflc
North-West Corner of Reid and Burnaby &Steets
Hamilton,
JOHN F. Evi, Printer to the Queen's Most I itl
lent Majesty.
Business Communications to be addressed LiA &
Co.
Communications for The "Royal Gazette" to be
addressed toThe Editor of the "Royal Ga(rtve.'
Blanks, Hand-bills, &c., printed at the abortest
notice.
Cable Address "Gazette:" Prrnuda
TELEPHONE No. 144.
.tent at ST. GeonBO's for the Royal Gazette
Ms. GEORGE D. BOTLE, Market Square.
Agent at SOaERSET, J. B. ZUILL, Esqr., J. P
The Bermuda Royal Gazette' is on file
[N LONDON-At the Imperial Institute; ard a
the offices of Messrs Hopkins, Ford, Lre &
Co., 35 Great St. Helen's, London, E.
IN PHILADELPHIA, PA.-At the Museum, 133
South Fourth Street.
IN NEW YORK-At the 0i0ces of Messrs Middle
ton & Co., Morris Building, Corner Beaver &
Broad Streets ; andat the Maritime Register
Office 01 & 63 WilliamStreet.


I&I




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