Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00155
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00155
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text


rI 1 N


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


No. 49,-Vol. L.


4T.%TE SUPE VIAS ANTIQUES.


lfa lilton!, eifdg


Toteday


December 4, I.S77.


JUST RECEIVED,
By the'Sir G. F. Seystour,'
ILadies Autumn and Winter
IRESS GOODS
S Opera FLANNEL HATS
Fancy GOODS PETTICOATS, &c.
All will be Sold at low Prices at the Mirror.'
THOSE wanting White and Red
ONION SEED (Teneriffe) will call or
send in their Names.
TpENDERS will be received for
my Property at St. George's on Queen
and York Streets, with or without
hI e Cottage at the
BACK,
To December 4, 1S77.
I do not bind myself to accept the highest or
any tender.
R. H. DUERDEN.
November 19, 1877.-3

RFCE VED
By the Latest Arrivals,
A VARIETY OF
CLOTHING G, HATS,
BLH3KETS,
And other GOODS Suitable for the Season.
T. M. JONES.
Hamilton, 20th Novr., 1S77.-8


JUST OPENED,

Received per Royal Mail Str. Beta,
A VERY CHOICE ASSORTMENT OF


Consisting of:
LADIES Kid and Morocco Tie and Dutton
SHOES
Ladies Button and Elastic Kid and Morocco
BOOTS
Women's Lace and Elastic Leather BOOTS
Gents Fine Calf OXONIONS
Men's Fine Calf BLUCHERS
Men's Working BLUCilERS
Children's Lace HOOTS and SLIPPERS.
The above, together with the present .Stock
of Goods on hand, are being sold at exceed ngly
REDUCED CASH PRICES.


A. GRANTHAM,
No. 46 & 47, Front St.,
[Hamilton, Bermuda,


Nov. 9, 1877.


Just Received,
Per SE Y 0 UR,
lAnd other Late Arrivals,
A New and varied Assortment of
:CROCKERY CHINA
GLASSWARE LAMPS
CUTLERY HARDWARE
TOO LS
TINWAR'E HOLLOWWARE
Agricultural IMPLEMENTS
Cement BRUSHES PAINTS OILS
And many other Articles usually kept for
Sale in such an Establishment.
SAMUEL A. MASTERS,
26 Front Street.
Hamilton, Novr. 20, 1877.-3

NEW GOODS.
oo s



BY THE
Sir G. F. Seymour,"
JVJD S. S. .( CIAJV1J1,"
Further Supply of NEW GOOD4, completing-
the Assortment for the Season.
J. H. TRIMINGHAM & SONS.

t 1 the Somerset STO fE
A very large and varied Assortment of


also just Received by the "SIR G. F. SEY-
MOUR" and "CANIMA," which will be
ready for Inspection
On Thursday next 22nd
instant, and will be sold at Very Moderate Prices
for the CASH ONLY.
J. 11. TRIMINGIJAM & SONS.
November 12, 1877--3

Winm. James Heney,


BRO .ER B
AND
Commission 'tgent,
HAMILTON, BERMUDA,


' Christmas TREE.

1H-IIE Ladies of ZION METHODIST CHURCH,
Hamilton, intend having
81 CIorisesas Tiec,

1 T
And Thursday,
The 19th and 20th of December.
A variety of Articles, both Useful and Fancy,
suitable for HIoliday Presents, will be offered for
Sale. Among these will be found a very Choice
selection of Books. These have come by the
Sir George F. Seymour," direct from Eng-
land, and have been selected specially for this
occasion and will be sold at most reasonable
prices.
Further particulars at a later date.
Hamilton, Nov. 26, 1877.

Notice.

A few Lady Friends of the Order of 0. F.
Intend hold a



At the Odd Fellows' Hall,
In this Town,
On Wednesday and
Thursday,
26th and 27th of December next.
Proceeds in aid of completing the Hall.
Particulars will appear in a future Advertise-
ment.
Hamilton, Nov. 26, 1877.


Bankrupt
Ex Eglantine" and
F. Seymour."


Stock,
'Sir George


i-- ; i^A li C ..

FIS JUST RECEIVED
124 Cases of Assorted
Merchandize,
The same being a portion of the HANKiRUJIPT
STOCK of 1Messrs. GILBURTON, 'Vs-T & Co.,
who recently failed in Manchester.
Intended buyers, of C LOTlIING, etc will
find it to their advantage to purchase ;t the i'm-'
porimin, thereby saving for themselves frnm 30
to 50 per cent on every purchase. Remember,
NO CREDIT.
47 Front Street, Hamilton, ?
19th Novr., 1877. (

T Boots & Shoes,
Cheap.
31so SLIPPERS in great variety
AMERICAN NOVELTIES,
LAMPS of the latest improvement,
TIN and HARDWARE
SHEETING and Fancy PRINTS.
J. N. JONES,
Five Doors West of Gazette" Office,
o In James Richardson's Store.
Hamilton, Nov. 20, 1877.
Tr E BEST INVESTMENT OF TIlE
DAY FOR A SMALL OUTLAY.

And where there is no
t Ti previous knowledge of
the business required,
I f is a Lemonade, Ginger
Beer, and Soda Water
-~--tMachine, as the public
taste is so much on the increase for Aerated
Drinks. The book of 90 pages of illustrations
and information forwarded free.
BARNETT, SON, AND FOSTER,
.Engineers, 23c, Forston Street, Hoxton, Lon-
don, England. 3m


Notice,

A LIBERAL REWARD will be
given for the Conviction of thIe Person or
Persons that broke into my Store (near the
Ferry) on the night of the 3rd inst. This being
the second time.during the past 3 months-and
also give notice that any Person or Persons
found TRESPASSING on the Premises after
this date will be punished according to Law.
B. POWEL.
Somerset, November 9, 1877.

"Garnet Red"'



We expect to receive our usual
supply of the above carefully selected for Seed.
Terms, accommodating.
S. 8. INGHAM & CO.
October U2 1877,


A Board.


L!rs. J. N. Jones, ofi t oston
IS prepared to Instruct Ladies in the art of
(;CUTTING by Measure, from Chart, in
general use by Tailors and Dressmakers in
America. Machine STITCHING and Dress
PLAITING done to order. And for Sale a few
of the improved Paris PLAITERS, with in-
structions for use.
Mrs. JON ES,
At the Residence of J. C. KEENEY,
Hamilton.
November 26, 1877.-6






Horses Clipped with despatch and neatness.
Terms moderate.
N.B.-Orders left at the 11Royal Gazette"
Office, or with Mr. Thomas Grier, Farrier,
Hamilton, will meet with immediate attention.
N. .. -No Horses clipped on Sundays.
Hamilton, Novr. 13, 1877.-3

The Emporiuam offers TWO GROSS OF
SBLUK SERGE and FLANNkEL SIIIlrTS AT
FI R ST COST. Purchasers disbelieving the
same may see the original Invoice.
November 19, 1877.

.?crated WVaters, 4c.


Is


SPrepared to Supply
Prepared to Supply


,Soda Water, Lemonade,
Ginger ALE and other Aerated

At the Shortest Notice, at any part of the
Islands, West of the Cisewf-,v
Orders for the above will be Heceived at the
"STAR AND GARTE, i" Tavern (Late the
"M ETROPOLITANN") Queen Street, and at
qis Store near the Commnissariat Buildings, East
End, Haamilton.
J. W. ADKINS.
October 9ih, 1877.

For Rent,

1 Rose Cottage,
Completely furnished, with Out-
houses, Stables and Coacl House, convenient-
ly situated and being in the Township of St.
Georges. in its own grounds.
Immediate possession given.
Apply to
W. T. ROBERTS,
Agent.
St. Georges, 12th November, 1877.
A LL persons IN DE B TED to the
IIAMILTON CLOTHING EMPORIUM
will be Sued in one week after delivery of their
Bills, without further notice, if not paid within
that time.
J. H. ROBINSON.

At the Royal Gazette"
STATIONERY STORE,
H3S BEEN RECEIVED,
BY THE
Sir G. F. Seymour,
From London,
I RAYER 1BOOKS & Church Services in
Variety
Scripture Text HOOKS Hymn BOOKS
Ornamental A I'HABETS Legal SEALS
Toy BOOKS ENQUIRE WITHIN
Tl,'E REASON WHY
Ready RECKONERS
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Letter WHITERS
Ball Room COMPANIONS
Prepared PARC IIMENT for Deeds, &c.
Music CARDS Memo. BOOKS
Exercise BOOKS
Foreign Letter and Note PAPIER, Envelopes to
match
Bristol BOARD
Reams thin Wrapping PAPER
Lead PENCILS, &c., &c.
Hamilton, Nov. 14th, 1877.

For Rent,
That desirable Property in Paget
Parish,


At present occupied by MAJOR WILKINSON
D.C.G. Possession given Ist January next.
Apply to
MR. M. S. HUNT,
Hamilton.
November 3, 1877.


SOf LI ER 'O OL,
CALLING AT QUEENSTOWN,
Carrying the United States Mail
from New York
0DN T E SDAY .


.Chimney Sweeping.

i H E Undersigned having re-
i ceived a Patent CIIIMNEY SWEEP-
IING MACHINE from New York, is prepared
I to
SSweep Chimneys
At Moderate Rates in any part of the Island*


S eamships GEORGE OAKLEY.
MONTANA sails Nov. 27, at 11 a.m. Hlamilton, April 2nd, 1877.
NEVADA sails Deer. II, at 11 a.m.
11)A10 sails Deer. 18, at 3p.m. 'heodorp Out ber id
WVYOMAING sails Deer 25, at 9 a im. OO O ruer e6,
The above Steamers are built expressly for '3T I 1.-"%T 71-2, 0 IT ,
the Trade, have five watertight bulkheads, and HAMILTON.
carry experienced Officers, Surgeons and Stew-
ardesses. The Saloon Accommodations are un- "eid Street, West of "Royal Gazette" Office,
surpassed by any Atlantic Steamers, and the Office Hlours-10 to 12 and I o 4.
State Rooms are on main deck opening'into the Will Visit St. Georges, Tuesdays and Fri.
Saloon, thus securing that great comfort in days.
ocean travel, perfect ventilation and light. Orders Promptly Attended to.
The U. S. Mail Steamer Canima" from Ber- 1tamilton, October 26th, 1876.
mude, Thursdays, generally arrives at New York
on Monday, and Passengers' baggage can be au" Of Dr. Ifoltz for
transferred direct to the Liverpool Steamer sail- H AIR DYE.
ing next day. A Y
WILLIAMS & GUION, f113 WATERis of an entirely vegetable
Agents, composition, and its use is quite inof-
29 Broadway, New York. fensive.
New York, Nov. 8th, 1877. Thanks to this peculiar quality which gives it
no rival, DR. I IOLTZ'S [Hair D)ye has not the
or Re nt, disadvantage of the other preparations which
For ent, gve to the hair n unnaturally vulgar color.
The Comfortable and Pleasantly Guided by his medical knowledge and his
Situated great chemical experiences, Da. HOLTZ has
W E L LIN G succeeded in the discovery of plants, which give
,r'TTIV the richest balsamic dyeing and curative essen-
yW nL I, U, I ces, and it is by this study that he succeeded to
In the Town of liamilton, now occupied by compound a dye which may be styled as the
M r. N. 0. 1) u RH A M. Regenerator by excellence of the chevelure.
Possession given 5th January, 1878. GENERAL WAREHOUSE, i PARIS,
Apply to La Correspondance Parisienne,
J. E. EVANS. 4 Rue de la Tacherie, 4.


At the Paint Store
Next Cor. of Queen and.Reid Streets.
IIamilton, Novr. 19th, 1877.

The standard of
the World.


Adapted to the Standard of all Nations, Packed
ready for Shipping.
World's Fair, London 1851
World's Fair, New York 1853
World's Fair, Paris 1867
World's Fair, Vienna 1. 873
World's Fair, Santiago, (Chili) 1875
World's Fair, Philadelphia 1876
World's Fair, Sydney, Australia, 1877
HIANCOCK'S INSPIRA-TORS
The best Feeder known for Stationary, Marine,
and Locomotive Boilers, &c.,) also
Oscillating Pump Co.'s Pump.
FAIRBANK'S & CO., N. Y.
October 16th, 1877.-6m

W 0,F, BASSC0 E
M.D
DENTIST,
REID STREET, HAMILTON, EAST,
Has Received a supply of the fol-
lowing

FOR THE TEETH
Put up by the well known Dentists Messrs. GA-
BRIEL, Ludgate Hill, London.
SEDADENT, or Cure for Toothache
CORALITE TOOTH PASTF, for Cleansing
and Improving the Teeth
ROYAL DENTIFRICE, gives the Teeth a
pearl-like whiteness
WHITE GUTTA PFERCHA ENAMEL, for
Stopping decayed Teeth
OSTEO-ENAMEL STOPPING, warranted to
remain white and firm as the Tooth itself
ODONTALGIQUE ELIXIR, celebrated
Mouth Wash.
Hamilton, March 26th, 1877.

Notice.

,LL Persons having DEMANDS against the
Estate of the late MRS. ADRIA ANNA
GILBERT HILL, of Hamilton Parish, are re-
quested to forward the same to either of the
Untersigned on or before the 31st day of Decem-
ber next; and all Persons Indebted to the said
Estate will please make payment by that time.
A. B. hILL,
WILLIAM WHITNEY,
T. A. OUTERBRIDGE,
Executors.
November 5, 1877,


For Rent,
In the Town of Hamilton,
A Furnished Two Story
DAwel i IOUSE.
Apply at the Royal Gazette" Office.
fHamilton, Sept. 25th 1877.

,.I .." ,"







0k
| 1 ;Z4 PI1i 1 A





-,l B E "M P "'C. S 0r 5 ) Z





a lsh e ta0 W G i n ju t r u r d t ,





m npuq: N C: R I, ) and,









DANIEL G. LANE Proprietor


ranch Establisghment, s t.George

rHE Proprietor of the above Es-a
tablishmen having just returned y the
"Canima"iom New York, and brought with
Stylish YOUNG HORJSES to add to his already
vell selected Stock, begs to thank the Public ot
Bermuda generally for their past Patronage andl


I l amilton, Sept. Jth, I 76.


5 OO
LLS ALBERT INGLIS
StBranc. eorges, April 2 1877,
St. Georg;es, April 12 1877,


24s per % g r,


S


0







EfiRMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


EXTRACT from METEOROLOGICAL OBSER-
VATIONS taken under the direction of the Principal
Medical Officer, Prospect, Bermuda. Above the sea
151 feet.


Date


1877
Nv. 26
27
28
29
30
Dec. 1
2


30-083
30-213
30-302
10-05S.
29-776
30-011
30-065


Wind Temperature previous I
9a.m. 24 hours. Rain.

2> 5' 2 cue' Inch.

0 0 0 0
SE 2 72,6 63"0 104-1 51-8 0.00
SE 2 73-6 65-0 102-1 54-5 0-00
SE 1 72-6 62-8 113-4 47-8 0-00
sw 3 73-7 64-5 113-0 52-5 1*16
sw 1 74-6 67-0 108-6 61-2 0-76
NW 3 66-1 60'0 112-4 50-8 0-03
N 3 66-1 56-0 113-6 46-8 0-19


a
Total 2"14 t
Total Rainfall for the Vonth of Nov. 1877...7'11 Ins.




t
tHamilton, December 4, 1877. t

Court of General Assize.

MICHAELMAS TERM.
Honorable EUGENIUS HARVEY, and Honble. J. H.
TRIMINGHAM, Assistant Justices, presiding.
The following Indictments were laid before the
Grand Jury by S. BRowNLow GRAY, Esqr., At-
torney General.
The Queen vs. Charles McKenne. Unlawfully
wounding. True Bill. Tried and acquitted.
The Queen vs. Henry Nelson Gilbert. Shopbreak-
ing and Larceny (five Indictments preferred.)
True Bills to which he pleaded guilty.
The Queen vs. Ellis Steed. Larceny. True Bill.
Pleaded Guilty.
The Queen vs. James Bean. Shopbreaking and
Larceny. True Bill. Pleaded Guilty.
The Queen vs. Ruth Jane Bonnell. Obtaining
goods by false pretences. True Bill. Pleaded
guilty.
The Queen vs. Wm. Dowling. Larceny. True
Bill. Tried and found guilty.
The Queen vs. Deborah Swan. Concealing the
birth of her child. True Bill. Pleaded guilty.
The Queen vs. Thomas Simmons. Perjury. True
Bill. Tried and found guilty.
The Queen vs. Nathl. B. McCarthy. Secreting a
Post note. True Bill. Tried and found guilty,
but strongly recommended to the favorable con-
sideration of the Court on account of his youth.
The Queen vs. Montreville Collins Outerbridge. In-
decent assault. True Bill. Two Juries impan-
neled in this case not having been able to agree
on a verdict, the indictment was put to a third
Jury, who returned a verdict "not guilty."
The Queen vs. Frederick Wilson. Shop breaking
and Larceny. True Bill. Tried and found
guilty.
The Queen vs. George Wi. Doors. Indecent as-
sault. True Bill. Tried and found guilty.
The Queen vs. Henry A. Wainwright. Indecent
assault. True Bill. Tried and found guilty.
The Queen vs. Samuel Smith and others. Riot,
&c. True Bill.
The Queen vs. Frederick Luchenbach. Larceny,
&c. True Bill. This case now being tried.
The Queen vs. John Thomas Lamb. Larceny and
receiving stolen goods. True Bill.
The Queen vs. 'Arthur Robert Thompson. Libel.
Bill not found.
The Court is adjourned to this (Tuesday) morn-
ing at 10 o'clock.

CUSTOM IhOUSE-HAMILTON.
ENTERED.
Nov. 28-Mail Steamer Canima, Liddicoat, New York ;
assorted cargo.-Agents, Trott & Cox.
CLEARED
Nov. 27-German Barque Demitra, Rose, Tybe Roads.
29-Schr. Yosemite, Grant, Jacksonville.
30-Mail Steamer Canima, Liddicoat, New York.
CUSTOM HOUSE-ST. GEORGE.
ENTERED.
Nov. 30-Royal Mail Steamer Beta, Shaw, Halifax;
English Mail of the 13th ultimo, and goods for mer-
chants.-Agent, J. M. Hayward.
CLEARED.
Dec. 1-Royal Mail Steamer Beta, Shaw, St. Thomas;
Mails, &e.
PASSENGERS ARRIVED.
In the Mail Steamer Canima, on Wednesday last
from New York :--Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Fowler, Mrs.
and Miss Gugy, Mrs. Grace, Airs. F. Smith, Miss
Smith, R. A. Tucker, Esqr., Messrs. E. S. Seon, C.
C. Coe, C. E. Curtis and H. Hutchinson.-2nd Cabin,
A. Shuthers, Miss J. Thompson and W. Gardner: 8 in
Steerage.
In the R. M. Steamer Beta from Halifax-Mr. and
Mrs. T. S. Reid, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Keane, Miss
Forbes, Miss Almon, Miss Ritchie, Mrs. and Miss
Goudge, Miss Smith, Lieut. Waudby, 20th Regiment,
Surgeon Riordan, R.E., Mr. J. D. Tupper, Master
Spikes, Mr. G. J. Troope, Capt. Althorpe, R.E., and
servant, Lieut. Sykes, ki.E.. and servant, Lieut. i rady,
R.E. Mrs. Harper and child (for St. 'homas). 2nd
Cabin-J. B. Carriss, Airs. Fennell, Air. Cunningham
and child, Sergt.-Major Eedhouse, R.E., wife and 3
children, Sergt. Harris. R.E., Airs. Downs and infant.
the 26th company Royal Engineers, 62 men, 2 women
and 6 children.
PASSED GERS SAILED.
In the Mail Steamer C(an ima on Friday last for New
York:-Miss L. McKeoun, Mrs. W.B. Oliver, Miss
Jane J. Despard, Captain Gardner, 87th Regiment,
Rev. K. F. and Mrs. Junor and child, Messrs. E. A.
Seon, E. Morris, Wmin. Thompson.-Steerage, Fred-
erick Passmore.
In the R. M. Steamer Beta for St. Thomas-Messrs.
C. C. Coe, Thomas Hutchinson, C. E. Curtis, J. P.
Oliver, B. Whetham.
H. M. S. Sirius, Captain G. L. Sulivan, left Queens-
town on 25th October for Bermuda.
Alice C. Dickerman, up at Cardiff for Bermuda
Nov. 10.
Rex, 334 tons, up at Liverpool for Bermuda Nov. 10.
Satellite and Reulluv'a up at London for Bermuda,
the former to leave Nov. '.0.

The weather yesterday was the coldest of the
season. The wind was at N.E. At 5 o'clock in the
evening the Thermometer was down to 58.


WAR OFFICE, Nov. 6.-Major General Sir J. H. Le-
froy, K.C.M.G., C.B., R.A., to be Lieut.-General vice
Lt.-General F. M. Eardley Wilmot, R.A., deceased.

Inspector General Dr. William Thomas Domville
SHonorary Surgeon to the Queen) succeeds Inspector
general Sir W. E. Smart, K.C.B., M.D., (Honorary
Surgeon to the Queen) at the Royal Naval Hospital,
Haslar.-United Service Gazette, 10th Nov.
Paymaster John T. Sueter, R.N. (1863), has been
appointed Secretary to Rear Admiral the Right Honble.
Lord John Hay, C.B., Commanding the Channel
Squadron.
QUARTERMASTER-SERGEANT H. L, SMITH, R.E.-
An order was received at the School of Military
Engineering this week, stating that the Commander-
in-Chief had been pleased to approve of the promo-
tion of Company-Sergeant-Major H. L. Smith (the
senior company-sergeant-major in the Corps) to the
rank of regimental quarter-master-sergeant, vice
Ross, whose time has expired. The promotion has
given universal satisfaction as Quartei master-Ser-
geant Smith is a non-commissioned officer mcst de-
servedly respected by his officers, comrades, and a
large circle of civilian friends,-Chatham News, Oc-
tober 27.


PROSPECT GARRISON CROQUET CLUB. A
A Cricket Match between the Royal Engineers
nd Royal Navy having been arranged to take
lace to-day at Prospect, the meeting of the above
lub will be postponed till Tuesday next week. b
o:
THE WAR IN TURKEY.
The Russians did not swing into Erzeroum as
hey expected, and the announcement of the cap-
are of that place was premature. The inhabitants
f the City were willing and anxious to open their
,ates to the invader, and this desire made its cap- v
ure so probable, that for three days after the battle
f November 5th, the report of its occupation by P
he Russians was reiterated and believed. But q
Nlukhtir, though he had been so severely handled,
Decided to make a stand and to defend the city. u
Some reinforcements came to confirm his determin-
ation, and he succeeded in repelling two attacks of
he enemy, one of them with serious loss. It was
found that the Russians were not in as great force
is had been supposed. The bulk of their army was
it Kars, and they had only 25,000 men before Erze-
roum. So matters stood until the 18th November,
when the Russians carried Kars by assault, and
they succeeded in occupying, and they now hold
that place. They took ten to fifteen thousand pris
oners, three hundred guns, and a large amount of
stores and munitions. Kars is a more important
capture than Erzeroum would have been. It has
been always thought that the fall of one place must
Follow soon on the capture of the other. But Kars
was much more of a fortress, and was much more
fully equipped and provided with materials of war.
As soon as it fell, General Melikoff, went in person
with 15,000 men to assist in, or direct the operations
against Erzeroum, and it does not seem as if that
place could much longer hold out. Some of the
troops heretofore engaged at Kars are to be sent, it
is said, to Plevna. This seems rather far to send
them, though no doubt, the fall of Kars leaves
them free for other service.
At Plevna, the situation has not materially chan-
ged. The Russians have obtained some further ad-
vantages and been able yet more to contract and
strengthen their lines. They failed in some of their
movements and were repulsed, but on the whole the
advantage is with them. The Turks still look on
and do nothing. Osman is believed to be better
provisioned than was at first supposed, and to be
able to feed his army for some weeks longer. He
is probably waiting for the co-operating armies of
Sefket and Mehemet All before making his effort
on the Russian lines. The Turkish accounts speak
of the relieving armies as gathering numbers and
form, and it was said that the command had been
given to Mehemet and was no longer shared with
Sefket. They make no aggressive sign though the
situation seems to urge it, the Turks doing nothing
more than to resist the Russians under Skobeleff,
who leads in their struggle around Plevna for po-
sition. He has been twice wounded in the last
three weeks, though not dangerously, and he still
retains his command. A lieutenant general at
thirty three, whose every step was gained by some
deed of gallantry, he stands out in the accounts of
the war like a hero of mythology. The reports all
become more glowing as they come to his name.
Conspicuous by his size, by his white coat and
white horse, by his ever being at the point of dan-
ger where the attack or defence is fiercest, he has so
far borne a charmed life, and until the late assaults
escaped unhurt. One cannot help hoping that there
is no bullet waiting for him at Plevna.
The Montenegrins are continuing their successes,
and are making head way toward Scutari. The
latest reports speak of a check they have met be-
tween Aidivanni and Scutari, and it was time they
should be checked. If the Turks did not have their
hands so full, the Montenegrins would not be so far
from home, but as it is, their part in the war adds to
the troubles at Constantinople. The Sultan and his
Ministers had held a meeting where the desire for
peace was unanimous, and they have asked Mr.
Layard, the British Ambassador, to solicit the me-
diation of his government. They claim to be earn-
est in their overtures, which if made as reported,
were before the fall of Kars. They say that pushed
as they are they can only invoke peace with bay-
onets still fixed, but they declare that both com-
batants have done enough for honor, and that the
war may now cease without discredit to either.

BURNING OF THE SCHR. "MARY E. RAN-
KIN." IN ST. GEORGES HARBOUR.
On Saturday evening last, about I past 7 o'clock,
while the mate and steward of the above vessel were
in the galley, which is below deck, the Kerosene
lamp in the galley, exploded, and in a few minutes
the whole vessel was a sheet of flame. Assistance
went from the shore immediately, but so fierce and
universal were the flames over the vessel that it was
with much difficulty that any of the clothing of
the captain or crew could be saved. A small
quantity of provisions was saved, and that would
not have been done had not the tugboat "Acker-
man" hauled the stern of the vessel to windward
and kept her so until the flames drove the men into
the boats. Endeavors were made at an early
moment to scuttle the vessel by boring, but this
was found impracticable from the closeness of the
timbers. At 10 p.m. the masts went over the side,
and the hull continued to burn until 8 a.m. on
Sunday morning, when it sunk at its anchors a
short distance from the shore. The sails had been
unbent and were stowed below, and the survey-
ors had only completed their survey at noon of Sat-
urday. Fortunately the cargo of Kerosene Oil had
all been discharged and was at a safe distance from
the burning vessel. We hear that very trifling
insurance was on the vessel.


RAINFALL, NOVEMBER, 1877.
1 0.15 37 0-58
2 0.15 18 3-20
3 0'00 19 0"00
4 0'01 20 0-02
5 0183 21 0"00 ,
6 0"01 22 0"00
7 0-38 23 0"00


0.00
0.03
0-03
0.01
0-66
0-04
0.00
0.00
0.00


0.00
0.01
0-02
0.00
0.00
0.00
1-~08


Total 6-53 Ins.


Rainfall November, 1876....................4..4-14 Ins.
Average of 7 years from 1870 to 1876 in-
clusive ...........................................453 Ins.

The Rev. Spencer Musson, B.A a Chaplain of
May, 1868, has resigned his commission in the
Naval Service.
Admiral Sir Hastings Yelverton, G.C.B., relin-
quished his seat at the Board of Admiralty on
Wednesday, and left his official residence on
Thursday. Admiral George G. Wellesley, C.B.,
will take his seat at the Board as Senior Lord of
the Admiralty as soon as the new patent is issued.
Major.General Sir William Jervois, C B.,
K. C. M. G., R. E., has a assumed his official duties
as Governor of South Australia with the fuil inten-
tion of remaining at his post. The fact of Lady
Jervois and family having returned to England
when Sir William took his departure from Singa-
pore led to the supposition that the General intended
to join them at home; but, had he intended to have
done so, he will not now leave Adelaide.


WARD OF THE HALIFAX FISHERY COM- ]
MISSION UNDER THE TREATY OF
WASHINGTON.
The Treaty of Washington, it will be remem- c
)ered, between Great Britain and the United States g
f America, referred to arbitration three questions: p
1.-The Alabama Claims so-called. t
2.-The San Juan Boundary. e
3.-The old standing question-the value of the t
British American Deep Sea Fisheries. p
7he Geneva Award, made binding by a majority r
wte of the Arbitrators, was honourably paid by t
Great Britain, notwithstanding the opinions which a
prevailed as to the excessive damages, which subse- t
quent experience has more than confirmed-the e
Washington authorities having still in hand an e
undivided sum under some six millions of dollars. t
The San Juan question was decided adversely to
Great Britain. r
In terms of the Treaty the United States and the a
British American fishery grounds were thrown open t
to the subjects of Great Britain and the United
States for a period of twelve years and British fish
and oils were to be admitted free into the United
States. The point referred to the Halifax Fishery
Commission was the difference in value of the two
national grounds, the Washington Executive con-
tending that the concessions mutually made left no
balance to be adjudged. It was soon discovered
that British diplomacy had, in framing this Treaty
of Washington, again committed a blunder adverse
to our national interests. The Geneva Award was
made binding by a majority, and so unequivocally
should the Halifax Award have been made. The
wording of the Treaty is ambiguous, however,
and it is generally construed that the Halifax
Award must be unanimous to be binding. In June
last, after much delay, the Commission assembled
at Halifax. After a diligent hearing of a volumin-
ous mass of evidence on both sides, and an able
summary of both cases, the Commission concluded
its labours on Friday week by a majority award of
five and a half millions of dollars in favor of Great
Britain-the United States Arbitrator dissenting.
The Commission ruled out the claim made by Great
Britain for bait, ice, and transhipment, which will
explain why the award is nearly eight millions of
dollars less than the original claim. At the expir-
ation of some six years the balance of the lease of
the fisheries under the Treaty the British Fishing
grounds will again revert. The probabilities are
that the United States will act honourably, and
discharge a moral if not a legal obligation by pay-
ing the award. British and American interests are
now indeed largely identical, and anything which
will tend to a closer alliance between the two coun-
tries must eventually tend to the strengthening of
the Anglo-Saxon power in the world, and the con-
sequent advancement of civilization.

The Revd. G. M. Grant, of Halifax, on vacating
St. Matthew's Church, of which he has been incum-
bent for twelve years, to take the Principalship of
Queen's College, Kingston, has received, in addi-
tion to several addresses, substantial testimonials of
the general favour in which he has stood. The
Rev. Gentleman, who enters a wide field in Canada,
accompanied S. Fleming's Expedition to the Paci-
fic, and published "Ocean to Ocean." lIe is a
Nova Scotian educated in Scotland, under the aus-
pices, we believe, of the late Dr. Norman McLeod,
a favourite Chaplain of Her Majesty. His indus-
try and natural abilities, combined with a rare
force of character, stamp the 'man as indefatigable
in the pursuit of what he thinks to be good.

From the Philadelphia Episcopal Register, Oct. 6.

CLF4ICAL REPUTATION.
The world well knows how easy it is to defame
the character and destroy the usefulness of a clergy-
man. It causes us great pain to see snch an at-
tempt made by sevei al of the papers, all proceeding
from one source, published in the city of Philadel-
phia.-Although the name was not given, yet the
article clearly pointed to one clergyman only. The
statements were most foul and false, and we insert
the following retraction by the newspaper which
gave birth to the slander :
"In our issue of last Sunday there appeared an
article as to which we now desire in as emphatic a
manner as possible to express our regret and mor-
tification. It was published as an item of news,
and, without our knowledge, it contained an un-
just and malicious reference to one of the most
worthy of the clergy of the Episcopal Church in our
city, and to his wife. We may complain that in
its publication we have been grievously imposed
upon; but we desire, befo e seeking the reparation
from another quarter which is due to ourselves, to
record our abhorrence of the base means by which
have been disseminated slanders, in every particu-
lar false, and our sincere pain that we have been
the agents of their circulation.
I "There is, fortunately, no Philadelphia Beecher
case. There is no gentleman in our midst of purer
intentions and life, than the distinguished Rector
of the time-honored and historic parish of Christ
Church. We have already, at our earliest oppor-
tunity, assured him and his friends of our deep
pain that any indignity should have been cast upon
him; and any imputation from us shoul I have
overshadowed and disturbed the tranquility of his
domestic privacy; and we now as publicly as we
can, as fully as we can, and in respectful conside-
ration of his virtues, disclaim the article in ques-
tion, and tender him the apology which those who
have imposed upon us have made his due."


This retraction is very full and complete, but we
trust that it will be a lesson to those who recklessly
and carelessly assail the reputation of those whom
they regard as comparatively helpless. The Clergy-
man alluded to in passing through the fire had not
his garments singed-and we do not hesitate to say
that there is not a more pure and devoted son of the
Church, not one who could or has passed more
meekly and patiently through the fiery trial, than
the active and zealous Rector of that Church so
long under the ministry of the venerated and ac-
knowledged Patriarch of the Protestant Episcopal
Church in the United States.

MAILS TO THE UNITED STATES.-The British
Post Office authorities have concluded a contract
whereby the Cunard, the Inman, and the White
Star Steamships, have the sole carriage of the mails
to the U. S. from December 1st.
Another extensive fire occurred at Chicago on the
evening of the 14th November, and destroyed pro-
perty to the value of over $1,000,000.
PITTSBURG, PA., November 19.-The grand jury
has returned indictments against nearly one hun.
dred persons accused of participation in the riots,
and there is every disposition that they shall have
prompt, impartial and fearless trials.
The Council of the Vatican has decided that no
power can veto the conclave's selection of successor
to the Pope.
A British officer, Major Campbell, led the Turks
in their magnificent attack upon Fort St. Nicholas
in the Shipka Pass. His battalion was 800 strong.
They took the Fort, held it for eight hours and
were then forced to retreat. The affair is regarded
by some military critic as the pluckiest which has
occurred in any modern war.
MARRIAGE IN HIGII LIFE.-Fitzallani Howard,
fifteenth Duke of Norfolk, was married to Lady
Flora Hastings on the 21st November, at the Ora-
tory, a Catholic retreat at Brampton, in the suburbs
of London. The ceremony was attended by a vast
concourse of wealth and fashion. The presents were
numerous and costly.


)EPARTURE OF THE 87TH ROYAL IRISH From the,Uniited States and Europe.
FUSILIERS FOR ENGLAND.
On the 6th day of December, 1876, this gallant The Mail Steamer Canima, Captain Liddicoat,
orps landed on our shores from Halifax, and the from New York, which place she left at 9 o'clock on
*ood people of St. George were not altogether the morning of the 23rd ultimo, did not reach her
leased with their presence, for unkind and un- wharf in this Town till the morning of the 28th, her
ruthful reports had preceded them, and they look- passage being prolonged by contrary winds and
d forward to all kinds of disorderly conduct on heavy weather.
heir part; but soon, very soon, all misgivings We are indebted to Captain Liddicoat, Mr. Pur-
passed away, and they found they had amongst ser Gale, Mr. Harding and Mr. Doughty second
hem one of the finest Regiments in Her Majesty's officer, and to R. A. Tucker, Esqr., passenger, for
service. Drunkenness and licentiousness, which files of New York papers of the 23rd.
oo often debase a body of men as well as individu- Robert L. Case, the ex-President of the Security
dls, was unseen amongst them, and the streets of Lire Insurance Company, has been sentenced, by
he good old town were never desecrated by drunk- Judge Davis, of the Supreme Court of New York
en brawls or exhibitions of immorality. Civility to five years imprisonment at hard labour, for
and a quiet demeanour have characterized the en- fraudulent transactions in connection with the said
ire corps during their residence here. Their de- Company. But for Case's advanced years the sen-
parture was consequently looked forward to with tence would have been for 10 years.
regret. A kind fraternal feeling was exhibited on
all occasions by officers and men, and the recrea-
ion furnished by their splendid Band on Monday Arrival of the Engliish Mail of Nc,.
evenings and at other times, for the benefit of the V in her 13.
St. Georgians and neighboring Parish, will long be
remembered, and their appreciation of which was The Royal Mail Steamer Beta, Captain Shaw
manifested by a parting gift to the Band a few with the English Mail of the 13th ultimo, arrived
evenings before their departure. at St. Georges on the evening of Friday last. When
On Thursday, 22nd ult., three companies under the Beta left Halifax, the storm drum was up at the
the command of Lieut.-Colonel Beagley, with the signal station there and she has had stormy weath-
women and children of the Regiment, embarked, and er the whole passage, but behaved remarkably well,
on the following day the headquarters, with the By the Beta we have our usual exchange files, as
popular Colonel of the Regiment at its head, led by well as files handed us by Captain Shaw and T. S,
the fine Band of the 19th Regiment, also embarked. Reid, Esqr., passenger. They supply us with twc
We may here remark that we never saw a regiment days' later dates from Europe, than brought by the
of soldiers leave these shores in more splendid or- Canima.
der as regards discipline, physique and morale, than ** 4
the 87th Royal Irish. There were no maudling The Turks have evacuated Orchanie.
" good byes," no leave-taking with loose and im- The Montenegrins havecaptured forts command-
proper characters, which too often disgrace- such ing the Town of Spezzia.
scenes; but there was the quiet manly farewell of In the French Chamber of Deputies it is proposed
parting friends then came "Auld lang syne" in to modify the laws regarding a state of siege.
all its plaintiveness from the Band of the Regt., re fl d sg.
succeeded by the cheerful and lively "Barrossa," The recent floods in Virginia are subsiding.
so familiar to the ears of the St. Georgians, and The capture of Spezzin, now imminent, will give
the 87th had taken their leave of Bermuda. the Montenegrins a strong foothold in the piece o
A large party of ladies and gentlemen accompa- Ottoman territory bounded on the east by Lake Sen.
nied them on board the Himalaya, lying in Mur- tari, and on the South by the River Bojana. Anti
ray's Anchorage. At 4 p.m. the noble ship had vari and Dulcigno hold out, but if the Turkish iron
discharged her pilot and the Royal Irish Fusiliers clads fail tocometo theiraid, both places may havetc
were on their way "Home." surrender. With seaports at their command, th
No better proof can be adduced of the salubrity Montenegrins will be encouraged to take their plao
of these Islands and the morality of the Regiment among maritime nations.
than the fact that since their arrival here they had
only lost two men, one of which was by accident, REMARKABLE VOYAGE.
the other by wilfulness amounting to suicide. T ,, i,. rJ ... .


The Army and Navy Gazete" says that a Cape
War appears now to be imminent. Deputy Comy.
General Strickland having been ordered to the
front from Cape Town to make the necessary Com-
missariat arrangements for a campaign. Great
confidence is felt in His Excellency Governor Sir
Bartle Frere and the course he has pursued is
fully approved.

The long expected Warrant for the re-organiza-
tion of the Pay Department has at last been adorn-
ed with the signature of the Secretary of State for
War, and published for the information of all whom
it may concern, and from all we can learn much sat-
isfaction is afforded thereby, especially to thejunior
Officers of the Department, who, immediately on
attaining eight years service from date of Commis-
sion obtain a step in rank, with an increase of 4/6
a day-thus, no less than fifteen Assistant Pay-
masters will on 1st April 1878, the date from which
the Warrant takes effect, obtain a step which would
have taken them from one to seven years to obtain
under the existing system.
Those who apparently derive the smallest bene-
fit are the present Deputy Paymasters whose pay
is increased one shilling a day, but with a prospect
of 2/6 increase after ten years service in the rank of
Paymaster, which rank is to be substituted for that
of Deputy Paymaster and Staff Paymaster for that
of the present rank of Paymaster.
As soon as the whole of the Assistant Paymas.
ters shall be absorbed in the list of Paymasters, the
rank of Assistant will be abolished.
Paymasters of Regiments will be eligible for ap-
pointment as Staff Paymasters, and Captains under
45 years of age as Paymasters in the new Depart-
ment after one year's probation as Acting Paymas-
ters, but it is generally understood that the period
during which any Officer may have acted as mem-
ber of Committee of Paymastership will be consi-
dered in fixing the period of probation, but no more
Civilians will be appointed as Assistants or Pay-
masters.
The new Army Pay Department being brought
under the General Staff some augmentation and
consequent promotion in the Corps of Staff Clerks
may be expected, to meet the clerical requirements
of the department.

A YOUNG RUSSIAN HEROINE.


From the London Times.
So on the 3rd of September began the advance
on Biela. The whole of the force encamped in
front of Rasgrad marched out under the command
of Achmet Eyoub, and proceeded by various roads in
the direction of Kacelyevo. Here the Russians
had strongly intrenched themselves in front of the
Kara-Lom. On the night of the 5th the right
wing, under Fuad Pasha, reached Costanza, while
the centre, under Nedjib, occupied Soleric.
Meanwhile ever since the 381st of August, Sabit
had been creeping along from Karahassankoi, over
the hills at the bank, and along the valley of the
river past Bekirin Yenikoi, in the same direction.
On Thursday, the 6th, a combined attack on Kacel-
yevo was carried out in excellent style. The Rus-
sians defended themselves extremely well, and
made the most of the advantages of their position;
but it was manifest that they were outnumbered.
The Turks showed good courage, and advanc-
ed with coolness against a very heavy artillery fire,
delivered with admirable precision. The enemy
had intrenched themselves in three lines, but the
first was soon carried. The second was more ob-
stinately contested, and here occurred, probably,
one of the most extraordinary episodes of the war.
As the Russians began to waver and their fire to
slacken as the Turks were pressing forward with in-
creased vigor, a young Russian officer was seen
standing just behind one of their batteries waving
his sword, and boldly encouraging his men to stand
their ground. Over and over again he rallied the
troops, who were pouring out of the trench, but it
was of no use; it was not in his power alone to stem
the tide of victory. His men, animated by his ex-
ample, turned and held their own for a few minutes,
but the fire was too heavy for any human thing to
stay and live. They could not bear it. They fell
on their knees and entreated him to fly, but not an
inch would he stir, and at last he stood for more
than a minute absolutely alone, save for the dying
and the dead piled in heaps around him. It could
only end one way amid the storm of bullets which
were raining round him thick as hail; one at last
found its way to that noble heart, and he fell dead.
As the Turks swept over the parapet and dashed past
the spot where he lay, the Colonel, struck by the
boy's extraordinary courage and devotion, gave or-
ders that he should be decently buried. In the
evening he reported to the Commander-in-Chief
that the body was that of a girl. I give this most
astounding declaration of the Colonel upon the au-
thority of one of the English officers on the Serdar's
Staff, who tells me that he was actually present
when it was made. It seems almost incredible ; but,
true or false, no braver heart ever beat than now
sleeps in that little grave on the sunny slope of
Kacelyvo.


I












f
-

o
e
e


n 11.0 rVLL W.LP) F,110 zb-za 15arss, Uaptain Henry
Hollis, arrived at St. Georges on Sunday last from
New York, with a full load of oxen in excellent con-
dition. The E. B. has a well earned character for
rapid passages, but the present beats all her pre-
ceding ones, having accomplished the round voyage
in twelve and three quarter days! I
We are indebted to Captain Hollis and Mr.
Steward Smith for files of New York papers of the
28th ultimo.
Gold in New York on 28th, 103.
Shares Delaware and Hudson Canal, 47.
The United States Steamer Huron, Commander
P. Ryan, was lost on Roanoke Beach, North Caro-
lina, within 250 yards of the shore, on the night of
the 25th ultimo; hugging the shore to avoid the
influence of the Gulf Stream is stated to be the cause
of the unfortunate accident. The commander and
12 other officers and 99 of the crew, were drown-
ed. Those of the crew that reached the shore alive
were quite badly bruised and the greater portion
of them all but naked.
Another cause of difference has arisen between
the United States and England. The U. S. Gov-
ernment had acknowledged the rights of the Ame.
rican discoverer to the Morant Cay, a guano is.
land, near the Island of Jamaica.

The body of a seaman of H. M. S. 'Bellerophon,'
-nO.M urgt ~a'1nai w on ot i the


namedct Ueorge inmclair, was found floating in the
Cambre on Sunday morning.
An Inquest was held before Charles C. Keane,
Esqr., Coroner, when a verdict of "Found Drown.
ed" was returned.

A. Supplement of Five
Columns accompanies this issue of
the GAZETTE -It contains a very in-
teresting letter from our Paris Correspondent. A
Communication from "Wayfarer," on the subject
of the contemplated Town Clock, and the latest Eu-
ropean Intelligence.

MARRIED, on Thursday last, at St. Mary's Church,
Warwick, by the Rev. J. F. B. L. Lough, Rector of
Paget and Warwick, JOHN P. SMITH, Esqr., to ELIZ-
ABETH SUSAN, only daughter of the late Captain Ben-
jamin White.
DIED, on 2nd inst, at the residence of Mrs. Walker,
Ireland Island, Miss FRANCES V. SEYMOUR, aged 77
years. Her end was peace.


Dentistry.

Dr. Thos. II.Outerbridge,
Surgeon and Mechanical
DENTIST,
Will visit St. Georges Professionally on every
VMONDAY, and may oe found at the Rooms
in Kent Street, lately occupied by Da. A. J.
JORDAN.
December 4th 1877.-3 Sp.

Colonist" copy 3 times on 3rd page.

A New Assortment of BOOTS and SHOES
Just Received at Nos. 46 & 47, Front
Street.


John B. Newman,


Hesid Street,


- Hamilton,


(Nearly opposite the Royal Gazette" Ollice.)
General Harness Maker and
Itepairer.
Carriage TRIMMER anl UPHOLSTERER.
MATRESSES made to order.
N. B.-Neatnes, Strength and Punctuality
Guaranteed at the above Establishment.
Hamilton, Dec. 1st, 1877.-3m.


H. A. James,
Received by the last Steamer
FROM NEW YORK,
A Fine Assortment of Silver

PLATED
Consisting of:-
CrA\KE BASKETS, Card RECEIVERS
SButter DISHES, Sugar DISHEd, (with
ruby and frosted Glass), CASTORS, Pickle
JAatS, Napkin RINGS, CUPS, GOBLETS,
SPOONS, FORKS, &c., &c.
These Goods are heavily Plated and finely
finished. Cor. Ft. St. and Chancery Lane.
Hamilton, Deer. 3, 1877.-1m






SERMITDA ROYAL GAZETTE


Public Auction, i AUCTION SALE. '. Off iA
AT T HE 01A 3TAND. Commissariat Office,30TH NOVEMBER 1877.
To-morrow, Wednesday, HAMILTON, Bermuda, 3rd Decr., 1877. _
,.^ 7 t 13 HI'lal m 00 HE DISTRICT CommIssARY GENERAL Will
At 12 o'clock, sharp, receive Tenders at the above Office up to .... ,'i
WILL BE SOLD, ner the B S hed, 12o'clock, Noon, of FOR
In order to make room, At 12 o'clock, MONDAY NEXT, tea m ComumainicationI

ibI 0ol Aving, On Thursday next, The10thinstant, Between Bermuda & ew York


Viz.:
LS. SF. FLOUR Do. Corn MEAL
Do. Planting and Eating POTATOES
Bags CORN and BRAN
Tubs BUTTER Boxes CIGARS
6 Half Chests Best Oolong TEA
1000 lbs. Bermuda manufactured SOAP
Toilet SOAPS, &c., &c., &c.
ALSO,


Consisting of:
FRENCH GRENADINES WORSTS
GINGHAMSS PRINTS COTTONS
Ladies' ,and. Gents' Under PANTS and VESTS
&c., &c., &c.
ALSO,
F LOOR and Table Oil CLOTHS
CARPETING MATS BASKETS
BUCKETS MIRRORS CHROMOS
School SLATES Clothes PINS
Carpet BAGS Paper Window Shades
LANTERNS Glass Plates
Lot Window Glasses, &c., &c., &c.
ALSO,
A Fine DONKEY A DRAY
AND,
17 Dozen Girls' and Misses'
Colored Striped 11OS3E,
Shipped contrary to order.

Immediately after the above,
In front of
TI. I, Pitt, Esqr's. Dwel=
1, ling, in Reid Street,
WILL BE SOLD,
A Lot of
Household Furniture,
Consisting of:-
B EDROOM SETS
Wood and Cane Seat CHAIRS
Oak CHAIRS
Rocking CHAIRS, wood and Cane Seats
BEADsTEADS, &c., &c.
And
Oats, Potatoes, &c.
JOHN HARNETT,
Auctioneer.
N.B.-Should Wednesday prove unfair Sale
will take place first fair day after.
Hamilton, 4th December, 1877.



1B 64Ut TIOtV,

To-morrow, Wednesday,
5th Instant,
I WILL SELL,
At the Residence of
Surgeon Dentist Jordan,
IN KENT STREET,
THE WHOLE OF HIS

HOUSE FURNITURE,
Consisting of
AM. BEDSTEADS BEDS
PILLOWS QUILTS Mosquito
CURTAINS
CHAMBERDELF Cane-bottom CHAIRS
TABLES PICTURES Easy CHAIR
LAMPS BOOKS Looking GLASS
A CLOCK Cooking UTENSILS SAFE.
And a variety of other useful Articles suited
for a Family.
ALSO,
A Complete Bed Room
SET, consisting of 10 Pieces.
THOJIAS TODD1VGS,
Auctioneer.
St. George's, Dec. 4, 1877.

M, N.B.-The HOUSE is for Rent. Pos-
S session given 1st Jany., 1878.

To be Sold


01Y TUE PREMISES.


At Noon,

Of Friday Next,
The 7th ay of December, inst.,
Under and by virtue of a Decretal Order of the
Court of General Assize of Bermuda in
Chancery,
f ALL that certain DWELL-
11L 1ING HOUSE and Parcel of LAND,
containing by estimation 4 Acres and 3 Roods,
belonging to the Estate of RICHARD FOWLE
BURROWS, deceased, situate in Sandys Parish,
in the Islands of Bermuda, and bounded North-
erly by a Public Cross Road leading to Geor-
ges Bay"; Easterly by Land heretofore of
Daniel Robert Tucker, deceased, afterwards of
Edward Conyers, deceased, and now occupied
by his Widow; Southerly by the Glebe Land
of Southampton Parish; and Westerly by Land
heretofore of Charlotte Bascome, now of Wil-
liam Olive.
JOHN F. BURROWS,
Administrator.
,Hamlton, 3rd December, 1877.


6th Instant,
25 B ARRELS Choice Garnet Reds
25 Do. Do. Table POTATOES
15 Drums CODFISH, 1281bs. each, now land-
ing ex. Beta"
50 Sugar cured HAMS
10 Doz. Tins Roast BEEF
5 Half Chests TEA
5 Boxes Gold Leaf TOBACCO, 201bs. each
30 Doz. TUMBLERS
18 do. Wine and Water GLASSES
Ground COFFEE in pound packets
A large assortment of Brown, Black and Drab
FELT HATS,
Soft and hard, recently imported.
COTTONS PRINTS HOSIERY
HANDKERCHIEFS PERCALES &c., &c.
1 CARRIAGE 1 DRAY
ALSO,
The large, Cedar built,

Sailing Boat,
Of about 150 barrels capacity, with SPARS,
SAILS and BALLAST, built and owned
by Mr. SAML. LAMBERT.
AND,
7 Bags G U. r0O,
Diamond K.
Damaged by sea-water on board the Steamer
"Canima," Liddicoat, master, while on a voy-
age from New York to this Port and on sur-
vey recommended to be sold for benefit of
whom it may concern.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, Deer. 3, 1877.

Notice.

We have been instructed to Sell
AT PUBLIC AUXCT10t ,
At 12-30 P.M.,
On Thursday Next
6th inst.,
UNDER THE BIG SHED,
I00 Bags POLLLA1D,
Ex. Brigt. Excelsior,'
Shipped contrary to order.
B. W. WALKER 4. CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, Dec. 3, 1877.



TO BE SOL,
ON THURSDAY,
The 13th Dec. inst., at 12 o'clock,
The Bull "COLUMBUS,"
AND
1 The Stallion ONTARIO."
The property of the Public of Bermuda, and
sold by order of the Agricultural Committee
appointed in 1870.
RICHARD TYNES,
Hon. Secy.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, Dec. 3, 1877.

New Winter Goods.

Has Just Received ex 'Beta,'
A Large Assortment of English and Scotch


Carefully Selected for the present Season,
which will be open for Inspection en '' HUl-
DAY 6th instant and to which he invites public
attention, at his Old Stand No. 39, Front street.
JALEX. J. FRITH.
Hamilton, Dec. 3rd, 1877.-3


JUST RECEIVED,
PER ELIZABETH NN.A,')
5 days from P. E. Island,
163 B BLS. Garnett POTATOES
94 Ditto Minnesota DITTO
100 Ditto Jackson DITTO
6 Tubs BUTTER
12 Crocks DITTO, 15 lbs. each, Superior for
Family use
12 Kits SAUSAGES
12 Ditto SALMON
20 Bags Pearl BARLEY, 20 lbs. each
20 D)itto OATMEAL do. do.
All of which is offered at a very low Figure
for Cash.
Apply to EDWARD WOLFF,
St. George's,
Or to C. H. ROBINSON.
45 Front Street, Hamilton,
4th Dec., 1877.
Colonist, twice.


CLOCKS!!


CLOCKS! 1 !
In great Variety.
For Sale by
It. A. JAMES,
Cor. Fioat St. and Chancery Lane.
December 4th, 1877.-l.u.


From Persons desirous of selling to H. M.
War Department

One HORSE

or MULE.
Forms of Tender containing all information
can be obtained at the Commissariat Office,
Hamilton, between the hours of 10 a.m. and
2 p.m, daily.
The DISTRICT COMMiISSARY GENERAL re-
serves the right of rejecting any or all the
Tenders.
H. J. WILKINSON,
A. C. G.,
1 District Commissary General.

FO* VD OUT
That

C. H. ROBINSON,
45 Front Street, Hamilton,
Keeps on hand the Largest, best, and most
Varied Stock of Havanah and other
Ch 'ice


in the Colony.
ALSO,
The Largest Assortment of

CHOI` I T3E T B. 1"Jf313
To he obtained. Consisting in part of English
Bristol Birds E1ye, Vanity Fair, Gold
Ieaf, Fig, Twist, Log Cabin.
'Love among the Roses,"
Honey Dew,
~~ ~
A LSO,
A Full Assortment
PIPES CIG\ir 11 TTES
Cigarette PAPIER
Manilla CHERIOOTS, very Superior
FIS U ES VE-sUVIA.NS
Friction MAT I I ES Cigarette H litO ) E ItS
Scotch and Black SNUFF,
And every requisite for the Smoker, Chewer or
n uffer. Recollect-
C. H. HOBINSON,
45 Front Street, lamilton.
I)ecr. 4, 1877.-3
Gazette, only.

Real Estate,
For' Stie aled to Ieint.
rI\IIE UNI)ED,111NEI) has received in-
structions to Sell a small COTTAGE
and halt lot of Land in the Seventh Longitudinal
Street of the Town of Hamilton. A HOUSE
and One acre of Land on Hlarrington Sound in
Smiths Parish. A HOUSE and Eight and a
half acres of Land in Warwick Parish. A Tract
of valuable LANI) in Southampton Parish. And
also to Sell or Rent A HIOUSE and two and a
half acres of Land at the Crawl in Hamilton
Parish, and a STORE or DWELLING HOUSEE
on the Middle Road in Devonshire Parish.
Information and particulars furnished on ap-
plice.t on to.
ORMOND T. MIDDLETON,
Ilamilton.
I)ecr. 1, 1877.--

Seed Potatoes.

THE UJYDERSIGJVED,


Offer on
Choice


Accommodating
Garnet


ALS(
A few Barrels of a new
1" Brownell


Terms,
Reds.


Seed Potatoc called
Beauty."


A hardy variety and great Producer.
B. W. WALKER 4. CO.
Ilamilton, Dec. 3rd, .1877.-2

N "\V WATCH E.S, Lockets, Brooches, Fin-
ger Rings, F.ar Rings, Sleeve Buttons,
Charms, &c., &c.
At 11. A. JAMES,
Cor. Front St. and Chancery Lane.
Decr. 4th, 1877.-1min

For Sale.



A Bay Mare by Knight of
Kars."
About 15-3 up to 15 stone, quiet to ride and
in Harness, with good action, very docile and
quiet with troops, has been ridden by a Lady.
This Mare just brought out from England is
to be sold as the owner being quartered on Ire-
land Island has no use for her. Any trial or
Veterinary examination allowed.
Price 60.
ALSO,
TWO 8ADDI, S,
And some Horse CLOTHIING.
Apply to
J. ROSE VINCEN T, Esq.,
19th Regt.,
The Casemates, Ireland kllat;d.
Deer, 3, 1877,-2


THE present agreement for maintaining
Steam Communication between Bermuda
and New York being about to expire:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
Persons disposed to Tender for the above Ser-
vice are to cause their Tenders to be delivered
at the Office of the COLONIAL SURVEYOR, in
Hamilton, Bermuda, on or before
The 31st January Next.
Among the conditions which will be requir-
ed to be fulfilled will be the following:-
1.-The Contract will be made for a term of
FIVE YEARS AND NINE MONTHS, from the
31st March, 1878, terminable by either party
on the 31st March of any succeeding year, on
giving six months' previous notice.
2.-A voyage to be made from each of the
Ports of New York and Hamilton once in
every week for ten consecutive weeks from
15th April, or such other date as may be
fixed for each year by the BOARD OF WORKS,
and once in every fortnight at the least dur-
ing the remainder of the year, at such dates
as may be fixed by the BOARD OF WORKS.
3.-The Vessels must be Steamers of not less
than 700 tons burden, exclusive of engine
and stoke room and of bunker space, and of
space allotted for the accommodation of the
crew, with an average speed of not less than
eight knots per hour and aedraught of water
not exceeding 16J feet when fully laden, and.
with comfortable accommodation for not
fewer than 40 First Class Cabin Passengers.
4.-The Contracting parties will be required
to make regular and periodical departures
from New York and from the Port of Ham-
ton, Bermuda, respectively, on stated days,
to be named by the BOARD OF WORKS, and
the Steamers must stay in each of the Ports
above mentioned not less than seventy-two
hours on each and every trip. The service
must be continuous and regular, but in the
event of any actual disability on the part of
the Contracting parties owing to unforeseen
causes to run the regular Steamers at the
appointed dates, other Steamers, equal in all
respects to the regular approved Steamers,
must, under a penalty of 50 for each de-
fault, be put upon the line within one week
of notification of such disability having
reached New York, and the Contracting
parties will, on approval of such substituted
steamer by the BOARD or WORKS, be entitled
to the payment of the full proportion of
subsidy.
5.-The Contracting parties will be required
under a penalty of 50 to have any iron
steamer which may be accepted for this ser-
vice by the BOARD or WORKS thoroughly
cleaned whenever in the judgment of the
Board such cleaning may become necessary
for the proper and effective performance of
the service.
6.-Before accepting any Steamer for the per-
formance of this service the BOARD OF
WORKS will have her thoroughly inspected
and reported on, and any vessel accepted
will be subject to periodical inspection ac-
cording to Law. The BOARD, however,
does not bind itself to have every steamer
that offers for the service examined..
Copies of the Law on this subject may be
obtained at the following places:
AT;NEW YORK-The Messrs. MIDDLE-
TONS, 40 Exchange Place.
AT BERMUDA-The COLONIAL SECRE-
TARY, Hamilton.
7.-Mail Bags will be delivered to* the Mail
Officer of the Steamers at One P.M. of each
day appointed for departure.
8.-The Earnings of the Contract Steamers for
the Year of 1876, were, irrespective of Sub-
sidy, for freight and passage money only,
23,000.
9.-THE BOARD does not bind itself to accept
the lowest or any other tender.
PHILIP NESS,
Colonial Surveyor.
Local papers, please copy.
rfRY that New TOBACCO, H. A. GIRAN-
'THAM has for Sale now at No. 46 & 47.
It is nice.

A VARIETY OF


And a Choice Selection of BOOKS,
Suitable for
Xmas and New Year
PR ESE.V TS,
Just Received, and For Sale at the Stationery
Store adjoining the Royal Gazette" Office,
which will be ready for inspection ou
THURSDAY next, the 6th inst.


Hamilton, Dec. 4, 1877.
Unclaimed Letters.
Mrs C Anderson, B J Beugtsson, Daliah Burch,
Joaquim de Barro, Robert Bradley, Laura A But-
terfield, W C Buckley, Robert Baldwin, Miss A
Costello, Antonio Jacintho Frulado mi Crolo, Wm
Casbolt, Mrs Christopher Cox, Mary A Cloyne,
Roza Corniceicas Correia, Antonio Jose Carcido,
Michael Carroll, R H Duecden, Lucius S Dill,
Manuel de Fontes, John Gonsalves, Thomas George,
Rev E H Goodwin, T Hallett, Mrs Jane Hayward,
Jerome Joaquin, H Johnson (care of T H A Pitt),
Wm S Iris, Miss A Johnson, John F James, Mrs
John W Kendle, John Landy, Silveira Coadres
Mencebo, Silveira de Mathos, John S Masters, Ellen
Murphy, P Ming, .Mrs E A Newman, Mrs G Oborn,
J T Petty, Thos J Place, E L Paterson, Manuel F
Perry, Tomas Pereira da Roza, George Swan, Mrs
Elizabeth Swan, Amer R Smith, Mrs Maryann Stone,
Miss Ehzabeth Simmons, Ella Stone, Mrs J A Steed,
David Smith, George B Swan, Sarah Ann Spencer,
James Smith (North Side), Rosetta Smith, Thomas
Taylor, George W Thompson, Miss Mary Ann
Tucker, John Virgin, Thomas Wells, Charles H
Wilkinson, Thos Willcox.
Post Office, Hamilton, Dec. 3, 1877,


I 11. 1 lr m AP -- -


2.-An Act to authorize the Coifrt of Chan-
cery to appoint Commissioners to administer
oaths in Chancery.
3.-An Act to continue the Act No. 22 of 1866
to amend the Act for preventing injuries
and annoyance on the Public Roads.
4.-An Act to continue the Marine Engine
Inspection Act, 1872.
5.-An Act to provide for the more convenient
administration of the Extradition Acts 1870
and 1873.
8.-An Act to continue the Act granting a
Salary to the Speaker of the Assembly.
9.-An Act to enable the Governor in Council
to postpone the sittings of the Court of
General Assize.
12.-An Act to continue the Act providing
Salaries for the Officers of the Revenue
Department.

H. A ,GR ^ANT AM hasjust Received
x. an Importation of TOBACCO
at; the Sign of the Big Cigar, 46 & 47, Front
Street.
JEW BOOTS and SHOES at Nos. 46 & 47,
*'l for Ladies, Gents and Children. Just
opened.

UNCLAIMED LETTERS IN THE POST OF.
FICE, ST. GEORGE, Dec. 3, 1877.
Isaac Bunn, Thomas Burchal, George Carter,
Eliza Ellis, Thomas Hamilton, Wm -ammond,
Samuel T Joel, Esau Minors, Thomas O'Brien,
H H Outerbridge, RI D Prudden, George Perry,
Laura Roberts, Samuel Richardson, B Silva
Gilmeth, John r Smith, James Smith, Susan A
Smith, Samuel Tucker, Mary F Trott, .1laliias de'
Urzes, Ruth Ann Wooldridge. P


CLOCKS!


Colonial Secretary's Office,
NOVEMBER 30THr, 1877.
HER MAJESTY'S JUSTICES OF THE PEACE
and other Gentlemen entitled to receive
Copies of the ACTS of the Colonial Legisla-
ture, are hereby informed that the Acts passed
during the last Session have been printed, and
that Copies may be obtained on application at
this Office.
Copies for Members of the Legislature have
been deposited with the Clerks of the respec-
tive Bodies.
R. E. WEBSTER,
Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office,
NOVEMBER 26TH, 1877.
TT IS HEREBY NOTIFIED for Public in-
formation that His EXCELLENCY THE GO-
VERNOR AND COUNCIL have been pleased to
define the Boundaries of the Districts of the
several Receiving House Keepers in these Is-
lands, in accordance with the provisions of the
Post Office Act No. 28 of 1864, as follows :-
By His Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER,
Colonial Secretary.
BOUNDARIES OF THE DISTRICTS OF
RECEIVING HOUSE KEEPERS.
MR. J. H. BARCLAY to take up delivery where
left off by Sub-Postmaster at Mangrove Bay,
and carry it down to residence of Mr. William
Olive.
MR. N. BASCOME from William Olive's down
to late J. M. T. Boyle's.
MR. F. M. COOPER from J. M. T. Boyle's
down to Miss Elizabeth Smith's.
MRS. H. A. LIGHTBOURN from Elizabeth
Smith's down to C. Leoblin's.
MRS. GWYNN from C. Leoblin's down to the
division line of Paget and Warwick.
MR. BENJAMIN TUCKER from the division line
of Paget and Warwick down to Paget
Church.
MRS. ELLEN GIBSON all that part of Paget Pa-
rish lying to the Eastward of Paget Church.
MIss SUSANNA PENISTON on the Northern side
of Devonshire from the Eastern boundary of
Pembroke Parish as far East as the Road
leading from North side over to Miss Tucker's
(Somerville) and South as far as theline of
Road running past Devonshire Church to
Mrs. William Foggo's.
MR. S. N. JOELL from where left off by Mrs.
E. Gibson and Miss Peniston as far East as,
and inclusive of, the Property of late Francis
Peniston, Esqr., (Penistons).
MR. BENJAMIN PAYNTER commencing at Pro-
perty of late Francis Peniston, carrying it
on for half a mile East of the Flatts, and to
the South side, and one mile beyond Flatts
Bridge.
MR. THOMAS W. HILL from one mile East of
Flatts Bridge to a half mile East of his own
Residence (say to Residence of Montreville
Outerbridge).
MR. W. 0. NORTH from where left off by Tho-
mas W. Hill as far East as the Causeway
and South as far as F. K. Outerbridge's,
Walsingham" House.
MR. W. H. WILKINSON from where left off by
Thomas W. Hill as far East as the Causeway
and to the South Shore on a line with the
Eastern border of Harrington Sound.
MIss E. TROTT on the South side of Harring-
ton Sound from half mile East of the Platts
to the Eastern border of Harrington Sound.
MIss E. RICHARDSON from the Western bound-
ary of St. George's Parish to Ferry Point
and as far as the Residence of William Mc-
Callan of Longbird Island, and as far East
as the Residence of Dr. F. A. S. Hunter.

Colonial Secretary's Office,
DECEMBER 3, 1877.
TTIS Excellency Major-General SIR ROB-
-L ERT M. LAFFAN, R.E., K.O.M.G.,
has received information from the Right Hon-
orable the Earl of Carnarvon, Her Majes-
ty's Principal Secretary of State for the Co-
lonies, that Her Majesty will not be advised
to exercise her power of disallowance in res-
pect of the following Acts of the Legislature
of Bermuda.
By Bis Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER,
Colonial Secretary.
1876.
No. 3.-An Act to amend the Law relating to
the currency and value of certain Silver
coins and other purposes.
1877.
1.-An Act for raising a Revenue for the sup-
port of the Government of these Her Majes-
ty's Islands and to appropriate certain sums
to the discharge of the expenses of Govern-
ment as therein expressed.


t
J







-F RMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


DETAILS OF THE CAPTURE OF KARS.

LONDON, Nov. 19.-A special despatch to the
Daily News, dated Veran-Kaleb, Sunday evening
says: The Fortress and City of Kars, with 300
cannon, stores, ammunition, cash, &c., have fallen
into Russian hands. The Turks lost 5,000 killed
and wounded, 10,000 prisoners, and many flags.
The Russian loss is about 2,700. The Russian
soldiers made but trifling booty, and spared peace-
ful citizens, women -and children. Gen. Loris
Melikoff directed the battle during the day. The
Grand Duke Michael was present also. The form-
er entered the city at 11 o'clock Sunday morning.
Kars was captured by about 15,000 Russians,
who climbed the steep rocks, ramparts, and walls,
and stormed an equal number of desperate fighting
Turks in a headlong flight over their ditches and
parnpels compelling them to die or surrender. The
escalade bad been originally fixed for the 13th but
it was postponed, owing to bad weather, the princi-
pal attack was made on the Southern forts. Gen.
Lazeroff commanded the right wing, consisting of
the Fortieth Division, and attacked Fort Hafiz
Pasha, crowning a steep rocky height. Gen. Count
Grabbe, with a regiment of Moscow grenadiers and
a regiment of the Thirty-ninth Division, assailed in
the centre the Kbauli-Tabia, Suivarra-Tabia, the
three towers, and the citadel. The Ardahan Bri-
gade and another regiment of Moscow grenadiers,
under Gens. Roop and Komaroff, forming the left
wing, assaulted Fort Inglis on the North. The at-
tack began in the centre at 8:30 o'clock on Saturday
evening, when Count Grabbe led his brigade a-
gainstthe Khauli redoubt and himself fell dead at
the first onset, pierced by a bullet. Capt. Kwadmic-
ki, of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, was the first to
enter the redoubt at 11 o'clock at night. His sword
was cut clean out of his hand and his clothes pierced.
The redoubt surrendered early in the morning, and
then the three towers. Almost simultaneously
with the capture of the Khauli redoubt the citadel,
Fort Suivarri, and Fort Hafiz Pasha were carried
by assault. By daylight on Sunday morning Gen.
Lazeroff's troops had made progress as far as the
capture of Fort Karadagh. The other Forts-es-
pecially the Arab-Tabia, on the east, and the Tak-
mah-Tabia, on the west-maintained a stubborn re-
sistance until 8 o'clock, when all the garrisons
which could escape fled toward Erzeroum. But
these were subsequently overtaken by the dragoons
and Cossacks and brought back prisoners,"

A VALUABLE INVENTION.
A Compass which is Insensible to Local Magnetism
[From the Wilmington (Del.) Commercial,
Oct. 18.]
Mr. Stephen Longfellow, of Cambridge, Mass.
now of St. Louis, a nephew of Henry Longfellow
the poet, has recently invented a ship's compass
designed to overcome variations of the needle due
to local causes, such as the use of iron in construc-
tion or the carrying of large masses of iron as
cargo. Mr. Longfellow was in the merchant ser-
vice and in the navy for many years, and this
compass is the result of long study of the subject
The bowl of the compass is surrounded by four
magnets in the form of segments, each segment
one eighth of the circle. They are insulated by
means of porcelain or glass knobs so completely
that a six-pound magnet placed within a very short
distance fails to affect them. These magnetic seg-
ments are put in slides around the upper part of
the bowl of the compass, and being attached to
jointed arms they can be readily adjusted to the
plane of the chord in a broken circle, or grouped
together on one side of the compass. Their ordi-
nary position is in the plane of the chord, extending
around the upper rim of the bowl and distant
therefrom only about one-fourth of an inch. They
probably effect the same purpose thus placed as
Professor Airy designed to effect when he recom-
mended the use of magnets placed near the com-
-pass and so arranged as to neutralize the influence
of all other local attractions; but the inventor
claims that these segmental magnets are much
more efficient than any arrangement of magnets on
the ship's deck, or of a complete circle of magnets
designed to neutralize other local attractions. One
of Mr. Longfellow's compasses has been made for
him by an optician of this city, and the needle
shows practically no deviation when masses of iron
are brought near it, although the same masses of
iron cause a marked deviation in an ordinary com-
pass. Magnets were also used in an experiment
on the effects of local attraction with the same re-
sult, a six-pound magnet within a few inches of
the Longfellow compass failing to deflect the
needle. The segmental magnets may be grouped
together to counterbalance any extraordinary at-
traction proving sufficiently great to affect the
compass when the magnets are in their normal
position, but the inventor does not anticipate that
there will be any necessity for calculations of devia-
tions from local causes when his compass is used,
nor for changing the position of the magnets as ar-
ranged in corresponding positions around the rim
of the bowl. The compass has many minor im-
provements in form and details over the ordinary
ship's compass. The bowl is not a true hemisphere
but is shaped like an oblong acorn cup, and has a
hollow ball on the bottom, which may be weighted
wlth shot. The spindle on which the needle rests
instead of being fastened in lead at tbe bottom of
the bowl is screwed up through the bottom with
long bearings so that it may be surely maintained
in its vertical position. The inclosing shell which
is designed to protect the compass from storms,
and the lamps for night observations are also of


new forms, but the chief feature of the new com-
pass is its use of segmental insulated magnets for
equalizing or neutralizing local attraction. If in
practical trials it should do what its inventor
claims for it, one great source of marine disasters
will be removed-the errors arising from unknown
variations of the compass due to local attraction.

DIPHTHTERIA IN P. E. ISLAND.-About a fort-
night age, a young man, 20 years of age, son of
Mr. Donald Clarke, Grand River, Lot 66, went home
from his work,on Saturday evening affected with a
violent type of diphtheria, and sad to relate be was
buried on the following Saturday. Since then five
of the'same family have died of the same disease,
and one little girl is the only one of a large family
left Mr. Clarke. She is suffering from the same
complaint and at last accounts was in a very preca-
rious condition. On two different occasions during
the week Mr. Clarke drove to the grave yard alone
to bury his children. Some years ago the same
family bad five children carried off by an epidemic.
-Halifax Morning Chronicle, Nov. 15.

The Penge agitation threatens to become a sort
of Tichborne craze. Having saved four interesting
but profoundly wicked criminals from the gallows,
the agitators are now asking, of course, in the
interests of justice," that a complete investigation
into the whole case shall be made before any final
decision as to the punishment to be awarded to the
convicts is arrived at. This demand was formula-
ted at a meeting held in London, and its meaning is
that even penal servitude for life is too severe a
penalty for the men and women who put Harriet
Staunton to death. A committee was appointed,
and if the provinces can be induced to follow suit,
the movement will soon be spread throughout the
country. The four convicts will then share with
the unfortunate nobleman now languishing in
prison" the honor of a widespread and fervent
popularity.


ROTTEN WAR VESSELS.
Another Scandal Leaking out about the Navy De-
partment.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 25.-The dilapidated condi-
tion of several of the new sloops of war, the last of
which was only completed this year and commis-..
sioned for service, is the cause of much unfavor-
able comment nmong naval officers, who have
become familiar with the facts as regards several,
notably the Enterprise, at Norfolk ; the Huron, at
Boston, and the Ranger in China. All officers
have been enjoined to secrecy, but the facts have
leaked out. The Enterprise, which was built at
Boston, and placed in Commission last April at
Portsmouth, N. H., is so poorly built that she has
been continually in the dry dock ever since on ac-
count of the extensive leakage of her cams, and it
is believed that she is utterly unsafe for a sea
voyage. The Huron, which was commissioned last
winter, was built on the Deleware River, but has
been almost continually under repairs ever since,
and when recently sent to Boston it was found that
her foremast was actually so rotten that it had to
be removed. It was rotten clear to the keel and
the vessel is otherwise in great need of repairs.
The Ranger, another vessel built on the Deleware,
sailed during the past summer after being repaired
extensively for her first cruise and reached Japan
late in September. The Department now has ad-
vices that the vessel has been sent to Shanghai to
be docked for extensive repairs. The Alert, an
iron vessel, was extensively repaired after being
placed in commission, and on her arrival last win-
ter in the Asiatic squadron, she had other extensive
repairs. The only one of the seven new sloops
which has not required very extensive repairs, is
the wooden vessel Adams, which was built at Bos-
ton and has just sailed from Rio Janeiro for the
Pacific coast. Secretary Thompson intends to send
a letter to Congress, calling special attention to
these vessels, and the matter will probably be made
the subject of an inquest.

Long trials are becoming a public vexation-
"The Detective case" has recommended. It fills
the papers, though we have already had all the
evidence published during the Magisterial examin-
ation at Bow Street.-The Penge business, though
9 the trial lasted many days, and was reported in
t many columns, had to be tried over again by the
public; and yesterday Alice Rhodes, who had been
condemned to death, was walking about at liberty
and enjoying the free air of heaven -The Bar, I am
told, are looking forward to another cause celebre,
as interesting in its way as the Tichborne case.
Lord Fitzgibbon, eldest son of the Earle of Clare,
was killed in the Crimean war. At least, that is
the record. Eye-witnesses saw him shot through
, the chest. Fatally wounded, he fell forward upon
, his horse, which dashed off with him into the
, Russian lines. He has never been seen since.
e Here is a romantic foundation for a new claimant
. to titles and estates. The pretender is at work.
s His case is in the lawyer's hands.-In an Irish
- trial, just concluded, a curious case of identity was
9 involved. A poor old woman from Australia
. claimed to be the next of kin to the late Alderman
r Carty, who left behind him an estate worth $450,000.
t The Alderman died intestate at Drogheda about
T four years ago. There has been much litigation
* ever since, and the property has been nearly all
t distributed among the relatives of the deceased who
established their claims. They were nearly all
f poor people. Some of them appeared in court
) barefooted. Something like $150,000 were swal-
lowed up in this way. The latest claimant is 84
years of age. She returned from Australia about
nine months ago, and finding that her nephew had
died and left a fine estate, she commenced proceed-
ings before the Irish Vice-Chancellor. Her case,
was, that 50 years ago she left Carty's house,
were she had been living with her sister, Alderman
Carty's mother, with the intention of going to Ame-
rica, but changed her mind, and went to Australia.
SHere she led the life of a gypsy, and she says she
knew Arthur Orton (the Tichbourne claimant) at
Wagga Wagga, and frequently visited his butcher's
shop there. The defense disputed the woman's
identity. They brought evidence to prove that the
real aunt of the deceased died in the House of
Industry at Dublin in 1820, and would now, if
alive, be 120 years old. The real aunt it was alleged
went by the name of Kitty Caffery, the name which
the present claimant (Catherine Murphy) says she
bore prior to her marriage. The original entry in
the book of the House of Industry was produced,
and the date of the claimant's leaving Drog-
heda and. the place of her birth corresponded with
the old woman's evidence. One point upon
which her statement was shaken in the minds of the
jury seems to me quite capable of explanation, and
the same idea has struck the editor of Truth, who, I
see, has half a dozen lines referring to the case.
She stated that when she left Ireland, in 1812, she
took with her 50 sovereigns in gold, which had
been given to her by her sister. An official of the
Bank of Ireland was called to prove that until 1817
a gold sovereign was a thing unknown. It does
not seem to have occurred to counsel that the old
woman might have meant "guineas" instead of
"sovereigns." Real weight having been attached
to this statement, any reflection upon her veracity
ought to be removed by a correction of her testi-
mony from "sovereigns" to "guineas." Mean-
while, however, the jury have given a verdict
against her, and I do not see that notice of appeal
has been registered.

THE SONG OF BRUNANBURIi..--This fine old Eng-
lish national war ode is found in the chronicles,
under the date 937. It celebrates the victory which


was won at Brunanburh in Northumberland by
King Athelstan and his brother Edmund over the
allied Scots and Danes, commanded by Constan-
tine, King of Scotland, Owen, of Strathclyde, and
the Danish Anlaf Sihtriobn : "'Athlstan, king,
lord of earls, giver of costly gifts among barons,
and his brother Edmund Atheling-life-long glory
they gained in the strife by Brunanburh with the
edges of their swords. They clove the wall of
shields; they hew'd the battle-shields of linden-
wood; with hammer'd brands they hew'd them,
these sons of Edward. This was their nobleness
from those that went before them, that they, so
often, in combat against every foeman, should guard
their land, their hoards, and their homes. The
spoilers cringed, the Scottishmen, crouched, and
the ship crews fell ; they were doomed to the death ;
the field flow'd with blood of warriors, from when
the sun on high, the mighty star in the morning
tide, the bright lamp of God the everlasting Lord,
glided over earth, even until this noble creature
sank to his setting. There lay stricken down with
the spear many warrior men of the North-shot
over the shield : many a Scotsman also, full wearied
with war. All day long the West Saxons-their
chosen men in companies-follow'd on the track the
race of their loathing, quickly they hack'd at the
fliers from behind-with swords sharpen'd by the
grindstone. The Mercians stinted not their hard
hand-play among those heroes, that along with An-
laf, over the weltering waves, in the bark's besom,
had made for the land. In fight they were doom'd
to the death. There lay five young kings, sword-
silenced on the war field ; there lay seven earls of
Anlaf-and ravagers innumerable-seamen and
Scotsmen. The Norse leader was hunted away;
needs must he fly to the stem of his ship-few of his
own were with him ; the keel drave afloat; the king
fled forth; on the fallow flood he saved his life.
There came likewise in flight to his kith in the
North the wary Constantinus, the hoary warrior.
No need had he to boast of the welcome of swords;


he was forlorn of his kin, he was forlorn of his
friends, they were fell'd on that thronged field, slain
in the strife; and he left his son upon the place of
slaughter; wounds had gashed him into pieces; he
was yet young in war. No need had had he of vaunt
of the carnage of axes-that white-haired baron!
that aged traitor! nor had he or any more had
Anlaf, with the ruin of their armies, aught of reason
for laughter, as though they were better in the
works of war, in the struggle of standards on the
battle ground, in the meeting of men at the gather-
ing of spears, in the wrestling of weapons, where-
withal they had played on the field of slaughter
against the sons of Edward. Then past forth a red
remnant of the javelins, the Northmen in their
nailed barks, on the sounding sea, over the deep
water, to make for Dyflen-for Ireland again-they
were shamed in their souls. But the brothers, the
king, and the Atheling, both together, sought their
kith in the land of the West Saxon rejoicing in bat-
tle. Many a carcase they left behind them, many
a sallow skin for the swarthy raven with homrney
beak to tear; the livid corpse they left behind them
for the ern with white tail to gorge as carrion for
the greedy war hawk, and for the gray beast, the
wolf of the weald. Never before in this island was
a huger slaughter of men fell'd by the sword edge
(among those of which the books tell us, the ancient
chroniclers)-never before-since the Angles and
Saxon came up hither from the East, and over the
broad brine sought Britain; when haughty war-
smiths overcame the Welshmen, and earls full of
the lust of glory gat hold of the land."-Hallam
Tennyson, in Contemporary Review.

PRESENTIMENT.
REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES CLAIMED BY AN OHIO
MAN.
From the Sandusky (Ohio) Register.
We have come into possession of some very sin-
gular facts in relation to the escape of a Bellevue
man in two railroad accidents-one of them that
of Ashtabula. The gentleman is a Mr. Freese, and
the truth of his story is vouched for by some of the
best people in Huron and Sandusky counties. It
is said by those who know him that his reputation
for veracity is unquestioned. Several years ago
Mr. Freese and his entire family-wife and two
children-went from Bellevue to a village in Penn-
sylvania to visit some relatives. After staying at
their relatives' homes for a few days. Mr. Freese
and his family started one evening to return to
Bellevue. They took the cars at Erie. Mr. Freese
says that the moment he stepped aboard the train
he felt a strange and unaccountable disinclination
to commence the journey. There was something
that seemed to oppress his mind and he felt an im-
pulse to turn back and take some later train. But
he shook off the feeling as best he could, and tried
to laugh at himself for nt ,aivin: what he con-
sidered a wild and follish notion, of which he was
even ashamed to speak to his wife. As the train
moved on he held one of his children on 1is lap,
and fell into a doze. While thus half asleep head
a dream in which he saw, with startling distinct-
ness, his wife and children lying in coffins, and all
the preparations being made for a funeral service.
Such a sight was well calculated to carry terror
even to the stoutest heart. But the worst was yet
to come-the awful realization of the dream. In a
few moments there was a jar and a jerk of the train,
a shiver seemed to run through every timber of the
coaches, there was a crash, a fall, and the cars
plunged into the water. A bridge had given away.
Mr. Freese found himself held down in the water
by a piece of timber; but he succeeded in releas-
ing himself and crawled out of the car. He saw a
train employee with- a lantern passing along on a
log beside the train, and the man helped him out
of the wreck and put him on his feet. Mr. Freese
found that he had suffered no special injury, but
he felt completely unnerved. Tne terrible reality
of the presentiment flashed upon his mind, and his
brain reeled as he thought that he should see his
wife and children lying cold in death, as they had
appeared to him in his dream. A search resulted
in discovering Mrs. Freese in the wrecked car
dead. The dead bodies of the children were found
near by. .The remains were taken to Bellevue for
interment.
Sometime thereafter Mr. Freese married again,
and a while prior to the Ashtabula accident he
and his family went east. They determined upon
a day to start home, but when the time arrived Mr.
Freese felt a strong disinclination to start. A
strange impulse again seized him and he felt that
if he were to go then something terrible would
happen on the way. He had disregarded this feel-
ing once, but he had resolved never to do so again,
consequently he decided to start one day earlier
and to go a part of the way by a different route than
he had anticipated taking. It was at first his in-
tention to reach Cleveland on Friday night, Dec.
29, and the train which he and his family would
have been compelled to take to do so would have
been the ill-fated one that went into the terrible
abyss at Ashtabula. The change which he made
in time and trains kept him and his family out of
one of the most terrible accidents in the history of
railways.

Speaking of the death of a man at Pan who
reached 104 years, a journal shows the number of
dynastic and Government changes which have oc-
cured in France during that period. The XV.,
Louis XVI., the Convention, Directory, Consulate,
Empire, Louis XVIII., the Hundred Days, the
Restoration, Charles X., the Revolution of 1830,
Louis Phillippe, the Revolution of 1848, the Repub-
Slic, the Empire, the Republic! All those events


were contained in a single life! With such his-
torical facts, who can desire to occupy a throne in
France ?
The works at the Palace of the Universal Exhibi-
tion are advancing rapidly. The collonade of the
great Salle des Fetes and the galleries belonging to
it, and which consist of 360 pillars of the Corin-
thian order, are receiving the finishing touches.
The immense hall itself, which is 50 metres in dia-
meter and 45 feet high, is almost entirely completed.
Preparations are being made to instal the colossal
organ intended for it. The magnificent mosaic
pavement of-the adjoining vestibules is already far
advanced. Nine hundred workmen are employed
on the building, including the carvers, who are oc-
cupied in embellishing the two great galleries of
the Retrospective Exhibition of Archaeology. They
will be ready at the beginning of November to re-
ceive glass cases destined to contain the finest col-
lection in the world. The objects which will be
brought here are estimated to be worth more than
800,000,000 francs.

A ROMANTIC STORY.-A singular rumour has gained
considerable currency at Limerick to the effect that the
late Viscount FitzGibbon, who was supposed to have
fallen in the celebrated charge of the bix Hundred at
Balaklava, did not meet that fate which was generally,
it not absolutely, believed, but that, on the contrary,
he is at this moment on his way home to claim his
estates. It was never ascertained whether the Viscount
was really killed or not; the fact of his never having
been heard of since being the only one that removed
almost any doubt as to his fatal end. It is now stated
that when last seen he was leaning, apparently wound-
ed, on his horse; that he was taken prisoner by the Rus-
sians, and shortly after, for some insult alleged to have
been given to a Russian officer, was transported to
Siberia, whence, his term of exile having expired, he is
returning to Ireland. A statue of him adorns the Wel-
lesley Bridge.-Dublin Express.


% -.v Atkinson's R A&EAAKS

PE R FUMERY,


celebrated for nearly a century past, is of the very
best English manufacture. For its purity and great
excellence it has obtained the following
EXHIBITION PRIZE MEDALS,
LONDON, 1862. PARIS, 1867. COBDOVA, 1872.
LIMA, 1872. VIENNA, 1873.
PHILADELPHIA 1876.

dtkinson s Choice Perfumes for
THE HANDm.ERCHIEF,
\\ white Rose, Frangipanne, Ylang Ylang, Stephano-
tis, Opopanax, Jockey Club, Ess. Bouquet,
Trevol, Magnolia, Jasmin, Wood Vio-
let.
And all other odours, of the finest quality only.

ATKINSON'S
Celebrated 1 4au de Cologne
is strongly recommended, being more lasting and
fragrant than the German kinds.

ATK INSON S
OLD BROWN WINDSOR SOAP
celebrated for so many years, continues to be made
as heretofore. It is strongly Perfumed, and will be
found very durable in use.

ATKINSON'S BEARS' GREASE, COLD
CREAM, SACHET POWDERS, TRANSPAR-
ENT GLYCERINE SOAP, ROSE TOILET
POW DER, TOILET VINEGAR, VELOUTINE,
WHITE ROSE TOOTH PASTE,
and other specialties and general articles of i'erfu-
mery may be obtained of all dealers throughout the
World, and of the Manufacturers,

-24, OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, W.

PRICE LIST FREE ON APPLICATION.

CAUTION.-Messrs. J. & E. ATKINSON manu-
facture their articles of one and the best quality
only. Purchasers are cautioned to avoid counter-
feits by observing that each article is labelled with
the Firm's Trade Mark, "a White Rose on a
Golden Lyre;" printed in seven colours.
ESTABLISHED 1799.
April 11, 1876-12m if
:o -


og Ca|g
.-. .? n ,.,




94


et
Z
-.,~

24 2. 54

L~,Z|| | zt

< 2 .2












Sotecio a ainst F I E








*tTT TlE MOST MODERATE RATES
Can be obtained from the
PHOENIX INSURANCE COMIPA NY
of London,
One of the longest Established and Wealthiest
Offices in Great Britain.

Through the BRANCH OFFICE in these
Islands, a Saving is effected to the Insured
of the Stamp Duty, a very considerable item.
RISKS taken both on REAL and PERSONAL
PROP ERTY for 3, 6 or 12 months,
No FEES and no CHARGE for Policies.
N. A, BUTTE FIELD,
NoFECadnVHAG o Polcis
N. A BUTER-FELS


Hamilton, September 9th, 1865.


Agent.


Notice of Removal.


Mr. Alfred Jordan,
Dentist,
Has Removed to St. Georges,
And may be consulted there in Kent St.,
daily, between 9 a.m. and 5 o'clock.
( october 10, 1876.

J IMMEL'S CHOICE PERFUMERY patron-
ised by all the world.
RIMMEL'S IHLANG-IRLANG,VANDA, HENNA, JOCKEY
CLUB, FRANGIPANE and other Perfumes of exquisite
fragrance.
RRIMMaL'S LAVENDER WATER distilled from Mit-
cham Flowers.
RIMMEL'S TOILET VINEGAR, celebrated for its
useful and sanitary properties.
RIMMEL'S EXTRACT OF LIME JUICE AN GLYCE-
RINE, the best preparation for the Hair especially
in warm climates.
RIMMEL's DUGONo OIL SOAP, perfumed with Aus.
tralian Educatusly
RIMMEL'S GLYCERINE HONEY, WINDSOR, and
other Toilet Soaps.
RnuIMEL'S ROSE WATER, COSTUME AND FLORAL
CRACKERS, very amusing for Balls and Parties.
RIMMEL'S VIOLET, ROSE LEAF, RICE, and other
Toilet Powders.
A Liberal allowance to Shippers.
EUGENE RIMM EL, Perfumer to H R 11 the Prin-
cess of Wales, 96 Strand ; 128 Regent
Street, and 24 Cornhill, London ; 16
Boulevard des Italiens, Paris; and 27
King's Road, Brighton.
Sold by all Perfumery VQnders.


FOR 1878,

Are in a state of forwardness at the Office of
the Royal Gazette."
Persons desirous of using the former as an
Advertising medium will please forward their
Notices as early as possible. Hotel, Tavern,
Boarding and Lodging House Keepers, would
do well to use it for their notices as the circula-
tion of the Book has become very extensive
not only in Bermuda, but abroad-every Visitor
to the Island securing one copy at least, and some
of them three or four for their friends in other
countries.
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
Page 30/ 1 page 21/ A page 16/ 1 page 12/.

BRONZE MEDAL AT THE
Universal Exhibition of Paris 1855,
Bronze Medal at the Exhibition of Trieste, 1871,
Silver Medal at the Exhibition of Havre, 1868,
Silver Medal at the Exhibition of Paris, 1872,
Gold Medal at the Exhibition of Lyons, 1872,
Diploma of honor at the Maritime Exhibition, Pa-
ris, 1875,
RIGOLLOT'S
MUSTARD PAPER
FOR SINAPISMS ORIPLASTERS,
Adopted by the Hospitals of Paris, Field
and Military Hospital, by the
English Royal Navy and
the French National
Navy, &c.
To retain the whole of the properties of Mustard
in its powdered state and to obtain easily in a few
moments a decided result with the smallest possible
quantity of the remedy, are the problems which M.
Rigollot has solved in the most conclusive and sa.
tisfactory manner. Rigollot's Sinapism in leaves
will, therefore, be found in every family, for the
prompt action obtained by it in many cases of emer-
gency renders it an invaluable remedy for various
disorders.
(Signed) A. BOUCHARDAT.
Annuairetherapentique annee 1868, p.204.

IMPORTANT NOTICE.
The precious quality of Rigollot's Paper in cases
of great gravity, is that of acting very rapidly. It is
in important Healing 'Agent. To children, weak,
and nervous persons, I strongly recommend the fol-
1hwing method of graduating the action of the plas-
ter according to the will or condition of the patients
viz., to put one, two, or three leaves of wet blot,
ing paper between the Sinapism and the skin.
An old piece of fine linen may also be employed
instead of blotting paper.
Beware of Imitations.
MANUFACTORY AND WAREHOUSE, AVENUE VICTORIA,
24 PARIs,--and by all respectable chemists.


C0


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.~NS.


W. 0. F.BASCOME, M.D.,
F.A.A., D.S.,
REID STREET, HAMILTON.
EAST END.




PR R VATE

BOARDING HOUSE,
North of Trinity Church.


HAMILTON,


- BERMUDA.


JIL EJNACK-DECEMBER, 1877.


SUN.

ris. sets.

6 50 4 52
6 50 4 52
6 51 4 52
6 52 4 52
6 52 4 52
6 54 4 b2
6 54 4 52


Tide,



7 30
8 18
9 6
9 54
10 42
11 30
12 18


R EMARKS.


Nw Mn 5h 45m p.m,



Conception of V. M.
2nd in Advent
St. Thos. Mail due


THE BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE is published
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Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent
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AT HIS OFFICE,
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Supplement to the Bermuda Royal Gatette, Hamilton, Tuesday, December 4, 1877.
... m a alil .. a a illu m I m a nu lm 1 Il .11 I I 1 al I~w lulenu


[From our Paris Correspondent.]
To the Editor of the Bermuda Royal Gazette.
PARIS, 9TH NOVEMBER, 1877.
SIR,-Events are hurrying us on, and at one mo-
ment or another we may be awakened with a start by
the most unexpected occurrences. Yesterday brought
matters to a crisis; the ministry which, at the last
moment, had decided upon presenting itself before the
Chambers, fell pitiously, without having been able
even to commence the battle, the Senate itself hav-
ing abandoned it. The various circumstances which
brought about the final overthrow of these extraordi-
nary statesmen happened in the following order:
The Ministry had resolved, in spite of the elections of
the 14th of October to retain provisional possession of
power in order that they might preside over the elec-
tions of the 4th of November for the removal of the
councils general and of the councils of arrondissements.
The ministers expected to be able to retire on the 5th
of November, that is to say, on the day following these
elections only, as there would have been too little
time from the 5th to the 7th of November (the latter
being the date fixed for the meeting of the chambers)
for the Marshal to negotiate and form a new ministry,
immediate steps were taken at the Elys6es to compose
a cabinet which should be ready by the 5th of Novem-
ber to take the place of the old one. A few days ago
it was believed that notwithstanding the difficulties of
the situation, the efforts made to constitute a new min-
istry had been crowned with success. The Marshal
had adopted the idea of composing a Cabinet of which
all the members should belong to the same opinions
as those of the retiring ministry. Such a determina-
tion on the part of the Marshal could be explained
only as indicating his intention of organizing a system
of resistance against the new Chamber of Deputies,
and of appealing for that purpose to the majority of
the Senate.
This majority might really be disposed to support
the policy oi continuing it to the 16th of May, but it
could do so only on condition of not assuming the res-
ponsibility of what hpd been done since that date.
Hence the resolution to sacrifice the Cabinet of the
16th of May and to constitute a new one with ele-
ments as nearly as possible the same; at bottom, this
was simply a last attempt at resistance against the re-
sult of the elections of the 14th of October. The new
ministry was to have been placed under the direction
of M. Pouyer-Quertier, the great cotton manufacturer,
and formerly a minister under M. Thier's government.
Now, it so happened that, by their unexpected results,
the departmental elections of the 4th of November
took every one by surprise, both the Republicans
themselves and the Government. These elections
have, in fact, gone far beyond what the opposition
could have anticipated. The Republicans have had a
more brilliant victory at these elections than at those
of the 14th of October,!and, on a totalof 1400 Councillors
who have been elected, they have gained 120 seats more
than they possessed previously in the departmental
assemblies. M. de Broglie himself, has been beaten
in his own department, and is no longer a councillor
general. So considerable and so unexpected an event
was well calculated to bring every body to their sen-
ses ; for the second time within the space of a fort-
night the electoral body had shown the ministry to be
in the minority in the country. The consternation
was very great amongst the groups favorable to the
Government and ideas of resistance lost ground even
at the Elyspes. M. Pouyer-Quertier and his friends
refused positively to form part of a ministry, prefer-
ring to leave thfe existing Cabinet to get out of the
scrape as best it might. This kind of panic occurred
on the 5th and 6th of November, and on the 7th the
meeting of the chamber took place. Under these cir-
cumstances the Fourtou-Broglie ministry declared, no
doubt because they could not do otherwise, that they
would remain in office only till a new Cabinet could be
formed. The day before yesterday the Chambers met
for the opening of the Session. People had manifes-
ted some anxiety as to what might happen on this oc-
sion; it was feared that a violent scene might take
place between the deputies and the government, but,
as yet, nothing of the kind has happened. The fol-
lowing is a concise account of the proceedings during
these two days.
THE MEETING OF THE CHAMBERS.
Of the two powers of the State, which on the 7th
instant resumed the exercise of their functions, only
one, the Senate, could act at once; for, the Cham-
ber of Deputies commences its legal existence only
from the moment at which it declares itself consti'u-
ted, and it can declare itself constituted only, after
having validated the powers of one more than half of
its members. In its first sitting the Chamber of De-
puties should have been presided over by its senior
member, M. Raspail, who is 85 years of age and is a
well knewn politician, a chemist and a physician. M.
Raspail being absent on account of ill health, the next
deputy in order or age M. Desseaux, presided, assisted
by the youngest members of the Assembly as forming
the bureau. M. Desseaux, on taking the chair, pass-
ed an culogium on M. Thiers, and he called upon the
assembly to cry vive la republique, vive lapaix." This
was the cry, which, as you will remember, was raised
by the members of the Left on the day of the dissolu-
tion. This bureau formed by order ot the age of the
members at the first sitting of our chambers, has no
other object than to wait for the constitution of the re-
gular bureau elected by the chamber, and this elec-
tion was at once proceeded with. M. Grevy was elec-
ted President, and immediately afterwards the cham-
ber adjourned. On the 8th of November the cham-
ber commenced the labour of examining and valida-
ting the elections against which no protestations had
been raised. By continuing to sit till 11 o'clock in
the evening it was able to validate about 150 elections.
It will validate about one hundred to-day and will
thus be definitely constituted and in a position to pass
official resolutions. The Right of the Chamber hav-


ing attempted yesterday to challenge the validation of
the election of one of their own party, the reply was
immediately given that the chamber, wishing to re-
serve its opinion with regard to the manoeuvres imputed
to the official Candidates, adjourned the examination
of these elections till the chamber should have consti-
tuted itself definitely, so that it might enquire at
leisure into the circumstances attending those elec-
tions. It must not be concluded from this incident
that the Chamber will invalidate all the official candi-
dates ; I do not believe it will go so far, but it is cer-
tain that it will invalidate a great number of them and
will most probably, in validating the others, express-
ly reserve its opinion as to the legitimacy of their ex-
istence. The chamber being legally incapable of vo-
ting any political measure before its has definitely con-
stituted itself, the ministry gained two or three days
for reflection ; it availed itself of them to prepare an
attack against the chamber. M. de Broglie one of the
ministers, proposed the following plan, an interpella-
tion should be addressed to the ministry, by one of the
members of the "Right" of the Senate, with regard to
the interior situation of the country. M. de Broglie
would reply in the name of the Cabinet, the Senate
would close the discussion by a vote of confidence in
the ministry and the Cabinet, on the strength of this
vote, would declare its intention to remain in office and
would at once proceed to renew the contest with the
Chamber of Deputies. Such was the last device im-
agined by M. de Broglie for the salvation of the Gov-
ernment. This plan fell through for several reasons.
First, some members of the Right" wished the order
of the day to express confidence not only in the Cab-
inet but also in the President of the Republic, they
wished by this means to protect M. de MacMahon
against any attacks which might be directed against
him by the Chamber of Deputies on account of his
personal attitude since the 16th of May. The Presi-
dent of the Senate M. d'Audiffret Pasquier, declared
distinctly that if this order of the day was presented,
he would not put it to the vote, as he considered it to
be unconstitutional: "the Marshal, said he, is accord.
ing to the terms of the constitution, irresponsible;
whatever his acts may be, he has no right to claim any


responsibility which the Constitution does not attribute
to him," besides added the President of the Senate '
"in voting such an order of the day as this,
the Senate would only be giving to the Chamber
of Deputies the example, and provoking it to vote an
order of the day diametrically opposed to that of the
Senate. The only result would be to render the Mar-
shal's situation absolutely intolerable." After this, the
Senators of the right" submitted the terms of the
order of the day to a long discussion ; yesterday they
again held a meeting in which they continued to be
unable to agree upon this matter. At last, the first
act of this crisis was finally closed by a resolution of
21Senators belonging to the Right Centre" and to
the group called "Constitutionals." This group,
which in the Senate represents Orleanism, resolved :
1st, that they would not support the ministry ; 2nd,
that they would wait upon Marshal de MacMahon to
explain to him that this resolution was not in any way
directed [against him, but that it only menaced the
ministry. This decision of the 21 Constitutional and
Orleanist Senators throws the ministry into a minority
even in the Senate, for the number of the Republican
Senators being nearly equal to that of the Monarchi-
cal Senators, this displacement of twenty-one voices
accruing to the Republican side is more than sufficient
to insure to them the majority ; in consequence of this,
M. de Broglie has been obliged to abandon his idea of
on interpellation. All the incidents just related took
place in secret meetings, nothing transpired officially
in the sittings of the Senate ; and, whilst these nego-
ciations were going on between the different groups,
the Senate was voting measures of no political inter-
est, whatever, merely to gain time and to allow the
interviews to proceed ; immediately after the negocia-
tions with the ministry had been broken off, the Senate
suspended its sitting and adjourned for a week in or-
der to allow M. de MacMahon time to take Council
and to form a Cabinet. In the course of yesterday
evening the delegates of the 21 Orleanist members
were joined by delegates from other groups of the
" Right" of the Senate, and waited upon the Presi-
dent of the Republic for the purpose mentioned above
and to tranquillize him with regard to the consequen-
ces of the fall of the ministry. The Marshal replied
that he relied on the Senate for the defence of the
Conservative policy, which is, added he the only one
which I can follow." This means that the Marshal
wants to continue the contest; but how, with what ele-
ments will he do so ? No one, at this moment, can
forsee how the contest will end; the next few days
will, in all probability, disclose it to us, and I trust my
next letter will contain all that you can desire to know
on the subject. At this moment, if we do not know
what the Marshal will do, neither do we know what de-
cisions the Chamber of Deputies will take. The Depu-
ties of the Left" taking into account the gravity of
the situation, have forgotten their party divisions into
" Extreme Left," "Left" Left Centre" etc., and they
hold general meetings, all engaging to keep secret any
resolutions which may be adopted in those meetings.
Yesterday evening, whilst the sitting of the chamber
was momentarily suspended, a general meeting of this
kind took place, in the course of which a committee of
18 members was elected and full powers conferred
upon it to take such measures, as the situation, which
is extremely strained and full of danger, may require.
The future of this country has, at no time, been so
enveloped in darkness as it at present; but one thing
makes us bear it patiently and that is the conviction
which we all entertain that this violent and menacing
state of things will now last only a few very days longer.
On next Wednesday when the Senate will resume its
sittings, important measures will no doubt have al-
ready been taken either by the Government or by the
Chamber of Deputies. I will not stop to consider all
the rumors which are daily put into circulation here.
One of them has it that Marshal MacMahon will at-
tempt a coup d'etat with the aid of Marshal Canrobert;
another states that M. de Broglie has packed up all
his things and is expected in Switzerland at Coppet,
where his mother's family resides, (for, as you are
aware, M. de Broglie is the grandson of Madame de
Stael); a third assures the'public that the Senate has
adjourned for no other reason than to avoid being
compromised by the resolutions which the Marshal
may be tempted to take, &c., &c. Of what use re-
peating all these cock-and-bull stories when a week at
most separates us from the final solution of the crisis?
It is wiser to wait for the event. M. Grevy is here the
observed of all observers and as may be guessed from
various indications, is doing his utmost to restrain the
impetuosity of some of his own party and to bring
about a reconciliation between the Republicans and
the President of the Republic.
P.S.--The gravity of the situation increases every
moment. This Cabinet, with a minority successively
in both chambers, feels itself disarmed in the absence
of the Senate and in presence of a Chamber of Depu-
ties whose irritation is great, and which keeps its in-
tentions strictly secret. At any moment this state of
things may culminate in some violent incident.
VARIOUS MATTERS.-It is stated that the printer,
Courbet, is seriously ill, in Switzerland, where he has
been residing since the occurrences of the Commune.
-We have just learned the death of M. Glais-
Bizoin who, in 1870, was a member of the Government
of national defence.-- In Austria several persons in
the public service have been condemned as spies for
having divulged to certain foreign agents, the secret
of the manufacture of the "Uchatius" cannon. I
mention this fact to show the curious difference which
exists in certain particulars of our European legisla-
tion ; in France the crime of espionage gives rise to
legal prosecutions only in time of war; during peace
it is not considered'as a crime. If a similar affair to that
of the Uchatius" cannon were to occur in France,
the accused could be condemned only if some other
plea could be raised against them at the same time ;
such for example, as that of peculation; or if they had


delivered up either documents or plans, they might be
condemned as having committed robbery to the pre-
judice of the State, and those who had bought them
might be prosecuted and punished for the offence of
"corruption of public servants" but by no means of
espionage.-- In the East the Russians advance slow-
ly but surely. The Turks, after an heroic defence are
shut up in that famous Pass of Shipka, and at one
moment or another we may expect to see the Rus-
sians pass the Balkans and march upon Constantino-
ple. The Peace Conferences may therefore begin
sooner than was anticipated.
T.D.
THE DAUGHTER OF COBBETT.-The death is an-
nounced of Miss Cobbett, daughter of William
Cobbett, author of the "Political Register." At
her death, which occurred at Brompton Crescent,
she bad attained the advanced age of 82, having
been born in Philadelphia, while her father wa,
there a political writer, in 1795. Subsequentlys
in 1810-12, during the period of Cobbett's imprison-
ment in Newgate for libel, she w as his companion
there, and used to write at his dictation leading ar-
ticles for his weekly publication, and for many
years afterwards was the custodian of his papers
and his chief aid as amanuensis. A large part of
Cobbett's most stirring matter went to the press in
Miss Cobbett's handwriting.
"THE CAVE OF HARMONY."-An event has taken
place of some social significance, as curiously
marking the changed circumstances of modern life.
For the first time aince Evans' music and supper
rooms in Covent Garden were opened since the
year 1826, ladies have been admitted to enjoy the
madrigals and mutton chops which have so long
given the place a peculiar celebrity. The so-called
comic songs of the olden time were not exactly fit-
ted for feminine ears, and partly for this reason and
partly for others that may be very readily under-
stood, the audience in the hall has been hitherto
scrupulously composed of the male gender. The
concert hall at Evans' was "immortalized" by
Thackeray in his novel of ** The Newcombs."


EUROPEAN-WAR AND OTHER NEWS.

LONDON, Nov. 24.-Mr. Gladstone lectured at
Howard last evening. He advocated liberal policy
and conditional quietude only while the Govern-
ment maintained their conditional neutrality.
The Russians loss at the battle of Perzoo was
thirteen hundred.
A despatch from Turkish sources says a Russian
cavalry regiment was completely destroyed near
Entrapol.
Rumors at most continental capitals are that
Russia is willing to entertain peace propositions.
General Melikoff, when summoning Mukhtar
Pasha to evacuate Erzeroum, informed him of the
capture of Kars, and that if he resisted he would
be attacked by eighty thousand men with over-
whelming artillery. Mukhtar replied that he
would hold Erzeroum to the last.
ATHENS, Nov. 24.-In consequence of the recent
speeches in Parliament the Miuis iy resigned. The
King r( fused to accept their resignations, and the
crisis continues. The populace have become very
warlike since the late Russian victories.
The Russians have ordered supplies of food in
expectation of the early capitulation of Plevna.
The Montenegrins are bombarding Lenoria, a
fortified island at the northern extremity of Lake
Scutari.
It is reported that Osman Pasha has opened ne-
gotiations for the surrender of Plevna. This must
be accepted with reserve.
An attempt to cup the Pope failed, and has pro.
duced an efflux of humors to the chest. Cardinal
Simeoni, in view of the condition of the Pope,
asked the cardinals to confer with him on the gen-
eral interests of the Papacy. It is probable that
a species of council of regency will be appointed.
Works for new docks at Liverpool were so dam-
aged by a gale, forty-two acres of excavation being
flooded, that it is feared 2,700 men will be thrown
out of work for three weeks.
A despatch from Tiflis says a corps will shortly
attack Batoum with heavy artillery.
The Caucasian insurrection is increasing. The
insurgents stormed the fortified town of Russor on
the 12th instant, and captured the garrison.
PARIS, Nov. 24.--The new ministry is gazetted
to-day. The morning's Republican journals regard
the ministry as a short lived expedient, and say
the Republicans cannot accept it. They will reject
any compromise as long as satisfaction is not given
to universal suffrage.
M. Lepelletier, the new minister of Justice, was
a distinguished magistrate of the court of Cessation.
Politically he is a Conservative, but without enthu-
siasm for any monarchial party. M. Craeff, Min-
ister of Public Works, was a member of the Road
and Bridges Department in the late ministry of
Public Works. Admiral Roussin is a naval officer
and was Under Secretary of last ministry of Marine.
News from Servia is very warlike.
'CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 24.-Mr. Layard, British
Ambassador, has demanded the abolition of ex-
ceptional permits to foreign vessels, threatening if
not granted that England will refuse to recognize
the Black Sea blockade.
PARIS, Nov. 24.-There are rumors that Eng-
land has sent an ultimatum to Russia.

MUCH LATER FROM THE EAST, &c.
Renewed Rumors of Peace Negotiations.-LoNDoN,
November 28.--Last evening's Vienna papers
publish Bucharest advices, according to which
Prince Gortschakoff is engaged in a lively
diplomatic intercourse. A proposal has already
been made for a conference on peace conditions.
WHY ORCHANIE WAS ABANDONED.-A special
despatch from Pera reports that the Turks held a
strong fortified position at the bead of the Orcha-
nie defile, and have abandoned the town of Or-
chanie for strategetic reasons.
ROUMANIAN SUccEssES.-The Romanul, of Bucha-
rest, announces that the Roumanians have occupied
Zileru and Lom .Palanka.
A SERVIAN BATTALION CROSSES THE FRONIIER0
-A Belgrade correspondent states that a Servian
battalion recently crossed the frontier near Vra-
tarnitza to protect some Bulgarian women and
children. The Turks drove the Servians back and
many were killed and wounded on both sides. A
commission has left Belgrade to investigate the
matter. The various consuls have been informed
of the affair.
ANOTHER UNLUCKY TURK.-Intelligence has been
received at Vienna from Constantinople that the
s eedy fall of Mahmoud Damad Pacha is antici-
pated in consequence of discontent at the loss of
Kars.
GREECE WILL NOT ACT.-A special despatch from
Athens says:-The Greek Chamber discussed on
Monday with closed doors the question of holding
a secret sitting to consider the dangerous position
ot Hellenis. The proposition was unanimously re-
jected. This is a triumph for the Government and
party of order."
RUssIA's LOSSES.-An official Russian report
issued at St. Petersburg places the Russian losses
from the commencement of hostilities to the 21st
inst. at 71,705 men.

FRANCE.-LONDON, November 28.-The HE-
RALD correspondent in Paris telegraphs that
President MacMahoen yesterday received a delega-
tion from the party of the Right in the Senate.
They assured the Marshal of the unwavering sup-
port of their party in the present crisis, and encou-


raged him to persevere in his present policy of re-
sistance to the Chamber.
AN OMINOUS THREAT.-The Marshal replied as
follows:-" Gentlemen, I thank you for your co-
operation and believe I have the right to count
upon it. If the Senate is faithful to its duty as the
guardian, with me, of the constitution and of lega-
lity, it will sustain me. I feel sure it will. If,
unfortunately for the country, it should prove
otherwise, our lot will still be the same and I shall
know how to show you the way."
MACMAHON MAY RELENT.-The Paris correspon-
dent of the Times, discussing the assertion of the
Moniteur that President MacMahon may submit to
the Senate the alternative of dissolution or his re-
signation, if the Chamber refuses to vote the Bud-
get, says others believe, and they are probably
right, tbhat if the Senate refuses a second dissolu-
tion President MacMahon will hold himself absol-
ved from his rash promises and take a Cabinet ac-
ceptable to the Chamber. Reports are also current
that the Left intend to send a conciliatory deputa-
tion to urge the Marshal to return to the normal
system of government by the majority.
THE LEFT MAKING THE WAY EASY.-The same
correspondent says it is understood that the Bud-
get Committee, ignoring Minister de Welche's mo-
tion for the separate consideration of the four cate-
gories of direct taxes, will themselves submit a re-
commendation to the same effect.
A STATE OF SIEGE THREATENED.-Yesterday's
Figaro said :-" Should the government dissolve
the Chamber, of Deputies the state of siege will only
be proclaimed in the frontier provinces and a few
departments, particularly those where the newspa-
pers are discussing the disposition of the army."
As to the latter the Figaro declares it even possible
that a state of siege may be proclaimed irrespective
of the question of dissolution. This refers to the
fact that many republican newspapers are discuss-
ing the question whether, in the event of a conflict,
the army will stand by MacMahon or the Republic.


THE SUEZ CANAL OBSTRUCTIONS.-A despatch
from Alexandria says the obstruction in the Suez i
Canal has been removed and traffic is resumed.
LANCASHIRE AND THE UNITED STATES.-At a
meeting of the citizens of Manchester yesterday,
over which the Mayor presided, an address, refer-
ring with gratification to the friendly relations
of Lancashire with the United States and express-
ing the hope that they would continue, was presen-
ted to Mr. Newton Crane, United States Consul at
Manchester, who is about to return home.
A LOCKOUT ENDED.-The iron workers who were
locked out on the Clyde have agreed to return to
work, the shipbuilders having undertaken to consi"
der the question of wages six months hence.

To the Editor of the Royal Gazette.
HAMILTON, 26th Novr., 1877.
DEAx Sra,-Again in Town, and having some
talk with my friends, about "matters in general,"
and the very liberal and sufficient grant made by
the House of Assembly, for the purpose of provid-
ing a suitable structure and of the necessary height,
for a Town Clock, which would have met with the
fullest concurrence of the Honorable Legislative
Council but for the circumstance of its omission in
the general estimates of the year, I ventured to
suggest, nay on hearing that the choice or election
of a site, was still an open question, to urge as the
very best par excellence, the Steeple of Trinity
Chapel, the Church of the Town of Hamilton,
affording as it does all the central prominence and
height necessary, and on which the money granted,
could be most advantageously expended.
If this suggestion meets with favour I may be
excused for pointing out more particularly other
advantages to be gained by the election and com-
pletion of the Steeple of this Church for the recep-
tion of the Town Clock.
This Steeple, I understand, is already well and sub-
stantially built 80 feet high, having walls throughout i
of five feet thickness, resting upon a foundation
of such reliability, as is only obtainable by great la-
bour and expense, but which will now admit of a su-
perstructure of'any height and finish, of this the
only feature, in the Town of Hamilton, of which the
inhabitants, have any reason to be proud. In this
then place your Town Clock and the only Bell
(now occupying a very doubtful position,) to be
heard in the Town, when a Peal of Bells is as de-
sirable and necessary in your Christian Loving
Town, as the Town Clock itself, and could be made
loudly and solemnly to proclaim each passing hour
and quarter of an hour in response to the pointing
of the hands of the Clock, which could not fail to
answer all the purposes for which so liberal a grant
was made by the House of Assembly, but prove an
accomplishment of great moment to all interested,
in having a standard of Chronometrical time.
I am, dear Sir,
Very truly Yours, &c.,
WAYFARER.

TURKISH NAVAL MOVEMENTS.
(FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.)
SULINA, Oct. 4.-Since sending my last letter
the long-expected torpedoes for the defence of this
place have arrived. The number and position of
these infernal machines of course I may not state;
but this much I will say, that the difficulty lies not
in determining their position, but in finding out
places where they are not. The defence ot this
place now has been made so perfect that one big
vessel of war would be all that would be necessary
to make it inaccessible, and should the Government
require more men-of-war for the Black Sea fleet,
three of the four large ships at present here might
be withdrawn. At present the Russians have got
quite enough to do, and require all the soldiers
they can lay their hands on for the desperate fight-
ing that is daily taking place iu Bulgaria, and so
I think Sulina will be left in peace for this year.
On account of the barrier of sunken ships at the
forty-third mile from here, the current in this
place is less than it generally is, and, therefore,
there is a good chance of this part of the river being
frozen over this year, which has not occurred for the
last seven years. I had great hopes that I should
have been able to report the blowing up of this bar-
rier, but am sorry to say the order for its destruc-
tion has not been sent yet. Still, I have great
hopes that Hassan Pasha, the Admiral in com-
mand here, will see the necessity of doing so. The
Rapid honoured us with a visit for a few days. It
is a good thing for the Turks to be allowed the
sight of such ships as the Rapid and Cockatrice now
and then, to allow tbemrn to compare their own ships
in matters of smartness below and aloft with ships
of the English Navy. Turkish Naval Officers are
ready to take advantage of any help and advice
that may be offered them, and have a great apti-
tude for learning things, as also has the Turkish
sailor. The navy are getting very tired of this war
on account of the few chances, out of the Danube,
that they have had to distinguish themselves. On
the 1st of this month, about 6 in the morning, a
Russian steamer steamed off the port, some five or
six miles distant, remaining for an hour, and then
on the Cartal, a small paddler, being sent after her,
moved off in the direction of Odessa. I think she
was either the Vesta or Constantine. Unfortunately
the Osmania was not anchored outside, she having
left for a day's cruise.

A MARRIAGE BROKEN OFF AT THE AL-
TAR.


The Chicago Tribune says :-The guests at a re-
cent expected marriage in a certain church on the
West Side were treated to a singular and rather
startling sensation at the very moment when the
connubial knot was to be tied. The bride and
groom were a young couple and had made all the
necessary preparations for the anticipated happy
event that was to unite them as one, and it was
thought by the respective friends of the pair that
the course of true love had run quite smoothly with
them and a genuine mutual affection existed be-
tween them. The invited company entered the
house of worship and the attendants on the couple
had taken their places around the altar, while the
minister remained in waiting to perform the cere-
mony. The bride attired in all the gorgeous finery
customary on such occasions, alighted from the
carriage, and the groom stepped blithely and
lightly after her and upon her long train. As he
did so the fair lady uttered a low cry and exclaim-
ed sharply "Oh dear how awkward you are!"
The young man's face colored as he stumbled off
the rich garment, and he gave his arm to the lady I
while laboring under a confused mind. The pair
walked into the church and down the aisle to the
altar. All eyes rested upon their movements, and
a murmur of voices arose as they came in and took
their positions before the minister. The ceremony
proceeded, the minister asked the bride if she would
accept the groomh for her wedded husband and re-
ceived the usual affirmative answer, and was about
to interrogate the young man, when the latter,
impulsively and unexpectedly said to the bride:
"Oh, dear how awkward you are!" and quickly
turning on his heel, walked out of the edifice
without another word of explanation, leaving the
astonished bride standing at the altar in mute
bewilderment, and the minister and guests in blank
amazement. The young man went his way in a
carriage, and the disappointed bride and the maids
who sought to comfort her left the church for
their homes. The occurrence was an actual one,
and has created no small amount of gossip in the
vicinity where the church is situated.


JOHN BRINSMEAD & SONS'
0 GOLD MEDAL

PIANOFORTES
WERE AWARDED
THE GRAND MEDAL OF HONOUR AND DIPLOMA
OF MERIT, Philadelphia, 1876.
THE GOLD MEDAL. Paris, 1870.
THE HIGHEST AWARD, THE GRAND DIPLOMA
OF HONOUR, Paris, 1874.
THE MEDAL OF HONOUR, Paris, 1867.
THE PRIZE MEDAL, London, 1862.
THE DIPLOMA OF EXTRAORDINARY MERIT,
Netherlands International Exhibition, 1869. etc.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
PATENT
PERFECT CHECK REPEATER ACTION PIANOS.
Patented 1862, i868, 1871, and 1875, in
GREAT BRITAIN, AUSTRIA,
PRUSSIA, ITALY,
FRANCE, BELGIUM.
AND AMERICA.
ILBERT I. BAU HER'S Prize Medal,
Drawing- Room ORGANS,
From 8 guns. to 300 guns.
On the Three years System.
JOHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
with the Patent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
I have examined Messrs.
BRINSMEAD & SONS' New
Check Action as applied to
SIR JULES BENEDICT. their Pianos, and consider
it a most ingenious andval-
uable invention, which can-
not fail tomeetwithsuccess."
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS
with the Patent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
On the Three Years System.


SYDNEY SMITH.



TOHN BRINGS


" I have much pleasers in
testifying to the great excel-
lence of Messrs. JOHN
BRINSMEAD & SONs'Piano-
fortes. Their"Perfect Check
SRepater" produces a touch
I that is absolute perfection,
and which is unsurpassed by
any other maker, native or
L foreign."
M EAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
with the Patent Perfect Cheek
Repeater Action.
On the Three Years System.


-" I have much pleasure in
testify g to the efficiency of
Messr`. .B RINSMEiAD & SONS'
New IP''tent Check-Action
BRINLEY RICHARDS. (. r Pjanofcrtes), which I
co-iicker a very Cie. cr and
useful invention, an. likely
t to be extensively adopted."
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
SHORT IRON GRAND PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
"Where all the pianos go to seems somewhat of a
mystery. for a really good instrum ennt w'il last a .ietime;
and yet every year thousands are made by each (f -he great
Londion Manufactuiers, khile the u:n iaers n'a e by the
two hundred or rpore smaller firms must represe'.t 'tn enor-
mous number in !,he course of each year-. The ir'-p;: -vmnents
made in English ianos have caused this trade laridly to
increase, until one pianoforte manuflaciry after t.nother
has been built to supply ith gpt-,'ig demand. O: of the
largest of these, lately crcctcd by2 Messrs. JoJ N OH:N:ISMEAD
& SONS', of \\igmore-st'eet, covers nearly an acre of
ground in the Gratton-road, Kentish-town, and is intended
to accommodate 300 workmen. These works alone can
supply 3,000 pianos annual, and there are at least three
nanufactories in London capable of making an equal
lumber."-Illusirated London News.
FOHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
Fromt FREIDERICK CHATTERTON, Esq.
Harpist to the Queen.
I have great pleasure in certifying to the fine, rich, and
i)verfultone of Messrs. JOHN BRINSMEAD & SoNs', Pianos,
so* to the great improvements they have succeeded in
attaining ;
As a Professor of the Harp, I can safely add that the
:nllow tones of their short iron Gold Medal Grands blend
charmingly with the Instrument I profess, and form a
delicious ensemble.

TOHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Action Repeater.
From Professor W. KUHE.
It gives me the greatest pleasure to state that I con-
sider the the instrument manufactured by you to be most
excellent in tone, touch, and quality of material. I
particularly admire your Pianos with the Patent Check
Repeater Action and new Grand Construction, being a
wonderful improvement upon the old system; in my
opinion your firm having been successful in creating as
good a touch to the Cottage Pianofortt as that usually
accorded to the Grand. All those I have chosen have
given the greatest satisfaction to the purchasers.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
From Professor IHERMANM PAPENDIECK.
I have great pleasure in testifying to the excellence of
your instruments. Your. newly patented system "the
Perfect Check Repeater Action," when applied to these
Pitinos, greatly increases their value, and I have no doubt
th',t these valuable improvements will excite general
attenti' n a d admiration.'
OH N BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
From iMr. BOYTON SrMITH.
I have much pleasure in bearing testimony to the
per section of Messrs. J. BRINSMEAD & SoNs' New Piano-
forte Action, which, for promptness in repetition, and
general exeel!ence in touch, surpass anything of the kind I
have vet seen, whilst the extreme simplicity of the mechan-
ism by which such important results are attained is an
additional recommendation."
OHN BRINSME eD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
Yl'rOm FREDERICK GUILLAUME, Chevelier de Liguro,
Examiner-General of the Ancient Bourbonnic Society in the
Royal Academy of Fine Arts at Naples, Honorary
Member of Musical A cademnies at Rome, Venice, &c.,
formally Director-General of all Military Music
for both Infantry and Cavalry of the Line in
the Army of the Two Sicilies.
I have much pleasure i'i testifying to the excellence of
' our upright and horizontal Grand Pianofortes, as they are
simply perfect in touch and tone."
JOHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
with the Patent Perfect Check
Repeater Action.
On the Three Years' System.
"Receive the greatest appro-
THE STANDARD," nation everywhere of musi-
( cans and manufacturers."
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
PATENT "PERFECT
CHECK REPEATER
ACTION" Pianofortes of
every description, manufac-
tured expressly for India and
extreme climates.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS
With the Patent Perfect Check Repeater Action.
May be obtained of a;l the principal music sellers.
OHN BRINSMEAD and SONS'
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS,
With the Patent Perfect Cheque Repeater Action,
From 33 guins. to 500 guins.
JOHN BRTNSiEAD ANID SONS'

PIANOFORTES,
GUARANTEED FOR FIVE YEARS.
*** Illustrated Price Lists and Descriptions,with Opinions
of the London Press and Musical Profession, forwarded-
Post Free upon application.
18, WIGMORE STREET, LONDON, W.

MANUFACTORY,
THE BRINSMEAD WORKS," GRAFTON-ROAD,
KENTISH TOWN, N.W.




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