Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00154
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00154
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text

THE


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


No. 4S.--Vol. L.


STATE SUPER VAS ANTIQUAS.


24s per -%,i


Hfamilton, Bermuda, Tuesday, *Vovember 27, I S77.


Marshal's Sale.

TO BE SOLD,
By Public Auction,
UPON THE PREMISES,
In the Town of St. George,
At 12 o'clock
On Wednesday,
The 28th instant,
Under and by virtue of sundry Writs of Execu.
tion issued from the Court of General Assize
against THOMAS PEACOCK PERRY and
IMARY FRANCES PERRY,
The Whole of their
Household Furniture,
Vizt.:
ST KINGG GLASS I Stag's Horn
I Umbrella Stand 3 Door Mats
1 Glass Shade 2 Sofas
I Lounging Chair I Small Round Table
1 Centre TABLE (Marble Top)
'1 Piano Stool 5 Oil Paintings
3 ENGRAVINGS on Glass
1 MODEL of a Schooner (in Glass Case)
Arm Chair I Camp Stool 1 Sofa
j Sideboard I Butler's Tray and Stand
1 Small Table 1 Water Filterer
Clock I Pair Stag's Horns
I Mahogany Liquor STAND
1 Mahogany Dining TABLE
3 Cane Seat Chairs
3 Mahogany Chairs (Hair-seat)
4 Pictures on Glass
1 Small Picture (Cardinal Wolsey)
I Billiard Sign 9 Champagne Glasses
7 Custard Glasses 9 Decanters
1 Pair Fire Tongs and Shovel
I Cruet Stand I Spring Bell
4 Metal Dish Covers 4 Vegetable Dishes
5 Flat Dishes 9 Dinner and 6 Soup Plates
3 Bowls 8 Cups and Saucers
2 Glass Salt Cells Sauce Bowl and Tin
2 Glass Plates 1 Double Kerosene STOVE
4 Table and 3 Dessert Forks
1 Pair Carvers 13 Metal Dinner Spoons
7 Dessert and 8 Tea Spoons
6 Table and 8 Dessert Forks
3 Kerosene Lamps and 1 Funnel
I Cruet Stnnd and Egg Beater
I Cedar and 3 Pine TABLES and I Meat Safe
No. 1 Bedroom
I MALL Iron BEDSTEAD
1 Hair 1 Flock Mattress
2 Feather Pillows
I Small Chest DRAWERS and Towel Horse
I Looking Glass I Small Dressing Table
Blanket Counterpane and Carpet
1 Rocking Chair 1 Cane Seat Chair
I Tin Water Kettle
No. 2 Bedroom.
1 WOODEN BEDSTEAD
1 Straw and I Feather BED
1 Feather Bolster and Pillow
I Blanket and Counterpane
I Chest DRAWERS (with Mirror attached)
I Washstand Towel Horse Cane Seat Chair
No. 3 Bedroom
I n AIR, 1 Flock and 1 Straw Mattress
M bChest Drawers with Glass attached
2 Washstands 1 Picture 1 Towel Horse
No. 4 Bedroom.
I Sea CHEST and LAMP
No. 5 Bedroom
I i MAHOGANY Four-Post BEDSTEAI)
1 Cotton Cord Mattress and Feather
Bed 1 Washstand I Commode
1 Mosquito Net 1 Looking Glass
1 Cane Seat Chair Clothes Press
1 Tin Bath Tub
1 American Cooking STOVE
2 Iron Kettles 2 Do. Saucepans
I Deal Table, and other articles for Kitchen use.
J. H. TROTT,
Pro. Mar. Genol.
November 12th, 1877.

Just Received,
Per SE YM OUR,
And other Late Arrivals,
A New and varied Assortment of
CROCKERY CHINA
GLASSWABE LAMPS


CUTLERY HARDWARE
TOOLS
TINWARE HOLLOWWARE
Agricultural IMPLEMENTS
Cement BRUSHES PAINTS OILS
And many other Articles usually kept for
Sale in such an Establishment.
SAMUEL A. MASTERS,
26 Front Street.
Hamilton, Novr. 20, 1877.-3


PRIVATE
BOARDING HOUSE
North of Trinity Church,
HAMILTON, BERMUpA.


TENDERS will be received at the
COLONIAL SURVEYOR'S OFFICE, until


THURSDAY
Instant,


the 29th


From Persons desirous of repairing
and improving the
PUBLIC ROAD
On St. David's Island.
Parties tendering are requested to state the
price per yard lineal.
The COLONIAL SURVEYOR does not bind
himself to accept the lowest or any tender.
A Specification and all further information
can be obtained on application at the Colonial
Surveyor's Office.


10th November, 1877.


P. NESS,
Colonial Surveyor.


Notice.
STLADIES Aid," Society No. 1.
COf the British Methodist Episcopal
Church, Pembroke.
Intend holding an

ENTERTAINMENT
At Vickers Store, Smith's Parish,

On Wednesday,
28th Instant.
The Proceeds in behalf of the above Church.
Refreshments &c &c. For Sale.
Doors open at 5 p.m.,
Admission 6d; Children 3d.
Alexandrina" Band will attend.
Hamilton, Novr. 20th, 1877.-2

NEW GOODS.

JVWT iVACVi iV Di,
BY THE
Sir G. F. Seymour,"
AI)D S. S.1" C3AITMIM./,"
Further Supply of NEW GOOD completing-
the Assortment for the Season.
J. H. TUIMINGHAM &SONS.

l1t the Somerset S TO lE
A very large and varied Assortment of


also just Received by the "SIRt G. F. SEY-
MOUR," and "CANIM \," which will be
ready for Inspection
On Thursday next 22nd
instant, and will be sold at Very Moderate Prices
for the CA1SH ONLY.
J. H. TRIMINGIIAM & SONS.
November 12, 1877--3

Bankrupt Stock,
Ex Eglantine" and Sir George
F. Seymour."

THE HAMILTON CLOTHING
EMIPO IUM
HFIS JUST RECEIVED
124 Cases of Assorted
fMerchandize.


The same being a portion of the BANKRUPT
STOCK of Messrs. GILBURTON, WEST & Co.,
who recently failed in Manchester.
Intended buyers of CLO TIIING, etc., will
find it to their advantage to purchase at the Em-
porium, thereby saving for themselves from 30
to 50 per cent on every purchase. Remember,
NO CREDIT.
47 Front Street, Hamilton,
19th Novr., 1877.

RECEIVED
By the Latest Arrivals,
A VARIETY OF
CLOTHING, HA TS,
BLIANKETS,
And other GOODS Suitable for the Season.
T. M. JONES.
Hamilton, 20th Novr., 1877.-8

S1 Boots & Shoes,
Cheap.
ilso SLIPPERS in great variety
AMERICAN NOVELTIES,
LAMPS of the latest improvement,
TIN and HARDWARE
SHEETING and Fancy PRINTS.
J. N. JON ES,
Five Doors West of Gazette" Office,
In James Richardson's Store.
Hamilton, Nov. 20, 1677.


Prospect Bernmada.

THE OFFICERS


ini a leur


OF THE
Dramatic
6th Regiment.


Club


Under the Patronage of His Excellency Major
General
SIR R. K LAFFAN,
K.C.M.G.,
Governor and Commander-in-Chief,
Lt.-Colonel. BENNETT and OFFICERS 46th Regt.

Tuesday, 27th Novem-
ber, 1877.
-IA
THE MIDNIGHT WATCH,
A Drama in 1 Act by J. Morton, Esqr.
To be followed by
A Farce in 2 Ts by Jaes Key.,
A Farce in 2 Acts by James Kenney.


lMusical arrangements under the direction of
the Bandmaster, Mr. CAMPBELL.
PRICES OF ADMISSION.
Reserved Seats 3/. Unreserved 1/. Gallery 6d.
It is particularly requested, that in order to
prevent mistakes, Visitors to the Reserved
Seats will kindly see that the numbers on the
Seats to which they are shown correspond
with those on their tickets.
Children in arms not admitted.
Doors open at 7'30. Commence at 8.
TICKETS to be obtained at the Stationery
Store adjoining the Royal Gazette" Office,
where a Plan of the Reserved Seats can be seen,
and at the Theatre on the nights of perform-
ance.
VIVAT REGINA.
JTUST RECEIVED,
By the 'Sir G. F. Se imsouar,'
Ladies Autumn and Winter
DIIESS GOODS
Opera FLANN EL lIATS
Fancy GOODS PETTICO \T.-, &c.
All will be Sold at low Prices at the Mirror.'

T HOSE wanting White and Red
ONION SEED (Teneriffe) will call or
send in their Names.

rT ENDEiRS will be received for
my Property at St. George's on Queen
and York Streets, with or without
The Cottage at the
BACK,
To December 4, IS77.
I do not bind myself to accept the highest or
any tender.
R. H. DUElRDEN.
November 19, 1877.-3
I',11 BEST INVESTMENT OF TIlHE
DAY FOR A SMALLL OUTLAY.

And where there is no
previous knowledge of
the business required,
I is a Lemonade, Ginger
V dBeer, and Soda Water
iMachine, as the public
taste is so much on the increase for Aerated
Drinks. The book of 90 pages of illustrations
and information forwarded free.
BARNETT, SON, AND FOSTER,
Engineers, 23c, Forston Street, Iloxton, Lon-
don, England. 3m


At the Royal Gazette"
STATIONERY STORE,
HJIS BEEN RECEIVED,
BY THE
Sir G. F. Seymour,
From iLondon,
pRAYER BOOKS & Church Services in
I Variety
Scripture Text BOOKS Hymn BOOKS
Ornamental ALPHABETS Legal SE1'ALS
Toy BOOKS ENQUIRE WITHIN
TIl1t1 REASON \VHIY
Ready RECOK()NERS
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Letter WiL ITERS
Ball Room COMPANIONS
Prepared PARC II M lN'lNT for Deeds, &c.
Music CARIDS Memo. 130OKS
Exercise BOOKS
Foreign Letter and Note PAP'ER, Envelopes to
match
Bristol BOARD
Reams thin WVrapping PAPEIt
Lead PENCILS, &c., &c.
Hamilton, Nov. 14th, 1877,


Children's Lace HOOTS and SLIPPERS.
The above, together with the present Stock
of Goods on hand, are being sold at exceedingly
REDUCED CASH PRICES.
A. GRANTHAM,
No. 46 & 47, Front St.,
Hiamilton, Bermuda,
Nov. 9, 1877.
"Garnet Red"

Atta 0otatoe .

We expect to receive our usual
supply of the above carefully selected for Seed.
Terms, accommodating.
S. S. INGHAM & CO.
October 92 1877,


Colonial Secretary's Office,
NOVEMBER 9, 1877.
SPHE following Acts have been passed by the
T _L Legislature of Bermuda, during the pres-
ent Session, viz. :-n
I No. 13.-An Act to pojvide for the Salaries of
the Light House Establishments.
14-An Act for the Regulation of Lighthouses.
15-An Act to cure certain defects in the Laws
relating to the jurisdiction of the Justices
of the Peace.
16-An Act to continue An Act entitled "An
Act in addition to the Clergy Act, 1869."
(In force to December 31, 1882.)
17-An Act to provide for maintaining Steam
Communication between these Islands and
New York.
(In force to December 31, 1883.)
18-An Act to provide for the Survey of Ships
prior to Registration.
By His Excellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER,
Colonial Secretary.


Timely Notice.

ONION SEED
FOIR 187S.

Prepare its Time.
rplIIE Subscriber with a view to any unpleas-
antness and to prevent disappointment in
obtaining Onion 'eod from his Establishment,
requests all persons to call and enrol their names
whether they be old customers or new. The
List is now opened and the subscriber would be
glad of an early call so as to perfect his arrange-
ments.
The Subscriber does not wish any one whose
name has been put down to be disappointed this
year in obtaining Onion Seed which has always
proved itself so reliable.
C. H. ROBINSON,
45 Front Street.
Hamilton, 13th Novr. 1877.-3

For Rent,

Rose Cottage,
Completely furnished, with Out-
houses, Stables and Coach I louse, convenient-
ly situated and being in the Township of St.
Georges, in its own grounds.
Immediate possession given.
Apply to
W. T. ROBERITS,
Agent.
St. Georges, 12th November, 1877.

Cook.
Wanted Immediately a good
COO K.
Apply at No. 1, ParYNC ALFRED TERRACE,
IRELAND ISLAND.
Angust 27, 1877.

NVotice,

A LIBERAL REWARD will be
given for the Conviction of the Person or
Persons that broke into my Store (near the
Ferry) on the night of the 3rd inst. This being
the second time during the past 3 months-and
also give notice that any Person or Persons
found TRESPASSING on the Premises after
this date will be punished according to Law.
B. POWEL.
Somerset, November 9, 1877.

A LL persons IN DE TElD to the
HAMILTON CLOTHING EMPORIUM
will be Sued in one week after delivery of their
Bills, without further notice, if not paid within
that time.
J. H. ROBINSON.

For Rent,
rThe Comfortable and Pleasantly
Situated

i DWELLING,
In the Town of Hlamilton, now occupied by
Mr. N. 0. )URHAM.
Possession given 5th January, 1878.
Apply to
J. E. EVANS,
At the Paint Store
Next Cor. of Queen and Reid Streets.
Hlamilton, Novr. 19th, 1877.

JUST OPENED.
Received per Royal Mail Str. Beta,
A VERY CHOICE ASSORTMENT OF


Consisting of:
LADI ES Kid and Morocco Tie and Button
u..JSHtOES
Ladies Button and Elastic Kid and Morocco
BOOTS
Women's Lace and Elastic Leather BOOTS
Gents Fine Calf OXONIONS
Men's Fine Calf BLUCH-IERS
Men's Working BLUCIIERS


Paget


At present occupied by MAJOR \VILKINSON
D.C.G. Possession given 1st January next.


Apply to


MRt. M. S. HUNT,
Hamilton.


November 3, 1877.
The Elmporiudm offers TWO GROSS OF
BLUK SERGE and FLNNNEL SHIIITS% ATr
Fil ST COST. Purchasers disbelieving the
same may see the original Invoice.
November 19, 1877.





lOiLSA CCLIPPEiaR
Horses Clipped with despatch and neatness.
Terms moderate.
N.13.-Orders left at the Royal Gazette"
Office, or with Mr. Thomas Grier, Farrier,
Hamilton, will meet with immediate attention.
N.B.. -No Horses clipped on Sundays.
Hamilton, Novr. 13, 1877.-3



"FOIt LIPEI POOL,
CALLING AT QUEENSTOWN,
Carrying the United States Mail
from New York
ON TU ESDAY.
Steams v hips
MONTANA sails Nov. 27, at 11 a.m.
NEVADA sails l)eer. I, at I1 a.m.
IDAiHO sails Deer. 18, at 3 p.m.
WYOMING sails Deer. 25, at 9 a m.
The above Steamers are built expressly for
the Trade, have five watertight bulkheads, and
carry experienced Officers, Surgeons and Stew-
ardesses. The Saloon Accommodations are un-
surpassed by any Atlantic Steamers, and tha
State Rooms are on main deck opening into the
Saloon, thus securing that great comfort in
ocean travel, perfect ventilation and light.
The U. S. Mail Steamer Canima" from Ber-
muda, Thursdays, generally arrives at New York
on Monday, and Passengers' baggage can be
transferred direct to the Liverpool Steamer sail-
ing next day.
WILLIAMS & GUION,
Agents,
29 Broadway, New York.
New York, Nov. 8th, 1877.


beratedd


Waters, S*c.


THE UNDERSIGNED,
Is Prepared to Supply
Soda Water, Lemonade,
Ginger ALE and other Aerated

At the Shortest Notice, at any part of the
Islands, West of the Causeway,
Orders for the above will be Received at the
"STAR AND GARTER" Tavern (Late the
"METROPOLITAN") Queen Street, and at
his Store near the Commissariat Buildings, East
End, Hamilton.
J. W. ADKINS.
October 9th, 1877.

Wanted,
A GOOD PLAdZN 000Z.
Also,
A Useful Nurse Girl.
Apply at Royal Gazetttu' Office.
November 12, 1877.


For Rent,
That desirable Property in
Parish,






AT: ~tTDA 'ROYAL GAZ1ITT N


R' ~ -
~ r.
Win


EXTRACT from METEOROLOGICAL OBSER-
VATIONS taken under the direction of the Principal
Medical Officer, Prospect, Bermuda. Above the sea
151 feet.


d Temperate
24 h




0 o
3 73-9 66-2
3 69-3 63-2
3 69-7 61-0
2 69-9 61-2
1 69-6 59-.6
1 68-6 62-5
1 73-6'63-6


re previous
ours. Rain.


R & Inch.

0 0
112-2 56-0 0-00
99-2 50-4 0-05
109-2 51-2 0O00
109.0 50"8 0'00
104-6 49-6 0-00
109.0 51-5 0-00
103*1 51-0 0-04


Total 0-09




Hamilton, ANovember 27, 1877.

Colonial Secretary's Office,
HAMILTON, 26TH NOVEMBER, 1877.
flIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR
has been pleased to appoint
11r. Williimn Jaimes Hency,
AND,
!ir. Willisnl A. Iliisters' ,
To be EXTRA REVENUE OFFICERS, in accor-
dance with the provisions of the Act No. 28
of 1875.
By His Eicellency's Command,
R. E. WEBSTER,
1 *Colonial Secretary.

Court of General Assize.

MICHAELMAS TERM.
The Honorables EUGENIUS HARVEY and JAMES H.
TRIMINGHAM Assistant Judges, presiding.
Yesterday, being the day appointed by Procla-
mation of His Excellency the Governor for the
holding of this Court-after several postponements
caused by our late Chief Justice the Honorable T.
L. Wood accepting a more lucrative appointment
elsewhere and no successor having arrived as yet
to fill the vacancy-a very suitable Sermon was
preached at Holy Trinity Church in this Town by
the Rev. Mark James, Rector, from the 25th chap-
ter of Exodus, 40th verse. The Court soon after as-
sembled, and the Grand Jury of which George
Boyle, Esqr., was chosen Foreman-was empanel-
led.
The Senior Assistant Judge made some very ap-
propriate remarks to the Grand Jury.
Eugenius Charles Jackson, Esqr., Barrister-at-
Law, was admitted as a Councillor and Attorney of
the Court, and also a Commissioner to take Affida-
vits and Oaths under the Court Acts of 1814 and
1861.
The following Indictments were laid before the
Grand Jury by S. BROWNLOW GRAY, Esqr., Attor-
ney General.
The Queen vs. Chas. McKenne. Unlawfully wound-
ing. True Bill
The Queen vs. James Tyne, alias Davey. Unlaw-
fully wounding. True Bill. Tried and found
guilty.
The Queen vs. Henry Nelson Gilbert. Shopbreak-
ing and Larceny (five Indictments preferred).
True Bills.
The Court is adjourned to this (Tuesday) morn-
ing, 27th November, at 10 o'clock.

CUSTOM HOUSE-HAMILTON.
CLEARED.
Novr. 27-Brigt. Excelsior, Mayor, New York ; 491
tons logwood and fustic, 2 coils hemp rigging.
CUSTOM HOUSE-ST. GEORGE.
ENTERED.
November 21-American 3-masted Schr. Mary E.
Rankin, from Philadelphia bound to Trieste, laden
with kerosene oil; in distress.-Agents, W. C. Hy-
land & Co.
PASSENGERS SAILED.
In the Excelsior for New York, Mr. J. R. White.
In the Himalaya for England, Mrs. H. J. Wilkin-
son and the Misses Wilkinson.
The American three-masted Schr. Mary E. Rankin,
Fuller, Master, 12 days out, from Philadelphia bound
to Trieste, arrived at St. Georges on the 21st instant,
with loss of sails, masts sprung, and vessel leaking
badly. Lost a seaman overboard in a heavy gale of
wind on the 13th instant. Is discharging cargo of
kerosene oil into the hulk Harvest Moon.-Agents, W.
C. Hyland & Co.
Nov. 24.-Spoken off the N. E. Point Breaker, by
Capt. Boggs, American Schooner Delhi, of Saco, Me.,
Emerson, Master, 5 days from Castine, Me., bound to
Martinique; all well; desired to be reported.
H. M. Trocpship Himalaya left on Friday last for
England with the 87th Royal Irish Fusiliers under
Colonel Stevenson ; the llth Company R. E. under
Captain Maud, and a number of others from the Gar-
rison as well as from the Royal Naval Yard.
H. M. S. Blanche leaves to day for Nassau and
Jamaica.
H. M. S. Eclipse will leave for England on relief by
Sirius expected daily from England.
H. M. S. Pert from Halifax arrived on the 21st in-
stant.
H. M. S. Zephyr arrived from Halifax on the 24th
instant.

THE REVEREND MR. RYAN'S LECTURE ON AUS-
TRALIA, as announced in our last issue, took place at
the Mechanics' Hall in this Town, on the evening
of Thursday last. Circumstances prevented our
being present, and through some misunderstanding
we had no reporter there. His Excellency Sir
R. M. Laffan and Lady Laffan, and Admiral Sir
Cooper Key and Lady Key, were present, but the
assemblage was not so extensive as there was rea-
son to expect. We are informed that the Lecture
was a most interesting one, so much so that both
the Governor and the Admiral thanked Mr. Ryan
for the able manner in which he had managed the
subject.


AN OUTRAGE.-We are grieved to learn, that
notwithstanding the Proclamation of our late bene-
volent Governor of the 28th February last, offering
a reward of 20 for such information as would
lead to the conviction of the person or persons who
so wantonly destroyed the crops of Mr. Henry
Fenner, whose property is situated near the north
shore of this parish, but which failed unfortunate-
ly, in the hoped for effect of bringing the depreda-
tors to condign punishment-on Sunday morning
last, Mr. Fenner was again subjected to an un-
warrafitable and malicious outrage. Between the
hours of 4 and 5 o'clock on that morning a stone
weighing between 5 and 6 lbs. was thrown into
Mrs. Fenner's chamber, through the window, break-
ing the sash, smashing the glass and falling in the
middle of the room. By great good fortune, the
stone did not fall on Mrs. Fenner, otherwise the
consequences might have been fatal to her as she
is in a very weak state of bodily health, "only just
recovering from severe sickness. It is to be re-
gretted that the perpetrators of such outrages are
not found out, so that they might meet with the
punishment they so justly merit.


ai nm


-I.N


able majority, so severe the strictures of the min-
ority and so divided the opinions of the people
generally, that we can scarcely suppose, even if the
present Bill runs its full course, we shall have
it again repeated on our Statute Book, but rather
consider it as the final warning to devise some other
means, than public aid, for the support of the min-
istry.
A motion to make provision for remunerating the
Stella Commissioners" found little favour, but St.
David's Island Light House shared a more liberal
fate, and soon we may hope to see that portion of
the Islands adorned with a Light sufficiently power-
ful to warn the passing mariner of heretofore hid-
den dangers. The Medical Practitioners Bill after
much discussion fell through. A Bill providing for
the Auding of Public Accounts, although gener-
ally admitted to be a useful measure, was never-
theless a source for the display of many different
opinions as to the best method of arriving at a de-
sired end, and as the Assembly could not agree to
certain amendments proposed by the Upper House
this Act had to lie ever, but will probably obtain
early consideration in the next Session. q ime will
show whether the Officers of the Revenue will be
benefited by the Act intended to provide a better
method of paying them. The grant in aid of the
completion of Sir J. H. Lefroy's Memorials of Ber.
muda, is money well laid out, and proves that the
Representatives of the People are aware of the value
of our ancient records, and desire to hand them
down to posterity. The great troubles which at-
tended the New York Steam Bill for the past two
years were removed by the aid afforded in the new
Board of Works, the working of the Subsidy Con-
tract was placed in the hands of this Board, in the
composition of which four Members of the Assem-
bly had been introduced, and consequently the
House felt that not only would the views of the
people be supported at the Board, but also that
those Members would in reality be liable to ex-
plain, when called upon, the reasons which gov-
erned the Board on any particular occasion, while
with the Council, the invidious clauses respecting


Date


1877
Nv. 19
20
21
22
23
24
25


120.08~
20-216
30-208
'10-228
30-237
20-200
30-102


M
10


*- LADY LAFFAN will be At Home" on Thurs-
day of this week, from 3 to 5 o'clock.

THE SESSION OF 1877
was opened by His Honor Colonel William Lawtie
Morrison, the then Acting Governor and Com-
mander-in-Chief, on the 31st May last, (Governor
Lefroy having sailed from Bermuda on the 10th of
that month) with a Speech wherein he called the
attention of the Members of the Legislature to a
few subjects which seemed to require immediate
attention, leaving it for His Excellency the Gover-
nor after his arrival, to bring such other important
measures as might be deemed expedient before
them.
On the first day of meeting it was ordered on the
motion of a Member, in the House of Assembly,
"that the Receiver General be requested to lay be-
fore the H house the Public Books of Accounts," and
as this order, or rather the neglect to obey it, gave
rise to much future discussion and to no little delay
in the progress of thepublic business, it maybe well
to remember that it had been almost, if not altoge-
ther, an invariable practice of the H house of Assem-
bly, for at any rate a very long period of years, to
make such an order, and for the Custodian of the Pub-
blic Accounts promptly to comply with it. At the
next meeting of the Assembly the Clerk laid be-
fore the House a letter from Mr. Fowler, the then
Receiver General, wherein it was suggested that
the application for the Public Books of Accounts
should be by Address or Message to the Executive,
and these Books were not then brought up to the
House as heretofore: this action of the Receiver
General caused no little dissatisfaction among a
majority of the Members of the House of Asssem.
bly, and on the 15th June they brought to the
notice of His Honor the Acting Governor, by Mes-
sage, "the failure on the part of the Receiver
"General to lay the Books of Public Accounts be-
"fore the House in compliance with its request
made on Thursday the 31st May, 1877, in accord-
ance with its annual practice." On the same day
the Supply Bill passed through its third reading in
the Assembly, and having been subsequently con-
curred in by the Council, was presented to the
Acting Governor and became Law on the 22nd of
June.
About the same time the Assembly voted a bonus
of 1000 to the Quebec and Gulf Ports Steam Ship
Company for past services, during six months
when they were not in receipt of any subsidy, and
passed Bills for providing Salaries for the Chief
Justice and Attorney General, and for the more
convenient administration of the Extradition Acts.
Fortunate was it, that even these had been accom-
plished before a reply was received from the Act-
ing Governor to the Message of the Assembly rela-
tive to the failure of the Receiver General to lay
the Books of Public Accounts before them, for in
the reply H is Honor supported the position taken
by the Receiver General, and objected most strongly
to the supposition that the House of Assembly is
authorized to convey any order directly to, or enter
into correspondence with an Officer of the Execu-
tive; a large majority of the Assembly differed
from the Acting Governor and after much debate,
and the Receiver General having disregarded a po-
sitive order of the House of Assembly to lay the
Public Books of Accounts before them at a speci-
fied time, that House expressed its sentiments in
a number of strongly worded resolutions, which
concluded with one authorising the appointment
of a Committee to enquire into and report upon
the most expedient mode of procedure in the
matter, upon the recommendation of which
Committee the House of Assembly determined
not to enter into the consideration of any fur-
ther money appropriations before the Public
Books of Accounts were laid upon the Table by
the Receiver General. This resolution of the
House, while demonstrating its strong sense of the
improper attempt to trespass on the rights of the
Representatives of the People, caused no little em-
barrassment to the Public Service, as all works
were suspended for the time, and several matters
attempted to be introduced into the House were
ruled out of order: in the midst of the disturb-
ance and confusion Mr. Fowler, the late Receiver
General, was promoted to Honduras, and the House
of Assembly unable to initiate much that did not
require money, continued comparatively idle until
the arrival of His Excellency Sir Robert Michael
Laffan, K.C.M.G., who soon cut the Gordian Knot,
by directing the present Receiver General, pending
instruction, from the Secretary of State for the Col-
onies on Colonel Morrison's dispatches, to lay the
Books of. Accounts before the Assembly. Thereby
the wheels were soon set in motion, the Assembly
made provision for the maintenance and repair of
the Public Works and Buildings and also of the
Roads and Works connected therewith, and then
in good earnest proceeded with the work of the
Session. A Bill constituting a Board of Works,
founded on the old Board of Roads, was, at the sug-
gestion of His Excellency the Governor, passed by
the Legislature. Three Clergy Bills were intro-
duced, one by Mr. Fraser for granting supplement-
ary aid to all Ministers of Religion, another by Mr.
J. W. Pearman, providing Salaries for those who
had been heretofore paid out of the Public Trea-
sury, as well as for some others therein specified,
and a third by the Attorney General for continuing
the former Clergy Bill of 1869 for a limited time.
After great discussion and many bitter speeches in
the House of Assembly the latter was passed for
five years, and having been concurred in by the
Council and assented to by His Excellency has be-
come Law, and the vexed question, as to the proper
mode of supporting Ministers of Religion, is thus
tided over for a time, but so slender was the favor-


the appointment of a Committee to perform the
work being no longer requisite, all other points
were easily adjusted, the result being that the
Board of Works is now entrusted with the admin-
istration and supervision of a contract which to give
up would have been a scandal to our country, but
which was trembling on its basis, and indeed may
be said to have been rescued only at' the last mo-
ment by the timely aid above referred to. A
Town Clock for Hamilton (or perhaps for the
whole country) obtained the favorable consideration
of the Assembly, and a Resolution passed that
House authorising the expenditure of 1500 in
erecting a Clock Tower attached to the Sessions'
House and fixing a Clock therein, but the Council,
in all prudence, thought that such a vote should
not be rushed through at the end of the Session,
when no provision had been made for executing the
work and therefore gave it the go-bye for the pres-
ent.
An Act to provide for the survey of ships prior
t o registration is a step in the right road, especially
in a country like ours where condemned or aban-
doned ships are not unfrequently refitted, and
therefore this measure should not be passed over
without notice. Shortly before the prorogation of
the Legislature, extracts from a Despatch of the
Secretary of State for the Colonies, relative to the
question of the right of the Assembly to call for
the Public Accounts, were forwarded to both bran-
ches by His Excellency, and the perusal of these
extracts clearly demonstrate that the Assembly
was by no means exceeding its privilege, when it
demanded from the Receiver General directly the
production of the Public Books of Accounts.
A temporary Bill for the adjournment of the
Court of Assize, and many minor matters, but not
on that account less necessary, have been passed
over to avoid prolixity in this brief summary; but
that a momentous and arduous session has been
closed in good feeling is in no small degree due to
the judicious management and able conduct afforded
by the Executive at a time when a small spark
might have kindled a large flame.
In conclusion we can only advise those who de-
sire instruction as to the real work of the Session
of 1877 to peruse the Journals of the Assembly, for
therein they will learn that although the time con-
sumed has been long, the work performed has not
been little, while the questions calling for Legislation
have probably been more weighty and perplexing
than usual.

THE MISSING FISHING BOAT "ALARM."

In our Gazette of the 6th instant we mentioned that
two men-Julius Wood, a West Indian, and a Ber-
mudian named John Harlord-went on a fishing voy.
age, on the previous Wednesday, in the boat Alarm,
and were last seen just before sunset on the same
evening near the North Rock. It blew heavily dur-
ing the night, and great fears were entertained for
their safety. Boats went out to look for the missing
one but without success.
The fate of the two men remained a mystery until
the 20th instant, when Capt. Robert Boggs, in his gig,
the Panther, found the Alarm, sunk in four fathoms
of water, about l miles to the southwest of the North
Rock. We take the following account of the Alarm's
discovery from the Colonist of Wednesday last, as
given by Capt. Boggs :--
"About 1-30. P.M., yesterday, Captain Robert
Boggs and his crew, in the gig boat Panther, were on
their way to board a passing schooner. When in the
vicinity of North Rock their attention was arrested
by what appeared to be the mast of a boat above the
water, at an angle of about 450, from the top of which
a dark object was suspended. After pursuing the
schooner for some distance, they returned to the ob-
ject which had attracted their attention on their way
out, and on reaching it found it was the mast of the
boat Alarm about whose disappearance so much anx-
iety has been caused:* The hull of the Alarm was
found on the bottom in about four fathoms of water-
about one and a half, miles distant to the south-west
of North Rock. The head of the boat is turned in
shore, and the hull has a list to port. The mast. head
is about 12 feet out of water. The jib is furled ; the
mainsail is on the boom and appears to be furled.
Everything seems to betoken that the ill-fated men
betook themselves to the top of the mast for safety
and lived there, may be, until exhausted nature could
no longer support the strain. A rope had been made
fast to the lift and carried around the mast so as to
form a boatswain's chair" in which no doubt the
men passed many a long and weary hour, watching
the land, and vainly looking for the succor that they
never would receive. The dark object suspended to
the mast-head turned out to be a "Balmoral" boot,
firmly secured to the flying-jib halyard block by a
piece of fishing line. Both block and boot were
brought on shore and left at this Office by Captain
Boggs.
The above facts leave no doubt about thu iate of
Wood and Harford. The Alarm sunk, and they no
doubt met with a lingering and horrible death. The
strange part of the whole affair is that not one of the
different boats that went out in search of the Alarm
was attracted by the signal of the unfortunate mon.
"The boat can be easily found, we are told, lying as
she does, in a straight line between Ireland Island
point and the North Rock."

Wood was a married man and leaves a wife. Har-
ford was not married. Ilarford purchased a pair of
Balmoral Boots for himself a short time before he
went on this ital voyage.
As both sails are apparently furled, it is sup-
posed that they had come to anchor ere the boat
sank.


AMATEUR THEATRICALS.
The efforts of the members of the Amateur Dra-
matic Club, 46th Regiment, to afford amusement to
the inhabitants of our little Colony have again
been attended with well meritad success; an his-
torical French Drama "The Midnight Watch" being
produced on Friday and Saturday evenings last, in
the Theatre Royal, Prospect, the houses on each
occasion being fairly filled.
The characters were generally well sustained, es-
pecially those of "Pierre Delaroache" (Captain
Grieve) and Labarre" (Doctor McCutchan) the
gaoler, under whose charge Pauline" (Mrs. Shaw)
a Royalist prisoner, is placed in the Fortress of
Marseilles. To Sergt.-Major Crausby is due great
credit for his admissable acting of Coco" a French
Soldier, full of fun, and with a corporation like the
proverbial "poisoned pup."
In the characters Pauline" and Ninette" there
was much to admire. Ninette" certainly has a
good voice, and in her exquisite rendering of The
daughter of the Regiment was" loudly applauded.
The performance concluded on each evening with
an old but very laughable Farce, entitled "A Re-
gular Fix," in which Lt. Eden, as Hugh-de-Brass"
keeps the house in continual outbursts of laughter
by his easy nonchalance, and unceasing flow of
spirits; the minor personages being represented
with a smoothness which does credit to the stage
management.
The strains of the magnificent string band of the
46th Regiment, under direction of Mr. Campbell,
Bandmaster, contributed immensely to the enjoy-
ment, discoursing some fine operatic selections in
good style.
Altogether this may be said to be the most suc-
cessful entertainment given for some time past,
many more of which we hope to see produced dur-
ing the stay of the Regiment among us.

THE STEEPLE OF ST. MARY'S CHURCH.

We have been kindly favored with the following :-
The Steeple of St. Mary's Church, Smith's Pa-
rish, designed by Dr. Henry J. Hinson was com-
menced in the summer of 1875 and completed
about the end of the year 1876.
It is in the early English style, modified so as to
accord as nearly as possible with the body of the
Church and is 102 feet high to the cross.
The Tower, 14 feet square, rises to a height of 56
feet and is supported by two buttresses at each of
the corners, placed at right angles to each other.
These buttresses are carried up in four storys, each
story being crowned by a plain triangular or pedi-
mental head, except the last which terminates in an
hexagonal pinnacle, paneled, but not decorated;
and from this springs a flying buttress to support
the spire, also ending in a plain pinnicle. From
the Tower rises an octagonal spire, plain, and 46
feet in height, above which is the Cross. This
Cross through some mistake as to dimensions order-
ed, is set too close to the apex of the spire, which
gives it a dwarfed appearance. The defect-which
was foreseen and pointed out-could have been re-
medied, but was not upon false principals of econ-
omy. Between the buttresses are triple and dou-
ble lancet shaped windows, connected together by
dripstones and surmounted by stepped Pediments,
the highest of which are crowned by crosses. The
Doorways which all open have equilateral shaped
arches, champerred at the edges and quicked, and
these give entrance to the lower part of the Tower,
which forms an open Porch. The design contem-
plated a groined ceiling to this Porch, but this has
not yet been carried out.
The chief workman was Mr. Julian Tucker, a
native Mason, who deserves very great credit for
the workmanlike manner in which he has completed-
the structure in all its details, and it is very much
to be regretted that such good work and so full of
expression should have been hidden by being daub-
ed over with cement. The cost was 489.

FIRE.-On yesterday week, about 10 o'clock in
the forenoon, a house occupied by Mr. Lucas Landy,
a mason by trade, situated on the South Shore of
Warwick Parish, was destroyed by fire. It seems
that Landy was away at work and the mother
who was in charge was but a short distance from
the building engaged in some domestic matters,
when she discovered the house to be on fire and her
children crying piteously. She immediately rushed
in and with difficulty, from the dense smoke and
flames, secured and removed the youngest, an in-
fant of about six months old-calling on the others
to follow, which they did, one of them however be-
ing slightly burnt on one its legs The cause of the
fire is said to be "matches," which one of the chil-
dren a boy of about 3 years of age had discovered
the whereabouts, and having ignited one the bed
clothing was soon on fire and the result as above
stated. There was no tank to the house, which is
too common a circumstance, and there was no
water immediately available, otherwise the house
might have been saved as many of the neighbors
were promptly in attendance.-As but very little
was saved from the burning building, the parents
and 6 children were left without clothing or shelter.
We are told that the Ladies and Gentlemen resid-
ing in the neighborhood promptly supplied them
with clothing, &c.

A Subscription List, in aid of the above suffrers,
is, we have been requested to say, open at the Office
of Messrs. Wainwright, Gorham & Co. in this Town

From the Illustrated London News, October 27.
THE ROYAL HUMANE SOCIETY.


BERMUDA HUNT,
"A southerly wind and a cloudy sky,"
"Proclaim a hunting morning."
Such was last Thursday with the exception that on
this occasion the wind had gone, for a change of air I
suppose, to the East. The breeze was cool, and the
thermometer at just the -itch to make a gallop enjoy-
able. We meet at the Flatts, and from there, over the
Crawl we go-Ye Gods what ugly names! and Flatts
spelt with two ts" to make it look uglier It is to
be hoped that our Grandfathers who were guilty of such
hideous nomenclature are not disturbed in their graves
at the thoughts of having so shockingly misnamed that
beautiful, now emerald, no torquise cove, with its pearl
grey sands and pretty rural scenery.
But to return to our muttons. As Ijox to the meet
on my -- Ah my dear young ladies, I was nearly
mentioning the exact color of that noble steed on which
the Royal Gazette so liberally mounts his Special
Sporting Correspondent, and revealing the tremendous
secret of my identity.
Toot-toot, Hulloa the Masters' horn is somewhat
croaky to-day Where was he dining last night, taking
a farewell of the dear old Faugh-a-Ballaghs I expect,
but clear the way, he'll set his whistle wetted at the
finish. What have we here ?
The dauntless H-d on his sprightly Bob"
And Frederick 0. bestrides a sable Cob"
Two graceful dames beyond the bridge" I see"
"Like fair Dianas coursing o'er the lea."
But hold hard Tally-ho! Thisis toomuch in the Wal-
singham and Calabash tree style, whilst (.u have been
posing in rhyme the Field has moved off.I: Hoick-over,
a little water jump, up the hill, down the hill, with a
pleasing variety of less grass and more stone. By
jingo! the natives are getting sporting, every field has
a post and rail in it with a gallery to applaud or chaff
as the case may be. That is a clever big bay horses
and the chestnut has not forgotten how to "lannd" safe-
ly after his long sea voyage. On on they fly. We
pass what ought to be Shelly SBay Race Course, now
closed owing, they say, to a mental indisposition on the
part of one or two owners thereabouts, temporary only,
we hope, and may they soon see the force of letting
their fellow islanders benefit by a gallop over that not
very productive sward.
A double wall, baulking very, a single. a double
again, confound it I've jumped into a four-wheeler. I'll
apologise next time. But what is this! some enthusi-
ast in the noble heart oflbro'.kindi other people's necks,
has nailed a stiff cedar rail 4 feet from the ground
across the track. Ent-ineer4. to the front-crash! A
gentleman noted for the admirable straightness and
sangfroid with which he rides removes the obstacle;
Forward on-; when in, but not out of a lane, the
Field are seen, all packed tight like herrings in a bar-
rel. Will no one move on P Come Wrexham, a lead
Bravo. Now we come to the North Shore, and how nice
and cool we find the breeze ; now over the road again,
and here we get one lot of rails, what a rataplan some
of these beginners beat; now two lots of rails; and
now a wall. I hope there are no Mercer-nary motives
in that Gentleman's eagerness to 'catch that loose
horse Hush that's a brand new swell from England,
on a 300 guinea weight carrier. I'll back the little
Moojians against him on their own ground; see how
they fly the last fences without a mistake. Hulloa'!
here I go head over heels into a large marquee with
500 flags and banners. Roast turkeys, cakes, ice creams
and elephant,* the latter certainly free of extra charge
to me. but what a rattle of Lawn Tennis bats and
balls about my ears! I don't like it and wont play, my
horse and I are not in form to-day. But where have I
got to ? 1 beg your pardon most Reverend Signor, if
you will kindly take my horses off-fore-leg out of the
ice pail, I will continue my sporting pilgrimage. Now
over the wall into the Doctor's yard we go ;.but.it ip
really too bad of that little colored boy lo catch hold df
my horses head just as I was going to finish i my l'best
Leicestershire style, before the ladies too! but perhaps
it was as well for there was a nasty drop on the other
side.
TALLY-He.
Novr. 26th, 1877.
P.S.-The drop on the other side was not so bad as I
imagined.
ED.-So I believe for Tally Ho" was heard to
sing on the way home Champagne Charlie is my
name," which I beg to contradict.
See advertisement in Royal Gazette" Novr. 20th,
A Wesleyan Picnic at Bailey's Bay.

SPREAD-EAGLEISM.
The great bald-headed American Eagle still
screams altitudinously from the summit of the halls
of Congress. The Bird" still flaps his wings In
defiance of the effete British Lion.
The latest instance of Cock-a-doodleism on re-
cord, is that given in a speech delivered by Mr.
Price, Republican Representative from Iowa, on
the currency question, in Washington last week.
Being confronted by another representative with
some opinions quoted from Sir Robert Peel. and
asked also to meet some arguments drawn from
English financial history, the Iowa orator replied:
"I do not know anything about the elder Peel's
opinion and do not care much about his son's. I
live in the afternoon of the nineteenth century and
am legislating for the people who live in the after-
noon of the nineteenth century, and while I have
the lamp of experience to guide my feet in the path
of the future, I am pretty safe so long as I keep in
it. While values in England at that time may
have got down sixty per cent. values here may
have gone up, because gold has gone down from
280 to 103. Do not compare this country with
any other. There is no country to compare it with.
There is no place to make a country to compare it
with. (Laughter.) In Engla~4you may take a
railroad car in the morning and start out in a
straight line and before the sun sets yofu will run
over the edge. (Applause and laughter.) You
cannot compare mole hills with mountains. You


ANSWER TO SCRIPTURE ENIGMAS IN GA-
ZETTE NOV. 6.
FOR SUNDAY SCHOLARS.
1st.
Saul-1 Sam. 9 ch., 27 and 10 ch. 1-24.
Achan-Joshua 7 ch. 18-26.
Chariots-1 Sam. 13 ch. 5.
Tychicus-Acts 20 ch. 4.
Smyrna-Rev. 1 ch. 11.
Dothan-Gen. 37 ch. 17.
Saint Mary's Church Sunday School.
2nd.
Esther-The seventeenth Book in the Bible.
Isaiah-The Son of Amos. Isaiah 1 ch. 1.
Where art thou-Gen. 3 ch. 9.
Bartimeus-Mark 10 ch. 46-52.
Syria-2 Sam. 8 ch. 6.
Bethabara-St. John 1 ch. 28.
Thyatera-Rev. I ch. 11.
Moses-Ex. 2 ch. 10.
Fan-Isa. 30 ch. 24.
Nahum-Nah. 1 ch. 1.
Wist ye not that I must be about my Father's
business.
Warwick, November 16, 1877.

CRICKET.
A match was played at Somerset on Thursday
last between the B. R. & C. C. and an eleven from
the Fleet, and resulted mirabile dictu in a victory for
the Civilians, owing chiefly to the very efficient bow-
ling of A. J. Darrell. Not being able to obtain a
correct score in detail we can only give the general
result. The Navy in their first innings made a
total score of 39, of which Lt. DeCrespigny contri-
buted 14 ; and in their second innings 43 ; in all 82.
The Civilians in their first innings put together a
total of 61, of which Darrell scored 18, and T. Hunt
19; and in their second required 22 to win. They
lost six wickets for 3 runs but F. Misick
and W. Frith managed to get the score to 17 when
time was called, and the match was therefore de-
cided on the first Innings in favour of the Civi-
lians.


may contrast them, but you cannot compare them.
Step out from yonder Eastern limit and, see the
King of Day shaking the water from his wings.
He takes his course westward, niot 600 miles only,
nor 1,000 miles, nor 2,000, nor 8,000 miles only, but
he has traversed nearly 4,000 miles when he sinks
to rest behind the golden waves of the Pacific.
(Laughter and applause). Or take your stand up
at the frozen North, where the Ice' King reigns,
and follow down through all degrees of latitude
until you have reached the land of the orange and
the pine, and then you have a country which for
diversity of clime and products has no equal on the
globe--(continuous laughter and applause)-and
you cannot make such a country anywhere else, for
there is no other place to make it in. (Laughter.)
This is our country. It has. one constitution, one
flag and one destiny, and I purpose, so far as my
ability extends, to keep it in the pathway of duty
until it shall arrive at the goal, and the capstone
shall be put upon it in time. (Shouts of laughter
and applause.)
Upon which the New York Herald pertinently
remarks :-
"This is an account of our country that will
cause the minions of despotism in foreign parts to
quake with wonder. But let them not rashly hope
to get up such a country on their own account; for,
as Price justly observes, you cannot make such a
country anywhere else, for there is no other place
to make it in.' We have the exclusive patent right
for the country and for one of its grandest pro-
ducts, Price himself. There is nothing like this
country elsewhere, and nothing like Price else-
where, and only two or three like him here."
The Herald, however, perhaps, does injustice to
Mr. Price, who may have been seeking to make his
mark as the Great American Humorist of the af-
ternoon" of the nineteenth century. Such morning
roosters" as Mark Twain and Bret Harte may well
take shelter under the fence.
MR. SPARKS.

Stanley and 120 of his followers are to be taken
from Cape of Good Hope by the steamship Industry
to Zanzibar,


The following case of attempting to save life was
last week brought under the notice -of the com-
mittee, which bestowed the usual award :-
The silver medallion was unanimously voted to
Mr. A. E. Bartlet, surgeon, of Goudhurst, Kent,
for the following act of gallantry:-On the 21st
ult. William Buss, a plumber, descended a well 34
feet deep for the purpose of effecting some repairs
in connection with the pump; but he had been
only a short time down when the foul air compelled
him to signal to be hauled up, which was done,
and when within 8 feet of the top he became insen-
sible, slipped through the rope by which he was
fastened, and fell to the bottom. Mr. Bartlet, as
a medical man, was sent for, and found the air so
foul that no light would burn, and the well was, of
course, quite dark. He heard the man breathing
stertorously at the bottom, and at once determined
to descend and attempt his rescue, which he did
by holding on to a short ladder let down by a rope.
On reaching the bottom be found the man still in-
sensible, with his head just out of the water, and
managed to fix him round the pipe of the pump to
prevent his drowning. Experiencing, however,
great difficulty in breathing, and not being secured
to the ladder, he was unable to remain or to take
up Buss, who was a heavy man. On coming to the
surface he endeavoured to induce someone else to
venture to the rescue, being himself much exhaust-
ed, but without success, and he therefore deter-
mined to make another effort. By this time, how-
ever, the unfortunate man had succumbed to the
influence of the foul air and the fall, and his would-
be-rescuer was only at last successful in bringing
bis body to the sui face.

The merchants ot Halifax are looking around to
see if there is no other markets for their fish than
the uncertain ones of the West India Islands,
Chicago ,and other Western Markets are improving
and no doubt other Continental Markets could be
found to repay shippers. A Haligonian in Chi-
cago is doing a very extensive business in fish from
his native province.







BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


News from ti(, Seat of War, &c.
Halifax papers received during the week furnish
us with European News some six days later than
before acknowledged.

GREAT BRITAIN.
LONDON, Nov. 14.-The rumors of an intended
rising in the North of Spain are contradicted.
About 300 Russian Mennonites left Berlin on the
9th inst., for Bremen, on their way to North Ame-
rica.
EDINBURGH, Nov. 12.-The contest for the Lord
Rectorship cf the Edinburgh University, termina-
ted on Saturday in favor of the Marquis of Hart-
ington, leader of the Liberal party in the Commons.
FRANCE.--- VERSAILLES, Nov. 13. -In the
Chamber of Deputies, to-day, a motion increasing
the powei s of the presiding officer for preserving
order during debate was carried by a vote of 303
yeas to 39 nays. It was opposed by Cassagnac and
other Bonapartist. The President. of the Chamber
is empowered by this resolution to suspend and fine
unruly members.
The report of the committee on motion for en-
quiry into electoral abuses, was read. It violently
attacks the government's policy as unscrupulous
and ruinous to the industry of the country.
Baragnon made a violent speech. lie declared
the Chamber could institute the inquiry proposed,
without the assent of the Senate. The effect of the
inquiry would be to prepare a new list of hostages
for the next commune. It was only necessary to
tread the Chamber under foot to show that it should
Dot become a convention.
The second ballots for members of Councils Gen-
erals have been concluded. The final result of the
election is, that the republicans have a majority in
49, and the Conservatives in 38 departments, while
in three the majority is still doubtful.
Great anxiety and depression are noticeable in
Paris.
RbME.-RoME, Nov. 13.-The Pope gave an
audience of six minutes yesterday, to 22 persons
from France. He was borne in by attendants, and
was very pale and weak during the audience. He
evere' moved his legs, but moved his bands fre-
quently and with apparent freedom. His appear-
ance is that of a man on the brink of the grave, but
who seems to retain his mental faculties. The
Pontiff conversed in French, and spoke with an a-
mount of effort that was painfully evident. The
few words be spoke referred principally to politics
connected with France. He counselled prayers for
peace, so that France might be spared the horrors
of another revolution.
VERSAILLES, Nov. 14.-In the Chamber of Depu-
ties to-day the debate was resumed on Albert
Orcvy's motion for appointment of a committee to
inquire into the election-abuses. Defourteau, Min-
fster of Interior, was the first speaker. He said he
would forget what was offensive in Gravey's resolu-
eions, he would consider the words and measures
which it seemed to preface. He defended the prin-
ciple of Government intervention in elections by
historic precedent. He called to mind the des-
patches of Gambetta, ordering prefects to interfere
in the elections, and said, if ever intervention of
the government was necessary, it was under the
government of Marshal MacMahon."
PARIS, Nov. 14.-Marquis DeFranclieu, Legi-
timist" life Senator, is dead.
THE WAR.
VIENNA, Nov. 18.-A special to the Political
Correspondenz," dated Bucharest, Monday, says
General Skobeloff has succeeded in definitely es-
tablishing himself in his newly captured position.
The final Turkish attack was repulsed by the fire
of 70 cannon. The Turks lost heavily.
A Russian official despatch states that General
Heyman advanced against Erzeroum on Thursday
night, but his column lost their way in the dark-
ness.
Three Russian battalions captured the fortified
position of Aztzie, and, although obliged to with-
draw before a superior force of Turks, carried off
560 prisoners. The Russians lost 32 killed and
600 wounded.
A telegram from Constantinople reports that a
body of Russians marched to Berkovatz, west of
Vratza. It is supposed they intend to make an
attempt to cross the Balkans.
LONDON. Novr. 13.-The capture of the position
which Skobeloff has been attacking would turn all
the intervening works towards Raderizo, Tutchen-
itza and Gravieza. It seems pretty certain that
fighting has not yet been for the redoubts themsel-
ves, but for the rifle pits in front. The redoubts are
the same which were temporarily occupied by Sko.-
beloffon September 11th.
According to rumors from the Russian camp,
preparations are making for a general assault on
Plevna, as it is doubtful whether it is possible to
starve Osman Pasha out before winter.
LONDON, Novr. 14.-Signs of activity in Servia
are multiplying. Fresh troops are daily marching
to the frontier. Ambulance corps are forming, and
iq Kregujevatz the arsenal works night and day.
-Besides the capture of the fort at Sutarmans,
commanding the town of Antivari, the Montene-
grins have taken four block houses towards Scutari.
The houses are suffering greatly from bombardment.
Telegraphic and road communication between
Podgoritza and Scutari is interrupted. Total
Turkish force in Albania is only 18 battalions. No
force at Antivari or Scutari sufficient to oppose the
MIontenegrins.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 11.-Marini Pasha, sub-


commandant at Kars, telegraphs under date of
Oct. 28t th at he received a letter from General
Laris Melikoff, asking for the surrender of the
place within 24 hours from receipt of this commu-
nication. The staff and all officers down to the
major assembled in council and unanimously re-
jected the summons, and resolved to defend Kars
to the last.
LONDON, Nov. 12.-A despatch from Dubruk
says:-" In consequence of the evacuation of this
place by the Turks, the Russians have contracted
the circle of investment to thirty miles. The Rus-
sians have 120,000 men, sufficient to fill two conti-
nuous lines of trenphes around the whole position.
Five or six thousand cattle are visible in Osman
Pasha's position, and other indications show it is
probable he can hold out for 80 to 40 days longer.
BRUSSELS, Nov. 11.-Le Nord, organ of the Rus-
sians, regards the speech of Beaconsfield, at the
Lord Mayor's banquet in London, as an encour-
agement to Turkey to fight to the last, but it does
not think the speech need cause fears of other
complications.
ViENNA, Nov. 11.-The "Political Correspon-
dence" says there is much excitement in Constan-
tinople. Forty of ex-Sultan Murad's servants were
strangled because of a conspiracy to reinstate Mu-
rad on the throne;. The excitement is increased
by a rumor that the Prophet appeared to the Sul-
tan ordering him to conclude peace.
LAHORE, INDIA, Nov. 11.-A newspaper states
that in consequence of the raids of warlike tribes
on the frontier, troops have been warned that a
six weeks' expedition has been resolved upon
This is not officially confirmed, but if correct
would, in consequence of excitement prevailing, be
the commencement of a serious frontier war.

PERU.-The wife of the British Vice Consul
Johnson, at Equitos, Peru, was fired upon by the
Mayor and fifty armed followers, on the night of
July 1st, in her house.
he miraculously escaped unhurt.


MEETS OF THE BERMUDA HUNT.
Dates. Meets. Finish.
Novr. 27th
(Tuesday) The Devil's Hole.'...Eolia.
Decr. 6th }
Thursday) 6th Berm. Yacht Club... Riddle's Bay.
Dee(Thursday) th
(Tuesday) Clarence Hill....... Clarence Bill.
Deer. 20th Flatts Village} f Mr. Fowle Tuck.
(Thursday) latts Village.... er's Cricket Fld.
(Thursday) 27thSpital Ponds ........ Claremont.


LALLY-TOLLENDAL.
(English paper, Oct. 31.)
A few days ago there was found dead in a coal-
cellar in Soho the Comte de Lally-Tollendal. Howt
many must muse over the strangeness of this last ap-
pearance of a great name! The Comte do Lally-
Tollendal dies in a coal-cellar. A morsel of bread
given to him delay by day had for some time kept him
alive, but it proved insufficient to sustain his vital
power. One morning he was found dead in the filthy
hovel where the charity of a poor tailor had allowed
him to sleep. So is laid at rest the last descendant
of the restless spirit who, an hereditary subject of Eng-
land, disputed with England the conquest of the East
and for his devotion to France, unsuccessful only
because it was not supported by the power of France,
was rewarded by death on the scaffold in Paris. What
led the last Lally-Tollendal to return to these islands
to die? His great ancestor was a victim of the in-
justice of the age of Louis Quinze; but his wrongs
were acknowledged, the sentence upon him reversed,
and some restitution done to his family before the
Great Revolution swept away the regime under which
he suffered.
The son of our antagonist in India, and the grand-
father of the man who was found dead last week in
Soho, obtained the reversal of his father's sentence
just a century ago, and it was thought that from that
time to this Frenchmen had not ceased to be proud
of Lally-Tollendal as one of those who had dared
most to promote the glory of France. He certainly
deserved to be so esteemed. No one ever had a
larger ambition, and no one more energetically strove
to realize it. His father was one of the Irish gen-
tlemen who accompanied James II. into exile, and,
according to the law that prevailed until a few years
since, he was himself an English subject; but he was
born in France, and his whole life was devoted to a
struggle to overcome the English Government of his
time. We can look back upon his career with un-
mixed admiration for his gallantry, though all its
efforts were directed against the freedom and great-
ness of England. The volunteer of Philipsburg came
again and again to England on secret missions in the
interest of the Chevalier, was foremost in the Irish
Brigade at Fontenoy, and the same year descended
with a band of companions on Scotland and joined the
Prince before Falkirk. Yet this was but the begin-
ning of his adventurous career. It was a dozen years
later, when he was over 50 years of age, that he car-
ried his warfare to another Continent. It is difficult
for those who are acquainted with the torpid existence
of decayed Pondichery and Chandernagore to dreamrn
of a time when French arms disputed with England on
not unequal terms for the conquest of India; but Lally-
Tollendal conceived the design of driving us from our
conquests in the East, and had his daring been loy-
ally seconded it might not have been unsuccessful.
But the Government of France at the time of the
Seven Years War was probably the most corrupt and
inefficient that ever disgraced a great nation. Mont-
calm in the West and Lally Tollendal in the East
were neglected that the caprices of Madame de Porm.
padour might be gratified, and French pretentions in
North America and the Indies were defeated simul-
taneously and for ever. Less fortunate than Mont-
calm, Lally-Tollendal did not loose his life in the
East. He came back our prisoner, and might have
been tried, according to the law of the time, for trea-
son against his lawful Sovereign ; but he was released
on parole that he might go to Paris to defend him-
self against the accusations which pursue the unsuc-
cessful. He experienced the fate for which he must
have been prepared. The administration of justice is
not yet perfect in France, but it is immaculate com-
pared with what it was in the Parlement de Paris
under Louis XV. It is one of the good things to be
remembered of Voltaire, who was, indeed, never back-
ward in the cause of justice, that he zealously assisted
the son of Lally-Tollendal in procuring the reversal of
the sentence passed upon his father. The work of
the executioner could not be undone, but the name
and honour of the daring soldier were vindicated, and
his merits were tardily recognized in the respect paid
to his son. This was the grandfather of the old man
who was found dead last week in Soho. We know
not through what vicissitudes of fortune he had fallen
so low. The career of his grandfather was not un-
chequered. He was one of the representatives of the
nobles in the States-General, where he took his place
among the Liberal supporters of a Constitutional
Monarchy, and was favored by the Tiers-Etat for the
sake of the sufferings of his father. But, like many
others, he became alarmed, and he fled, first to
Switzerland, and later to England. Yet he was no
more deficient in courage than his father, for he ap-
plied tor permission to be one of the counsel of Louis
XVI. on his trial-an application made in vain. He
returned to France under Bonaparte, and was even
made a Peer at the Restoration ; but misfortunes
would seem to have pursued the family until it ended
in last week's tragedy.

IN THE SHIPKA PASS.
IAN ENGLISH OFFICER DEAD.
[From the Times Correspondence.]


BEFORE SHIPKA PASS, Septr. 27.-A gloom was
cast over the camp last Monday by the death of
poor Lieutenant Layard, of the 37th Regiment, the
junior Military Attache to Suleiman Pasha's army,
and nephew to our Ambassador. He was on sick
leave from India, and the fact of his not having en-
tirely recovered from the effects of that climate,
doubtless rendered it a task of far greater difficulty
to arrest the progress of the fatal disease which
carried him off-typhoid fever-contracted in the
camp. He was only 25; but young as he was, -he
had already distinguished himself in his career in
India, more especially in the Topographical De-
partment. his knowledge of which rendered his ser-
vices of peculiar use here. While with this army he
was always in the front, and was never weary of
doing his duty. At the attack and capture of
Kezanlik, he accompanied the Cavalry, and was
under a heavy fire then and on several subsequent
occasions. He was buried in the grounds of the
Greek Monastery at Kezanlik, which is occupied as
a refuge for the fugitive Bulgarian women and
children placed there under a guard. A battallion
of troops followed the cortege, which was led by
Captain Fife, Mr. Layard's colleague, who was ac-
companied by all the English and other foreigners
present in the army, anxious to pay a last tribute of
respect to the memory of one whose frank and ami-
able character had made him a favorite with every
one.

NEW YORK, Nov. 18.-The landing of cattle or
hides from European ports outside of Belgium is
forbidden in the United States, owing to the spread
of rinderpest on the Continent.
It is reported that Lieut. Bullis crossed the Rio
Grande in chase of the Indians, and two miles from
the river was confronted by 500 Mexicans and In-
dians, who set fire to the grass and thus drove
Bullis across the river, the enemy firing on him as
he crossed. Two hundred cavalry have gone to his
assistance.


THE SOLITARY GUEST.
A cumious dinner was lately given at one of the
principal Parisian restaurants. Thirteen covers had
been laid, but, to the surprise of the waiters, a single
guest made his appearance. The mystery was after-
wards explained. Many years before thirteen friends
(amongst whom were Alfred De Musset and Theo-
phile Gauthier), met at the restaurant in question and
agreed to dine together every year, on the same day
and in the same place. The solitary guest at present
was M. Bubelles, a painter of some repute, aged 84.
Canadian Illustrated News.
At Paris, in a sumptuous room,
The lamps were lit one autumn night;
The air was fragrant with perfume,
And all was luxury and light.
A princely feast the table graced,
Rich wines flashed, eager to be pour'd,
And velvet-cushioned seats were placed
For Thirteen Guests around the board.
A liveried crowd, with noiseless foot,
Like shadows flitted to and fro,
Just touched a flower or turned a fruit,
Each to the other whispering low:
Est-ce que ces Messieurs vent venir ?.
Tis time the banquet should begin."
Hush! The door opens-they are here-
An old man feebly tottered in.
He took his place, and bowed his face,
In mute but reverential prayer:
Then glanced all round, as though he found
A phantom in each vacant chair.
The lackeys gazed appalled, amazed
With awe, that momently increased-
They could not guess the wretchedness
That racked the Master of the feast.
Full forty years have passed away
Since in that same luxurious shrine
Poets and painters, young and gay,
Thirteen in number, met to dine:
And when the festal hours had sped
They vowed each coming year to meet,
And, as each brother joined the dead,
Still to retain his ghost a seat.
Here sat Do Musset-Murger there-
And here Sainte-Beuve-but wherefore dwell*
On the great names of those who were P
Those names are still a potent spell.
Last year two met-to meet no more-
Since then bright Theophile has gone-
Bubelles, whose years are eighty-four,
Survives the last and dines alone!
Hle sits and drams ; his eves are blind
To flowers and fruits and dainty fare
His soul is with the Twelve-his mind
Is busied with each empty chair.
Once, only once. he called for wine:
They filled his glass-and then he said
In hollow tones: "0 comrades mine,
I drink the memory of the Dead !"
Ah who can tell the thoughts that thronged
The lonely chambers of his brain,
As gazing round he almost longed
His final home at once to gain.
Enough, my Friends The heaviest stone
Fate flings at Man's devoted head
Is when, gray-haired, he sits alone,
And dreams of all his comrades dead !
GEORGE MURRAY.
CLEOPATRA'S NEEDLE.-George A. Sala writes
to the London Illustrated News :-That unfortu-
nate Cleopatra's Needle Upon my word I begin
to think that the end of the big boulder will be to
get into Chancery, and then, who shall say what
will happen to it? Already there are as many legal
questions bristling round it as there are hierogly-
phics on its mouldy old face. The captain of the
Fitzmaurice picked it up abandoned and knocking
about in the Bay of Biscay. Is it a derelict ? If
it be so, the Needle is, by clearly ascertained mari-
time law, the sole property of the person who finds
it. There is then no question of salvage; the de-
relict belongs to the captain of the Fitzmaurice,
and to nobody else. But then it may be flotsam
and jetsam ;" and in that case the Spanish Govern-
ment might put in some claim to it. Finally, if it
be only held to be a partial wreck rescued by the
captain of the Fitzmaurice, how is the value of the
Needle on which asalvagecan be claimed to be es-
timated ? It has been insured, I hear, for two
thousand pounds, but cargoes are frequently in-
sured far beneath their real value. It has been
spoken of as a priceless relic." Suppose the cap-
tain of the Fitzmaurice were to appraise a priceless
relic" at 1,000,000, and demand ten per cent
thereupon ?
Wht a state of things to render such an order
as the following requisite :-
WASHINGTON, Nov. 3.-Secretary McCrary has
issued an order forbidding employees of the War
Department to partake of any spirituous liquors
between 9 a. m, and 4 p.m. under penalty of dis-
missal.

A Telegraph Office has been opened at Cunard's
Wharf, Halifax, from whence telegrams can be
sent immediately on a steamer's arrival there to any
port in the world-except Bermuda which is left out
in the cold.
The Mail Steamer Canima," due yesterday from
.New York, was not signaled up to sunset last evening.

BIRTH, at Harmony Cottage, Warwick Parish, on
21st instant, MRS. JAMES E. WHITNEY of a SON.
........., on 24th October, at Laurel Cottage, Chat-
ham, the WIFE of Lieut. Matheson, Royal Engineers,
of a DAUGHTER.


.........., Octr 30th, at 154 Hoxton Street, London, N.,
the WIFE of C. J. Stansby, R.N., of a DAUGHTER.

DIED, at Ireland Island, on Wednesday, the 14th
instant, after 2 days illness, MR. JOHN THOMAS CANN,
aged 50 years and 5 months, leaving a number of re-
latives and friends to lament their loss.-His end was
peace.
.......... in this Town, on Saturday 24th inst., MARY,
infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Lightbourn,
aged 2 months and 21 days.

/NO rTICE.

ANY Person wishing to obtain a
good and serviceable


H HORSE,
for any particular purpose is invited to call at
the Ollice of the Undersigned and furnish Mr.
E. MORRIS (who goes by Canima" on
Thursday next) with a full description of the
lHorse required, ard such a Horse will be
brought (own subject on arrival to the ap-
proval of the party wanting him.
B. W. WALKER & CO,
Ilamilton, Nov. 26, 1877.

Lost,

A 5 E ,
For which the Finder will he paid One Pound
Sterling, on delivering it at the Royal Gazette"
Stationery Store.
P.S.-Recollections of this Pipe are sacred.
November 27th, 1877,


ftrItUtt e* le. Bargains! Bargains!!

TIRE SILE OF LAST DAYq

HOUSE 0L FRN ITl!, Auction Sale of GOODS,
pe, At the Store lately occupied by

Of MAJ. WILKINSON, D.C G., 4
W7ILL B O On Queen Street,
At 12 o'clock, M.,WILL CONTINUED,
To-morrow, Wednesday, ON


28th Instant,
When the balance unsold on Wed-
nesday last
WILL BE DISPOSED OF,
Amongst which are :-
1 VERY Handsome Solid Black Walnut
Marble Top Ladies DRESSING CASE
or Bureau, with large Glass
1 Handsome WASHSTAND, to match
1 Mahogany Chest of DRAWERS
1 Large Gilt and Bronze Metal BEDSTEAD
with Patent Springs, Hair Mattress,
Pillows and Bolster
1 Iron BEDSTEAD and BEDDING
1 Handsome Ladies WARDROBE with Hat
Box
2 Small Work TABLES
1 Easy CHAIR
4 Pairs Green CURTAINS, with Poles
5 Lace Do. Do.
2 Portiere Do. Do.
PICTURES BRACKETS
Table COVERS
2 Garden SEATS Carpenter's TOOLS
&c., &c.
ALSO,
If not previously disposed of,

1 Stylish Brown



6 years old,
The last of Mr. E. Morris's lot.


To-morrow, Wednesday,
28th Instant,
Commencing at 12 o'clock, M.
J. T. DIRRELLL4L CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, Bermuda, Nov. 27th, 1877.

Christmas TREE.

''l IE Ladies of ZION ME'rnoDIsT CHURCH,
llamilton, intend having
e Chrisfmas Tree,


And Thursday,
The 19th and 20th of December.
A variety of Articles, both Useful and Fancy,
suitable for Holiday Presents, will be offered for
Sale. Among these will be found a very Choice
selection of Books. These have come by the
"Sir George F. Seymour," direct from Eng-
land, and have been selected specially for this
occasion and will be sold at most reasonable
prices.
Further particulars at a later date.
lamilton, Nov. 26, 1877.

Notice.

A few Lady Friends of the Order of 0. F.
intend hold a


AND,

IH1 I 1FE MRT niont*s in,-A
Cal E ER. 7 months in At the Odd Fellows' Hall,
B. W. W.JLKER CO., In this Town,

Hamilton, November 27th, 1877. Auctioneers. On Wednesday and


Su~ttton *-atr,


WE WILL


SELL,


AT PUBLIC AUCTION,
Under the Wig Shed,
At 12 o'clock,

On Thursday next,
29th Instant,
10 BLS. FLOUR
1 u 25 Barrels Table POTATOES
0 Barrels Choice Garnet Red POTATOES
50 Sugar Cured HAMS
500 Lbs. Clear Butt PORK
10 Drums CODFISH
3 Half Barrels No. 2 MACKEREL
10 Tubs and Kegs BUTTER
12 Dozen Tins Roast BEEF, 2 lbs. each
150 Bushels Heavy black OATS
5 Casks VINEGAR
10 Half Chests Mixed and Congo TEA
2 Washing MACHINES and WRINGERS
ALSO,
S8 0 0 ,
Comprising:-
PRINTS PERCALES GRENADINES
COTTONS FLANNELS HOSIERY
HANDKERCHIEFS Merino SHIRTS
&c., &c.
AND,
A Consignment of

Consisting of:-
50 Dozen TUMBLERS, various patterns
25 do. Filleig GOBLETS
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, Nov. 26th, 1877.


Young Jen's Friendly
Institution.

A Special Meeting of the Members of the
above Institution is earnestly requested
at the LANE S'CHOOL HoOM, on the Evening of
THlURSDAY next, 29th instant, at half past
Seven o'clock.
Business-ELmCTION OF OFFICERS.
CHRISTOPHER SEON,
President.
Hamilton, Nov. 27th, 1877.
P.'.-Should the weather be unfavorable
Meeting will take place on Friday evening., the

The Bermuda Library.

LL Persons are invited to send to the Li-
b Ian u ingtepeetIiontla Li


-L-- brarian during the present Month LiJsts
of BOOKS recomnnended to be added to the
Library, stating, in addition to the correct
Titles of the Books, the number of volumes,
the prices, the names of the persons recom-

mending them, and, when known, the names
of the Publishers.
S. BROWNLOW GRAY,
Honorary Secretary.
November 2nd, 1877.

o An Emergent Meeting of At-
.lantic Phcenix Lodge, No. 224, will
be held this Evening, at 7 o'clock.
Masonic Hall, Ilamilton,
Novr. 27th, 1877.


Thursday,
26th and 27th of December next.
Proceeds in aid of completing the Hall.
Particulars will appear in a future Advertise-
ment.
lamilton, Nov. 26, 1877.


A (ard.

tIfrs. J. N. Jones. ot Boston
IS prepared to Instruct Ladies in the art of
CUTTING by measuree, from Chart, in
general use by Tailors and Dressmakers in
America. Machine STITCHING and Dress
PLAITING done to order. And for Sale a few
of the improved Paris PLXITERS, with in-
structions for use.
Mas. JONES,
At the Residence 0ofJ. C. KEENEY,
Hamilton.
November 2', 1877.-6

'ED EAnberotgneb.
Offers on Accommodating Terms,


OF THE
BRIG T FLEETWOOD),"
8 days from Charlottetown, P. E. Island,
Carefully selected fr this Market and received
in prime order,
1 LS. Seed POTATOES Garnet Red"
Do. 1)O. -- Minnesota"
BIs. Jackson POTATO ES for table
Bls. TURNIPS Sacks OATS
Half Bis. No. 2 MACKEREL
Kits No. 1 DO.
Kits TROUT Half Boxes CODFISH
Tubs and Crocks Choice IIUTTER
Bags OATMEAL Bags Pearl B \RLEY
Bags Seed BARLEY
GEESE, &c., &c.
JOHN F. BURROWS.
Hamilton, Nov. 12, 1877.-2 3p


Apprentice Wanted,
Not younger than 14 years,
To the Blacksmith Business


Apply to


F. W. VOSSMER,
Smithery, Hamilton.


INovember 27, 1877.-2 ;3p


Un clainted -Letters.
W C Buckley, Robert Beddingfield, Jno A Berg,
Robert, Bradley, Mary Buttertield, Mary Jane Bean,
Silveria Coadres Mencebo, Mary A Cloyne, Mrs
James Co., B Carlson, Henry Darrell, Antonio
Jaeintho Frulado, Mrs 8 F Friswell, G A Fager-
burg, John Greenslade, Susan Gibson, W C Hallett,
Jane E Ilarford, Rev KFJunor, John Alingo Jones,
Laura Jones, Mrs John W Kendle, Clara Lloyd,
Francisco Silveira de Mathos, T Oute bridge, Doug-.
las Outerbridge, Mrs W B Peniston, Thomas J
Place, E IL Patersen, Manne! F Perty, Alpheus
Stubbs, Mrs Mary T Smith, Clara Smith, Elizabeth
Swan, Elizabeth Simmons, Mary Jane Stovell,
Richard Simmons, James Smith (North Side),
Rosetta Smith, Thomas 'aylor, George Tunbridge,
John Virgin, Joaquim Veira, Thomas Wilcox,
tharles H Wilkinson.
Post Office, Hamilton, Nov. 26, 1877.

UJNCLAIMED LETTERS IN THE POST OF-
FICE, ST. GEORGE, Novr. 26, 1877.
Isaac Bun, W Been, John R Jackson, Samuel T
Joell, Capt F Lockhast, Mis McLaien, Mrs E Mon.
tague, John S Minor-, Cornelius .Minors, Mrs McKay,
Thomas O'Brien, George Perry, H Johnson, R D
Prudden, Samuel J Richardson, Thomas Hamilton,
Samuel Tucker, Matthias das Urzes,


XT -- I n i -n-


I


I







BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


A RED CRESCENT HOSPITAL SERVICE
ESTABLISHED.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Oct 6.-Miss Nightingale by
her devotion to the wounded in the Crimea, gained
for herself not only the respect and admiration of
both the Christian and Mussulman world, but she
also set an example to her countrywomen of prac-
tical charity that has bad the effect to stir even
noble ladies to an emulation of her good deeds.
Whether it is the pursuit of an honest fame or
innate goodness of heart that inspires Lady Strang-
ford and her fair aids to the sacrifices they make
in this rude land in nursing the wounded soldiers
and in executing the painful duties of hospital ser-
vice, the result is the same. Suffering humanity
is relieved; the pain stricken patient's hopes
revive when he sees an angel form at his bedside,
binding up his bleeding limbs, and a Christian
woman watching over him as tenderly as if he was
one of her own blood. Woman rises in his estima-
tion, and for the first time he recognizes that she is
a helpmate and guardian when prostrated by dis-
ease. I know of nothing that has contributed sc
powerfully to elevate the status of woman in Turkey
as the self-sacrificing philanthropy of Miss Night-
ingale and Lady Strangford, the energy of
character they have displayed, their power of or-
ganization and their high moral courage.
LADY STRANGFORD,-Lady Strangford deserves
the homage of universal humanity. Belonging tc
a rich and noble family of England, enjoying all
the luxuries that fall to such a condition in life,
she leaves her splendid home to organize the Red
Crescent hospital service in this semi-barbarous
land-to follow the armies to battle, to gather up
the deserted wounded, to bear refreshing drink and
nourishment to the famished soldier on the verge
of death from exhaustion and to nurse the suffer-
ing in the fetid atmosphere of the hospital wards,
Her interest in Turkey is the greater from the fact
that her husband was once British Ambassador to
the Porte. She is employed night and day in or-
ganizing medical relief corps, in establishing and
equipping hospitals and in training others for the
care of the wounded. The Red Crescent Society
was founded in England chiefly by her exertions.
It is astonishing what amount of money and hospi.
tal articles it has sent out to Turkey, the ambu-
lances it has built, the many surgeons it has in its
employ and the great number of disciplined agents
it has under its orders.
NOBLE WoRK.-Every steamer from England
brings stores of preserved meats, of liquors, of lint
and material for tQ '-ansport of the wounded, such
as spring beds, am in ces, &c. Every division
of the Turkish army has some of the Red Crescent
personnel with complete field apparatus, stationed
near it when in camp and following it when it
marches to battle. Yesterday six baggage vans of
the Society, with ambulance furnishings went up
to Philopopolis by the Adrianople Railway. Before
she left huie for the seat of hostilities Lady Strang.
ford had hospital accommodations provided at the
royal palaces according to the Red Cross system
and under its superintendence. The palaces of
Beylorhey and Tchirigan, two of the finest imperial
residences on the Bosphorus, are now turned into
hospitals, and they, as well as the great barracks at
Scutari and on the heights of Bellevue, are cram-
med with patients under treatment. The head.
quarters of Lady Strangford are at Adrianople,
where a vast hospital has been prepared, which
now holds within its walls over two thousand.
From this point she is enable to communicate with
the temporary and permanent hospitals in the rear
of the armies and on the line of the roads to the
Balkans and Servia. You can form an idea of the
amount of suffering needing relief when I say that
the battles in the Schipka pass alone furnished over
two thousand patients in two weeks.

THE MAN-EATING TREE OF MADA-
GASCAR.
The following description of this singular tree,
found in the Island of Madagascar, is copied from
the New York World. It was originally published
in the last Graefe and Walther's Magazine of Carls-
rube, together with notes upon it by Dr. Omelius
Fredlowski, to whom the letter by Carl Leche, the
discoverer, from which the following is extracted,
was addressed :-The Mkodos are a very primitive
race, going entirely naked, having only faint ves-
tiges of tiibal relations, and no religion beyond
that of the awful reverence which they pay to the
sacred tree. They dwell entirely in caves hollowed
out of the limestone rocks in their hills, and are one
of the smallest of races, the men seldom exceeding
56 inches in height. At the bottom of a valley (I
had no barometer, but should think it not over 400
feet above the level of the sea) and near its eastern
extremity, we came to a deep, tarn-like lake, about
a mile in diameter, the sluggish waters of which
overflowed into a tortuous reedy canal that went
unwillingly into the recesses of a black forest, jun-
gle below, palm above. A path diverging from
its southern side struck boldly for the heart of the
forbidding and seemly impenetrable forest. Hen-
rick led the way along thbispath. I followed closely,
and behind me a curious rabble of Mkodos men,
women, and children. Suddenly all the natives
began to cry "Tepe! Tepe,!" and Hendrick, stop-
ping short, said "Look !" The sluggish, canal-
like stream here wound slowly by, and in a bare
spot in its bend was the most singular of trees. I
have called it the Crinoda because when its leaves
are in action it bears a striking resemblance to that
well-known fossil the crinoid lilystone, or St. Cuth-
bert's beads. It is now at rest, however, I will try
to describe it to you. If you can imagine a pine-
apple eight feet high and thick in proportion rest-
ing upon its base, and denuded of leaves, you will


have a good idea of the trunk of the tree, which,
however, was not the color of anana, but a dark,
dingy brown, and apparently bard as iron. From
the apex of this trurcated cone (at least two feet in
diameter) eight leaves hung sheer to the ground,
like doors slung back on their hinges. These leaves,
which were joined at the top of the tree at regular
intervals, where about eleven or twelve feet long,
and shaped very much like the American aguave or
century plant. They were two feet through in their
thickest part, and three feet wide, tapering to a
sharp point that looked like a cow's horn, very con-
vex on the outer (but now under) surface, and on
the inner (now upper) surface slightly concave.
This concave face was thickly set with very strong
thorny books, like those upon the head of the teazle.
These leaves, hanging thus limp and lifeless, dead
green in color, had in appearance the massive
strength of oak fibre. The apex of the cone was a
round, white, concave figure like a smaller plate set
within a larger one. This was not a flower but a
receptable, and there exuded into it a clear, treacly
liquid, honey sweet, and possessed of violent intox-
icating and soporific properties. From underneath
the rim, so to speak, of the undermost plate a series
of long, hairy, green tendrils stretched in every di.
reaction towards the horizon. These were seven or
eight feet long each, and tapered from four inches
to half-inch in diameter, yet they stretched out
stiffly as iron rods. Above these (Irom between the
upper and under cup) six white, almost transparent,
palpi reared themselves towards the sky, twirling
and twisting with a marvellous incessant motion,
yet constantly reaching upward. Thin as reeds
and frail as quills apparently, they were yet five or
six feet tall, and were so constantly and vigorously
in motion, with such a subtle, sinuous, silent throb-
bing against the air, that they made me shudder in
spite of myself with their suggestion of serpants
flayed, yet dancing on their tails. The description
1 am giving you now is partly made up from a sub-
sequent careful inspection of the plant.


i My observations on this occasion were sud-
denly interruptedby the natives, who had been
shrieking around the tree in their shrill voice
and chanting what Henrick told me were
propitiatory bymns to the great tree devil.
With still wilder shrieks and chants they
surrounded one of the women, and urged her
with the points of their javelins, until slowly and
with despairing face, she climbed up the stalk of
the tree, and stood on the summit of the cone, the
palpi twirling all about her. 'tTisk! Tish!"
("drink! drink !) cried the men, and stooping she
drank of the viscid fluid in the cup, rising instantly
again with wild frenzy in her face, and convulsive
cholera in her limbs. But she did not jump down
as she seemed to intend to do. Oh no The atro-
cious canibal! that had been so inert and dead came
to sudden, savage life. The slender delicate palpi,
with the fury of starved serpants, quivered a mo-
ment over her head, then, as if by instinct with
demoniac intelligence, fastened upon her in sudden
coils round and round her neck and arms; then
while her awful screams and yet more awful
laughter rose wilder, to be instantly strangled
down again into a gurgling moan, the tendrils, one
after another, like great green serpents, with brutal
energy and infernal rapidity rose, retracted them-
selves, and wrapped her about in fold after fold,
ever tightening with the cruel swiftness and savage
tenacity of anacondas fastening upon their prey.
It was the barbarity of the lacoon without its beauty
-this strange horrible murder. And now the
great leaves rose slowly and stiffly like the arms of
a derrick, erected themselves in the air approaching
one another, and closed about the dead and ham-
pered victim with the silent force of an hydraulic
press and the ruthless purpose of a thumbscrew.
A moment more, and while I could see the bases
of these great levers pressing more tightly towards
each other, from their interstices there trinkled
down the stalk streams of the viscid honey-like
fluid, mingled horribly with the blood and oozing
viscera of the victim. At the sight of this the sav-
age hordes around me, yelling madly, bounded for-
ward, crowded to the tree, clasped it, and with
cups, leaves, hands, and tongues got each one
enough of the liquor to send him mad and frantic.
Then ensued a grotesque and indiscribably hideous
orgy, from which, even while its convulsive mad-
ness was turning rapidly into delirium and insen-
sibility, Henrick dragged me hurriedly away into
the recesses cf the forest, hiding me from the dan-
gerous brutes and the brutes from me. May I never
see such a sight again The indiscribable rapidity
and energy of its movements may be inferred from
the fact that I saw a smaller one seize, capture and
destroy an active little lemur which, dropping by
accident upon it while watching and grinning at
me, in vain endeavored to escape from the fatal
coils. With Henrick's assistance and the consent
of some of the head men of the Mkodos (who, how-
ever, did not dare to stay to witness the act of sac-
rilege) I cut down one of the minor trees and dis-
sected it carefully.-Publc Opinion.

THE FATE OF FRANKLIN.
Organized search in the Arctic regions for traces
of Sir John Franklin's expedition has done very
little towards dispelling the uncertainty connected
with the fate of that gallant explorer and his fol-
lowers. The most important discovery was made
by Capt. McClintock eighteen years ago, in the
Western part of King William's Land. A paper
recording the death of Franklyn and twenty-three
of his men, and a boat with two bleached skeletons
besides it were sad evidences that all had perished,
but in what manner, or in what exact locality, re-
mained a theme for conjecture. At length, how-
ever, light dawns unexpectedly upon the mystery,
and there is a probability, already eagerly bailed,
that some details of the expedition may become
known.
The barque A. Houghton sailed from New Bed-
ford in the summer of 1876 on a wailing cruise,
and, entering Hudson's Bay, proceeded northward
till in the early fall she reached a place a few miles
south of Cape Inglefield. At this season the ice
floes began to surround the vessel, and it was deter-
mined to lay her up for the winter at Marble Is-
land. In the course of the winter a party of Es-
quimaux, nearly two hundred in number, came
from the Nachilli settlement near Cape Inglefield
and made quite a village of snow huts in the
neighbourhood of the vessel, the second mate of
which, Mr. Thomas Barry, was able to converse
with them, having learned to speak their language
fluently during his previous voyages to the North.
They were entirely harmless and very friendly, and
while mingling familiarly with the crew of the
whaleship, they told Mr. Barry about a party of
white men who had come among them many years
before-how long ago they could not tell, al-
though two old men of the tribe distinctly re-
membered and described the appearance of the
strangers, particularly one large man whom they
called the great chief from the obedience and res-
pect paid to him by the other white men, some of
whom they supposed held positions of command
from the fact that they wore colored stripes on their
arms and shoulders. The winter following the ar-
rival of those white men was one of unusual sever-
Sity. Game entirely failed. Many of the natives
' died, inured though they were to the rigors of the
climate and scarcity of food. All were reduced to
the miserable necessity of eating raw sealskin
which, of course, could not sustain life in the white
men, and one by one they succumbed to cold and
hunger till before the opening of spring all had
perished. The Esquimaux wrapped the bodies in
skins and buried them beneath small heaps of


stones near the settlement, but the books, journals
and some utensils of the strangers were gathered
and carefully deposited in a cairn which had been
built for that purpose, and which was ever after-
wards regarded with a kind of sacred awe, no one
daring to open the mound or disturb its contents.
Some articles belonging to the explorers, however,
had been retained by the Exquimaux, and of these,
Mr. Barry succeeded in obtaining three large silver
spoons, undoubtedly the property of the expedition,
as one of them bore the Franklyn crest-a fish's
head surrounded by a wreath. This spoon Mr.
Barry has brought with him to New York; the
others engraved with letters which could not be
made out he presented to the American Consul at
St. John's, Newfoundland, at which place he
landed on his way home. The Esquimaux offered
to conduct the whaler's crew to the Nachilli set-
tlement and to show them the mound, but as the
distance was nearly one thousand miles, it was not
possible to undertake the journey.
This interesting discovery, it is hoped, will lead
to renewed search, from which more definite re-
sults may be confidently expected. Messrs. Mor-
rison andBrown of New York, the agents who fit-
ted out the Polaris, have already proposed to send
out a vessel next spring, under the charge of Mr.
Barry, for the recovery of those buried records of
the Franklyn expedition.


Theodore Outerbridge,

HAMILTON.


Reid Street, West of "Royal Gazette" Office.
Office Hours-10 to 12 and I to 4.
Will Visit St. Georges, Tuesdays and Fri-
days.
Orders Promptly Attended to.
Hamilton, October 26th, 1876.


Chimney


Sweeping.


T H E Undersigned having re-
ceived a Patent CHIMNEY SWEEP-
ING MACHINE from New York, is prepared
to

Sweep Chimneys
At Moderate Rates in any part of the Island.
GEORGE OAKLEY.
Hamilton, April 2nd, 1877.

W. 0. F. BASCOME, M.D.,
F.A.A., D.S.,
REID STREET, HAMILTON.
EAST END.


"Eau" of Dr. H oltz for
HAIR DYE.

fItlIS WATER is of an entirely vegetable
composition, and its use is quite inof-
fensive.
Thanks to this peculiar quality which gives it
no rival, DR. IIOLTZ'S Hair Dye has not the
disadvantage of the other preparations which
give to the hair anr unnaturally vulgar color.
Guided by his medical knowledge and his
great chemical experiences, D). HOLTZ has
succeeded in the discovery of plants, which give
the richest balsamic dyeing and curative essen-
ces, and it is by this study that he succeeded to
compound a dye which may be styled as the
Regenerator by excellence of the chevelure.
G GENERAL WAREHOUSE, IN PAals,
La Correspondance Parisienne,
4 Rue de la Tacherie, 4.

Notice.

A LL Persons having DEVIANDS against the
SEstate of the late MRS. ADRIA ANNA-
GILBERT HILL, of Hamilton Parish, are re-
quested to forward the same to either of the
Undersigned on or before the 31st day of Decem-
ber next; and all Persons Indebted to the said
Estate will please make payment by th:it time.
A. B. HILL,
WILLIAM W ITNIrNY,
T. A. OUTER B3RIDI)E,
Executors.
November 5, 1877.



BULL'S HEAD LIVERY
STABLE I.

DANIEL G. LANE Proprietor.
HAMILTON.

Branch Establishment, St. George.

T HE Proprietor of the above Fs-
tablishment having just returned vy the
" C'anima" from New York, and brought with
him a number of N i,',V CARl[AGES and
Stylish YO UNG li ORI S ,S to add to his already
well selected Stock, hegs to thank the Public ot
Bermuda generally for their p.ist Patronage and
hopes for a continuance cf the same.
Strangers visiting the Islands are particularly
requested to call and give the above Establish-
ment a trial before going elsewhere.
Hamilton, Sept. 19Uth, 1876.

Empty Flour Barrels.

.500
For sale by


St. Georges,


ALBERT
April 12 1877.


ING4LIS.


Notice of Removal.


Mr. Alfred Jordan,
Dentist,
Has Removed to St. Ueorges,
And may be consulted there in Kent St.,
daily, between 9 a.m. and 5 o'clock.
October 10, 1876.

TO WIN G


BY THE PROPELLER
C. F. Jckermann,


I. LUCREINBACH.


Apply to


J. S. DARRELL,
W. C. HYLAND & CO.


St. George, Sept. 25th, 1877.-2m
P'rolfcCtion amail.vl F t1M
AT THE MOST MODERATE RATES
Can be obtained fro.n the
PHOENIX INSURANCE CO P'A N Y
of London,
One of the longest Established and Wealthiest
Offices in Great Britain.

Through the BIRANCH OFFICE in these
Islands, a Saving is effected to the Insured
of the Stamp Duty, a very considerable item.
RISKS taken both on REAL and PERSONAL
I'ROPIERTY for 3, 6 or 12 months.
No FEES and no CHARGE for Policies.
N. A. BUTTERFIELD,
Agent.
Hamilton, September 9th, 1865.

For Rent,


In the Town of Hamilton,
SA Furnished Two Story
Dwellintg HOUs.
Apply at the Royal Gazette" Office,
Hamilton, Sept. 25th 1877.


SW O. F. BASCOME,
1 M.D.,
DENTIST,
REID STREET, HAMILTON, EAST,
Has Received a supply of the fol-
lowing

FOR THE TEETH
Put up by the well known Dentists Messrs. GA-
BIIEL, Ludgate Hill, London.
SEDADENT, or Cure for Toothache
CORALITE TOOTH PASTE, for Cleansing
and Improving the Teeth
ROYAL DENTIFRICE, gives the Teeth a
pearl-like whiteness
WHITE GUTTA PERCHA ENAMEL, for
Stopping decayed Teeth
OSTEO-ENAMEL STOPPING, warranted to
remain white and firm as the Tooth itself
ODONTALGIQUE ELIXIR, celebrated
Mouth Wash.
Hamilton, March 26th, 1877.


4 8 N

















o1-]I



Th Standardiof
W.44orl4
o '-P









z



14O^









The Standard of
the World.


Adapted to


SCALES.
the Standa'.d of all Nations, Packed
ready for Shipping.


World's Fair, London 1851
World's Fair, New York 1853
World's Fair, Paris 1867
World's Fair, Vienna 1873
World's Fair, Santiago, (Chili) 1875
World's Fair, Philadelphia 1876
World's Fair, Sydney, Australia, 1877
IHANCOCK'S INSPIRATORS
The best Feeder known for Stationary, Marine,
and Locomotive Boilers, &c.,) also
Oscillating Pump Co.'s Pump.
FAIRBANK'S & CO., N. Y.
October 16th, 1877.-6m


BRONZE MEDAL AT THE
Universal Exhibition of Paris 1855,
Bronze Medal at tho Exhibition of Tries te, 1871,
Silver Medal at the Exhibition of Havre, 1868,
Silver Medal at the Exhibition of Paris, 1872,
Gold Medal at the Exhibition of Lyons, 1872,
Diploma or honor at the Maritime Exhibition, Pa-
ris, 1875.
RIGOLLOT'S
M USTA1RD PAPER
FOR SINAPISMS OR PLASTERS,
Adopted by the Hospitals of Paris, Field
and Military Hospital, by the
English Royal Navy and
the French National
Navy, &c.
To retain the whole of the properties of Mustard
in its powdered state and to obtain easily in a few
moments a decided result with the smallest possible
quantity of the remedy, are the problems which M.
Rigollot has solved in the most conclusive and sa.
tisfactory manner. Rigollot's Sinapism in leaves
will, therefore, be found in every family, for the
prompt action obtained by it in many cases of emer.
agency renders it an invaluable remedy for various
disorders.
(Signed) A. BOUCHARDAT.
Annuaireth6rapentique ann6e 1868, p. 204.
IMPORTANT NOTICE.
The precious quality of Rigollot's Paper in cases
of great gravity, is that of acting very rapidly. It is
in important Healing Agent. To children, weak,
and nervous persons, I strongly recommend the fol-
lhwing method of graduating the action of the plas-
ter according to the will or condition of the patients
viz., to put one, two, or three leaves of wet blot,
ing paper between the Sinapism and the skin.
An old piece of fine linen may also be employed
instead of blotting paper.
Beware of Imitations.
MANUFACTORY AND WAREHOUSE, AVENUE VICTORIA,
24 PARIs,-and by all respectable chemists.


I Have on hand a variety of Gold
and Silver WATCHES to suit the most
stidious in prices, from 30/ to 30.
Call and see for yourselves.


E. T. CHILD.


.J. XND V. AMT iNON%'S

PERFUMERY,
celebrated for nearly a century past, is of the very
best English manufacture. For its purity and great
excellence it has obtained the following
EXHIBITION PRIZE MEDALS,
LONDON, 1862. PARIS, 1867. CORDOVA, 187g.
LIMA, 1872. VIENNA, 1873.
PHILADELPHIA, 1$76.
ATKINSON'S CHOICE PERFUMES
For the Handkerchief,
White Rose, Frangipanne, Ylang Ylang, Stephano.
tis, Opopanax, Jockey Club, Ess. Bouquet
Trevol, Magnolia, Jasmin, Wood Vio-
let. And all other odours, of the
finest quality only.
Atkinson's Florida Water
A most fragrant Perfume, distilled from the choicest
Exotics.
ATKINSON'S QUININE HAIR LOTION.
A very refreshing Wash which stimulates the skin
to a healthy action and promotes the growth of the
hair.
ATKINSON'S "
ETHEREAL ESSENCE OF LAVENDER.
A powerful Perfume distilled from the finest flowers.
ATKINSON'S QUININE TOOTH POWDER
VIOLET POWDER, MACASSAR OIL, GLY-
CERINE GREAM,
And other specialities and general articles of Per-
fumery may be obtained of all dealers throughout
the World, and of the Manufacturers
;. & E. ATX I NaON7,
S24, OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, W.
PRICE LIST FREE ON APPLICATION.
CAUTION.-Mesrss. J. & E. ATKINSON mann.
facture their articles of one and the best quality only
Purchasers are cautioned to avoid counterfeits by
observing that each article is labelled with the Firm
Trade Mark, "a White Rose on a Golden Lyre,"
printed in seven colours.
ESTABLISHED 1799.

IIMMEL'S CHOICE PERFUMERY patron-
ised by all the world.
RIMMEL'S I-ILANG. IHLANG, VANDA, HEN'A, JOCKEY
CLUB, FRANGIPANE and other Perfumes of exquisite
fragrance.
RIMMEL'S LAVENDER WATER distille from Mie.o
'ham Flowers.
RIMMEL'S TOILET VINEGAR, celebrated for its
.iseful and sanitary properties.
RIMMEL's EXTRACT OF LIKE JUIo AVO GLYCEI.
RINE, the best preparation for the Hair especially
in warm climates.
RIMMEL'S DUGONU OIL SOAP, perfumed with Aus.
tralian Educatusly
RIMMEL'S GLYCERINE HONEY, WINDSOR, and
other Toilet Soaps.
RIAMEL'S ROSE WATER, COSTUME AND FLORAL
CRACKERS, very amusing for Balls and Parties.
RIMMEL'S VIOLET, RosE LEAF, RICE, and other
Toilet Powders.
A Liberal allowance to Shippers.
EUGENE RIMMEL, Perfumer to II R li the Prin-
cess of Wales, 96 Strand ; 118 Regent
Street, and 24 Cornhill, London; 16
Boulevard des Italiens, Paris; and 27
King's Road, Brighton.
Sold by all Perfumery Venders.


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SOLID and Plated Silver Ware
in endless variety and pattern from best
Manufacturers at E. T. Cl1ILD'S.-4*

a1LM3ld.ICK-NOVR., DECR., 1877.


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5 54


REMARKS.



Lt. Qr., 5h 46m pm


St. Andrew Eng.
[MI. 13th inst. duo
1st in Advent


TIE BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE is published
every Tuesday by DONALD M'PHER LEE,
Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent
Majesty,
AT HIS OFFICE,
North-west Corner of Reid and Burnaby Streets,
Hamilton,
where Blanks, Hand-bills, &c., will be
printed at the shortest notice.-Agent
at St. Georges for the Royal Gazettle,
JAMES THIES, Esqr., Post Master General.




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