Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00135
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00135
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text










BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


No. 29,-Vol. L. STATE SUPER VIAS ANTIQUAS. 24s per Ann


Iffailton, Bermnida, Tresvfy, -~iuly1 7, I S77.
M iguagI u m "- .


Lectures.


T HE REV. DR. FOGGO will give
three LECTURES on 1I]AKSI'EARE,
on the Evenings of
Thursday, July 19th,
July 26th and august 2nd,
At 8 o'clock,
In the Building of C. H. Robinson,
Esqr.,
Entrance on Reid Street, East of Tower Store.
Subjects,
1. Shakspeate, Life and Writings
2. Tragedy in Shakspeare
3. Comedy in Shakspeare
Tickets for the Course, in the Seats Reserved
5/.
Single Ticket 1/6.
To be had at the Stationary Store adjoining
"Royal Gazette" Office.
Proceeds to be devoted to Religious and Chari-
table objects.
July 9, 1877.

Immense Attraction!!
Unlimited Success! !

The Paget and Warwick Choral
Society.
THE abovementioned Society re-
spectfully desires to acquaint their Pa-
trons of their intention to Repeat the Suc-
cessful Grand Vocal Instrumental and
Literary Entertainment,
Of July 5th,
Together with three Grand Representations
of the Coronation, Enthroning and Brittania
with Tableaux.
3t the Town Hall, Hamilton,
On the -Evn'g otf Ie *Ber-
muda Hunt Races,
Probably the 20tli of July
Patronage respectfully Solicited.
Doors open at 71 P.M. Performance 8
Sharp.
For further Particulars see Programmes.
T. R. DARRELL,
P. W. C. S. A.
July 10th, 1877.

Final Notice.
EFRRHING to my Advertisement, April
16th, 1877, in the Ioyal Gazette," I
now give Notice to all who have not Settled
their ACCOUNTS and who do not at once come
forward and do so, that they will be placed in
legal hands for Collection.
T. H. PITT.
Hamilton, July 9th, 1877.-2*


Notice of Removal.

T H E Undersigned begs to inform
his Patrons and the Public generally that
he has removed his
Carriage andI Harness
ESTABLISHMENT
from his old Stand in Reid Street, to FRONT
STREET, over the Store of 1H. R. HUNT,
Esqr.
CARRIAGES Painted and Trimmed in all
the latest Styles. FURNITURE Upho'stered
and MATTRESSES made.
All Orders sent to the above Establishment
will be executed with neatness and deslatch.
C. W. GdQUATLETT.
Front Street, Hamilton, June 25, 1877.
Required at 1H. J1. Dock-
yard
IMMEDIATELY,
3 Shipwrights,
Wages 7/6 per diem,
Steady employment for two months ensured.
None but good workmen need apply.
Application to be made at Master Shipwright's
Office, Dockyard.
23rd June, 1677.


For London,
To Return Direct.

The Barque
Sir. G. 1 Seymour,
IIENTY J. WATLINGTON, Master,
Will Sail for the above Port,
On or about the 18th Inst.
For Freight or Pagsnge,
Application to be made to
J. H. TRIMINGHAM & SONS,
H.imilten, 2nd July, 1877.-3Agent


Notice.


S't. George's marine
Company.


Slip


A MEETING of the SHAREHOLDERS
of theST. GEO()RGE'S MARINE SIIP
COMPANY is requested at the Company's
Office, St. George's,

On SATURDAY,
'Ihe 21st Instant, at 12 o'clock, Noon,
For the purpose of
Electing Officers for the Ensuing
Year
And any other business that may come before
the Meeting.
By order of the Board of directors.
G TUDOR BOURNE,
Secretary.
St. George'%, 7th July, 1877.-P,

Now Landing,
Ex Brigt. Rover' from Barbados,
100 Bis. Muscovado


10 Casks MOLASSES
50 Bls Sweet POTATOES.
For 'ale by
S. S. INGHAM & CC
July 10th, 1877.*
47 Froit Street,
Under the VICTORIA HOTEL,
3 GREVT ddiD GRAAD
d'-1 1 I -...- -' 1 -


utearanice aaie,
AT THE
Hamilton Clothing Emporium;
CLOTHING for Men
CLOTHING for Youths
CLOTHING for Boys
CLOTHING for Childen
CLOTHING in great Variety
Gentlemen's White SIIRTS-a long variety-
at prices ranging fron 2/0 and 3/I1, up.
wards
Gentlemen's Oxford SHIlRTo, from 4s. up
Men's Workling Stl RTS from 1/12 an] 11/6 up.
The Hamilton Clothing Emporium will repay
every Visitor.
Further Reduction in the prices of Clothing
a' the Emporium.
American Straw HATS are all the rage,- we

are clearing them out at C( st
Engsh Elastic Side BOOTS are selling from
4/6 per pair upward, at the Empoiiumn.
In consequence of a recent Consignment of 10
Cases CLIOTHINGk, II \TS, and BOOTS, ex
"Alpha," and also 3 Cases, I Cask, and 15
Packages, just received per "Reullura," from
London, we have prolonged the Clearance
Sale," and have made a further reduction in
our prices.
The Emporium must be Closed The
Stock must be Cleared !
June 25, 1877.


BERMUDA, Alias
POMIERtS' ISLANDS.
By His Honor Colonel WIL LIA.V1
L. MORRISON, R E., Acting
Governor, Commander-in-Chief,
Vice Admiral and Ordinary, in
and over these Islands, d'c., ,-c.,
Arc.
W I1EREAS ELIZABETH BROWN,
has prayed for Administration, on the
Estate of CHARLES iBROWN, late of St.
Georges Parish, in these Islands, Tavern Keeper
deceased.
This is therefore to give notice, that if any
Person or Persons can shew any just cause why
the said Administration should not be granted
unto the said ELIZABETH BROWN, he,
she, or they, are to file his, her, or their Caveat in
writing, in the Secretary's Office of these Islands
within Fifteen (lays from the publication hereof,
otherwise the said Administration will be granted
accordingly.
JAMES TUCKED?,
Colonial Secretary.
Dated at the Secretary's Office,
this 2nd day of July, 1877.


Teneriffe Onion Seed.

T HE Undersigned has assumed
the Agency of the late MR. JOHN D.
BEfLL'i,
ONION SED
And expects to receive the usual Supply of that
Article in September next.
P arrties whose names have been on Mr.
Bell's List for a considerable period, will please
inform the Undersigned if they wish to continue
their engagements.
List for coming Seatson open at Office of
S. S. INGHAM & CGO.
W. E. TALBOT.
Hamilton, April 14th, 1877,


For Sale.

The Undersigned Offer
The Undermentioned
VIZ,:
lHhds Tie'ces and Barrels
Choice ,S I7( .1 f ,
Sacks CHA",COAL .'
Ex Rover," from Demerara.
ALSO, IN STORE,
B BLS. Family FLOUR,
Bags COIN and BiR \N
Portland & Rosendale CEMENTS


Jnd
Their usual Stock of

For CASil only.
S S. INGHAIM & i
Hamil ton, 26h .Jure, 1877.

C ilm nel y w pi .


Co.


.


T H E Undersigned having re.
JL ceived a Patent ChuII ING M.ACIlNE from New York, is prepared
to


Sweep Chimineys
At Moderate Rates in any put of the Id d,
GEORGE OAKLEY.
Hamilton, \pril 2nd, 1877.

P Boots & Shoes.


NOW OPEN,

A Large Assortmentof Ladies',
Gents'. Misses', Boys'and dChildre,,'s


(f the latest Styfes and cf the best quality,
Suitable for the Season.
All down at bottom Pri-ces for ihe CASH on'y.
JOHN HARNETT.
Hamilton, June 12th, 1877.


For Rent,


And possession given on 1st July,
A very comfortable and convenient two story
a D" 5 l TIfING


Situated in the rear of thu To.wn of Hamilton.
For further particular. ap,,ly to 31I. JAM1ES
WATXI S, on Union Street.
June 19, 1877.

r- ~
That desirable Property in Paget's
Called
<< ,i-F.liiOV,.r
Ima.ed'atc possession given.
For Terms apply to
ANDREW TURNBULL,
(lamilton.
May 1, 1877.

For l-ent,

In the Town of i amilton a, Cuomfrtab)le
--- DjLwelling house,
Situated on the Coiner of Parliament and Dun-
donald Stroots, lately recupied by the Control
Officers.
For Particulars please apply to
T. N. ROBERTS,
Reid Street.
June 25, 1877.

For Sale.
A Fine


Quiet and kind in every respect. Calfjust off.
Sold for no fault whatever.
Further particulars apply at the Store of W.
BLUCK, EsQal, to


J. H.
Hamiiton, June 11, 1877.


M ASTERS.


Empty Flour Barrels,


For sale by
ALBERT INGLIS.
St. Georges, April 12, 1877.


HT


The

Until


[R SWIU
met with an
d by a Sai
Passage
C
Further Not;


Notice.

NG BRIDGE havi
SAccident on the 2.3rd instai
I [oat running foul of
Same,
e for Sail Boats
LOSED)
ce.
P NRES,
Colonial Survey


flamillon, 25!h June, 1877.

Notice.
F IER li tRtING to ou- Advertisk.nient bearing
data 12th March last, we give notice that
our Business
Will be continued until 3Oth Sep.
member next.
Al just Dl I1ANDS against us %uill be p id
on presentation, and we shall feel obliz d to
those INI)ETlED to us, if they will make pay-
n-ent on or before the above .iate.
S. S. INGHAM & CO
Hamilton, June 26, 1877.-4

Notice,

A 1,L Persons found TRES-
ASSING on tie 1vI l- lr:. iLANDS
at Pills' Bay, now under Cultivation by MR.
[ENRY ). SMITH, will be Prosecuted to the
full extent of the Law.
SAMUEL A. MASTERS.
July 9tbh, I,77.-3

Notice.
t LL Persns hivin- j ist )Mc'm" \NilS against
the I'stIte of the lkito WorsQhipfu, JOSEPH
1). EV\N, J.J1'., are requested to forward the
same dressed to the drnd to the care
of B. E. licitrxO, q, on rr-fre 3Ist
day ofJuly instant, and a ll persons N I) lI'-
FD, to the said Estate are hereby notified th'it
their respective A M OUNT- must he paid by the
above menriioned date.
SAMUEL T. WHITE,
WM. t. WItiTTER,
B. F. DICKINSON,
Executors to said Estate.
Ilamilton, Bermuda, Ju!y 3rd, 1877. im

Final Notice.


plERSONS having received their
Accounts to3i st Deer., 176, and not ar-
rangedl, will please era' and do so on or before
FRIDAY, the 20th Inst.
Parties hI vinr Accours against the Under-
sigued w i please rend r same on or before
above date.
DON ALD) AI'PfHEE I EF.
' Royal G.zettO' 01 i-ia i to),
July 3 1-77.

Notice.
A I$L. Persons hKving jest DEi4 "i ) against
the state of I tii \RID T'I'uTT, late
of t.e Parish of St. George eceas, are re-
quested to rendt.r the sa:ne to the Undersigned
on or before the 25th July, next Th,>se IN-
IE[iTlDI';S) to the s.id *state are required to
make Pi'yment by the above date.
RIC[! \R1) GEORGE THOTT,
Surviving Executor.
St. George, 25th June, 1877.

Or /ale.
A new and fashionable



L.aps, Fecuders
Also trinmirned in green leather, is very roowiny
yet light.
Can be seen at
E. ROBI1NSONS,
Harress Establishment,
Under Town liall, liamilton


Iarch 31, 1i77.
PE.', DESK, and I1
Kia VT .


JULY 7, 1877.
ng THlE following ACTS have been passed by
L the Legislature of Bermuda during the
it, present Session, viz.:-
the No. 2-An Act to authorise the Court of
Chancery to appoint Commissioners to ad-
's minister Oaths in Chancery.
(No duration Clause.)
3.-An Act Act to continue the Act No. 22,
of 1866, to amend the Act for preventing
or Injuries and Annoyances on the Public
!0r. "nP _


rtoaws.
(Made perpetual.)
4.-An Act to continue the Marine Engine
Inspection Act 1872.
(Made perpetual.)
5.-An Act to provide for the more convenient
administration of the Extradition Acts 1870
and 1873.
(Operation suspended until' Her Majesty's
allowance has been obtained.)
J4MES TUCKER,
3 Colonial Secretary.

WANTED
100 B]s. Mixed POTATOEr; ,
Apply to
S, S. INGHAM & Co.
i lamiitol Jly 3rd, 1677.*

W. O. F. BASCOME,
M. 1)
D) EN I'Il S'I',
REID) S'TRIET. HAMILTON, EAST,
Has Received a supply of the fol-
lowing
PREP. Il4 TOS.,'S
FOR THE TEETH
Put up by the well known De >itits Messrs. (I -
Si UIE i,1 Ludgate ill ILondn.
SE[DADENT, or Cre for Toothache
CO A LITE TOOTH PASTE, for Cleansing
and Improving the Teethl
ROYAL DENTIFRICE. gives the Teeth a
pet 1-like whiteness
\VIIlT'F GUTTA P'ERCHIA EN\.11EL, for
Stopping decayed Teeth
OST FP(-E1NAMEL STOPPING, warranted to
remain white and firm as the Tooth it-elf
ODON'TALGIQUE ELIXIR celebrated
Mouth Wash.
Hlamilton, March 26th, 1877.



BULL'S HEAD LIVERY
STABLE E S.
DANIEL G. LANE Proprietor.
hIAM IUrLTON:
, Branch Establishment, St. George.

TH P hProprietor of the above Es-
| 'abishment haviZ jtst returned hy the
C ani,.a" fr, m New York, and brought with
hi.n a number of NEWV CARRIAGES and
Stylish Yo0UNG !OhSiSES to add to his already
i e!l selected Stock, lv gs t., thank the Public of
Bermuda generally for their past Patronage and
hopes for a continuance cf the same.
Strangers visiting the Islands are particularly
requested to call and givc the above Establish-
meact a trial before going elsewhere.
1Iamniton, Sept. 19th, 187G.



o im re t Livery


NEAR NAVAL CRICKET FIELD,
E. Crawled ( 1aii Contractor,)
IPROPRIETOR.
lirses and Carriages, (%%ith Experienced Dri-
vers,) obtainable at all hours on accomrnoda-
hing Term-s.
October 24th, 1876.

W. 0, F. BASC0ME, M.D.,
F.A.A., D.g.,
REID STREET, HAMILTroN.
East END.

Wm. James Heney,


BROKER,
AND
Commission .igent,
HAMI'LTON, BERMUI)A.

Wanted,
Oiff@S9 stioess and


For which highest market price's will be paid.
JOHN F. I UlROWS.
laminitu,, 2 -d ApVil, i877.


POCKETi


A Variety of ihe above by the' ISIR, GEORGE
F. SkYMOURf,"

At the Royal Gazettb" Stationery Store.
Hamilton, Jure 26, 1877.


'o be Sold a argai


Copper fIstened,
With IiIN Y-Chain and Anchor Moorings.
Capacity about Seventy round barrels.
Bermuda P'roduce at the highest Market Value
will be taken in payment.
Apply at the Office of this paper.
liat ilto:, May 29th, 1877.


I


COIOPI'07, SPOPoOl17,1r4jl-Q f)-X,%6


D,


1
1
1
1
t


1-1






RERMUTDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


EXTRACT from METEOROLOGICAL OBSER-
VATIONS taken under the direction of the Principal
Medical Officer, Prospect, Bermuda. Above the sea
151 feet.


Date


1877
July10
11
12
13
14
15
16


0.


Wind
9a.m.

fD C


30-061 o'lm
30-188 sw
30-250 s
30-118 s
29-938 sw
29-974 E
30'118, c'lm


Temperature previous
24 hours.


0
83.8,
87-8
S'64
86-1
87-0
86-2
81-2


o
73-8
74-0
72-2
76-2
76-2
66-5
74-5


E;


158-4 (

153-48

156-0)
154-0(
134-5


a 2 Inch.


61-6 0-00
66-2 0-26
66-0 0-17
68.8 0'00
69-0 0-02
60-2 0-82
56-2 0-00
Total 1-27


Hamilton, Juily 17, 1877.

BERMUI IA.

Proceedings of the Legislative
Council.
No. 13.)
Friday, 18th July, 1877.-Pursuant to adjourn-
ment the House met.
Present,-
The Honorable Augustus J. Musson,
William H. Gosling,
James H. Trimingham,
Eugenius Harvey,
Henry Fowler, Receiver General,
', Joseph H. Harvey,
James Tucker, Colonial Secretary,
George Somers Tucker.
The Senior Member present took the Chair.
The Colonial Secretary with leave withdrew his
motion respecting certain Resolutions which he
gave notice of moving on the third reading of The
Chief Justice's and Attorney General's Salaries'
Bill."
The Bill entitled An Act to provide Salaries for
the Chief Justice and Attorney General," was read
the third time, passed, and ordered to be laid before
His Honor the Acting Governor by the Colonial
Secretary.
Adjourned to Tuesday next, 17th July, at 11-30.

CUSTOM HIOUSE.-HAMILTON.
ENTERED.
July 10-Brigt. Florence, Baynon, London ; goods for
merchants-Agents, N. T. Butterfield & Son.
13-Schr. Annie Florence, Frith, Barbados ; assorted
cargo to B. W. Walker & Co.
CLEARED.
July 10-Schr. Racer, Young, Barbados; 15 barrels
potatoes, 1093 cedar posts, 1 carriage.
11-Swedish Barque Svea, Soderholm, Miramichi,
N. B.
12-Schr, Mary D. Haskell, Carter, Turks' Islands.
CUSTOM HOUSE-ST. GEORGE.
ENTERED.
July 13-R M. Steamer Beta, Shaw, Halifax; Eng-
lish Mail of the 26th ultimo and assorted cargo.-
-Agent, J. M. Hayward.
CLEARED.
July 13-R. M. Steamer Beta, Shaw, St. Thomas;
mails, and 20 bls. and 3 hf.-bls. potatoes, and 3 bxs.
onions.
PASSENGERS ARRIVED.
In the R. Mi. Steamer Beta from Halifax :-Asst.
Commissary General Lilley and servant, Mrs. Austin
Shawe, Miss M. Shawe, Rev. G. F. Johnson, W.M.,
Mr. W. P. Nelmes, Miss Nelmes, Miss M. B. Magoon,
Miss S. M. Rowe, Rev. W. Purvis, W.M., and Mrs.
Prurvis.
In the Annie Florence, Captain and Mrs. J. W.
Harnett.
PASSENGERS SAILED.
In the Racer for Barbados, Mrs. N. S. Vesey and
Miss Vesey, Mr. Daniels and servant.
The Fanny Fern, Lady Milne and Matilda were up
at London for Bermuda on the 23rd June. The L. rM.
to leave on July 10.

OTTAWA, July 2.-Dominion Day was celebrated
here to-day with great success. About 20,000
people visited the city from all points.. The gar-
rison artillery paraded and fired a royal salute.
OTTAWA, July 4.-The outrage by the Zouaves
in hauling down a British flag and hoisting the
Papal flag, on the steamer between this city and
Montreal, continues a matter for general comment.
Pilot Myrarid and one of the crew named Cousi-
nean, were arrested to-day for disobeying the cap-
tain's orders to take down the Papal flag. They
say the Zouaves did not take down the flag, but the
pilot did at the bow of the boat according to con-
tract. The circumstance intensifies the feeling be-
tween parties and great trouble is expected, espec-
ially at Montreal on the 12th of July.
The Ottawa River Navigation Company have,
after investigation, concluded that the Zouaves
were wrong in hoisting the Papal flag on board th 3
steamer, but that the captain was hasty in pulling
it down as he did. They have decided not to allow
party flags to be put on the boats in future.
MONTREAL, July 6.-Sir Hugh Allan has tranr-
ferred three thousand shares of Merchants' Bank
stock to the Bank of Montreal, Banque du Peuple
and the Union Bank.
MONTREAL, July 5.-The steamers Elphinstone
and Rederwater came into collision at Point aun
Tremble, just below this city, yesterday afternoon ;
both were sunk. The former was bound inward
with iron and the latter outward with corn. Both
are large steamers and will be a total loss. Crews
saved.
YAnRMOUTH, N. S. July 5.-Moree, the author of
the incendiary fires, whose conviction was secured
lbyV the services of a Boston detective, has been
sentenced by Judge James to fourteen years in the
Penitentiary. The sentence, though heavy, is
generally approved by the public.
WASHINOTON, July 2.-Secretary Sherman re-
ceived an order from London for $14,000,000 in
four per cent bonds. ie estimates that popular
subscriptions in this country will reach $20,000,000.


They are already known to exceed $8,000,000.
NEw YORK, July 2.-A rumor that members of
the Cabinet were about to retire is false.
San Francisco collected $6000 for St. John. A
lecture by Rev. Dr. Guard on Monday night
added $1000 more.

**CAll HER MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA."-The
military association called the Grand Army of the
Republic--composed of Northern soldiers who were
In the civil war-held its annual meeting or "en-
campment" at Providence, I. I., last week. The
'Cbief, Governor Hartranft, of Pennsylvania, sent
the following telegram to General Grant :-
"GENERAL ULYSSES S. GRANT, care Her M-jesty
Queen Victoria, Buckingham Palace, London:
Your comrades in annual encampment asremrn
b;hd at Providence, R. I., send their heartiest
pt(etings to their old comrade, and desire through
you, to England's Qu en, to thank England for
Grant's reception. "JoHN J. HARTRANFT,
"Commander-in-Chief, G. A. R


THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY AND THE
RECEIVER GENERAL.
We stated in our last issue that the Committee ap-
pointed to enquire and report upon the most ex-
pedient mode of further procedure in the matter re-
lating to the Public Books of Accounts, was to pre-
sent a report on the next day. The Report was
presented accordingly, and is as follows :-" That
as in no former Session of the Legislature, as far
as your Committee has been able to ascertain, after
diligent research, has the House of Assembly ever
proceeded to grant pecuniary appropriations before
the Public Books of Accounts have been laid
upon the Table by the Receiver General in com-
pliance with its direct request, in the opinion of
your Committee it would be inexpedient and
inconsistent with the undeviating practice of this
House to enter upon the consideration of any
further appropriations in the present Session until
this requirement has been complied with."
This Report was, on motion, adopted by the House
-24 against 4-in the face of a Resolution moved
by the Attorney General, as follows :--" That inas-
much as the country must be involved in great
present inconvenience, and ultimately in consider-
able increased expenditure on the Public Roads and
other Public Works, if no appropriations are made
for those Works during the present Session, and in-
asmuch as the Public Service must in other respects
be seriously impeded if the report of the Committee
be adopted, it is not expedient to act on the said
Report."
We fail to perceive what pressure this determina-
tion of the House will have in effecting a compli-
ance on the part of the Receiver General with the
wishes of the House, while incalculable injury will
result from the Public Works generally, particular-
ly the Causeway Bridges, which we are told are in a
most dangerous state, from not being kept in repair.

THE RECENT APPOINTMENTS.-The appointments
mentioned in our Extra Gazette of Friday last,
took every one in the community by surprise as
nothing of the kind was anticipated.
We understand that the Mr. Webster, the gen-
tleman appointed to succeed the Honorable James
Tucker as Colonial Secretary, is from the Colonial
Secretary's Office in Queensland. Whatever may
have been his position there he will find the office
in Bermuda very different, the duties being far
more varied and onerous than anywhere else.
The promotion of the Honorable James Tucker
from the office of Colonial Secretary to that of
Receiver General, is considered doubtlessly by the
Home Government as complimentary to that Gen-
tleman, and such, in a pecuniary point of view, it
may be considered, for the salary of the former is
but 300 per annum, whilst that of the latter is
500. Mr. Tucker has conducted the many
duties of his office in the right way and has con-
sequently earned honor to himself, the good wishes
of the whole community, and the approbation of
the Crown.
We were unsuccessful in our attempt to ascertain,
before the issue of our Extra Gazette of Friday last,
as to where the Honorable Henry Fowler was going.
We soon after ascertained that Mr. Fowler was ap-
pointed to the Office of Colonial Secretary at Be-
lize, Honduras. Not a very desirable place to re-
side in, but the position which he will fill there
will make up for much disagreeableness consequent
on a marshy locality, a high temperature and a
splendid variety of insects. As Colonial Secretary
Mr. Fowler will rank next the Governor, and
will act for him in case of his absence. He will',
also be in the line of promotion. The salary is not
much better than he receives here.

Major-General Sir J. H. Lefroy, K.C.M.G., left
Quebec for England on the 7th inst.
We understand that our new Governor, Briga-
dier-General Sir Robert Laffan, RE., will come
from Halifax in the next trip of the Royal Mail
Steamer Beta. He remains in Halifax this month
with the view to recuperate his health.
his Excellency, we are told, has on board of the
Schooner J. W. Fisher, which left Deal on the 20th
June for Bermuda, among other things, several
pair of pheasants.

BERMUDA HUNT RACES, 20TH JULY.

The following Entries had been received shortly
before three o'clock yesterday afternoon -
The Planters' Stakes-Four entries.
The Bermuda Hunt Cup-Four entries.
A Flat Race for all horses-Seven entries.
The Somers Hurdle Race-Six entries.
The Grand Military Hunt Cup-Four entries.
The Polo Stakes-Four entries.
A Flat Race for horses 15 hands and under-Four
entries.

We publish elsewhere a few lines from our Spe-
cial Sporting Correspondent, to which we would
refer all our readers who wish to back some win-
ners at the Races on the 20th inst.

THE CANIrMA."-A telegram has been received
by the Agents of the Canima here to the effect that
the Canima was undergoing some refitting, and
would leave for Bermuda on the 19th insant. If
the Canima has been on the dock she may be looked
for on Sunday evening, if not then on Monday
morning.
There seems to be no grounds for the report that
three British Ships-of-War passed the West end of


these Islands on Tuesday last going North. We
are reliably informed that on Tuesday last there
were three unknown sail made off from Gibbs' Hill
in the morning, but as it was calm all the forenoon
they did not come close enough to be made out.
In the afternoon a little breeze sprung up, and the
three sail proved to be one ship, supposed to be an
East Indiaman, steering N.W.
What has become of the three Russian Ships-of,
War which left New York some six weeks since for
the presumed purpose of intercepting the steam-
ships engaged in the conveyance of arms from a
Northern U. S. port, for the Turkish Government
to Constantinople ?
The U. S. Ship-of-War Monongahela arrived at
Halifax, N.S., from New London, Conn., on the
4th July, and exchanged salutes with the Citadel
and the Flagship Bellerophon. In consequence of
its being the 4th July the Flagship Bellerophon and
Sloop Argus, and the North German War Ship
Nymphe, then in Halifax Harbour, hoisted the
American Ensign at the Main, in compliment to the
American Ship.

Joseph E, Godfrey, student at Alston College, has
passed the preliminary n7edical examination held on the
13th, 14th. 15th and 16th March, 1877, at the Univer-
sity of Edinburgh. Mr. Godfrey distinguished himself
in pure Mathematics.

It is stated that the Kkedive has agreed to erect
forts at ihe mouths of the Suez Canal, to prevent
any threatened cutting of its banks.
Telegrams from various points on Danube give
particulars of frightful bombardments along the
river. At Rustchuk the German Consulate was
destroyed by 24 shells, the French by three, and
the Austrian riddled. The military hospital in
Jews' quarter received 72. Shells fell everywhere
and no spot can be considered safe. Up to Wed-
nesday the Turksb ad thrown 2000 or 8000 shells
into Giurgevo. However, though the streets here
and there are ploughed up and housesibored through
not more than one house in twenty or thirty is se-.
riously injured at Giurgevo.


From our Special Sporting Correspondent.
From all I hear and all I see, the Hunt Meeting
of 1877 is to be a great success. The enclosure is
now complete, the going is good, horses out in ear-
ly morning and evening too; and I think I've seen
a winner here and there. I've canvassed all my
sporting friend; owners and jockeys all agree that
entries wont be scarce, and I've made a list of those
I think will start for every race. I'll show it to
my friends if they'll call on me at any hour they
name; but mind, the entries are not yet made, so
don't say that I'm a simpleton, for I'm plumping
in the dark.
The Cup for Hunters a mare will win-of that
I'm pretty sure, but I forget the colors that she's
to wear.
The Cup for Sons of Mars will give a pretty race,
and I would back a chestnut nag, but a head or
neck will be all the winner will have to spare.
A Race for little horses on the flat of 15 hands or
less a smartish one will win--a bay I think she is;
so little yet so good.
The prettiest colors in the field will win the
Planters' Race; so turn out smart and trim.
The Polo Stakes a mare will win-I will lay my
all on that; a bay she will be, of that I'm pretty
sure, perhaps a soldier on his little mare.
For the Somers Hurdle Race I've backed a chest-
nut pretty heavily, so hope the rest will stay at
home.
The Race for all horses on the flat will be a good
one, that I know;- and if the Judge cant tell you
which is first how can TALLY HO ?
Hamilton, 14th July, 1877.

From the Whitehall Review, June 23.
THE BRITISH FORCE FOR EGYPT.
We are enabled to give the details of the British
force which, under the command of Lieut.-General
Sir Thomas Steele, is under orders to hold itself in
readiness to proceed to Egypt. The cavalry for the
expedition will consist of only three regiments,
namely, the 8th, 19th and 21st Hussars.
The first troops to land in Egypt will be a brig-
ade of infantry from Malta, consisting of the 42nd
Highlanders, the 71st Highland Light Infantry, the
74th Highlanders, and 101st Bengal Fusiliers.
These corps will be replaced by the 2nd Battalion
23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers, the 69th and 102nd
Regiments, and the 2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade,
all from Gibraltar. These will remain at Malta
until replaced by other troops of the line (not yet
named) from England, and will then move on to
Egypt. A brigade of Guards, consisting of the 2nd
Battalion Grenadiers, 2nd Battalion Coldstreams,
and 1st Battalion Scots Fusiliers, will move direct
from England to Egypt. Colonel De Horsey
(Grenadier Guards) will command the Brigade.
In addition to the above, a force of 5,000 men (all
natives and all Moslems) will be sent to Egypt
from India. This will make the total force as near-
ly as possible 14,000 or 15,000 men.
We understand that it is the full intention of
Her Majesty's Government to apply to Parliament
for a grant on account of the expenses which will
be necessarily incurred in order to protect British
interests in the East, unless some at present unfore-
seen changes should take place in the political situ-
tion. The amount which Parliament will be asked
to vote will, we have reason to believe, be either
5,000,000 or 10,000,000. Whatever the sum
may be, it will, we think, be cheerfully voted, and
Ministers will have the approval of the country
generally in any course which they may find it ne-
cessary to take. WVe Team on undoubted authority
that all the necessary preparations for the despatch
of the British force to Egypt are completed. Those
preparations iiiclu p a camp, which has already been
marked out, so'tahaan English expeditionary force
would find everything ready for its reception in
Egypt.

A new carbine, on the Martini-Henry principle,
has lately been issued for trial; and the reports of
its efficiency received at the Horse Guards are most
satisfactory. The accuracy of firing, especially at
long ranges, has been far above that of the Snider.
The recoil is not complained of; and the sighting is
considered very exact. The War Office therefore
intends issuing the new weapon to all our cavalry
regiments.
It may comfort the public mind to learn that the
army, so far as the fighting part of it is concerned,
is just now in a perfect state of readiness for war.
The Field-Marshal Commanding-in-Chief, when
he visited Aldershot recently, expressed himself well
satisfied with the state of the different arms, all of
which he not only had paraded for his gratifica-
tion, but subjected to a searching scrutiny. Unfor-
tunately, in the Administrative Services all is con-
fusion.
The Medical Department is in as unsatisfactory a
state as can well be imagined; and, owing to con-
tinual interference, the Commissariat and Transport
Services are in a little better condition.
What makes the prospect of any amelioration of
their state the more gloomy is that Parliament ig-
nores the grievances of deparmental officers; and
the Horse Guards will not move in the matter be-
cause the Medical and Commissariat arrangements
are under the War Office. The officers on the staff
of the Field Marshal Commanding-in-Chief have
enough to do without saddling themselves with the
responsibilities properly attaching to others.

LONDON, July 3.-A Paris correspondent says,
referring to MacMahon's order of the day to the
troops on Sunday:-" At last we feel that we are


ruled by a hand that wields the sword. The chief
of the army has appealed to the bayonets, and all
must now return to their duty."
Concerning the despatch of the fleet to Besika
Bay, the supporters of the Government say the Me-
diterranean fleet is for the representation and pro-
tection of B; itish interest and could be nowhere so
properly stationed as in a vicinity where its pres-
ence is most useful. Those who doubt the pacific
declarations of the Government argue from this
movement that the intention is to keep the Russians
out of Constantinople by force if necessary.
The House of Commons sat from four o'clock
yesterday afternoon to 7 o'clock this morning, chief-
ly in Commitee on Supply. There were eighteen
purely obstructive divisions and severalattempts to
count cut. Concern is expressed lest such pro-
ceedings which greatly impeded business during
several sessions, may lead to alterations of debate
curtailing privileges of members.

A Haligonian in Boston writes as follows con-
cerning the action of that city ; in reference to the
New Brunswick fire.
"While my heart beats with pride at the noble
manner in which Halifax came to the front with aid
for her sister city, I feel more than proud of Boston,
for while the wires were telling the world that St.
John was burning, they were also conveying from
Boston to the burning city Mayor Prince's mes-
sage. CALL ON BOSTON FOR WHAT YOU WANT!'
When I read that, I felt that although differences
do exist, and hard words are some times used, the
same blood flows through a Yankee's vein as
warms a Briton's heart; and if I need further
proof, I obtained it at the splendid meeting held
in Fanueil Hall. The best reports in the papers
will fail to give you any idea of the enthusiasm
displayed. Deeds are wanted, not words,' was
the expression of one speaker, and his sentiments
were carried out. Others spoke (of our brothers
in r eed) and all went away down in their pockets
for practical sympathy. After all there is more
of the John Bull spirit in a Yankee that we are
always willing to admit."


THE SUEZ CANAL.
Removed though it is from the scenes of conflict
between the Russians and the Turks, the Suez Canal
has been the abundant source of anxiety to the British
Government ever since the war, which is to settle the
Eastern question one way or the other, broke out.
Even now, with certain solemn assurances made by
one of the belligerents, there is doubt in the British
mind on the question of the safety of that important
highway of commerce. The Suez Canal, in its in-
ception laughed at by nearly every Englishman, is
now rightly enough looked upon as an international
road, which must be kept open at any cost. There
are, however, difficulties, and difficulties of great mag-
nitude. The Canal is in Egyptian territory, or in
other words, in Turkish territory. The Russians, at
war with the Turks, might very well send a fleet and
troops to Egypt to operate in the vicinity of the canal;
they might send men-of-war to force their way
through from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean, and
as far as their right to do this goes, there is no doubt
they would be as fully justified in "carrying the war
into Africa" as in directing their armies to enter the
Turkish territory in Asia Minor and in Europe. They
enjoy the right as belligerents and it cannot be denied
them. But their exercise of it would be fatal to the
commerce which finds its way through the canal.
That commerce is carried on chiefly under the British,
French, Dutch, Italian, German and Spanish flags,
and all these countries are interested, in different
degrees, ot course, in maintaining the absolute free-
dom of the navigation. It is Britain which is most
deeply interested, as more than three-fourths of the
tonnage passing through the canal is British ; as
many steamship lines, over a dozen, use it regularly;
as it has become the principal, as well as the shortest,
route to India, that Colonial Empire in the maintain-
ance of which the mother country has ever been ready
to freely expend men and money. The moment warlike
operations on or about the canal begin the traffic
through it must be suspended. To begin with, Tur-
key would probably set torpedoes both in the canal
itself and in the approaches to it; the Russians
might blockade it, or such damage be done to the works
as utterly to prevent the use of the great waterway.
These possibilities have presented themselves forcibly
to the minds of the English statesmen, and the con-
clusion speedily come to was that in one way only
could they be prevented and the free navigation of
the canal kept up uninterrupted. That way was to
notify the belligerent powers that England would
not permit any interference with the navigation of
the canal and would resent any attempt in this direc-
tion by force of arms-in other words, that if the
belligerent parties did not consent to avoid the canal
she would make them keep away.
To this intimation, conveyed in clear and unmis-
takable terms, a reassuring answer has been received
from Russia, the Czar's government announcing its
readiness to coincide with the views of the British
Cabinet and to avoid initiating warlike operations in
Egypt on account of the international character of the
canal. The importance of the interests involved and
the necessity for not disturbing them is acknowledged
by Russia in her pledge to respect them, and whether
it is really this which leads her to yield to the British
demand, or a sense of the unwisdom of going to war
with England at this juncture, is really of little im-
portance. Of course, the pledge may be broken;
circumstances may compel Russia to occupy Egypt
and operate in the Persian Gulf, accepting at the
same time, the consequences of this course, and for
this reason it is right that England should be prepared
to enforce her demands. As it is, she has a couple
of iron-clads guarding the entrances of the canal and
quite capable of holding their own against an enemy
until assistance reaches them.
But while Russia has readily acceded to the request,
it is remarkable that no definite answer has been
obtained from the Porte. The reason is not far to
seek. The same spirit of proud independence which
caused the Divan to contemptuously reject the pro-
posals of the Constantinople conference has induced
it to maintain the position then taken by Turkey and
to refuse the surrender of any rights, however small-
though, in this case, the right in question is no small
one. Turkey is bent on maintaining inviolate every
one of her privileges. This course she cannot pur-
sue very long without, to use a homely expression,
" getting into a mess." She made a sad blunder
when she refused to listen to the powers represented
at the'Conference, and she may be making a much
worse one by not agreeing to neutralize the canal.
It may be part of the Russian policy to induce, by
intrigue, the Porte to close up the canal, knowing
how quickly and severely such an act would be re-
sented by the British, and how destructive of philo-
Turkisb proclivities among Englishmen it would
prove. For the present, however, there is no ap-
parent danger of a closing of the canal, and so far
the British Government is reassured and the great
mercantile class, that which provides the money for
supplies and grumbles freely on every occasion, need
feel no alarm at the idea that the route to India will
be "closed till further notice" by order of Czar or
Sultan.-Nova Scotian, July 9.

SLow POISONING BY ARSENICAL COLOURING.--
Mr. G, Owen Recs, Consulting Physician to Guy's
Hospital, writes :-I have had occasion more than
once to bring cases before the notice of the medical
profession in which severe symptoms were experi-
enced by patients who were being slowly poisoned
with arsenic. This slow poisoning is going on at
present very extensively. In a recent number of
the British Medical Journal I described a sad in-
stance of poisoning by an arsenical colouring mat-
ter contained in the green calico lining of some bed
curtains. For months and months this source of
poison was not discovered, and the symptoms were
treated as those of natural disease. On the remov-


al of the curtains the patients at once recovered their
health. This poisonous lining has been sold, and, I
believe, is still selling, freely, and is, doubtless,
producing severe suffering. There is, however a-
nother source of arsenical poison of which I have
only lately been informed, and against which I
would especially warn your readers. It exists in
the colouring matter of a green muslin, which, I am
told, is much used for ladies' dresses. I am in-
debted to Dr. Debus, the Professor of Chemistry in
our School at Guy's Hospital, for this observation.
He made the examination of the bed curtain lining
above alluded to, and thinking that other green
coloured goods might also contain arsenic, he pur-
chased some muslin of a very beautiful pale green
tint for analysis. It proved to contain upwards of
60 grains of an arsenical compound (Scheele's
green) in every square yard, and this was so
slightly incorporated that it could be dusted out
with great facility. Now, sir, it is not easy to con-
ceive anything more lamentable than this, nor do I
see how the evil can be arrested save by the inter-
ference of Government. Here is a cause for nau-
sea, vomiting, violent headache, imflamation of the
eyes, &c., which can only be removed by stopping
the manufacture of these deleterious fabrics. Our
suspicion should not only be directed to material
of green color, for Dr. Debus informs me that the
beautiful red, scarlet, and mauve colours so much
in use and so justly admired are sometimes conta-
minated with the arsenic used in their preparation,
the metal not being always properly separated.
Imagine, sir, what the atmosphere of a ball-room
must be where these muslin fabrics are worn, and
where the agitation of skirts consequent on dancing
must be constantly discharging arsenical poison.
The pallor and langour so commonly observed in
those who pass through the labours of a London
season are not to be altogether attributed to ill-
ventilated crowded rooms and bad champagne, but
are probably in great part owing to the inhala-
tion of arsenical dust shaken from the clothing of a
number of poisoners, who, though blameless, are
not the less pestilential."


The London Times on the Fishery Commission-The
Wimbledon Team, c.- OTTAWA, July 7.-A cable-
gram from London says the Times has an editorial
article on the Fisheries Commission, in which it says
the Alabama case, in which it was certain that
England would have to pay something, was not well
looked after. It was expressly stated that it was to
be decided on all points by a majority of the arbitra-
tion, but when it was referred the liability of the
United States was not thus easily secured. We
shall have to convince the United States Commis-
sioner, and he may possibly be a little deaf- to
arguments which seem clear enough to others.
We may hope, at any rate, that the case will be de.
cently conducted on our side. No sum could be
asked from the United States other than that to
which we are prepared to maintain our right, that
which we believe the Commissioners would assign if
they judge correctly. There is a possibilitythat they
may choose to save themselves some trouble and
some odium by taking the case half way and split.
ting the difference between what we ask and what
the United State3 offer. There is no reason why
we should ask mere than we are entitled to. It
concerns our honor to give a better example of the
way in which an international law suit should be
conducted on the part of the plaintiff. Compared
with this the result of the Commission is a matter
of indifference. We shall acquiesce in anything
which in some way or other will settle the fishery
questions between the United States and ourselves
and prevent them from being again left open as a
perpetual subject for us to quarrel over.
The Canadian rifle team will arrive at Wimble-
don to-morrow. All well.
The Governor-General will return to Ottawa
from the St. Lawrence about the 21st and on the
25th will probably leave for Manitoba.
180,000 head of cattle were slaughtered in Mon.
real in 1876.
The officers and men of the Garrison at Halifax
have subscribed $564-00 for the St. John sufferers.

CH ARACTER AND HABITS OF THE TURKISH
SOLDIERS.
A correspondent writing from Rustchuk to the
Republique Francaise says :--" Whilst the enemy's
cavalry makes its appearance on the bank of -the
river opposite Rustchuk, as if to defy the cannon
which would certainly crush it, the troops encamped
outside the town harden themselves bv drill and ma-
ncnvring. We found the men in excellent health,
sufficiently equipped, and, above all, well armed.
They were Egyptians, Kurdz, and Circassians, all
brought under the same discipline, and conforming to
it with remarkable military spirit. It is wrong to
suppose that the Turkish soldier does not know how to
fight under the same conditions as the European;
that their troops disband and combat against all the
rules of the art of killing their enemies mathematical-
ly. I have not seen him under fire, but if he then
conducts himself with as much correctness as at drill
I do not see any appreciable difference between him
and an European soldier. The short stature is ex-
ceptional in the Turkish army, and these men, of
Herculean strength, are sober to a fabulous extent.
They do not drink ardent liquor, and rarely touch
meat. I saw some this afternoon taking their meals
beneath their tents. The repast consisted of pilan
(stewed rice) and vegetables. It is difficult to con-
verse with the simple soldier; the officer is less la-
conic, and I learned from one of them a detail which
shows how powerful the sense of duty is among these
men. For eight months the troops have not received
any pay; they are content with their meagre ration
and a little tobacco. What soldier anywhere in the
world, and particularly what ignorant one, would
not murmur at such a state of things? And
yet the Mussulman accepts all without a com-
plaint; on the contrary, the use of the rifle and life
in the country please his warlike imagination, and I
think that the artillerymen leaning on the ramparts,
whom I see from my window, are furious that they
are not permitted to send some shell among the newly
constructed works at Giurgevo."

CONSTANTINOPLE, July 1.-The Porte has pub-
lished the following official despatch.-" The Rus-
sians, defying the rights of humanity, and without
any military necessity, have completely destroyed
the flourishing town of Rustchuk, which is now
nothing but a heap of ruins. They spared neither
mosques, churches, hospitals, nor public buildings.
We hereby make known their acts to the justice
and humanity of Europe."
A monitor from Widdin has sunk a large Rus-
sian steamer which was endeavoring to embark
troops and ammunition near Rahone.
Admiral Hessien Pasha is cruising in Morean
and Ionian Waters with four ironclads watching a
chance for attacking two Russian frigates.
Servia has ordered at Paris accoutrements for
50,000 men, to be delivered in three weeks.

NEwroNDrAND.-We learn from St. Johns that
accounts from the North were favorable, fish plenty
and the bait eagerly taken. From the South the
reports not so favorable, a little better, however,
if anything of last year's at a similar stage. A de-
cided improvement had taken place in the Banks
fishery within the previous three weeks.
The French Man-of-War Reineblanche, belonging
to the Squadron of evolution, has been accidentally
rammed and sunk off Hyeres island (Mediterranean)
by a French ironclad.

From the Whitehall Review.


JOHN BULL TO THE PREMIER.

Never mind, Ben, what the Radical pack,
Howling and yelping to-day in your track,
Wish they could do to your ruin;
The heart of old England is true to you still,
Not a pulse of it beats for the glib "PeoplesWill,"
Who is sadly addicted to Bruin.
Never mind, Ben, though the Daily News raves,
SVile Turkish tyranny! "Poor Christian slaves !"
Bashi-Bazouks and Atrocities!"
Englishmen's eyes are not all of them blind,
Nor have we all "a clear, logical" mind,
Clouding the truth with verbosities.
Never mind, Ben, That they think or they say,
Gnawing their lips in black envy away
At the thought of the terrible Tory;
The cowards who carp at the patriot's fame
Shall receive as their guerdon hereafter the shame,
And yours be the proud meed of glory.
Never mind, Ben, I have no fear of you,
Aye to your Queen and your fatherland true,
In spite of the cries of a faction.
Peace? Why, of course it is all I desire,
Yet to smother yon dangerous Muscovite fire
I'm ready to back you by action.

It is said that a number of Russian merchant
vessels have been sold in New York recently for
fear of capture by Turkish war vessels.
Coal has been discovered in Montserrat, West
Indies. It was about to be tried under the boilers
of one of the Royal Mail Company's Steamers.
There was another heavy storm on the night of
the 2nd inst., over Central and Northern Ohio and
Indiana. Six persons reported killed, 12 seriously
wounded, and several houses demolished.
In the case of a man found with ten bullets in
his head, a Missouri jury decided that he had been
"shot, or met with some bad accident in some
manner not just now known."







BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


FATAL ACCIDENT IN THE ALPS.
M. Henri Cordier, well-known to English moun-
faineers as a prominent member of the French Al-
pine Club, has met with a terrible fate on one of the
glaciers at the base of Mont Pelvoux, in Dauphine.
M. orderr was a cragsman of no mean order, and
some of his expeditions of last year, including the
Sascent of the Aiguille Verte from. the Argentibre
Glacier, of Les Courtes from the Talefre Glacier,
and of several peaks in the Pontresina neighbour-
hood, were made in conjunction with members of
the English Alpine Club. It was M. Cordier's
special ambition to attain the summit of the Meije,
which is almost the only Alpine peak of first-rate
eminence, besides the Aiguille du Dru, and having
failed in his attempt of last year, he betook himself
at the beginning of the presentmonth to the village
of La Bdrarde, which is generally the starting point
for excursions in the range of Mont Pelvoux. One
of his guides was the well-known Jakob Anderegg:
the other is called "Maurer." This season they
had crossed the pass from La Grave, had attacked
the, lofty "Pic sans nom" but had been defeated by
the large amount of recent snow, and on the 7th of
this month had successfully made the great ascent
of the Plaret, which appears to be one of the minor
peaks in the Pelvoux range. They hbad safely de-
scended to the lower glacier, and had just been
lunching among the rocks at the side. The rope
had been cast off, for they were below the region of
concealed crevasses; the guides, were just ad-
justing their knapsacks, while M. Cordier, in ad-
vance, strolled down the glacier. Presently he
reached the top of a steep slope of snow which was
partly undermiroed by the glacier torrent; and on3
of the guides, looking round, was horrified to see
b him preparing to glissade down this slope, and
shouted to warn'him of the danger, But M. Cor-
dier wasso short-sighted that probably he was un-
able to see the torrent below, and he either failed
to hear or disregarded the caution. He was seen
to glide rapidly down, but after he had glissaded a
considerable distance the snow gave way, and he
was precipitated into the furious subglacial torrent
which was here running some eight or 10 feet be-
low the surface. The force of the stream in the
early spring is enormous, and he was whirled along
by the rush of waters far under the ice. The
guides rushed to the spot, ard one of them des-
cended by the aid of a rope into the gulf in which M.
Cordier had disappeared. But his shouts met with
no answer, and so steeply did the torrent descend
through the ice that in a few yards its cavernous
course was lost in darkness. The search was long
continued without success, and it was only in the
evening that Anderegg and Maurer arrived at La
BNrarde with the news of the catastrophe. Next
morning a large body of men, with axes and spades
were sent to the place, and excavated the glacier
to the depth of 12 feet at right angles with the
cleft. At a turn of the channel, about a dozen
yards from the spot where the snow and ice had
given way, the body was discovered, and was with
some difficulty brought to the surface. It bore no
marks of disfigurement, and in the opinion of the
medical men who conducted the official examina-
tion death had been almost instantaneous. The
water had worn the ice smooth, and there were no
rough projections likely to cause mutilation; but
the cruel torrent had seized him in its icy grasp
and beaten the life out of him.
CAUGHT.-Students who have to pass an exam-
ination for which they have not properly prepared
themselves are sometimes apt to seek a means of
supplementing their limited information not con-
.sidered legal by the authorities. At the United
'States Naval A academy at Annapolis, on the occasi-
on of the recent examination, some of the cadets
felt shaky in mathematics. They imagined that if
they could get hold of the examination paper in
advance they would be all right, and accordingly
three of them, having procured false keys, entered
the rooms of the mathematical examiner and stole
a number of copies of the paper. At the same
time, finding their false keys fitted the professor's
wine cellar, they celebrated their success by some-
whgt copious libations, spending the better part of
two nights in punishing the claret. The papers
they had secured in this disgraceful way they pass-
ed on to their immediate associates, intending, of
course, that the secret should be kept sacredly kept,
but some of the other cadets transferred their copies
to still other candidates and before long almost
every one knew what the mathematic paper was.
And then came the denouement; too many cooks
spoilt the broth ; so many cadets were in the secret
that it speedily became public news, and the author-
ities got on the scent, nor was it long before the
whole business was traced up to the triumvirate of
burglars, whose performance in the way of abstract-
ing wine and questions is likely to cost them dear.
THE CAXTON CELEBRATION.
The following account of the opening of the Caxton
celebration is taken Irom our very enterprising con-
temporary the Montreal Star, which publishes a most
inter'etini illustrated account of the event:-
The chair was taken by Principal Dawson. The
President, Mr. B. Moir, Secretary, Mr. Gerald E.
Hart, the speakers of the evening and the invited
guests took seats on the platform. Among them were
Hon. P. J. O. Chanveau, D. Hammond Trumbull,
Hartford, Conn.; Dr. May, of the Educational De-
partment, Ontario; T. White, Jr., Rev. J. F. Steven-
son, Dr. Fenwick, J. R. Dougall, Alderman Green,
and McCord, and many others.
Dr. Dawson opened the proceedings in an eloquent
address in which he epitomized the history of Caxton,
and paid a grand tribute to the man who in the early
times of this country set up a free press. The art of


printing is one to which society in our time owes more
than any other, and the obligations which are due to it
should be openly and freely expressed. He introduced
the Hon. Mr. Chauveau, who spoke in French. Mr.
Chauveau's paper was learned, original, eloquent, and
in some passages pathetic; but it was heard at a dis-
advantage, as, being read from manuscript, the speak-
er was unable to display those oratorical powers which
are his charm. To those who heard his funeral ora-
tion over the body of Garneau, the historian, his ad-
dress last night was a great disappointment. His re-
view on the progress of literature and its development
under the influence of the press was well arranged.
Mr. Thomas White, Jr., addressed the assembly on
the improvement in printing and the development of
the newspaper press, a rich and varied subject.
Mr. White's practical experience fitted him eminent-
ly to deal with the subject and he did it well. lHe
discussed the mechanical features of printing from its
earliest stages to the present day. The more important
portion of his address was wherein he referred to the
effect of combination among printers of the present
day. In his opinion trades' unionism has lowered and
is lowering the standard of typographical excellence
and that the work of the present day is not equal to
that of 30 years ago? Sketching briefly the early
history of journalism in Canada, he concluded with
remarks concerning features of* journalism of the pres-
ent day, sensationalism and interviewing. Mr. White
looks upon these with abhorrence. He concluded :
' With a free press, the bulwark of the people's liber-
ties and the parent of reform, human progress was
safe. The newspaper had become the literature, al-
most the only literature, of the masses, moulding their
opinions and forming their destiny. The responsibili-
ty of such influence could not be overestimated and
every one who was connected in any way with the
press and was permitted, in however small a degree,
to control its influei.ce, might well adopt as his daily
rayer the words uttered the other day by Dean Stan-
ley at a Caxton commemoration in Westminster Ab-
bey, 'Give us, O GOD, the sense of the value of truth,
welcome or unwelcome.'


g To our budget of Foreign and War news,
contained in our Extra Gazette of Friday last, we
have but little to add to-day.

BIRTH, in this Town, on the 12th instant, the WIFE
of Honble. James Tucker, of a DAUGHTER.
MARRIED, at St. Luke s Cathedral, Halifax, N. S.,
on Tuesday, the 3rd July, by the Rt. Rev. the Lord Bish-
op of the Diocese assisted by the Rev. John Abbott, Rec-
tor of St. Luke's, the Rev. Frederick Skinner, of Rose
Blanche, Newfoundland, to Emma Lightbourn, eldest
daughter of the late W. B. Peniston, Esq., M. D., of
Hamilton, Bermuda.--lalifax Morniny Chronicle,
July 4.
.........-HOLDER-STEPHENs.-On the 22nd March,
at the residence of the bride's parents, by the Rev. T.
McNeil, FREDERICK WILLIAM, son of J. M. Holder,
Esqr., H.M.C.S., Freeling, to JULIA MARIA, daughter
of J. R.. Stephens, Esqr., M.D., Kooringa.-South
Australian Advertiser, April 19.

DIED, on the evening of the 10th instant, at his re-
sidence Devonshire. Mr. G. BERESFORf ZUILL, aged 33
years, leaving a widow, father, mother, two sisters and
many other relatives and friends to mourn his early de-
parture.
........., at Somerset, on the 10th inst., from exhaus-
tion caused by Small-pox, MARcus THADDEUS SI-
MONS, only son of Mrs. Jane A. Simons, aged 24 years;
leaving a mother and a number of relatives and friends
to mourn their loss. The deceased was a member of
Benevolent Lodge No. 6, I. 0. G. Samaritans.

BY AUCTION,


On Thursday next,
19th Instant, 11 o'clock,
1 lthe Old Sltatd,
I WILL SELL,
FLOUR CORN BRAN
BACON SHOULDERS
BUTTER FISH SARDINES
PEACHES &c. 5000 CIGARS
Toilet SOAPS in any quantity
White Cedar Water BUCKETS, brass hoops
Two and three hoop American PAILS
Wash TUBS Wash BOARDS
Clothes PINS SATCHELS
Travelling BAGS TRUNKS
Floor CLOTHS CARPETING MATS
Oil Cloth Table COVERING
Window CURTAINS Looking GLASSES
2 WATCHES, &c., &c.
ALSO,
1 CEDAR BEDSTEAD
Centre TABLE
Sewing MACHINE Book SHELF
Printing PRESS, TYPE, &c.
School DESKS and BENCHES
CHAIRS Window SHADES
And a number of other articles which will
be offered at the Sale.
JOHN HARNETT,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, July 17th, 1877.


BY AUCTION, Notice.

ON TH URSDAYTE-N- I
26th Instant, at 12 o'clock, M. 7,, T SWI -b. .....


In Front of the Stores of the Un-
dersigned,
I Superior Carriage


Believed to be quite, sound, warranted to trott
a Mile in 3 minutes.
1 Superior Black HORSE
Good for Carriage or Cart.
Now owned by Antonio Joseph, of Devonshire
Parish.
I Good Farm HORSE.E,
Very true to the Collar.
1 Ladies Riding PONY
Very quiet, does not shy and is afraid of noth-
ing,
1 Small Side SADDLE
Suitable for a child 10 or 12 years old.
And Sundry Goods as will appear in next
Tuesday's Gazette.
B. W. WALKER & CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, July 17th, 1877.

Valuable Property
AT AUCTION.


WILL BE


SOLD,


1. Adl.G IJj UIOPEN
For TRAFFIC of Boats through the Reach.
P. NESS.
Colonial Surveyor.
July 14, 1877.


Bermuda Hunt
1877.


laces,


THESE RACES which are to be held on the
20th instant, on the Prospect Race Course,
Will commence at 12 noon.
An Enclosure has been provided with Mar-
quees and an Awning, from which a good view
of the course can be obtained, for the accom-
modation of the Bermuda Hunt and their
friends. Tickets of admission are Two Shil-
lings each, and can be obtained at either of
the entrances to the enclosure.
Correct Cards, containing the entries, colors
and full particulars, will be obtainable on the
ground. No booths or erections of any des-
cription will be permitted on the W. D. land,
without the written permission of the Honor-
ary Secretary, to whom all applications of this
nature must be made.
H. T. W. ALLATT,
flonorary Secretary.
Prospect Camp, 16th July, 1877.


AT PUBLIC AUCTION, o. I, East Broadway.


On the Premises, at 12 o'clock,

ON TUES DA Y,
31 st instant,
THE VERY VALUABLE

House & Lot,
On Reid Street, owned by Samuel T. White,
Esqr., fronting 46 feet by 96 feet in depth.
This Property is unencumbered, title perfect,
and can be seen at any time on application to
SAMUEL A. MASTERS,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, 16th July, 1877.-3
Gazette only.

2Votice.

E ENDEIRS will be received by
the Subscriber up to


SFor Sale,
Ex. Schr. M. D. Haskell,"
FROM BOSTON,
fRUMiS Extra L-irge CODFISII
11 0 !o. DO-
I Do. DO. (not shredded)
Ills., & Hlf. Bs. A No. 1 MACKlREL
Cases Cooked Corn BEEF
Boxes Labrador i E R It ING
IIalabut FIN B1is.
Choice Sugar Cured I MS
Breakfast BACON
XXXX Family FL')URt
SO \lPS of all descriptions
Choice Gosehen tUl 1' f'E R
Family Mess POR)K in Bis. and Half Bls
Pickled II ERIUilNC in Bis. and IHalf Bls.
CORN, BRAN, OATS, IIAY, POTATOES
TEAS, &c &c. No Blue Class.
Apply to
G. W. CASTNER.


PRELIMINARY -NOTICE. 21? "aiilton,16sth July, 1877.- 2

Tar nan 61 The 1st day of August next, Ba1SS S Ale--Quarts.


I have been favored with instruc-
tions to Sell,
BY PUBLIC AUCTION,
At an early date,
The Household Furniture
And Effects of the
lHonable. Henry Fowler,
Receiver General.
Particulars and date will be given hereafter.
ALSO,
That well known Horse



A thorough Saddle and Draught
Horse and a good charger, perfectly sound and
open to any veterinary inspection.
For further particulars apply to H. Fowler,
or the undersigned.


JOHN HARNETT,
Auctioneer.
1Hamilton, 17th July, 1877.

ICE CREAM ESTIVAL

,THE LADIES of the Methodist
Church Aid Society intend holding an IC E,
CREAM FESTIVAL in the SCHOOL ROOM of
Zion C(hurch, Hlamilton, on
WEDNESDAY, 18th Inst.
Refreshments in abundance.
Doors open at 6'30 p.m.
The Public are cordially invited.
Hamilton. July 14, 1877.

Notice.

Edward i. Susith, Esqr.,
W1HO1 has recently left Bermu-
T da has placed in my hands a Power of
Attorney with instructions to collect all DEBTS'
owing to him, and I hereby notify all Persons
INDEBTED to the said Edward II. Smith
to make PAYMENT to me of their several
Debts on or before the 31st July Instant.
REGINALD GRA Y.
17th July, 1877.-3

Received by the Florence

FROM LONDON,
At the Royal Gazette Stationery
Store.
W WRITING PARCHMENT, various sizes
Programme PENCILS and CARDS
Other CAMR)S-Plain and laying
Scoring S11EETS for Cricket
Cricket BATS and BALLS PORTFOLIOS
Mavor's and Carpenter's SP E LLING
S&e., &te., &c.
Hamilton, July 16th, 1877.


For the Purchase of the Under
mentioned

PROPERTIES,
Belonging to the Estate of the late Richard
Fowle Burrows, Esqr., deceased.
No 1.-DWELLING HOUSE and
about 7 acres of Land in Sandy's Parish occupi-
ed by the late MN. BURROWS up to the time of
his death.
No 2.--D)WELLING HOUSE and
about 4 and I Acres of Land in Sandy's Parish,
now in the occupation of George Bean.
The Subscriber will not bind himself to ac-
cept the highest or any Tender, if in his es-
timation the offers ate unreasonably low.
JOHN F. BURROWS,
Administrator.


I lamilton, 16th July,

NPivw Goondlb


1877.


'17l
I I Jiom Onnlml,4


Consignment per
Seymour,"
Will be sold by the Barrel,


' Sir G. F.

of 3 dozen each,


At 10s. per dozen,
To close Sales.
F. PAINTIN
Burnaby St., '!amilton, Ju'y 16, 1877.
BERMUI)A, Alias
SO'IERS' ISLANDS
By His Honor Colonel WILLIAM
LJ1IWTIE MORRISON, R.E.,
Acting Gove nor, Commrnder-in-
Chiej, Vice Admiral and Ordinary.
in and over these Islands, 4;c., &rc.,
gjc.
V11 VlERE. OTITNIEt, ANGLIMf GIL-
BERT has prayed for Administration
on the Esta'e of DANI E L EPI R 1\I GIl.-
BEi"tl' late of Paget Parish in these Islands, de-


S, -, "--' u ., o it anB ceased.(I
NE W GOODS. Thih is therefore to give nn)t;co, that if any
Person or Persons can shew any just Cause why
From London direct by the Flor- the said Adminimtration should not be granted
9 unto the said OTIINIEL ANGLIM GILBERT
ence and by the Mail Steamer Beta" via he, she, or they are to file his, her, or their C ,ve.
lialifax, at in writing, in the Secretary's Office of these
At the Old Stand of the late THO- Islands within Fifteen days from the publication
Q.1 I hereof, otherwise the said Administration will be
Ti n V-


lus d. UjiiIKn'].r, csqr.,
Opposite tile Cricket Ground,
A well and carefully selected Assortment of


HITS, BOOTS, SHOES, cc.
CHARLES MORGAN.
Somerset, July 17th, 1877.-4

Cottage Wanted.


"'l'11
, IisA o


A COTTAGE wanted to
Rent, in or near the Town of Hamilton.


Apply at the Office of this Paper.
Hamilton, July 17th, 1877.


For Turks Islands,
To Return Direct


The Fast Sailing SCIOONER
't Annie Florence,9
E. MATSON FRTITH, Master,
I ill Sail /or the above Port,

On Monday Next,
23rd Instant,
Affording a good opportunity for a pleasant
trip to and from above place.


t


As Special preparations are being made for
Passengers, a large nu'nb'r can therefore bo.
accommodated.
B. W. WIVLKER c. CO.,


Agents,
v-


Hamilton, July 16th, 1877.


granted accordingly.
JAMES TUCKER,
Colonial Secretary.
Dated at the Secretary's Office,
this 16th day of July, 1877. (
BIERMUI)A, Alias a
SOM ERS' ISL \NDS.
By His Honor Colonel WILLI4 M LAIW.
TII MORRIS ON, R.E., Acting
Governor, Commander-in- Chief,
Vice Admiral and Ordinary in and
over these Islands, &'c., Skc., 8c.
W HERE.AS WILLlDAI JOHNJIDCOCK
has prayed for Adinistration on the
Estate of WILLIAM ,1DCOCK, late of Pem-
broke Parish, in these Islands, Warder, deceased.
This is therefore to give notice, that if any
Person or Persons can shew any just cause why
the said Administration should not be granted
unto the said WILLIAM JOHN ADCOCK
he, she, or they, are to file his, her or their
Caveat in writing in the Secretary's Office of
, these islands within Fifteen days from the
publication hereof, otherwise the said Adminis-
iration will be granted accordingly.
JAMES TUCKER,
Colonial Secretary.
Dated at the Secretary's Office,
this 10th day of July, 1877.

-Notice.


A lL Persons are hereby forbid Crediting my
Wife ELIZ iillrH FOWLER, a wo-
man of colour, on my account, as I will not be
responsible for any debts contracted by her.
JOHN RICHARD FOWLER.
I'embroke Parish,
July 16, 1877, Ipi


Colonial Secretary's office,
JuLy 14, 1877.
HIS HONOR THE ACTING GOVERNOR
J has received from Her Majesty's Princi-
pal Secretary of State for the Colonies the
following Instructions for the guidance of
Pilots in these Island with directions to give
publicity thereto:
"British Pilots are not to pilot Ships of
War for either Belligerent, except in British
Waters, within three miles of the Shore, or to
do more than pilot such Ships into or out of
British Ports or roadsteads when they are not
at the time engaged in any hostile operations,
but Ships of War in distress may always be
piloted out of immediate danger, other than
the danger of immediate or imminent capture."
By His Honor's Command,
JAMES TUCKER,
1 Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Qflice,
JuLY 14, 1877.
HIS HONOR THE ACTING GOVERNOR
has received information from the Right
Honorable the EARL OF CARNARVON, Her Ma-
jesty's Principal Secretary of State for the
Colonies, that Her Majesty has graciously
confirmed and allowed the following Acts of
the Legislature of Bermuda, which were pissed
during the Session of 1876.
By His Honor's Command,
JAMES TUCKER,
1 Colonial Secretary.
1.-An Act for raising a Revenue for the sup-
port of the Government of these Her Majes-
ty's Islands and to appropriate certain'sums
to the discharge of the expenses of Govern-
ment as therein expressed.
2.-An Act to prevent Vexatious Indictments
for certain misdemeanors.
4.-An Act to amend the Law relating to the
Relief of the Poor.
5.-An Act for the punishment of Frauds by
Trustees, Bailees and others.'
6.-An Act for the protection of Churches, and
Churchyards and Places of Worship against
intrusion.
7.-The Seamen's Clothing Act, 1876.
8.-An Act to continue the Act to prevent
danger from the Storage of dangerous com-
modities.
9.-An Act to continue and amend the Act to
encourage the destruction of Crows.
10.-An Act to continue the Act for the secu-
rity of Inhabited Houses.
11.-An Act to continue the Act providing for
the performance of the duties of the Speaker
of the Assembly during his temporary ab-
sence.
12.-An Act to continue the Act providing for
the Public Printing.
13.-An Act to amend the Law relating to
offences against the person.
14.-An Act to continue and amend the Act
providing for a registration of the Causes of
Death.
15.-An Act to amend the Act No. 21, 1869,
relating to the Salaries of the Officers of
the Gaols.
18.-An Act to continue the Acts 'relating to
the Office of Colonial Surveyor, with 'an
amendment.
20.-An Act to continue the Acts regulating
summary proceedings before Justices of the
Peace.
22.-An Act to amend the Law relating to the
election of Parish Vestries and Parish Offi-
cers.
23.-An Act to authorise a certain Sum to' be
paid out of the Treasury in aid of the Im-
provement of the Parsonage House in Paget
Parish.
24.-An Act to make a further grant to the
Board of Education.
26.-An Act for the relief of Trustees and other
persons acting in fiduciary relations and i ith
respect to Trust Estates.
27.-An Act to provide for the better adminis-
tration of the Estates of Insolvent D;'btors.
28.-An Act to transfer the Savings TBanik de-
posits from the Public Treasury to theTrus-
tees of the Savings Bank.: ,
29.-An Act for the abolition of Imprisonment
for Debt, for the Punishnent of Fraudulent
Debtors, and for other purposes. .


Do U


Salt!


salt!


THE UNDERSIG NE D
Offers for Sale, at his Store, :
About 800 Bushels of

Turks' Island Salt,
Cheap for Cash.
A. R. THOMPSON.
Nos. 3 and 5, Queen Street, #lamilton.:...
July 17th, 1877.-3
Bermudian copy twice. ;

Unclaimed Letters.
Peter Butterfield, Samuel Bean, Robt ButterfiilId,
Richard Collier, Captain of C0 Club, G il Curfis,
Wm T Crawford, 0 T Conyers, Louisa Durham, R
H Duerden, M E Davis, Richard T Dill, Mrs Thomas
W Di.1, Nancy Emery, Emily Frith, Manuel deFon-
tes, Mrs S F Friswell, Thos Gould, Angelina Gil-
bert, Richard Gibbons (13ail,-ys Bay), P N Gilbert,
M S Hunt, Samuel A Halstead, Miss Hall, F W
Hawkins, L S Hayward, Elzabeth J Harford, George
E Jones, Jerome Joaquim, Thos Linch, Manuel Jo'e
Machado, J Morris, M ,.raret Mead, Re'v R Miller,
Otto D Nelson, Stowe Outerbridge, Joseplh M Place,
Cec..lia Roberts, N J Robinson, S D Robinson, Jos-
eph W Robinson, J 11 T Robinson, J J Riley, Jae
N Swan, Solomnon J Simons, Aubrey James Saltus
Simuel Simons, (Paget), Ja; Smith, (North Side,)
G Sims, G,orgo B Swan, Julian Tu:kr, Summers
Tuzo, M rs Julius Wood, Richard Wilson (Carpen-
ter.)
Post Office, FHamilton, July 16, 1877.
UNCLAIMED LETTERS IN THE POST OF-
FICE, ST. GEORGE, 13th Ju'y, 1877.
John Bartram, John Burches, George Carter, A
Hughes, Mrs Heller, Perry 0 Johnson, Hel~eta
Keele, .Mrs John Lorane, 11 May. r, Cornelius \ i-
nors, Robt Miller, John S Minors,. WVdliain, Ric- ."ird-
son, Louisa Smith, Aniaudo Swan, M *s "'frey
Tucker, Rolland J Tucker, IR M Thomson A Wil.
inson.


-ILI Utrilluutru Oulue





BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


BHER8UIU A.

Irreceedings of tile Legislative
Council.
Tuesday, 10th July, 1877.-Pursuant to adjourn-
ment the House met.
Present,-
The Honorable Augustus J. Musson,
William H. Gosling,
James H. Trimingham,
4" Eugenins Harvey,
,' Henry Fowler, Receiver General,
Joseph H. Harvey,
James Tucker, Colonial Secretary,
S George Somers Tucker.
The Senior Member present took the Chair.
The Bill entitled "An Act to provide Salaries
for the Chief Justice and Attorney General," was
read the second time.
The House went into Committee thereon.
The Honorable Wm. H. Gosling in the Chair.
The Committee rose.
The Chairman reported the Bill without amend.
ment.
The House resumed and adopted the Report.
The Honorable James H. Trimingham presented
a Petition from William Whitney and Frances
Mary Whitney his wife. praying for Naturalization
of the said Frances Mary Whitney.
The Colonial Secretary gave notice that on the
3rd reading of "The Chief Justice's and Attorney
General's Salaries Bill" he will move certain Reso-
lutions.
Adjourned to Friday next, 18th July, at 11380.

BERMUDA.

Abstract of the Proceedings of the Honorable
House of Assembly.
Wednesday, 11th July.-The Attorney General
moved that the Minutes of the last meeting be
amended by inserting the Resolution offered as Re-
solution No. 4, which was afterwards withdrawn-
which was negatived.
Ayes 6-Messrs J Fowle, S B Gray, E H Gosling,
H G Hunt, S A Harvey, T D Middleton,
Nays 20-Messrs. F M Cooper, R J P Darrell,
N J Darrell, T N Dill, R D Fraser, W J Frith, J
Harnett, J M Hayward, W S Masters, S A Mas-
ters, T A Ouferbridge, S C Outer bridge, J W Pear-
man, T J Pearman, E Peniston, C Peniston, J N
Smith, T F J Tucker, R Tynes, W H Wilkinson.
The Attorney General presented a Petition from
Win. Whitney. Deputy Consul of the United States
of America for the Port of Hamilton, and Frances
Mary Whitney, his wife, praying for naturalization
of his said wife, for reasons set forth in the Petition.
The Attorney General introduced a Bill relating
to the adjournment of the Court of General Assize
-which was read a 1st time.
Mr. Dill, from the Committee appointed on the
last day of meeting to enquire and report upon the
most expedient mode of further procedure in the
matter relating to the Public Books of Accounts,
presented the following Report:-
'" The Committee to whom was entrusted the en-
quiry as to the most expedient mode of further
procedure in the matter of the Receiver General's
non-compliance with the request of the Assembly
to lay before it the Public Books of Accounts, beg
leave to report:
"That as in no former Session of the Legislature,
as far as your Committee has been able to ascertain
after diligent research, has the House of Assembly
ever proceeded to grant pecuniary appropriations
before the Public Books of Accounts have been laid
upon the Table by the Receiver General in compli-
ance with its direct request, in the opinion of your
Committee it would be inexpedient and inconsistent
with the undeviating practice of this House to enter
upon the consideration of any further appropriations
in the present Session until this requirement has
been complied with.
S. C. OUTERBRIDGE,
THOMAS N. DI.L,
RICHARD J. P. DARRELL,
W. H. WILKINSON,
SAMUEL A. HARVET.
Sessions' House, llth July, 1877.
Mr. Cooper moved the House do go into com-
mittee to consider the Report-which was agreed
to.
Mr. J. W. Pearman took the chair of the com-
mittee.
Mr. Cooper moved that it be recommended to
the House that the Report of the select committee
be adopted.
The Attorney General moved that inasmuch as
the country must be involved in great present in-
convenience, and ultimately in considerable in-
creased expenditure on the Public Roads and other
Public Works, it no appropriations are made for
those Works during the present Session, and in-
asmuch as the Public Service must in other res-
pects be seriously impeded if the report of the Com-
mittee be adopted it is not expedient to act on the
said Report-which was negatived.
Ayes 4.-Messrs S B Gray, E H Gosling, H G
Hunt, T D Middleton.
Nays 24-Messrs Speaker, F M Cooper, R J P
Darrell, N J Darrell, T N Dill, R D) Fraser, W J
Frith, A J Frith, J Fowle, S A Harvey, J M Hay-
ward, J Harnett, W S Masters, S A Masters, T A
Outerbridge, S C Outerbridge, E Peniston, C
Peniston, T J Pearman, J N Smith, T F J Tucker,
R Tynes, W H. Wilkinson, T J Wadson.
Mr. Cooper's motion was then affirmed.
The House resumed and adopted the resolution


of the Committee.
The Bill to prevent frauds in shipments of pro-
duce from these islands, was read a 2nd time and
committed.
Mr. Hayward in the chair.
The House resumed.
The Chairman reported progress and obtained
leave to sit again.
Adjourned to Wednesday next.
Orders:-
Petition of W. Whitney, Esqr.
Bill to prevent frauds in the shipment of pro-
duce.

From the Naval and Military Gazette, June 9.
THE DESTRUCTION OF TURKISH MONI.
TORS.
The following interesting particulars of the de.
struction of a Turkish monitor by torpedoes are
ga',herd from an account furnished by a correspond.
ent of the Daily News, who obtained them from the
officers engaged in the exploit. It appears thai
,' two steam launches, with a handfulof men, placed
two torpedoes under the monitor, and succeeded in
completely destroying it without tLe loss of a single
man. The little expedition was composed of four
steam launches, two of which were to make the at.
tack and the two others to hold themselves in readi-
ress to render assistance in case of an accident to
either of the attacking ones. The launches which
were to make the attack were commanded by
Lieuts. Dubasoff and Shestakoff, and manned, one
by fourteen, the other by nine men. The crews
were protected by an iron screen or awning, which
covered the boat completely over from stem to stern,
and which was sufficiently thick to stop a bullet.
The crews embarked in the boats a little after
twelve o'clock at night, at a distance of about seven
miles from where the Turkish monitors were lying.
The night was dark and rainy, and clouds com-
pletely obscured the moon, which nevertheless pre-
vented the night from being one of complete pitchy


darkness. There was just enough light to enable
them to distinguish the dark masses of the Turkish
gunboats without themselves being easily seen.
After an hour's steaming they came within the im-
mediate neighbourhood of the enemy'sflotilla. The
engines of the launches were so constructed as
to make very little noise, and when they were slow-
ed down all the sound they made was a low, dull,
kind of throbbing noise that was almost drowned
by the continual croaking of the frogs, which are
very large and very numerous along the marshes
of the Danube. Nevertheless, the quick ear of a
Turkish sentinel caught the unusual sound and
cried out, 'Who goes there?' in Turkish. The
boats advanced without replying. The sentinel
again called out, and again remained without an
answer. He called out the third time, and as it
was becoming evident that the ship would be alarm-
ed, Lieut. Dubasoff replied in Turkish, Friends!'
and continued to advance. The sentinel was by no
means satisfied, and after calling out again fired.
Then the Russians, who were by that time very
near the doomed monitor, heard a noise in the
ship. There was a rushing about of sailors, cries
and shouts, and the voice of an officer commanding
them to prepare for action. They heard the order
given for the gun in the bow to be fired, and a shell
went whistling over their heads. One of the boats,
that of Shestakoff, now drew off, while that of Du-
bascff continued to advance. Each boat was arm-
ed with two spar torpedoes. These spars were ar-
ranged to move on pivots, and could be swung
round so as to describe a half circle. The torped-
oes could be detached from the spars at any moment,
and, in addition to this, long light chains were at-
tached to them by which they were to be attached
to any projecting part of the attacked ship, and
they were connected with the boat by a fine flexible
wire about 100 yards long. The officer in com-
mand carried a small electric battery. A lively fusil-
lade had now been opened upon the boat by the
Turks, but, in spite of this, the launch of Dubasoff
shot under the bow of the monitor, the chain which
was fastened to the torpedo was flung round a chain
or rope that was hanging from the bow of the ship,
the torpedo was dropped from the spar, and the cur-
rent of the river carried it against the bottom of
the ship. The launch then shot away again until
the full length of the electric wire had been reached.
The officer applied it to the battery, and, at the
same instant a volume of water rose into the air,
which nearly swamped Dubasoff's launch. In the
meantime the other monitors became alarmed, and
fired at random. They not only fired on the Russian
luunches, that still kept dodging about like mos-
quitos, but in their confusion fired into each other.
The bullets rattled over the iron awnings of the
launches, but did them no harm. They were not
once struck, although the bow of one was pierced
by a piece of a shell that exploded near it. The
two launches were now on Opposite sides of the
doomed ship. Dubasoff perceived that she was
sinking, but very slowly; while the Turks continu-
ed to fire away blindly, but incessantly, both with
small arms and cannon. Dubasoff cried out to
Shestakoff to try and place another torpedo in
order to make sure of the ship, and the latter slip-
ped in under the stern and put down another tor-
pedo in the same manner as the previous one. He
then shot off until he was at a safe distance, applied
the electric battery in the same manner, and an
explosion followed. Parts of the ship were blown
into the air, as they very soon perceived by a large
plank which, a few seconds later, came down end-
ways, driving its way through the iron screen into
the boat between two of the sailors.. Then the
monitor sank rapidly, and after a few moments
nothing but her mast were visible above water. The
crew had all either been drowned or had escaped
by swimming. Day now began to break, and the
position of the two little launches within the near
* range of two other Turkish monitors became very
critical. To add to the danger of the situation, the
screw of one of them got fouled, and the boat became
unmanageable; while they perceived a Turkish
launch from one of the other monitors bearing
down on them. They opened a fire of small arms
on the Turkish launch, which veered of and showed
no disposition to come any closer. One of the sai-
lors succeeded in clearing the screw, and the two
launches, having accomplished their mission of
destruction, darted off, passed under the fire of the
I two other Turkish gunboats, escaped unharmed,
and, rejoining their two consorts, returned in tri-
umph to their place of starting. The Grand Duke
received the news within two or three hours after,
I and the rejoicing among the Russians was very
great. The two officers and the crews of the two
boats have all received the Cross of St. George.
With regard to the explosion on board the first
Turkish monitor that was lost, the "Naval Corres-
pondent" of the Telegraph gives quite a different
account to any which have previously appeared.
He says :-"1 begin in a state o! indignation with
regard to a paragraph I have just read in an Eng-
lish journal, quoting a telegram from Bucharest,
in which it is stated that a Turkish monitor had
been blown up by a Russian shell from the batteri-
es at Ibraila. This report is utterly untrue. The
vessel unhappily blown up was not at the moment
in action to all. She had retired out of the range
of the Russian guns to make some change in the
quantity of powder put into the cartridges, when,
by some unfortunate mismanagement, her magazine
caught fire and she was destroyed, her captain and
eight men only being saved."

According to the plan laid down by the Com-
missioners, the pending arbitration of the fisheries
dispute will be concluded as to its sessions nearly


a month earlier than the time allowed by the treaty,
which is six months from the formation of the Com-
' mission. The British case has now been submitted,
making a bulky volume and discussing the whole
matter from the beginning. The United States is
to present its answer by the 7th of July, and the
British Counsel can rejoin by the 25tb. After the
reassembling of the arbitrators evidence will be in
order until September 10 on the other side, and for
us from that date till October 23. Then follows the
time for rebutting testimony, and six days each to
the counsel of both parties. This ends the business
on the 19th of November. It is already understood
that the British claim for twelve years' damages is
$13,000,000. But if our three to five hundred ves.
sels bad purchased licenses to fish for that time,
as they could have done, they would not have paid
" far from $17,500 a year, or less than a quarter of a
million ot dollars for the whole time. There is some
difference between that amount and thirteen milli-
ons. But as offset to this, there is the value of our
own fisheries to which the Canadians have access,
besides the valve of our market which is thrown
open to them. It has heretofore been insisted on
our part that we conceded as much as we got, and
for that reason we shall now strenuously hold that
nothing whatever is due from us by way of differ-
r ence to Canada. The granting of the right to bring
* fish into our markets tree has been worth millions
* to the Canadian fishermen, while the right we gave
them to fish within the three-mile line is of immense
value in respect to the catch of mackerel and bait.
The fishing on our own coast begins some two
) months earlier than the Canadian fisheries, and
continues longer. It will be a difficult matter for
Canada to make out a case of damages against us.
-Boston Post, June 23.

The American Consul General at Melbourne, Mr.
Adamson, warns emigrants to Australia that for-
tunes are not so easy to make in that country as
they scem to suppose ; and that in most cases they
will want to go home within a year.


Private Board Lodging ^ sth faOg
T _i1*_ .hs.A t ee^ni^ A d


2MERS. E. A. NEWMAN,
Stone Haven, Reid Street,
Hamilton.


Novr. 6, 1876.--tf

Theodore Outerbridge,

HAMILTON.
Reid Street, West of1" Royal Gazette" Office.
Office flours-10 to 12 and I to 4.
Will Visit St. Georges, Tuesdays and Fri-
days.
Orders Promptly Attended to.

Hamilton, October 26th, 1876.

For Rent.
In the Town of Hamilton, a Com-
fortable and Conveniently Situated

i DWELLING HOUSE,
Comprising Eight Rooms, including Four
Bed Rooms, situated on Parliament Street,
near the Police Office.
Please apply at the Royal Gazette" Office.
June 26th, 1877.


ProteclioM against FI jtE
TA THE MOStr MOD RATE RATES
Can be obtained from the
PHOENIX INSURANCE CO.MIPANY
of London,
One of the longest Established and Wealthiest
Offices in Great Britain,

Through the BRANCH OFFICE in these
Islands, a Saving is effected to the Insured
of the Stamp Duty, a very considerable item.
RltIKS taken both on REAL and PERSONAL
PROPERTY for 3, 6 or 12 months.
No FEES and no CHARGE lor Policies.
N. A. BUTTERFIELD,


Hamilton, September 9th, 1365.


Agent.


, 1


MA PS
To Illustrate the Eastern Question.
On Sale at the Royal Gazette" Stationery
Store.
Hamilton, May 29th, 1877.




FO I LIPERPOOL,
CALLING AT QUEEN9TOWN,
Carrying the United States Mail
from New York

ON TUESDAY.
Steamships
MONTANA sails June 12, at 3 p.m.
IIDAlO1 sails June 19, at Noon.
WYOMING sails July 3, at 10 a m.
WISCONSIN sails July 17, at 10 a.m.
The above Steamers are built expressly for
the Trade, have fivewatertight bulkheads, and
carry experienced Officers, Surgeods and Stew-
ardesses. The Saloon Accommodations are un-
surpassed by any Atlantic Steamers, and the
State Rooms are on main deck opening into the
Saloon, thus securing that great comfort in
ocean travel, perfect ventilation and light.
The U. S. Mail Steamer Canima" from Ber-
muda, Thursdays, generally arrives at New York
on Monday, and Passengers' baggage can be
transferred direct to the Liverpool Steamer sail-
ing next day.
WILLIAMS & GUION,
U'~ Ta *T


New York, May 24,


(I)












z


Agents,
29 Broadway, New York.
1877.


rFz4

CA~


-a s )








R1 ^
1^ p4


Notice of Removal.


IBR. ALFRED JORDAN,
Dentist,
Has Removed to St. Georges,
And may be consulted there in Kent St.
daily, between 9 a.m. and 5 o'clock.
October 10, 1876.


SOLID Silver and
CASES at CHILD'S.


Pearl Card


Lacties anci uenitemen,


BELL & YOUNG.
March 6, 1877.

1877.


New Year's Stock
FOR PRESEJNTS,-sAT LOW
PRICES,
CONSISTING OF :-
WATCHES CLOCKS
JEWELRY (English and American)
Solid SILVER Silver PLATED\WARE
Pearl, Bone and Hlair GOODS
SPECTACLES, &c.
Making in all as suitable a collection for the
public as any ever offered before.
C. S. HITTER,
Next west Gazette" Office.
Hlamtilon, December 18, 1876.










'Brown Windsor Soap
SPure Glycerine Soap
SOAPS Marshmallow Soap
Elder Flower Soap
Carbolic Acid and Glycerine
Soap
Medieval Perfume
EXTRACTS FOR THE Jockey Club Bouquet
HANDKERCIIEF Extract of Ylangilang
Ess. Boquet, &c., &o.
Marrow Oil
POMADES Crystal Cream
I Exquisite Pomade, &c., tc.
Saponaceous Tooth Powder, Violet Powder,
Rosemary and Cantherides Hair Wash,
Toilet Vinegar, and every description of Toilet
Perfumery
Manufactory,
33, RED LIN ROAD, HOLBORV, LONDON.
Depot-PARIS.


R IMMEL'S CHOICE PERFUMERY patron-
ised by all the world.
RIMMEL'S IHLANGO.ILANaG,VANDA, HENNA, JOCKEY
CLUB, FRANGIPANE and other Perfumes of exquisite
fragrance.
RIMMEL'S LAVENDER WATER distilled from Mit-
cham Flowers.
RIMMEL'S TOILET VINEGAR, celebrated for its
useful and sanitary properties.
RIMMEL'S EXTRACT OF LuIE JUICE ANo GLYCE-
RINs, the best preparation for the Hair especially
in warm climates.
RIMMBL'S DUGONU OIL SOAP, perfumed with Aus-
tralian Educatusly
RIMMEL'S GLYCERINE HONEY, WINDSOR, and
other Toilet Soaps.
RIMMEL'S ROSE WATER, COSTUME AND FLORAL
CRACKERS, very amusing for Balls and Parties.
RIMMEL'S VIOLET, ROSE LEAF, RICE, and other
Toilet Powders.
A Liberal allowance to Shippers.
EUGENE RIMMEL, Perfumer to 11 R H the Prin-
cess of Wales, 96 Strand ; 128 Regent
Street, and 24 Cornhill, London ; 16
Boulevard des Italiens, Paris; and 27
King's Road, Brighton.
Sold by all Perfumery Venders.


TIlE BLOOD!


THE BLOOD!


THE BLOOD !

CL/ RK E' S
World Famed Blood Mixture.
FOR CLEANSING and CLEARING the BLOOD from
ALL IMPURITIES, whether arising from youth-
ful indiscretion or any other cause, cannot be too
highly recommended. It
Cures Old Sores
Cures Ulcerated Sores in the Neck
Cures Ulcerated Sore Legs
Cures Blackheads or Pimples on Face
Cures Scurvy Sores
Cures Cancerous Ulcers
Cures Blood and Skin Diseases
Cures Glandular Swellings
Clears the Blood from all Impure Matter, from
whatever cause arising.
As this mixture is pleasant to the taste and war-
ranted free from mercury-which allills and most
medicines sold for the above diseases contain-the
Proprietor solicits sufferers to give it a trial to test
its value.
Thousands of Testimonials from all Parts.
Sold in Bottles 2s. 3d. each and in Cases, contain-
ing 6 Bottles, I Is. each, sufficient to effect a per-
manentcure in long standing cases, by all Chemists
and Patent Medicine Vendors; or sent to any
address on receipt of 27 or 132 stamps, by
F J CLARKE, Chemist, High Street, LINCOLNt
Wholesale Agents:-
BARCLAY & SONs, LoNDON,AND ALL THEWHOLESALE
HOUSEs. I
"'iATCH1ES for Ladies, Watches for Gen-
tlemen, Watches for Boys, in gold or
silver cases, at prices to suit all, at CHILD'S.


J. & E. Atkinson's

PER FITMERY.
celebrated for nearly a century past, is of the very
best English manufacture. For its purity and great
excellence it has obtained the following
EXHIBITION PRIZE MEDAL,
LONDON, 1862. PARIS, 1867. COBDOVA, 1872.
LIMA, 1872. VIENNA, 1873.
PHILADELPHIA 1876.

Atkinson s Choice Perfumes for
THE HANDKERCHIEF,
White Rose, Frangipanne, Ylang Ylang, Stephano,;
tis, Opopanax, Jockey Club, Ess. l Bouquet,
Trevol, Magnolia, Jasmin, Wood Vio-
let.
And all other odours, of the finest quality only.

ATKINSON'S
Celebrated Eau de Cologne
is strongly recommended, being more lasting and
fragrant than the Germin kinds.


To retain the whole of the properties of Mustard
in its powdered state and to obtain easily in a few
moments a decided result with the smallest possible
quantity of the remedy, are the problems which M.
Rigollot has solved in the most conclusive and sa-
tisfactory manner. Rigollot's Sinapism in leaves
will, therefore, be found in) every family, for the
prompt action obtained by it in many cases of emer-
gency renders it an invaluable remedy for various
disorders.
(Signed) A. BOUCHARDAT
Annuairethdrapentique ann6e 1863, p. 204.
IMPORTANT NOTICE.
The precious quality of Rigollot's Paper in cases
of great gravity, is that of acting very rapidly. It is
in important Healing Agent. To children, weak,
and nervous persons, I strongly recommend the fol-
]-wing method of graduating the action of the plai-
ter according to the will or condition of the patients
viz., to put one, two, or three leaves of wet blot-
ting paper between the Sinapism and the skin.
An old piece of fine linen may also be employed
instead of blotting paper.


Beware of Imitations.
MANUFACTORY AND WAREHOUSE, AvENUE VICTORIA,
24 PARts,-and by all respectable Chemists.

" Eau" of Dr. I-oltz for
HAIR DYE.

lHS IVWATER. is of an entirely vegetable
composition, and its use is quite inof-
fensive.
Thanks to this peculiar quality which gives it
no rival, DR. IIOLTZ'S Hair I)ye has not the
disadvantage of the other preparations which
give to the hair an; unnatural vulgarly color.
Guided by his medical knowledge and his
great chemical experiences, Da. HOLTZ has
succeeded in the discovery of plants, which give
the richest balsamic dyeing and curative e3sen-
ces, and it is by this study that he succeeded to
compound a dye which may be styled as the
Regenerator by excellence of the chevelure.
GENERAL WAREHOUSE, In PARIS,
La Correspondance Parisienne,
4 Rue de la Tacherie, 4.

JALMJ I CK-U-JULY, 1877.


SUN.
o
a ris. sets.

17 Tu 5 10 7 2
18 WVe5 10 7 2
19 Th 5 10 7 2
20 Fri 5 II 7 1
21 Sat 5 11 7 1
22 S 5 12 7 0
23 Mo 5 13 6 59


Tide. REMARKS.



1 6 1st Qr. 8h.58m. a.m
1 54
2 42
3 30 Margaret
4 18 [Magdalen
5 68th after Trinity-
5 54 St. Thos. Mail due.


TUE BERMUDA RoYAL GAZETTE is published
every Tuesday by DONALD M'PHEE LE,
Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent
Majesty,
AT HIS OFFICE,

North-west Corner of Reid and Burnaby Streets,
Hamilton,
where Blanks, Hand-bills, &c., will be
printed at the shortest notice.-Agent
at St. Georges for the Royal Gazette.
JAMES THIS, Esqr., Post Master General.


I


I


Highest Centennial Award.
ST|IIE Judges in the report said : It seems
undisputed that WEBEK has distanced all
competition, and must he to-day recognized as the
Piano-maker par excellence of the world, and the
musical jury has but stamped the seal of the
American Centennial Exhibition upon the gener-
ally awarded verdict of every vocalist and musi-
cian by the award which gives the medal to A.
WEBER, of New York, for sympathetic, fine and
rich tone combined with greatest power as shown
in three styles, Grand, Square and Upright Pi-
anos, which show intelligence and solidity in
their construction, a pliant and easy touch, which
at the same time answers promptly to its re-
quirements, together with excellence of work-
manship."
One of these Instruments can be seen and
Catalogues obtained by applying to
I E. J. YOUNG,
Sole Agent for Bermuda.
Hamilton, March 17, 1877.-6m

One of the above Instruments for Sale, and
can be seen by applying at the Store of


ATKINSON'S
OLD BROWN WINDSOR SO\P
celebrated for so many years, continues to be made
as heretofore. It is strongly Perfumed, and will be
found very durable in use.
ATKINSON'S BE RS' GREASE, COLD
CREAM, SACHET POWDERS, TRANSPAR-
ENT GLYCERINE SOAP, ROSE TOILET
POWDER, TOILET VINEGAR, VELOU I'NE0
WHITE ROSE TOOTHII PASTE,
ar.d other specialties and general articles of Perfu-
mery may be obtained of all dealers throughout tt
World, and of the Manufacturers,
:. & E. A.TEZINSOZT,
24, OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, W.
PRICE LIST FREE ON APPLICATION.
CAUTION.-Messrs. J. & E. ATKIsSON manun
factnre their articles of one and the best quality
only. Purchasers are cautioned to avoid counter.
feits by observing that each article is labelled with
the Firm's Trade Mark, "a White Rose on a
Golden Lyre;" printed in seven colours.
ESTABLISHED 1799.
April 11, 1876-12m If

BRONZE MEDAL AT THE
Universal Exhibition of Paris 1855,
Bronze Medal at the Exhibition of Trie mte, 1871,
Silver Medal at the Exhibition of Havre, 1868,
Silver Medal at the Exhibition of Paris, 1872,
Gold Medal at the Exhibition of Lyons, 1872,
Diploma of honor at the Maritime Exhibition, Pa-
ris, 1875.
RIGOLLOT' S
MUSTARD PAPER
FOR SINAPISMS OR PLASTERS,
Adopted by the Hospitals of Pars, Field
and Military Hospital, by the
English Royal Navy and
the French National
Navy, &c.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs