Group Title: Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder.
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076588/00112
 Material Information
Title: The Royal gazette, Bermuda commercial and general advertiser and recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: D.M. Lee
Place of Publication: Hamilton Bermuda
Publication Date: -1920
Frequency: three times a week[jan. 1910-dec. 1920]
weekly[ former 1828-]
semiweekly[ former -dec. 1909]
three times a week
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Hamilton (Bermuda Islands)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda Islands -- Hamilton
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1828?
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 93, no. 153 (Dec. 30, 1920).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Jan. 22, 1828).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076588
Volume ID: VID00112
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46887227
lccn - sn2003060500
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bermuda gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda Islands : 1821)
Succeeded by: Bermuda colonist
Succeeded by: Royal gazette and colonist daily

Full Text


THrR


.j,


BERMUDA COMMERCIAL AND GENERAL ADVERTISER AND RECORDER.


No. 6.-Vol. L. STW.TE SUPER VAS ANTIQUAS. 24s per An n



f'siltion, Bermuda, Tuesday, February 6, I S77.


[Written expressly for the Bermuda Royal Gazette.] struction in the first instance, by purchasing the
Oriental and Occidental. Khedive's direct stock, has thrown the British
2Egis over a work of world importance, and given
SUGGESTED BY THE VICEROY OF INDIA PROCLAIMING assurance of its being preserved intact for the
HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA Ex- general benefit. Thus a new highway has been
PRESS OF INDIA AT DELHI, January 1st, 1877. opened to the East and a new disturbance of trade
is its consequence. Trade formerly in the hands of
(Continuedfrom last Gazette.) large companies and favoured firms has been dis-
Cntinued fro os Gai tribute since competition h."d more favourable
So large had this Eastern trade become and so e
desirable was the securing a share of it that an im- ou to araon. adnd e what little ema
petuswas given to discover a new ommercial path-ted to the PersianGulf and drawn through the
way to the East which would both facilitate and
cheapen intercourse. The period, which has been Canal. All this disturbance means a certain loss
noted as that of the Reformation, marks the begin- an ino nvenience m or thet equipoise which
ning of a grand series of discovery, the main incen- long run, we may look' for that equipoise which'
nng of a grand series of discovery, the main icen- follows on commercial disturbance. But, prompted
tive to which was unquestionably a desire to share fol reflections have been by the Delhi ceremon-
in the profits of Oriental trade. The discovery by ial, we must immediately regard the new route to
Vasco De Gama of the Cape of Good ope opened India as a great national gain in point of the de-
the great watery highway between the East and fence of our Indian Empire which is thereby
the West destined in time almost to destroy the old fence of our Indirect bearing with thereatby
caravan trade, centering in such places as Cairo, brought into more direct bearing with the great
cravantradecentring insuch places as Cairo, centre of British Power. The Indian Rebellion is
Bagdad and Damascus-for many long centuries still fresh in memory and might, though with less
enjoying this undisputed trade. In due time the ability than formerly, again occur. There are
oeing of this highway/prepared the way for probability than formerly, again occur. There are
opening of this highway, prepared the way for
English enterprise, and-how much the East India huge difficulties to grapple with in India, and we
English enterpze, and how much the East nia pride ourselves that our country has manfully and
Company, from its formation till its dissolution and most successfully met them in he fullest and freest
the lapse of its territories direct to the authority of spirit of civilization. We have extended our sway 1
the British Crown, accomplished for the credit and over a huge class impotent of self government and
profit of the Nation a casual enquirer into our Na- over tribes upon tribes we have exercised compul- 2
tionalAnnas discovery was all important,buwhat sory jurisdiction, which has led to their mutually 1
De Gamae s discovery was all important, but what respecting each others lives and properties. As far 1
shall we say of the discoveries of Christopher Co- as possible we have striven to establish in the Pro- 1
lumbus, and how shall we mark the day when the vinces of India the principles and practices of
celebrated Genoese planted his foot on San Salva- equitable Western rule compatible with the special
dor, which we English people have capriciously circumstances which exist-antagonism of races, A
called "Cat Island ?" Columbus was in search of caste religions, &c. Thus India under its own na-
a highway to India, and indeed it was the dream of ive Princes little better than a hot bed of the worst
all navigators of the time. And at least in two in- vices of a degenerate humanity has been won from
stances we have this idea happily preserved on the its state of darkness and placed in a first condition of
American M3ap. The West INDIES and La Chin civilization by the determination and beneficence of
the pretty suburb of Montreal. It was in no hope British rule. The Delhi ceremonies mark we
of discovering a new Continent and peopling it, that should say the conclusion of a first Grand Chapter
Western Europe at first embarked on these voyages. the English in India, and points to a future chapter
Purely and simply the lust of gain to be acquired not without its great hazards because reforms must
from an improved trade with the East, the traditi- progress in spite of the stearnest opposition of
conal source of trading wealth as it was the actual Oriental Conservatism; because what is even now
cradle of the human family. tolerated as politic, will come to be regarded as hos-
The discovery and settlement of America were tile in due course to improved progress. If, in our
the immediateresults of efforts put forth to extend domestic history, reforms have been slow and con-
the trade of Western the consequences t. And ceded under the greatest pressure among people al-
how grand have been the consequences? An out- most homogeneous, how much more tardy must
let yet Westward for the crowded populations of they necessarily be among our Indian subjects
.Europe, for those malcontented, in England as wel where diversities of tongues are but the least bin- J
as other countries with the then existing political drances to progress ? The success of British rule is
-status. To the Spaniards fell the golden share in everywhere itshigh sense of right and it deterin-
the South, to England and to France in the North, aevyn to see that right cost what it may, is done.
and the special traits of these three European races I is this quality which has made us both respected
are indelibly stamped on the history of the le and feared in India, and which has made usgiven our au-espected
American -Continent. The Spanish and French and feared aIndia, and which has g ive
elements have not been progressive. It is some- trinces, and y there a immediate followers The im-
what singular that the Anglo-Saxon races should roeme, nts whir ich our commercial owers. e ie has
be dominant not only over India with its worn-out provements which our commercial enterprize has
e dominantnot only over India with its worn-out given India has still more contributed to our per-
creeds and castes and enormous varied populations, manent hold on the country and given us the op-
but also should form a large constituent of and the portunities of relieving those visitations of famine s
ruling element in North America, discovered by to which the country is subject and to succour
accident in attempting to find out a new road to which the natives themselves would be powerless.
India. The Centennial celebiation of 1876, and the It is the strict exercise of a high Christian civiliza-
visit of the Prince of Wales to India are two grand tion in which our success as Rulers of India must
events in juxtaposition, which may very significant- lie. The faith and prejudices of the natives must 1
ly be considered together. For the first time in be respected as the fixed customs of many centuries
English History had India been visited by the Heir so far as consistent with personal and public secu-
.Presumptive, and we shall have a word to say di- gdie a be d ma dn
which alone made the visit possible. No soonerThe good time of a brighter day may abundantly
hil therinem of e returine d froms ise. o auspui be hoped for, but must at present in great patience
ha tPrince of Wales returnedfrom his ausii- be awaited. The results so far of our Indian rule
ous tour, calculated to improve his own knowledge are not discouraging, and as we read the gaudy
:of a vast country, and to bring local native mag- shows of Delhi heralding our Indian Empress let
nates into a closer compact with the great rulings rejoice with a courageous hope as we contem-
centre, than the people of the United States, gener- plate the extraordinary spectacle of the far West of
ouy applauded in their patriots by England Europe being permanently planted in the East as
celebrated their birth as a nation. A series of the S p n pl e
,British Colonies combined for a century in National o
,existence has exhibited a progress of which the .. ..... t
Parent Stem feels proud. Transplanted to Ameri- N Oi l
can soil congenial to the well being of the creature, nJgi et j
F cent radistiuction to India where the Anglo-Saxon
is but a perpetual shifting dominant population, the To Farmers and other persons in-
English Colonists lived and flourished in those terested in
principles, which they carried with them across the -
Atlantic to work out the great problems which the Cr. l lul a ob1111
alteredd conditions of their new homes entailed on
them. How American Civilization has progressed, ----
those who had the high privilege of attending the THE UNDERSIGNED are prepared to give
Philadelphia Exhibition, had some correct means of their personal attention during the coming Crop
judging. There was an exhibit of hundred years Season to all Shipments either by the weekly
progress-a century particularly fruitful in civiliz- Steamer or fast sailing Vessels to the consign-
lug influences. :As we said just now about the meant of
Italian cities of medieval commercial prominence,
it may also be worth considering what demon- Messrs. Jd. BE .NNJETT 4 Co.,
station the United States would have been able to
make in 1876, had they been the Colonists of 156 West Street,
,France, or the Colonists of Spain!! Would the NEW YORK.
same progress have been attained as has now been Sales guaranteed with prompt returns.
reached, and would the general civilization have s G .
been influenced to the extent it undoubtedly has S, S. INGHAM & Co.
been by the success of the development of the Hlamilton, .0th Jan., 1877.-4
United States? The United States in 1776 a con-
federation (supposed !) of Spanish or French Co-Ef V P ?
lonies what would 1876 have had to tell us ? We E4 . W SP ?A N [' 1:- -,
very much fear a poor tale, talents doubtless tied COm isSiRn H rChan
up in a knapkin and concealed. No progress in ommiSSion Nerchant,
America, no reflex benefit on Europe. The Anglo- Vesey Pier, Washington Market, New York.
Saxon has been the pre-eminently successful Colo- -
iist and "The Greater Britain" is the grand ex- A LL Persons desirous of Shipping to the
mansion of Great Britain. With the grievances of above Address will be afforded every ac-
of the day acted indiscreetly. But the grand re- commotion by aplying to my aget,
suits ofthat policy have notinthe long run been THFO. OUTEI BRIHDGE,
either discreditable to the then nascent nation or ton
the noble parent stem. The English language and 2nd Street, 11amilton,
-.literature have been further extended and the Near Steamers Wharf.
blessings of the principles they certainly inculcate Stencil Plates and Brushes -upplied on appli-
have been experienced in a wider sphere. The cation.


broad principles of humanity founded on our Brit- January 30, 1877.-6
ish Civilization have been more felt and acknow-
'ledged. There have been a series of reciprocal ac-
'tions all tending to the best results. And parallel A LARGE Mercantile Firm in
too with the American Republic lie the British "At."England principally engaged in the Hlard-
Provinces whose progress is alike satisfactoy and ware Line, but executing Indents in all branch-
whose dependence on British authority, now so es of trade i ish to meet with an energetic Eu-
mildly exercised, bears such good fruits. Thust as resident agent in
stumbled on as it were en route to India, North ropean Gentleman to act as resident agent in
America has under British fostering care become hamilton, Bermuda, on commission. Liberal
even greater than India, with an essentially British Terims and facilities will be give so that a
Civilization. good income can be made by,.,i crtitrprizing
We are now led to consider the recent Li_'"i-1wr-- representative-a candidate with a good con-
to India which has almost altogether superseded section among the principal importers will be I
the Cape route with an economy in time at least. preferred.
The Suez Canal in the face of much discouragement ift references mu i
has assumed its place as a permanency among ". > atn Yfctori-teltcr es Vu,. b I, Gw. m.ed 1
great highways of the earth. The course of events Addrcss in first instance to hox 129 Genural
which enabled the British Government to retrieve Post Office, Birmingham.
an error in its policy, with reference to its con- January 2nd, 1877.-6.


UPON THE PREMISES,
IN THE TOWN OF HAMILTON,
AT 11 O'CLOCK

On Wednesday,
The 7th day of February now noxt ensuing,
Under and by virtue of a Writ of Execution is-
sued-' ,. the Court of GeneralAssize at Suit
of RICHARD KEMPE vs. MATTHEW
STUBBS,



Vizt. :-
I MAHOGANY SOFA
1 PIANO
1 Side TABLE 1 Centre TABLE
6 Cane-Seat CHAIRS 1 Do. ROCKER
2 Mahogany BEDSTEADS
I Hair MATTRESS 1 Straw BED
I Sick CHAIR 2 Large Pine TABLES
I Toilet TABLE A Small Lot CROCKERY
A. Lot Cooking UTENSILS
And I SPADE and 1 FORK.
J. H. TROTT,
P. 1M. G.


Hamilton, Jany. 22, 1877.

NIf'W GOODS
From London via Halifax per Beta

3ust Opening,
A IIANDNOME ASSORTMENT

1 LLITT5R 0Y GOODS
By MISS OLIVE,
Front Street, Hamilton
January 30th, 1877.*

WANTED
To Borrow on Mtrtgage of Valu-
able Real Estate

100.
lInerict at s ,even per cent. will be paid for
For further particulars apply to
M!?. REGINALI) GRAY,
Ilamilton.
Jany. 30, 1877.
BERMUDA, Alias
SOMERS' ISLANDS
By His Excellency Major General JOHN
HENRY LLFROY, C. B.,
Gave minor, Coinmnder-in- ChieJ,
Vice Admiral and Ordinary, in
and over these Islands, 4c., ESc.,
8rc-
WHEREA:S KET7URJIH JANE STOVE
HARVEY has prayed for Administra-
tion on the Estate ot HIARRINGTON H \R-
VEY, late of Pembroke Parish in these Islands,
MIerchant, deceased.
This is therefore to give notice, that if any
Person or Persons can shew any just Cause why
the said Adminitration should not be granted
unto the said KETURAH JAJNE STOWE
HARVEY, he, she, or they are to file his, her,
or their C:,veat in writing, in the Secretary's Of-
fice of these Islands within Fifteen days from the
publication hereof, otherwise the said Adminis-
tration will be granted accordingly.
JAMES TUCKKIR,
Colonial Secretary.
Dated at the Secretary's Office, 3
this 24th day of Jan., 1877.

Notice.


r pHE UNDERSIGNED beg to offer their
Services as usual for the Shipping of


BF-A-e?,' e iii li


f-ro dtice


To New York.
All Shipments at risk of Owner or Grower until
net proceeds are paid by Consignees to our or-
der in New York which order shall attend each
shipment.
J. T. I)ARRELL & Co.
Hamilton, Bermuda,
Jany. 29, 1877.

For Sale,


By Grove Stend, of Now York.
PRICE 20.
Apply at the Office of the Royal Gazette."
['aget, January 29, 1877.-3

Wanted.
By a small Family in this Town
L. -. '2f i^ 5
A nd a

The latter must be able to Hew neatly--Good
ie.:.',,. required.
Apply at the Olfice of the Royal Gazette.'
Jany. 29, 1877,


To be Sold,
At Private Sale, or at Public
tion,


ON THE PREJMI
If not sooner applied four,


S E1


~;A.- (')


The 9'h day of February next ensuing,
At I o'clock P.M.,

A LOT O) LAAD
Together with the T .i BlE [R thereon,
Comprisittg FOUR- AND A II ALP ACRE-'.
more or less, situated in Smrnithi' Parish, belong-
ing to the Estate of the late Samuel Spencer,
(eceased, and bounded as follows, viz.,-North.
erly and Westerly, by Lands late of Thomas
spencer, enr., deceased, aid Lands of J. W.
l'earman; Easterly, by Lands of said J. W.
Pearman, and Southerly by the sea.
If set up at Auction it may, if necessary, be
put up in Lots to suit purchasers, should ono
person not be desirous of buying tie whole.
Apply to
N. J. DARRELLd
Smiths' Parish.
Smiths' Parish, Jany. 9th, 1877.


Shredded Codfish,
ANDI)
Steam-Sliced
SMOKED D Ez F

ON TON Shredded CO)FISII ready for
B'Table in 15 minutes. The most desirable
style of Codfish ever offered in this market-put
up in lib. Boxes.
Eureka Steam-Sliced SVIO10KE l) Bl F-
I Commends itself to consumers by reason of the
superior quality of meat used, and the delicacy
with which it is cut.
Put up in 4, A and lib) Boxes.
For 8ae at Wholesale and Retail.
W. T. JAMEN/i
Front Street.
N.B.-The undersigned being Sole Agent for
Bermuda for the above articles is prepared to
supply the trade at a liberal discount.
\V. T. JAMES.
Hamilton, Jan. 23, 1877.


Valentines! .

11th February, 187Y. !.

A large assortment of
C )IlI. CEa R J& 1 o10 1 CI.
FOR SAL A1
At the Royal Gazette" Sta-
St.onery Store
l Hamilton, 15th Jany, 1l77.


For Sale.


MRl. THIOMA.S D)OE,
The Owner of that w,.ll know Property in
Paget Parish, called
WOOD ST O I,"
Intending to leave Bormuda about June next,
is desirous to sell the same.
THE PROPEiITY CoNs'ist OF
A


And about Eleven Acres of excellent Arable
LAND.
Possession can be given when the Owner
eaves the country.
For further particulars apply to
THOMAS S. DOE,


Jany. 18, 1877.-3pd


On the promises


BULL'S HEAD LIVERY
STA BLE .
DANIEL G. LANE Proprietor.
HAMILTON:

Branch Establishment, St. George.

T HE Proprietor of the above Es-
tablishment having just returned by the
" Caniia" from New York, and brought with
hi, a number of NEW CAK RiAG KS and
Stylish YO(UNG iORSES to add to his already
well selected Stock, begs to thank the Public of
Bermuda generally for their past Patronage and
hopes for a continuance cf the same.
Strangers visiting the Islands are particularly
requested to call and give the above Establish-
ment a trial before going elsewhere.
Hamilton, Sept. 19th, 1t76,


E. P. & N. If. Loomnis
Commission Merchants
And Dealers in

FORElIN AN!) I)MESi'IC FRUITS.
I;' porters of

I, P O UGE,
No. 92 harcloy e Sbeet, N. Y.
('onsignmen's Solicited.
Parties wishing to Ship to us will be tacili-
ated in so doing by calling on MESSRS. B. \V.
WALKE:R. & Co., i'ront "-t., Ilamilton, Bermu-
da, of who a they c.n obtain Stencil Plates
and be otherwise aided free of Charge.
January Ist, 1-77.




CfALI N; i'F ([1E71' 7ST'9)\VN,
C A 1 LLIN T\ K [ T N,


Carrying i le United


States Nlai)


fromi New York

O0N TUT'"IS'DAY.

WISCON8!, N sails Jan. 3(i, at 3 p.m
WV YOS) IIN( sails Feby. 6, at Noon.
I) KOT 1 sails Febv. 13, at 3 p).m.
I!) \110 sails Feby. 20, at 10 a.inm.
NEVADA sails Febov. 27, at 3 p.m.
MONTANA sails larch 6, at 9 a.m.
'he above Steamers are built expressly for
the Trade, have five watertight bulkheads, and
carry experienced Officers, Surgeons and Stew-
ardesses. The Saloon Accommodations are un-
surpassed by any atlantic Stoamers, and the
State Rooms are on main deck opening into the
Saloon, thus securing that -great comfort in ocean
travel, perfect ventilation and light.
Tht, U. S. Mail Steamer Canimnia" from Ber-
muda, Thursdays, generally arrives at New York
on Monday, and Passengers' bagtage can be
transferred direct to the Liverpool Steamer sail-
: ,- A -i


ing next day.



January 18, 1


WILLIAMS & GUION,
Ageuits,
29 hroadlw.y, New York
877.


+. G r a n t h a t m ,
Has Just Received,
A NEW ASS(ORTM ENT OF
Ladies', Gent's and children's ,

S4 Boots & Shoes.
Front St hamilton, Dec. 5, 1876.

The Subscriber
BEGS to call attention to the fact that he
is still at his Old II \RtINSS ESTAB-
LISi1ii ENT, in Reid Street, where he is pre-
pared to PAINT and 'T I Vl with a Superior
finish all Carriages placed in his charge.
Also, to execute UPIiOLSTIERING of every
description-for I)rawing Rooms, Bed Rooms,
&c., in the neatesc style and with despatch.
Especially MATTRiESSES.
C, W. GAUNTLETT.
Reid Street, Hamilton,
Oct. 30th, 1876.

A Reward of 30
WJ ILL be paid to any one (not the actual
offender) who shall give information
sufficient to convict the person or persons who
maliciously destroyed several Trees in the Park
in this Town on Sunday night last, and any
accomplice of such offender who shall give
said information will also not be prosecuted.
N. A. BUTTERFIELD,
Mayor.
Hamilton, November 20, 1876.

'Iheodore Outerbridge,

HAMILTON.
Reid Street, West of Royal Gazette" Office.
Office flours-10 to 12 and I to 4.
Will Visit St. Georges, Tuesdays and Fri-
days.
Orders Promptly Attended to.
Hamilton, I'ctober 26th, 1676.

Valuable Heal Estate
la Warwick Parish,
FOR SALE.

A DESIRABLE

SIn good order with the Parcel of
L. N L) thereto belonging containing Eight Acres
in idalting and pasturo land situated in the vi-
(iitOy of the Parish (. hureh.
I crins accomiiodating. Further particulars
n'nished on application to
ORMOND T. 11I)DI.E'TON,
liamilton,
bovr. 27, 1876,








" T)rDA ROYAL GAZETT,-


EXTRACT from METEOROLOGICAL
VATIONS taken under the direction of the
Medical Officer, Prospect, Bermuda. Abov
151 feet.


Date


1877
JN. 29
30
31
FY. 1
2
3
4


30-"9
30'366
30-440
30-361
30-269
30-156


Win
9 a.n





N
NW
NE
E
sw
NE


nd Ternm
m.



o
2 64'7
1 62-9
2 63-7
1 68-3
1 70'5
1 71-3
2 67-3


perature previol
24 hours.


o 0
57-6 127-2
5'-7 121-0
55-7 127-2
54-1 136-2
56-1 126-4
57-5 1.-7
60-3 117-4


OBSER-
Principal


APPOINTMENTS OF THE BERMUDA HUNT.


e the sea FEBRUARY.
Tuesday, 6th-XEolia, (Captain Creek's Residence.)
Thursday, 15th-Riddle's Bay.
Lus Tuesday, 20th-Prospect.
IjRL i.


Zr


0
50-4
45-2
45-5
42-4
40'4
45-4
55-2


Inch.


0-02
0"00
0-02
0-07
0-01
0-33
0"00


Total 0'45
Total Rainfall for the month of January 1877....2"46
-




Hamilton, February 6, 1877.

CUSTOM HOUSE.-HAMILTON.
ENTERED.
February 5-Mail Steamer Canima, Liddecoat, New
York; assorted cargo to Trott & Cox.
CLEARED.
Jany. 31-Barkentine Satellite, Barmeson, Kingston,
St. Vincent; 12 tons copper ore.
CUSTOM HOUSE-ST. GEORGE.
ENTERED.
Jany. 29-Barque Eliza Barss, Yesey, New York; 100
oxen, 100 bis. meal, 62 bales hay, to Trott & Cox.
Feby. 5-Schr. Rescue, Anderson, Demerara, bound to
Halifax in distress; 150 puns. rum, 240 b1s. sugar,
45 cases bitters and 100 bags peanuts.-Agent, J.
S. Darrell.
CLEARED.
Jany. 30-Brigt. Water Witch, Handerson, New York ;
inward cargo of sugar.
Feby. 2-Schr. Dreadnot, Borden, New York; inward
cargo of Iogwood.
Schr. Beta, Guptill, Bostin ; inward cargo of molasses.
3-Schr. Satagawa, Guptill, Jamaica; inward cargo.
EO- The, Barque Eliza Barss, Capt. Vesey, leaves
for New York this morning.
H. M. Gun-vessel Bulflnch, Commander Lloyd, left
on Saturday last for Jamaica.
PASSENGERS ARRIVED.
In the Mail Steamer Canimna, on Sunday last, from
New York :-Colonel Gordon, Royal Engineers, Mrs.
Gordon. Miss and Master Gordon and servant,
Mr., Mrs., Miss, two Master Ropes and Servant,
Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Berword, Mr. and Mrs. J. G.
Taite, Mr. Mrs. and Miss Adams, Mr. and Mrs. H. G.
Murray. Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter, Mrs. M. Going, Mrs.
G. W. Watlby, Miss Carp-nter, Miss Gordon, Miss E
Ogden. AMiss H. Higgins, F. M. Cooper, Esqr.,
M.C.P., Messrs. Wm. Cox. H. D. Justi, A. Strenli,
S. S. Draper, P. F. Lamber, J. Youngman, J. L. Og--
den, C. B. Ellsworth, T. B. Gumming, F. D. S. Nash,
M. F. Judge, W. A. Topping, J. Jackson, A. Fergu-
son, J Medunich, H. C. Tocker and A. Vladescovich.
(.2 (.;i... --'1. M Carten and 2 children, Charles
Mursh an.) F. Fi-l ,i-r.
The Schr. Rescue, of and for Halifax, Captain An-
derson, out 63 days from Demerara, partially laden
with rum and sugar, arrived at St. Georges on Saturday
last, with loss of sails and spars and in want of provis-
ions. The R. was, on the 1st January, up to Beaver Is-
land, -;ir ;l;Ilit:, ., but was driven off and for want of
sails was compelled to bear up for these Islands.-
Agent, J. S. Darrell.

The Hull of the American Schooner Georgie Staples,
as she now lies waterlogged at Washington's Point,
was sold yesterday for 22 10/, and was purchased by
Mr. J. M. Allen.

Nothing has been heard of the missing steamer
George Cromwell before alluded to, and now the steam-
er George Washington, belonging to the same line, and
which left Halifax for St. Johns, Newfoundland, on the
18th ulto., was not heard of up to 31st. The cap-
tain of the steamer Alhambra from Newfoundland at
Halifax on 31st reports that he met heavy gulf ice 90
miles southeast of Seatarie, which extended as far west
as Whitehead.

BISHOP KELLY.-The New York Journal of Com-
merce of 27th ultimo, states that "Bishop Kelly has
resigned the See of Newfoundland in consequence of
ill-health." i
Tli v.-rnt i i mithe rumour that has been in circulation
here the last few days, to the effect that Bishop Kelly
in his recent visit io England failing to secure the as-
sistance of a Coadjutor, and feeling that he could not
faithfully and satisfactorily perform the responsible
duties of his high office, over such extensive and vari-
ed territories and climates as those of Newfoundland
and the Labrador, in, his rather delicate state of
health, determined to resign the See in July next.
We also learn that Bishop Kelly has stated it to be
his wish to make Bermuda his future. home.

An Inquest was held in Hamilton Parish, on the 31st
ultimo, before Denis Tucker, Esqr., Coroner, on view
'of the body of Sarah Elizabeth Trott, a colored woman,
who fell dead on the morning of above date.
After receiving several depositions, which, however,
did not account satisfactorily for the sudden death, the
Coroner suggested a post-mortem, which was accord-
ingly made by T. A. Outerbridge, Esqr., M.D. On
opening the body it was found that death resulted from
an extensive rupture of the left wall of the heart, caused
by frici i..r of the liver, which was greatly enlarged.
This was the first case of the sort that had come to Dr.
Outerbridge's notice during his long practice. Verdict
---Death from natural causes.

A fatal case of Yellow fever had occurred on board
therv'.ivinz ship Aboukir, at Port Royal, Jamaica,
very re,'-.tly. The victim was a fresh arrival, only
two months- on board as steward's assistant. There
was no fever in either Port Royal or Kingston, and the
inference is that it originated in the Aboukir, which
says the Army and Navy Gazette, It is no exaggera-
tion to say, is in a state of decay from truck to keelson,
from stcm to stern." Persons recently returned to En-
'gland'from Jamaica, state that at times the smells
an-ini.:' from her hold are most offensive. The officer
in command of the troops had given orders forbidding
the troops having any communication with the vessel.
The Commodore at once directed a board of
medical officers to report upon her sanitary condition,
anil since the vess 1 was condemned long ago and has
been rotting ever since, it may readily be imagined
that the result of the medical inquiry is not too reassu-
ring." Thie Urgent has been preparing, since the
Aboukir's condemnation, at Portsmouth Dockyard, to
relieve her.


We published on 23rd January, the particulars of a
suit, taken from the New York Herald, John W. Ham-
ilton vs. Jacob Lorillard, to recover the sum of $350
due as salary. Mr. Hamilton writes to a friend here,
that he will pay every cent due in Bermuda, if necessary
from his own ,purse, but is awaiting the result of the suit
spoken of-trusting that he will be in funds from that
to pay his creditors here. The further hearing in the
case was postponed to 2nd April for the return of the
sleamer North Point, when the counsel of Mr. Hamilton
alleges he will prove Mr. Lorillard's liability for his
debts contracted in Bermuda.

Under tie heading" M-rcantile Misfortunes," the
New York ilerald of the 1st instant gives a list of
32 failures of mercantile firms that have taken place
in that city during the month of January last with
liabilities amounting to $1,650,729. Within the
ame i ciio d there were fifty-two assignments filed
;be liability. s aggr(,ai:, $550,000. There wVre
a so nineteen adjudications in bankruptcy reported
in which ihe indebtedness is $850,000. The total
liabilities for the month is, in round numbers
$3, 0 0,000.


in their ranks, and the Compromise Bill was pre-
pared by one of their leaders and supported by
enough of the rank and file to carry it. The De-
mocrats were not a unit, either, in its support.
Some of them, like the Republicans, thought that
the right to decide in this disputed election was
sufficiently fixed and clear. They did not think,
like the Republicans, that the right was lodged in
the Republican Senate, but claimed that it belong-
ed to the Democratic house, and the opponents of
the Bill insisted that if the duty or right to decide
the dispute was imposed on, or given to, either or
both houses, it could be delegated to no commission,
or any other Tribunal, fixed or casual.
The bill was, therefore, in all respects and truly,
a compromise, and as such it meets the approval of
the people, as well as of the majority of politicians.
It is a great relief to see some mode of adjusting a
difficulty which no government could bear without
a strain. The politicians and the men who aspire
to statesmanship were at fault, and their ark of re-
fuge, the constitution, gave no clear or explicit
sound to guide them. The Compromise Bill has
parted the turbulent waters of controversy and
shown a safe way out of their dangers. It is an
expedient, but only an expedient seemed practic-
able. It is to be hoped that no impediment to the
action of the commission will present itself, and
that its decision may be more unanimous and more
impartially inspired than seems anywhere to be ex-
pected. Its conclusions will be accepted and ac-
quiesced in as the only way of deciding an election,
which is nearly a tie, with two candidates of power-
ful parties almost e :-lly, though on different
S, ,. ', entitled to the victory.

Sir Arthur Guinness retires from the brewing
business with a fortune of $5,000,000,


MARCH.
Thursday, 1st-The Ducking Stool.

THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION.
A plan for settling the dispute over the late elec-
tion in the United States has been reached by the
joint Committee of the two houses of Congress. A
Bill has been passed to carry out this plan, and the
prospect is good for an early adjustment of the
difficulty. A commission has been constituted
composed of fifteen members equally distributed
between the House of Representatives, the Senate,
and the Supreme Court of the United States, for
the purpose of arbitrating and deciding the contro-
versy. The Bill provides for the appointment by
each branch of Congress of its quota of the Commis-
sion; it names four of the five judges who are to
belong to it, and leaves to these four the selection
of the fifth. The Senate being Republican in its
majority and officers, the Senators will be three
Republicans to two Democrats. The House of
Representatives being democratic in its majority
and officers, the Representatives on the commission
will be three Democrats to two Republicans. The
four designated Judges are equally divided between
the parties, and the fifth to be chosen by them must
be a Republican. The questions to be passed upon
have been so discussed and considered during the
past three months, that it is very hard for any man
in public life to be without opinion or bias. The
two houses of Congress have placed their best men
on the commission, most of them being lawyers of
learning and experience who may be able to deal
impartially with the case. But it is hardly expect-
ed. that they will. The doctrines which underlie
the dispute, rest as much in law as they do in poli-
tics; and in defining the rights and liabilities of the
states within their own sphere, or in their relations
to the general government, it is not easy to find a
difference between a judicial opinion and apolitical
one. The theory of politics, like the reasoning of
law, looks to the same authorities, the same prece-
dents, the same history, one only being more elastic
than the other in observing and applying the rules
to which both refer. On the few broad questions
which distinguish and make parties, it is, therefore,
no reproach to say of those who consider them phi-
losophically rather than as partisans, that their
political, legal, and even, judicial opinions must be
the same. Thus, while it is assumed that all the
politicians on the commission, who are not judges,
will decide for Hayes or Tilden according to their
party faith, it is also assumed that the decision of
the judges may be forecast by the same test, and
that the decision after all rests with the fifteenth
man, the fifth judge to be selected by his four
brethren. It will be pleasanter if this expectation
is disappointed. The judges are all experienced in
their high office, and the judicial habit disposes to-
ward impersonality, so that the opinions of the man
are forgotten in performing the duties of the judge.
If Senators and Representatives cannot slough off
the antagonisms of the former from which they come
to this grave arbitration, the judges, at least, should
not lose their impartiality in the change of juris-
diction.
The Compromise Bill, as it is called, though
passing both Houses by large majorities, and im-
mediately approved by the President, did not go
through without opposition. No stratagem was
used to delay it, as to be of any use, it had to be
passed at once. But it was debated with great
ability. The contingency it was designed to meet,
had been long foreseen. It was known that the
constitution had made no sufficient provision for
deciding the differences in a close election. It has
been the practice, since the foundation of the Gov-
ernment, for the Vice President to count the votes,
and his action had grown to be considered and taken
as judicial and final. But this has been in cases
where the result of the election was certain, no mat-
ter what might be done as to particulars of the ag-
gregate vote. It was deemed, nevertheless, that
the practice was without authority, and at different
times, and by different measures of legislation, pro-
posed rather than perfected, efforts have been made
to define the powers of the Vice President and of
the two houses of Congress in counting the electoral
votes. The present emergency found no existing
legislation on the subject. The Democrats claimed
that the House of Representatives had co-ordinate
rights with the Senate in counting the votes. The
Senate claimed the right of counting, and of decid-
ing questions arising on the count, as belonging to
its presiding officer, the Vice President, and there
seemed no tribunal to decide the question ; certainly
none to decide it as speedily as it was necessary to
have it decided. There were more Democrats than
Republicans who voted for the bill, though the
disparity was not very great, and the Republicans
furnished the ablest and warmest advocates of the
measure. The Republicans felt that the advanta-
ges of the position were with them, and so, no
doubt, did the Democrats. The practice, almost if
not quite uniform in such cases, gave to the Vice
President, or that office being vacant as now, to the
President of the Senate, who is a Republican, the
control of the counting of the votes. The returns
from the disputed States were in form for Hayes,
or in such form that they could be consistently
counted for him; and to go behind these returns,
and to question their validity, would be against the
doctrines of the Democrats who are always jealous
of any federal interference with state rights or au-
thority. The trouble of the Republicans was that
many of their number doubted the constitutional
right of the Vice President to perform the duties
which he had been accustomed without conflict to
perform; and they were not convinced of the entire
fairness of the returns which in legal forms elected
their candidate. There was, therefore, a division


Arrival of the Mail Steainer "Canii-
Wa.
The Mail Steamer Canima, Captain Liddecoat,
from New York, arrived at her wharf in this Town
soon after 5 o'clock on the evening of Sunday last.
She left that city on the afternoon of Thursday
last, the 1st instant.
We are indebted to Captain Liddecoat, First Of-
ficer Whitter, Mr. Purser Gale, Mr. Miller, 1st En-
gineer, and Mr. Harding for files of New York pa-
pers of the afternoon of the 1st.
Gold in New York on 1st instant weakened from
1051 to 104,ths.
Delaware and Hudson Railway Shares 601.
The Powers and Privileges Committee of the
House of Representatives at Washington, had be.
fore them on the 1st inst., a person named Maddox
who was authorised by Wells of the Lousianna
Returning Board to sell the State, to either party,
for $1,000,000. Maddox had an interview with Pre-
sident Grant and the Secretary at War ; the latter
refused to have anything to do with the proposi-
tion. Maddox is said to have given his evidence
in a direct positive way. Wells wanted $200,000
for himself, and said the "niggers" on the Board
would be satisfied with a smaller sum.
Colorado has been admitted into the Union as a
State, and the representatives thence, sworn in at
Washington on 31st ultimo.
The Coroner's Jury in the case of the Brooklyn
Theatre fire censured both the Theatre Managers
and the Police.
A gang of Railroad Train Wreckers have been
captured in Kansas after having within a week
thrown two trains from the track upon that road,
besides weakening a bridge so that a freight train
was thrown into a creek. Fortunately no lives
were lost.

EUROPE.
DATES OF THE 1ST, FEBUARY.
The Eastern question presents nothing of inter-
est this morning. No new fact has been brought
to light, and no new feature in the diplomacy of any
of the Powers interested directly in the question
has been developed, so that the newspapers have
nothing to speculate upon. The subject is be-
coming threadbare, and yet Europe still waits with
bated breath, not knowing whether the spring may
bring on a war with all its horrors, or whether the
inevitable struggle may be postponed for a year or
two. If present indications are to be relied on
Russia seems anxious that Servia and .Montenegro
should make peace with the Porte, but whether
sha intends that peace to be 'lasting or not is not
clear yet.
A Russnan Advocacy of Peace in Servia.-A des-
patch from St. Petersburg says :-The Golos says no
sensible Russian can desire a renewal of the Servian
war. The advance of the Turks to Belgrade would
disturb friendly relations between the Powers which
now constitute the only basis upon which influence
can profitably be brought to bear upon Turkey. If,
on the other hand, Servia obtains peace on satisfac-
tory conditions the task undertaken by the Powers
of settling the difficulties will be considerably facili-
t-ted."
A New Russian Plan.-A Berlin despatch says
that after much hesitation Russia seems to have
decided upon a peculiar plan. The present state of
things, which is neither peace nor war, is to be inde-
finitely prolonged. Russia does not care to encoun-
ter the Turkish troops 'in their present condition,
nor does she wish to abandon the campaign alto-
gether. She trusts she can support the strain of pro-
longed mobilization better than Turkey.
The troops to be kept an the Frontier -She will,
therefore, keep troops jn the frontier, thus com-
pelling Turkey to do the same. If Turkey follows
Russia's example it is expected that before many
months the people will demand peace at any price
because of the consequent financial collapse.
The Pruth probably to be Crossed.-If, however,
Turkey in desperation decides to anticipate a Rus-
sian attack, the Russians are sufficiently confident
of the result, as they would then fight in their own
country. The Russians, in order to redouble their
pressure on Turkey, will probably cross the Pruth,
if not immediately at least at a latter stage.
Preparing for the Ultimate Struggle.-It is not
likely she will attempt,- the l)anube until Turkey's
fighting spirit is sensibly diminished by delay.
With a view to these contingencies the Russian
army is continually being increased, while all the
Southern fortresses are being made ready for de-
fence. It is because of these circumstances Turkey
thinks it necessary to ask Servia for guarantees
against -participation- i a possible resumption of
hostilities.
Russian efforts to raise Money.-A Vienna corres-
pondent reports that Russia has made fresh but
unsuccessful attempts to raise a loan in Amsterdam
and Germany, and will be obliged to have recourse
to the increase of her floating debt and issue treas-
ury bonds.
Arming fora Great Struggle.-Russia is employ-
ing her time well. War preparations are continued
with energy, and on a larger scale than before.
Nothing has been done hitherto which would in-
dicate that the beginning of a war is very close at
hand, but the preparations leave no doubt of the
determination to follow up the war if it breaks out.
The reserve observed hitherto and the feverish ac-
tivity in arming may be taken as a tolerably sure
sign that Russia will not speak until she is quite
prepared for any contingency which may follow.
German Answer to French Criticism.-The semi-of.-
ficial Provinzial Correspondent reproduces an article
from the Bdoue des Deux Mondes warning Sweden


MR. GLADSTONE.
The Eastern Question-Vehement Anti-Turk-
ish Speech from Mr. Gladstone-Promising r
negotiations of the Porte with Servia and
Montenegro.
LONDON, January 27.-Mr. Gladstone, in a speech
at Taunton to-day, said : We ought to mind our
own business, and why we should mind the East-
ern Question is because ve chosen to make it
our own question. It was made our business under (
circumstances which no true-hearted Englishman 1
will disown. I have had within a few days the
honor of a letter from Mr. Schuyler, United States
Secretary of Legation and Consul-General at Con-
stantinople, in which he says he is about to make a
further report on the trials and executions in, and t
on the state of, Bulgaria. 'I think you will find in
it,' he writes, abundant confirmation of the remark t
at which Selim Effendi took offence.' I quote this
because those who wish to lull the people of Eng- t
land into ignoble slumber are fond of saying there
has been exaggeration on this subject. There
has been no exaggeration, except the exaggeration t
that the Turks had in them the capacity and de- ,
sire of reform. Do not listen to that for a moment. d
But as to the black deeds done in Bulgaria, the I
whole vocabulary of human language is insufficient f
to paint them as they deserve. The people of Eng-
land are bound to resist the seductive language of
those who tell them, now the conference has met
and failed, there is no more to be done. It is you, 4
the people of England, whose resouo es and whose
actions have maintained Turkey in-the position of
power she has so abominably misused. After the
Crimean war the Treaty of Kainardji, concluded
a century ago, which gave Russia the right to inter-
fere for the protection of Turkey's Christian sub-
jects, was destroyed, and we in conjunction with
France destroyed that right. Can anything be
more plain than if we destroyed that right we can-
not divest ourselves of the obligation to put in its
place something equivalent, or better. Therefore
to say our responsibilities are discharged by having
sent an honorable man to Constantinople to give
the Porte good advice and then come away with
nothing but the refusal of that advice in his recol-
lection, is nothing more or less than mockery. I
have not sought to make this speech an attack on the
Government; I think we are justified in attacking
them, and it is just possible at the proper time I
may be taking a share in doing so. But the sett-
ling of past accounts is of secondary consequence.
The Prime Minister has repeatedly dwelt upon the
importance of maintaining what he calls the faith
of treaties. Now the vital question for us is this :
Are the treaties of 1856 in force or not ? I hold it
to be ridiculous, I hold it to be monstrous, to say
they are in force as between Turkey and us. If
the treaties are in force I hardly know what liber-
ties you possess. You are in a disgraceful position.
You become accessories in the maintenance of a
power marked with perhaps the deepest disgrace re-
corded in the whole history of mankind. The new
Turkish constitution is worse than imposture, be-
cause it commits the Christian minority to the ten-
der mercies of the Mahommedan majority in the
Council to which we are invited to leave the task i
of doing justice to the Porte's subjects. If by the
incessant dinning into our ears of the maintenance
of British interests, if by the infusion of every
word of suspicion against the policy of Russia, if
by the abuse of those unhappy Turkish Christians
who, having been an enslaved people, are necessarily
in such respects open to the demoralizing influence
of slavery, if by the recent invention of a Turkish
constitution, made to order and intended to act as a
bar to the propositions of the Conference-if by
these, or any other like device-for I must say the
imagination of the Turkish press of this country is
fertile beyond everything in manufacturing them
-if by these things you are going to be drawn
aside from the great purpose you have in view,
then we shall leave to posterity the melancholy les-
son that the people of England, having long dwelt
in the apathy which was due to ignorance that we
all labored under, and having been once awakened to
gallant and noble effort in favor of the principles
of humanity, justice and freedom, were content to
be lulled to sleep again; that they found the task
of duty too heavy for them; it was more convenient
for every man to go about his own pursuits-his
own money making, his own pleasures-and dis-
miss from his mind these painful and harrowing
subjects. It may be so; but if that be true, these
are marks of a degenerate nation. This is conduct
that emphatically confutes the doctrine of human
progress. But, gentlemen, if you really wish to be
worthy of the forefathers from whom you are des-
cended, of the civil and religious liberty you pos-
sess, and of the religion which it is your greatest
privilege and blessing to possess, for Heaven's sake
do not allow yourselves to be corrupted-for corrup-
tion it is-by these debasing insinuations, but grap-
ple with this great duty which is given you, and
leave to those who come after you a lesson and ex-
ample which I will venture to say, will neither be
less noble nor less beneficial to mankind than the
noblest of all lessons which you have received from
a long line of ancestors." [Great cheering.]

LONDON, Jan. 31.-Countess Howe yesterday
threw herself from a window of her mother's resi-
dence in Berkeley square, and died from the injur-
ies she received. The coroner's jury rendered a
verdict that the act was committed while the lady
was in an unsound state of mind, caused by grief
at the death of Earl Howe, her husband.
A severe gale on the English coast on the 29th
ult. The gale extended to the west and northwest
coasts, doing much damage to shipping.


RUBRIC.


John McArthur, mate of the steamer Perit, which
while on a voyage from Halifax to New York was
destroyed by running on Chatham Bar, is on trial
at Boston for having wilfully cast away the vessel.
The vessel having a British register, the jurisdic.
tion of the United States District Court is denied,
but on the other hand it is contended that jurisdio-
tion is conferred by the fact that the vessel equit.
ably belonged to American citizens, although the
title had been transferred annually to a British
subject to enable the owner to use the vessel as a
coaster in British waters. Judge Lowell intimated
an opinion in favor of the first view, but reserved
his decision. Some of the cargo of4he Perit had
been saved. A portion of her hull had drifted to
sea.

THE GRASSHOPPER AGAIN. -The Cincinnati Jour.
nal of a late day says that the theory that the cold
and freezing of winter would destroy the eggs of
the Grasshopper deposited in Iowa, has been
thoroughly exploded, for sections of carth, in which
eggs were deposited, have been carried into the
house and kept by the fire for a couple of weeks,
and in no case has the experiment failed to produce
a hopper for every egg. They cannot therefore be-
frozen out. Farmers in the Western States are
therefore advised to turn their attention to, the
growing of corn 'being the only grain likely to
escape their ravenous appetite.

BIRTH, at Rural Hill Cottage, Paget, on Sunday
morning last, the WIFE of J. Esten Butterfield, Esqr.,
of a SON.
........., at Prospect Hill, Somerset, on the 26th ult.,
MRS. JOHN SAMBELLS, of a DAUGHTER.

MARRIED, at St. David's Church, St. David's Is-
land, on the 18th January, by the Rev. F. J. F. Light-
bourn, Rector, MR. ROBERT WILSON HIGGS, to SUSAN
hIGGS, second daughter of the late John W. Hay-
ward, Esqr.
... ......, at Minster Church, Sheerness, England, on
24th Deer., by the Revd. Dr. Willis, D.D., WILLIAM
CHARLES HARRIS, to SARAH ELIZABETH CURTIS, both
of Sheerness.
........., at Baltimore, Ma., on the 26th Deer. last, by
Revd. William Alford, Assisted by Dr. France, W. E.
Alford, Esqr., (son of the former), to DOLLIE,: only
daughter of Capt. E. T. White, of Bermuda.

DIED, at Tucker's Town, on Thursday, 1st instant,
Mr. MINGO SMITH, aged 90 years, leaving a wife, 6
children and 12 grandchildren to mourn their loss.
........., suddenly, at St. David's Island, yesterday,
MR. CORNELIUS HAYWARD.
........., on the 25th January, MRS. ANNIE E,, for.
merly of Bermuda, wife of E. B. Smead.-Baltimore,
Ma., Sun, January 27.
... ...... suddenly.at the Royal Naval Yard, yesterday
morning, the 5th instant, of heart disease, in the 43rd
year of his age, MR. JAMES A. I. SPEER, Dispenser,
M. Dockyard, which position he has filled for nine-
teen years, to the general satisfaction of his superior
officers and all others : he has left a wife and five Child-
ren and numerous relatives and friends to mourn their
loss. His remains were brought to Hamilton last
evening for interment, in the Cemetry of St. John's
Church Pembroke, in one of the Dockyard Launches
towed by Tug Boat Olivia, kindly loaned by Captain
Leveson E. H. Somerset, A.D.C. to the Queen, Super-
intendent of the Royal Naval Establishments.
Being a member of the Ancient Order of Foresters,
his funeral was attended by the Members of the Dock-
yard and:Hamilton Courts.


AW There will be a Cricket Match on Thursday
next at the Garrison Ground, Prospect, between the
Officers of St. Georges and Officers Prospect Gar-
risons.

For the Royal Gazette.
THE EIGHTEENTH CANON.
In reply to Churchman" in your issue of to-day
I would say that he might spare himself the trouble
of searching the Scriptures to prove that Jesus is
GOD," because we are quite agreed upon that point;
but the Bible certainly does not give any more war-
rant for bowing at the name of Jesus in our Church
Services than for doing it in our ordinary reading,
or conversation by the fireside, or in our family de-
votions, or upon the Emmaus journey. If he means
;o say, as stated in my first communication (in Ga-
zette of 27th December), "that when our Lord and
the world are in conflict, the whole world is to bow,
and yield at the bare mention of His Name," in
this figurative sense we are agreed also. As to the
'ramers of the Canon, if we are to judge of the
manner and effect of their "studying of the Scrip-
tures" by their directions as to the Ministers
'night caps and stockings," I must say, with all
due deference to their piety, that I think they might
have studied them to much greater advantage, and
this simply shows like the direction on bowing, how
much more their minds were occupied by outward
and visible signs, than by inward and spiritual
grace. Respecting its being still in forCe, I don't
think we are much indebted to the framers for it,
because the substance was adopted long before, and
it would have continued to the present day just
as effectually as if it had never become a Canon.
It was simply to tell the people how to behave
themselves in Church, and to conform to the Prayer
Book, and this, their profession and religious be.
lief, and common sense of propriety taught them
much better, and they complied from a much higher
motive than Canon Law. Does not "Churchman"
imagine that the framers of the Prayer Book also
studied the Holy Scriptures, and is not this Book
of far better authority for" outward ceremonies and
gestures" in conducting our Church' Worship'than
any Canon can be, and yet it tells us nothing about
this extra reverence that the Canon (non-scriptural)
imposes! It is not that in bowing there is any
wrong in 'the thing itself, done by really devout
minds in true reverence, but it is questionable wheth-
er it has not, like many other things in themselves
good, an evil tendency in those not so devout and
reverent as "Churchman" P I started with the
proposition is it not wise to discontinue its profuse
adoption all through our Services, in this age P
The example handed down by observers of it in the
Belief has induced many of the young people to add
to it conceiving that the oftener the better to conm-
ply with the text in Phil., and hence the advisabil-
ity of ceasing to do it at all, as not Scriptural ? Let
us take heed of the evil consequences of similar ex.,
tremes amongst fellow Christians in some of our
Sister Churches, where substance falls a prey to
forms commenced in innocence.
As to "sadness of heart that some professing
Christians do not acknowledge the Divinity of the
Saviour" I certainly advocate administering a more
potent operation than bowing in our Services which
I deem futile. As to alms-deeds, if Churchman"'
is dissatisfied with the argument, all I can say is it
is our Saviour's argument and not mine, and I be-
lieve the nearer we approach to His directions the
more acceptable will our offerings be; and the less
parade there is in our Congregational Worship the
better He will be pleased, because the example of
His whole life on Earth was to shun notoriety and
display; and were He to visit some of the Churches
of the present day and see what goes on there, I
doubt not they would meet the fate of the "tables
of the money changers." The more simple our
Public Worship, and the fewer our ceremonies and
gestures, the more composed is the mind to partake
of spiritual food, and the more nearly do we follow
the footsteps of our Saviour and His Apostles.
Thaniking you Mr. Editor for permitting these
subjects to be so freely discussed in your columns,
I am respectfully, &c.,


and Denmark against Germany's covetousness, and
comments thereon as follows :-" The French press
is repeating the frivolous game which it played
two years ago of insulting and challenging Ger-
many with the reserved intention of complaining
of threats of coercion when Germany, as is natural,
repels these insults.

Lieut. Young, of the Livingstone mission to Af-
rica, is coming to England. He reports that the
mission has had a great effect upon the slave trade.
Only 88 slaves were sent to the coast in 1876, al-
though the traffic previously amounted to many
thousands annually.
The London Post says Col. Gordon, the explorer,
who has returned from his expedition into the in-
terior of Africa under the auspices of the Khedive,
and who arrived in England a few days ago, has
already received an urgent summons from the Khe.
dive to return to Egypt.
The Times reviews Colonel Gordon's Chinese and
African experiences and the proofs he has given of
high administrative capacity and military genius.
It says:" Can it be that Midhat Pasha, in his search
for a Governor for Bulgaria, has made no overtures
to Col. Gordon ? We should be surprised to hear
that he had overlooked the very man in all Europe
who would satisfy the personal conditions implied
in the demands of the Conference. The choice, if
made at all, must be made soon. Turkey has no
time to lose now that a great army is massed on her
frontiers. Perhaps her last chance for peacefully
tiding over the next few critical years lies in the se-
lection of a born ruler of men to govern Bulgaria."
The new judicial system of Great Britain proves
to be a failure in one respect at least,Ithe number
of cases in chancery awaiting decision the present
month l. -:n.; nearly double what they were two
years ago.
The French Senate has voted money for the re-
lief of the famine-stricken people in Pondicherry.


RINDERPEST IN ENGLAND.-A special supplement
of the Gazette was published on 31st ult. announc-
ing that in consequence of the appearance of the
rinderpest in Limehouse parish, a suburb of Lon-
don, the Privy Council have ordered that no cattle,
sheep or goats be allowed to leave that city.
There were eighty-six deaths from small-pox in
London last week.
The British Council has issued further stringent
orders against the importation into Great Britain
from Germany and Belgium of cattle, hay, hides,
horns, fat, hoofs and fresh meats.
It has b; en decided in the British Common Pleas
following a Queen's Bench decision two years ago,
that the receiver of a telegram cannot maintain an
action against the telegraph company for a mistake
in the transmission.
The Admiralty have removed the names of a firm
of engineers from the list of those invited from time
to timetotender forengineering works tobeexecuted
for the Government, in consequence of a member of
the firm having offered a sum of money to one of
the dockyard officials with the view of obtaining
his support in certain transactions in which the
firm was concerned.
A torpedo boat for service at Bermuda is being
constructed for the Government by Messrs. Rennie
& Co., of Greenwich. She is to be an iron vessel
about 70ft. long, and will be employed both for
practice and for laying submarine mines for 'the
defence of the island.-Army and Navy Gazette,
January 13.
SAD FATE OF GERMAN EXPLORERS.-Herr Barth,
the German explorer, who was engaged in survey-
ing the Portuguese possessions in Africa for the
government of Portugal, has committed suicide in
Loanda while delirious with fever. Herr Mohr,
another German explorer, who belonged to the ex-
pedition which was searching for the sources of the
Congo River, is dead.
The section of the Brazilian telegraph cable be-
tween Rio Janeiro and Bahia has been repaired.


January 30th, 1877.







BHERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE.


~4


JIUCTIO." S1IL f For Benefit of Owners, Underwrit-
ON i ers and all others concern .

1t3 ,BY AUCTION,
15th inst., At 12 o'clock, B.Y E L 8,
AT THE RESIDENCE OF THE LATE Wn L L a i n g L ,
In A a I N On Was hington i sWharf,
L 'HI S At 12 o'clock
ALL HIS ^ m -u


Personal Effects,
Consisting of
BEDROOM FURNITURE
CHAIRS TABLES
CHEFFONIER SIDEBOARD
PRESS Chest of DRAWERS
Iron SAFE One SPYGLASS
One WATCH and CHAIN
CROCKERY GLASSWARE
&c., &c,, &c.
W. H. GRISET,
WM. D. FOX,
SExecutors.
St. Georges, Feby. 5th, 1877.

Notice.

The Undersigned
IS INSTRUCTED TO SELL BY
WUtbtc auction,

ON
Friday next,
The 9th inst.,
On the Market Square,
In this Town, at 12 noon,
THAT EXCELLENT
Clipper


With all her SAILS and other Gear includ-
ing her Moorings, the Property of COL. AN-
NESLEY, 97th Regt.
No RESERVE.
W. T. ROBERrTS,
Auctioneer.
St. Georges, Feby. 5, 1877.
A Ral'c Chiance folr

A BUILDING ALLOTMENT
IN TO WN.

I am Instructed to Sell,
33y Publtc 2ucttou,

On Wednesday,
14th instant, At Noon,
ON THE SPOT,
THAT VERY DESIRABLE

Building A, LOTA IEiTV
ON BURNABY STREET,
Between Reid and Church Streets, and next
South of Mr. Rogan's Photograph Gallery.
This valuable Allotment is nearly cleared
out ready for building, its locality is unsur-
passed and Title unquestionable, which renders
comment unnecessary.
WILL BE SOLD AS ABOVE,
12 o'clock, sharp.
JOHN HARNET'F,
Auctioneer.
Hamilton, 'Feby. 6th, 1877.


SNotice.
Full attendance of the Members of Alex-
andrina Lodge, No. 1026 G. U. 0. of'
D FELLOWS is requested on WEINES-
V Evening the 7th Instant, 7"30.
Business of Importance.
By Order,
JAMES D. PERENCHIEF,
Secretary.


un Tuesday iNexi,
13th instant,
100,000 Feet, or thereabouts,

PITCH PINE LUMBER R,
Consisting of
Large 1MBER, lPL\NKS and
BOA RDS.
Particulars of Sizes and Quantities will be
given by Handbill.
The same being Cargo ex Schr. Georgie
Staples," Maloney, Master, which Vessel put
into this Port in distress while on a voyage
from Brunswick, Ga., to New York.
JOHN FOWLE,
Agent.
Hamilton, Feby. 6th, 1877.
.lttctm"o *ale*


SBY A U CT I
WILL BE SOLD,
WT QUft %7U0Xi

On Tuesday next,
13th instant,
Just before Sale of Cargo ex Georgie
Staples,"
10 Tierces COPDFISII,
Remaining unsold ex Ellie,"
40 Sugar-cured HAMS
50 Sides BACON


10 tDozen BASINS,
Three sizes, 6, 8 and 10 quarts each, shipped
contrary to order.
AND,
I I)raught


B. W. WALKER CO.,
Auctioneers.
Hamilton, Feby. 6th, 1877.
1877.

Fyn ES 0Z ..nDSN s03=9
Per Canima,"
FROM NEW YORK,
CUGUIlBE MELON, VEG ET..BLI:
1 \RROW, PUMPKIN, SQUS.i,
SWATE(i MELON.
ALSO,
COLORIFIC, for the Ilair Star PAPERli
E113BOWS and PIPE1' for Stoves
I'homat' Electric OIL
Quaker CLEAN iER, for Polishing
Astral OIL Pure KEROSENE
G uava JELLY C(olza OIL
Gold Leaf and Black TrOil CCO
Vanity Fair GIGA RlT'" E
C. H. HOBINSON.
Front St., Hamilton, 1
6th Feby., 1877.,
Colonist once.
SUPERIOR EATING(

POTATOES.
i By the BUSHEL and BAR-EL, for Sale CHEAP
FOR C ASIH.


Feby. 3, 1877.


W. T. JAMES.


Genteel Board


Hamilton, Feby. 5th, 1877. AN be obtained in a respectable Family in
this Town, for a permanency,
THE SHAREHOLDERS i TERMS EXCEEDINGlY LOW.
OF the AMILTON MARINE ASSU- For Particulars apply at the Royal Gazottu'
OF the HAMILTON MARINE ASSUR- Office.
ANCE ASSOCIATION are requested to February 5th, 1877.-4 pd.
attend
-* meeting PRIVATE 80 ARDf NG,
At the Broker's Office
FRIDA Y A few Persons can be comfortably accommo-
ON FRIDAX dated, at


9th inst., at II o'clock, a.m.
For the purpose of choosing DIRECTORS
for the current year.
J. H. TRIMINGHAM,
Broker.


2ad Feby., 1877.


A Small Family
ORA COUPLE OF SINGLE GENTLElEN
CAN obtain the whole of one Floor, or two
or three Rooms, in a comfortable healthy
residence near the Comnmissariat Offices-with
or without Board,
For information, apply at the Ofllice of the
" Royal Gazette."
February 3rd, 1877.-4 pd,
ARCHBISHOP LEDoscHOWSKI.-The Diritto an-
nounces that an officer of the Roman Correctional
Tribunal has served Archbishop Ledochowski with
a copy of indictment and summons to appear be-
fore the Posen tribunal to answer for breaches of
the German law.
The conviction of Slade, the American 'medium,
who was sentenced in London under the Vagrant
.Act by Magistrate Flowers to three months in the
House of Correction, has been quashed on appeal
on the ground that it did not exactly set forth the
words of the statute, the words by palmistry or
otherwise" being omitted in describing the offence.


MRS. E. H. NEWMAN'S,
Reid Street, Haimilton.
Feby. 5, 1877.-3

For Rent,
In the Town of Ilamilton,
Comfortable
BEDRO OMNS,
Well furnished and at reasonable rates.
Apply at the Office of this Gazette.
Hamilton, Feby. 6, 1877.-lpd tf


TO BE LET.
A COMMODIOUS
SDwelling


Situate in the vicinity of the Commissariat
Office in this Town, and between the Military
Road leading to Fort Ilamilton and the Resi-
deuce of It. 1. )DA'arELL, Esqr.
Possession can be given on 1st May next, or
earlier if required.
I For further particulars apply at the Office of
this Gazette.
Hamilt)n, 5th Feby. 1877,


IVew York Mail Steamern.

TH i' ST EAMI'[I

eCAN IMA
Captain LIDDECOAT.
Will leave here for St. Georges,
On Wednesday,
The 7th Inst., at 10 a.m.,
An.l will receive Produce. Parcels, Freight
and Passengers Baggage, until 9 a.m.
.From St. Georges the Canima" will leave
at 4 p.m. 8th instant, for NEW BEDFORD,
and on discharge of Cargo of the Barque
" Modesta," thence immediately to NEW
YORK, in order to leave on 15th instant com-
pliant with her time table.
Passengers holding Return Tickets will be for-
warded fromil New Bedford to New York at
Steamer's expense.
Passengers purchasing tickets will have
to pay their own way from NNew Bedford to
New Yoik or else remain and be landed when the
" Canima" arrives at New York.
All Mails close at Post Office, at 10 a.m.,
8th.
Carriages with Mails and return ticket Passen-..
gers, will leave the Office of the Undersigned at
I p.m., 8th.
Specie %ill be received at Hamilton only and
until 6 p.m., Wednesday, 7th inst.
TrlOTT & COX,
A GENTS.
Hamilton, Bermuda, Feby. 3, 1877.

SPECIAL NOTICE.
Freight on IlAY will be raised to ONEF DOL-
LAR AND A HALF per bale, until further notice.
Colonist once.

Wanted.


Potatoes,


Onions,


and "Tomatoes,
For which the highest Market rates will be
given.
Co.,i-inments solicited, and Shipments made
flec of charge to
Mlessrs. E. P. y AN. II. Loomis,
Who will make prompt returns.
B. W. WALKER & CO.
Ham ilton, Feby. 5, 1t77.

Notice
To Farmers and others.
The Undersigned is prepared to give his PER-
SONAL ATTENTION to the Sale of
i imuibta Yrobur ,
In the NEW YOiK MA;iKT, and respect-
fully solicits Consignments from Farmers and
Dleaers.
Persons wishing to ship to my address will
please call on
IV. T. JAM ES,
I amiltou.
Who will give every attention to Shipments
by each Steamer, or by any other opportunity
offering-and will furnish stencil plates, &c.,
free of charge.
Prompt account Sales and settlements guar-
anteed.
j .WILLIAM PEACOCK,
Washington Market,
NEW YORK.
Febly. 6, 1877.
Persons desirous of Consigninog
PRODUCE
TO
SMlessrs. Middleton 4' Co.,
NEW YORK.
Will please call upon
Mr. SAML. A. MASTERS.
Who will attend to the Shipment of their
Goods.
Hamilton, Feby. 6, 1877.

Notice
To Growers and Owners of
BERMUrA PRODUCE,
IN consequence of the great increase in ship-
ments of Produce to New York since the
season of 1874 we deem it necessary to give
notice, that we are ready to give our personal
attention as usual to all Shipments of Bermuda
Produce for New York made through us but with-
out being responsible for the nt proceeds until
paid to our order in New York, which will be
given to the New York Consignees for Sale,
by each vessel transporting a shipment.
When necessary to order Specie in return for
any shipment it will be insured at the expense
of the Owners interested, and Owners will
clearly understand that all the dangers of tran-
sport are borne by them;
T RO TT & COX.
Hamilton, Bermuda, to oh 3
January 9, 1877. to0thJune, 3p.


Cook Wanted,
By a Family in this Town.
Apply at the Office of the "Royal Gazette."
Hamilton, Feby. 6th, 1877.


For Sale.
. The Barque
SSTELLA,


243 Tons
With SILS, B10ATS, 3A-
CHORS and CHAINS, &c., &*., &c.
Apply to
A. .. B UTTERFIELD.
Hamilton, Nov. 7th,-cont. 3p tt.


-A


A!'.


Army Contracts.

Commissariat Office,
HAMILTON, BERMUDA, 1st Feby., 1877.
SEALED TENDERS in Duplicate
will be received at the above Office, as
under, from Persons desirous of entering into
Contract for the following
Rpupplitz an*0 CRPWOUM
FOR ONE YEAR,
Commencing on the 1st April next, namely:
Until 12 o'clock, Noon, of


The 16th day of February, 1877,
Tenders will be received for the Supply of
Land Transport......Hamilton and Prospect
District
Do.............St. Georges District
Wines, Spirits, and For all Military Hospit-
Beer J als in Bermuda
Groceries, Vegeta- For all Military Hospit-
rocees, Veget als and Prisons in
bles, &c.( Bermuda
Forage ..............For all Stations in Ber-
muda
Kerosene & Whale Oil Do.
Lamps and Fittings.. Do.
Hops and Malt....... Do.
Fuel Wood .......... Do.
Rushes.............. Do.
W ater............... Do.
Coarse Salt.......... Do.
NOTE.-The Contract for Wines, &E., includes the
whole of Bermuda, so also does the Contract for
Groceries.
Fuel Wood may be tendered for East of the Cause-
way and West of the Causeway, as well as for all
Stations in Bermuda.


Until 12 o'clock Noon of


The 19th day of February, 1877,
Tenders w'ill-.be received for
Supply of Lime, for all Stations in Bermuda
Washing and Repairing Barrack Bedding at
St. Georges
Purchase of Empty I Hamilton
Barrels


Do.
Do.
Purchase of Re]
Do.
Do.
Purchase of
Manure
Do.
Do.


St. Georges
Ireland Island
fuse from Prospect Hospital
St. George's Do.
Watford Do.
Stable I Prospect Stables


Shoeing War Depart-
ment Horses
Do.
Do.


St. Georges Do.
Ireland Island Do.
Prospect & Hamilton
St. Georges
Ireland Island
At all Stati ins iR -


Emptying Ash Pits d s -
Do. Dry Earth Closets Do.
Do. Soil or Cess Pitts Do.
Sweeping Chimnies Do.
I.-Forms of Tender containing full instruc-
tions can be obtained at the DISTRICT COMMIS-
SARY GENERAL'S OFFICE, HAMILTON, on and
after the 8th instant, between the hours of
10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
II.-Applicants for Forms of Tender must
furnish the District Commissary General with
every information as to their Names, places of
abode, and means of executing a Contract.
III.-The Tenders must be properly filled up
in every particular and reliable Securities to
the amounts specified in each Tender must be
furnished.
IV.-Each Contract must be tendered for
separately, but there is no objection to any one
person tendering for two or more Contracts.
V.-Each Tender must be separately enclos-
ed in Envelopes, addressed to "THE DISTRICT
COMMISSARY GENERAL, HAMILTON," and
marked outside' Tender for Wines and Spirits,'
'Land Transport,' 'Forage,' or as the case
may be.
VI.-The DISTRICT COMMISSARY GENERAL
reserves the right of rejecting any or all the
Tenders.
t. J. WILKINSON,
A. C.aG.,
2 District Commissary General.
Colonist copy twice.

For Sale.

JNova Scotia
Onion Box Material.
A Small Cargo of bright and fresh-
I ly cut ONION BOXES, expected daily,
AND IN STORE
New York Onion Box MATERIAL of first
quality,
,New Brunswick TOMATO BOX ENDS and
LATHS very bright and dry.
ON WHARF AND IN YARD.
Ex Schooner Sarah B,
PITCH PINE of almost every
dimention required in this Market.
TROTT & cox.
6th February, 1877.-2 3p.
"Colonist" copy twice third page.


Lost,
D URING the Bermuda Hunt on Thursday
Last the 1st Inst.,
A GENTLEMAN'S
Gold Albert Watch Chain,
With Keys and a Silver Coin of Henry VII,
attached.
Anyone bringing the same to the Commis-
sariat Office, Hamilton, will be suitably re-
wivrded.


Feby. 6, 1877..


H J. WILKINSON,
A. 0. G.
-1


BF, iiUDA, Alias
SOM ERIS' ISLANDS,
By His Excellency Major Gen-
eral JOHN HENRY
[L.S.M.1] LEFROY, C. B.,
Governor, Command-
3- 1. Lefroy, er-in-Chief and Vice,
Governor and Commander- Admiral in and over
in-Chief, these Islands, rc., gfc.,
Sfc.
1 3ro)daination.
W1 I ER EAS this present COLONIAL PARLIA-
MENT stands Proroguedto TI IURSDAY,
the Eighth day of February Instant; I have
thought fit further to Prorogue, and do hereby
further Prorogue the s;id COLONIAL PARLIA-
MFNT, to
WED.2, SD.4g ,
The 21st day of March, 1877,
Of which as well the Members of the Legisla-
tive Council as the Members of the House of
Assembly are hereby required to take notice
and to govern themselves accordingly.
Given under my Hand and the Great
Seal of these Islands, this
Third day of February, 1877,
and in the Fortieth year of
Her Majesty's Reign.
By His Excellency's Command,
JAMES TUCKER,
Colonial Secretary.
God Save the Queen.

To Public J'accinators.

Colonial Secretary's Office,
JANUA.RY 31, 1877.
T HE usual Quarterly supply of
VACCINE LYMPH has been received
and will be distributed on application at this
Office.
JAMES TUCKER,
1 colonial Secretary.

Tenders
Will be received until Noon of


7th February,
By the CHURCH VESTRY CLERK of Paget, from
persons willing to Contract for either of the
follow ing works:
(1) To make and place Sixty-eight Seats sim-
ilar to those now in St. Paul's Church, Paget,
numbered 39 and 78.
(2) To Build Buttresses (Twenty-one or there-
abouts) to the transepts and chancel of the
said Church, similar to those now standing at
the South last and South West corners of the
Southern transept.
Further particulars may be obtained by refer-
ring to the Rector,
Rev. J. L. LOUGH.
Jan. 20. 1877.-3 3p


for. ar.d.lio.
TIHE SCHOONER

1"METEO R,"
W. 0. DUNScouIBE, .Master,
Will Sail for the above Port,

About 28th Instant.
Offering for Freight and Passengers at cus-
tomary rates.
Highest rates paid for second size
POTATOES.
B. W. WALKER <. Co
Ilamilton, Feby. 5, 1877.
Unclaimed Letters.
o G Autley, Mrs Basham, G H P Bell, Thos J
Butterfield, Selina Burchall,a Miss M E Browi, Elea-
nor Bean, Peter Burgess, Maryann Belon, G Cook,
Miss S Clemants, Jos Darrell, W L Dickinson, W 8
Darrell, Letitia Darrell, Thos Dickinson, Jos F Dar-
rell, Alma George, Walter Glendinning, Jane Gil-
bert, Wm H Gilbert, Theodosia Gianto, Nathaniel
Hayward, Samuel T Harford, Wm B Jennings,
Emma Jackson, Jane Johnson, Mrs Wm C King,
Alex Logan, T Woodward Lightbourr,, Henry J
Lloyd, Jas G Lawrence, Margaret McMahen, Herbert
Moulton, Jas Mullens, Fanny Moore, Sarah Jane
Petty, R Pearman, Manuel Perry, Cecilia Roberts,
Geo Robinson, Jas Robiuson, Kite V Smith, Ben-
jamin E Smith, W 0 R Smith, Amelius Stowe, J F
Smith, Mrs Dr Smith, Rich N Swan, John Searles,
Wm H Shadbolt, Wm A Searles, John H Smith,
Englesbe Stovell, Joseph Trott, Joseph Tuzo, Berj
Trott, M J Talbot, B Tynes, Benj T Trott, Mrs
Susanna R Tucker, John Virgin, Peter Williams
Miss E Wilkinson, Julius Wood, Helena Williams,
(Pagtt,) Mrs Jane Wilson, Win White (Baker,) John
Yates, Robt R Young, Eliza D Young.
Post Office, Hamilton, Feby. 5, 1877.
MAILS FOR ENGLAND, United States and
Dominion of Canada, per Steamer Canima, close at
the Post Office, Hamilton, on Thursday next, at 10
a.m. Letters received in Forenoon Mails will be in
time.
UNCLAIMED LETTERS IN THE POST OF.
FICE, ST. GEORGES, 5th February, 1877.
Mrs Bridle, Israel Buichall, Thos D Birch, Step-
hen Brangman, Wm Birch, English Consul, John
Carty, F W Chaley, Denis B Davis, Joseph Dickin-
son, Mr Dill, John Evans, I J Dacreo, Ed James,
Ed Low, Mary Lightbourne, Honble A J Musson,
Wm McCallan, Thos G Morris, Samuel Mlillett,
John A Nearon, Fied Ober, Rebecca Outerb.idge,
Samuel J Richardson, Andrew if P Robertson Dr A
Ries, T S Spicer, Ann Smith, John H Smith, Jona-
than Smith, Catherine Smith, Mrs Wm Smith, Eltz
R Smith, Sarah A Swainson, Elizabeth I Tablo-, W S
Tankard, Henrietta E I rott, Jis Trott, J 11 Upton,
M D Vigreaux, Ed Walsh, Jas F Wilsoi, Josep'i
Walker, Robt White
Postage Stamps for sale at the Royal Gagelte"
Stationery Store,


A
ODI
DAI


I









..'.'.-.


2 M )A ROYAL GAZETT1


hand si 'e '. n O-.s,, r ;,fr is *ia hine vo-
lume issuc..1 thv. fIh S P ;i , "i. ,n IneiTuiin, m under
the title "7.Li Distribution annd YV;ri:tions ,fM the
Atmospheric Temperature in the United states."
: 1. temperature tables are based upon all available
thermometric observations made in the Unitedi States
and Canada previous to the year 1871, the estimated
number of which will not fall below 11,0e'-;,'' '. The
labour of 1 ,. ;:.' this great mass of observations
and of deducing some general results has been ably
performed by Mr. t'l.:..i.:. A. Schott, of the Coast
Survey Office, to whom science has also been indebted
for the Smithsonian Rain T.il,' and for many other
special works in :*.. Three large charts
accompany this work, showing the distribution of
surface temperature for the summer, the winter, and
the year. Numerous ,.,;: plates illustrate the
daily and annual fluctuations of temperature. Mr.
Schott finds no perceptible secular change in the tem-
perature of the country, nor any deci 1ed connection
between our i -es and the variations in solar
spots. For ten stations the mean temperatures have
been computed for every day of the year, and it ap-
pears from these that changes in the normal tempera-
ture of any day e(xt.end over large fracts of country,
and progress in an easterly direction. All the sta-
tions agree in shewi; a rpild rise in temperature
about the 20th of Februlnry. There are also indica-
tions that the hottest and coldest epochs change some-
what from year to year, n adng- a complete circuit in
seventy years through a ranne of %bout six weeks.
On comparing the average .;. : '. of the win with
the av. ,i.. temperature, it appears evident that for
years of northerly winds the temperature is lower, and
for southerly winds is higher, so that secular changes
in local temperature are attributable to corresponding
changes in the direction of the wind, These latter
changes, on the other hand, must be a part of a sys-
tem of oscillations in the -. i currents of the at-
mosphere, which may possibly be ultimately due to
slight variations in solar radiation,
Although the Smithsonian Tables approach so near-
ly to being an exhaustive compilation, yet there are
continually being brought to light hitherto unknown
series of observations, some of which will be worthy
of future publication. Of this character is the exten-
sive work done by Engelmann in 1859, as meteorolo-
gist to Simpson's explorations in Utah. Hlis report
on the hypsometric results of these observations has
just been published by the Army Engineer Bureau,
and forms one of the best contributions that the army
has made to the subject. In this report Engelmahn
gives a very lucid explanation of the influence that
vapour exerts in affecting the diurnal variations of
temperature on the Western plateaus. Editor's Sci-
entific Record in Harper's Magazine for November.

PRESIDENT GRANT AND SIR EDWARD
THORNTON.
President Grant and the Thorntons are described
by Mrs. Clemrmer in The Independent as among the
notabilities who walk along Pennsylvania-ave:
Here is Lady Thornton afoot-her dress-skirt
lifted h,,h, her gray petticoat clearing the wet
ground below at every turn-her fair, clear, English
face evidently in pursuit of something, in earnest.
Andrew Johnson was a frequent walker here.
With his image comes back the extreme nicety of
his dress. This was remarkable. There was no-
thing effeminate or dandified in it; but such a gloss
of broardcloth, such perfection of fit, such fault-
lessly gloved hands were not easily overlooked, if
only from contrast to the ordinary ranks of care-
lessly-dressed men. Another exceedingly well-
dressed man who walks Pennsylvania-ave, is Pre-
sident Grant. In the earlier days of his Adminis-
tration he did dump his hands in his pockets and
travel slowly along the street with a smoking cigar
in his mouth. He does no such thing now. Neith-
er does be any longer use his pockets as mittens.
His bands are carefully gloved, and he carries a
substantial cane. I know old people who would
say, comparing him with his former self: 'The Pre-
sident looks as if he had got religion,' Another
especially clean-looking man, who walks every day
on Pennsylvania-ave., is the British Minister, Sir
Edward Thornton. He has dark, kind, sagacious
eyes, the regulation mutton-chop whiskers of the
Englishman, great big hands and feet, altogether
that beefsteak basis of body and limb which Amer-
icans lack and long for. No human being could
be freer from pomposity or airs of any sort. His
feet, planted firmly on the solid earth, seem to be
forever striking out for new miles to conquer, and
his eyes to be forever in quest of some human crea-
ture whom he may help by the way. The stately
coach of the English L.e;aii',' may be seen any day
on the Avenue, with its maroon liveries and cock-
aded outriders; but the 'dean of the corps' is sel-
dom in it. Him you meet striding along the street
'r" idi' in the First cars. T"r.' no woman is so
poor or so shabby that the British 'iI-'st',,' will
not put her ticket in the box, nor one so old or
ugly that he wil! not give her his seat. He is a
gentleman of gentlemen.
S'i he Ameican .'' .:-as in Matamoris have
asked the United States Government to protect
Jhem by a military force.


0


.New Ye ?8s Stock
FOR PRESEATS,-AT LOW
PRICES,
CONSISTING OF :-
W ATCHES CLOCKS
JE W ELR Y (English and American)
Solid SILVER Silver PLATEDWA!RE
Pearl Bone and liair GOO )S
SPECTACLES, &c.
l Making in all, as suitable a collection for the
public as any ever off red before.
C. S. WHITTERI,
Next west Gazette" Office.
Hlamilton, Iecember 3, 1876.



General Shipping and
ConisRiBsionR lerehalsint,
52 Exchange Place,
NEW YORK.
Refer to Messrs. 4. S.' 'GIIAMJ & Co.,
IlI aniltoi,.

rhE BEST INVESTMENT OF
THE D)AY FOR A MA3 \1, OIJTL \Y.
--J- v.... And N her there is no
"' "i'- previous knriwled(ge of
Se luinecss required,
._. -. .4 .''. .Ging i'
;. '" ,---. e r an-,d Soda-w at-r
-. -.. '. ,achi as the public
laste I o iiuc on h ih trets' fori AGrated
D1;inks. The book of :* pI cs ,of illustrations
and inkforni C,'n for warded frec,
S iN I T, aid F'N o ., 'n.i-e rs,
20() I'orslmta -street, lioxton, Londoni, LEnglalil,
Nov. 4, 1876.-13


POCK IE'I


S -


~ ~: ---~
A'.''
-. '


~~RL NOW REdO 17.


The Sheet contains all the customary inform -i
ation in an Almanack.
The iook contains Dl)iI '(r ) IS for the
Towns of Ilainilton and St. George; a General
Itinerary; a IPLN of the Tt)\VOWN (F tHA
I LTON, and all information generally to be
f-eund in such publications.
PRICEs-Sheet 1/; Book, plain, 1/6; Ditto,
intrrleavod, 1/9.
Can be had at the Post Office, St. George;
of the Chief Warder, Royal Nava Yard, Ire-
land island ; of tie several uCarriers of the
" Gazette," and at the G zettc" m oice.
Royal Gazette Office,
Dec. : ', .
^..w- 0. iatle
H- ^4it'~elrzf


7rI
T iC North' .


Lieifrs


Cattle Food


C3ora- ,.


Liquid Beef Extract and
Tonic Restorer.


Especially adapted for Invalids. Try it. No
Reviver equal to it.

Mafdie's Disilectan9t
The Great Preventive from Fevers, Small Pox
and all Infectious Diseases ; also for Foot and
Mouth Diseases, &c., in Cattle. No llouses
hold or Farmstead should be without it. It is
the Best, Cheapest, Safest and without Smell.
The Undersignedcan supply a small quantity
of each of the above Articles, which he will sell
Cheap for Cash; and orders for the same are
solicited.
W. T. ROBERTS,
Agent.
St. Georges, 30th March, 1874.

Lost,
Fi0OM II. I. S. Eclipse," A L\IRGL
Wm I'rE OWL. Any person bringing the
same to Government lIous,, Mount Langton,
will receive 1 KEWARI) if the Bird be alive
and 10s. if dead.
Mt. I angton, Jan. 9, 1877.

Lost.
EFT on a Chair, at the Naval Sports, Som-
Serset, ou 20th inst.,
A LARGE SCARLET WORSTED

V however brings it to the Porter R. N. Hos-
pital, shall receive FIVE SHILIS! "GS reward.
Ireland Island, 29th Jan., 1877.

Notice
ALL DEMANDS against the Estate of the
late AUGUSTUs PIENISTON, are re-
quested to be rendered to the Undersignsed
before WEDNESDAY, 28th February next.
All Persons INDEBTED to the said Estate
ate required to make Payment by the above
named date.
ANNA MARIA PENISTON,
Executri
EDW,\RD PENISTON,
T. J. PEARMAN,
Executors.
The Flatts, Jany. 15th, 1877.

W. 0. F. B1ASCO EE, 0 -D.,
1F. A. A.) .S-)
REID STREET, HAMILTON.
EAST END.


2Jas. (a Lawrence,


ST. GEOGES and IIAMilI'TON,
B ER MIIDA.

i Examinations made and Leaks stopped at small


expense.
May 9th, 1876.

Win. James Heney,


BROKEAND
AND


Commission
II\M IULTON,


Clothes


j7.3
enovatUU(i,14


.... m tt)
lias just returned from New York,
where he has perfected himself in the art of
DYLNG 3AJ)D REAOV"TIA'G
WORA CLOTHES,
And offers his services to the Public in that
capacity; and being thankful for past favors,
solicits a continuance of support from his late
patrons ; and the Public generally are invited to
call and exatiine Work done by him.
He has opened a Shop in Burnaby Street near
Church, under the Photograph Gallery of Mr.
JOHN ROGAN, Jr.
0( AN APPRENTICE wanted for the
above Business.
Hamilton, Delember 4th, i 87g6.

For ale,

CherB for CCash,
A BIOADWOOI)


In good order.
Apply at the Royal Gazette" Office.
Hamilton, Jan. 20, 1877.



Private


NORT'I'l OF TRINITY CHURCHH,
I lamilton.
Nov. 13, 1876.

f.- ...:72--
.':-.'..; '.- ". ?


!1


/Igent,
BKI, MIJ!)A.


'' THlE MOST MO(IERATE 1ATIES
Can be obtained from the
PHOENIX INSURANCE CO P.1' .1N Y
of London,
O(e of the lor.gt Established and Wealthiest
Ofricos in C(reat Britain,

Through thE BRANCIl OFFICE in these
Isl.ads, a Saving is effectedto to he Insured
of the Stamp Duty, a very considerablee item.
!1:-,KS taken both on IRFAL and PERSONAL
PI'OP 'ITY fo 3, 6 or 12 months,
No FI'S and no CHAItGE for Policies.
N. A. IU'UT"TEIRFIE_ L ,P
Agent.
i n: h. n, ,- :L.r 9th, 186:5.
T. ,. ,_

Ladies ,,d (Gentlemen,
:-':'< ":".. .. :7-,.i-/:. t .. ,

5,one Haven, Reid Street,
Hamilton..
Novr, 6, 1876.--tf


Notice of emoval.



dentist,
Has Removed to St. Georges,
And may be consulted there in Kent St,
daily, between 9 a.nm. and 5 o'clock.
October 10, 187(6.




KS omerse t Livery

ST BLE
NEAR NAVAL CRICKET FIELD,
E. Crawley (Mail Contractor),
PROPRIETOR.
horses and Carriages, (with Experienced Dri-
vers,) obtainable at all hours on accommoda-
ting Terms.
October 24th, 1876.

" Eau" of Dr.. oltz for
HAIR DYE.

rfj'lIS WATER, ie of an entirely vegetable
t composition, and its use is quite inof-
fensive.
Thanks to this peculiar quality which gives it
no rival, D). IIOLTZ'S Hair Dye has not the
disadvantage of the other preparations which
give to the hair an unnatural vulgarly color.
Guided by his medical knowledge and his
great chemical experiences, D). HOLTZ has
succeeded in the discovery of plants, which give
the richest balsamic dyeing and curative essen-
ces, and it is by this study that he succeeded to
compound a dye which may be styled as the
1., f,. '.,,' by excellence of the chevelure.
GEN R-AL WA'.: US IN PARIS,
La Correspondence Partiienne.
4 Rue do la 'Tacherio, 4.

SIHLD Keeps Watch CHAINS,
WATCHES. Call and see them.


From Shediac, N. I.,
Ex Brigt. T. H. A, PITT,
The following

Which the Subscriber offers
CHEAP FOR CASH,
1JLS Garnet Planting POTATOES
Minnesota DO.
Early Rose DO.
Onion Box MATERIAL
Tomato Do DO
OATS LATHS'
LUMBER i I, &c., &c.
THOSE. H. PPITT.
West Front st., Ilarmilton, Nov. 27, i876.

Heceivecd by the Satellite
FR OM LONDO.,
A nd for Sale 'at the Royal Ga-
zette" Sationery Store,
)LAYIN( C \ l( )S-various patterns and
prices
Freig n PAPIERV-'"- Green, Pink, Lilac,
Orange and White
ENVELOPES to match
Cream laid tOOLSCAI', LETTER and NOTE,
ruled and plain INVI' lopesES' to match
Pocket T T 'I .ETS, different sizes
Cricket B A.TS, ALLS, S'VIUJlPS, Leg and
Knee G(UARDDS, GLOVES, Si'lKl ES, &c.
Ci AIPS and liorderings for Scrap BOOKS
Large and '"mall lBrown Paper for Patterns, &c.
Indian CEMENT, for repairing all kinds of
Glass, China, &c.
Photograph FRAMES aud ALBUMS, a grea
variety and at low figures
Golden Toy BOOKS Surprise Do. Do.
Napkin RINGS Date RACKS in variety
GAM IKS ot Snap, Happy Families, Fright,
ilickery D)ickcry Dock and Hiumpty Dumpty.
llamilton, Jany. 15th, 1877.


TFill BLOOD1 !
T lIE


THE BLOOdI !
BLOOD !


CL A R K E S
VWorld auRned Blood lixtul'e.
FOR CLEANSING and CLEARING the BLOOD from
11 ALL IMPURITIES, whether arising from youth-
ful indiscretion or any other cause, cannot be too
highly recommended. It
Cures Old Sores
Cures Ulcerated Sores in the Neck
Cures Ulcerated Sore Legs
Cures Blackheads or Pimples on Face
Cures Scurvy Sores
Cures Cancerous Ulcers
Cures Blood and Skin Diseases
Cures Glandular Swellings
Clears the Blood from all Impuro Matter, from
whatever cause arising.
As this mixture is pleasant to the taste and war-
ranted free from mercury-which all pills and most
medicines sold for the above diseases contain-the
Proprietor solicits sufferers to give it a trial to test
its value.
Thousands of Testimonials from all Parts.
Sold in Bottles 2s. 3d. each and in Cases,contain-
ing 6 Bottles, Ills. each, sufficient to effect a per-
mianentcure in long standing cases, by all Chemists
and Patent Medicine Vendors; or sent to any
address on receipt of 27 or 132 stamps, by
F J CLARKE, Chemist, High Street, LINCOLN.
Wholesale Agents.:-
BA.!CLAY & SONS, LONDON,AND ALL T-H EWHiOLESALr E
HOUSES.


ia" < -








Brown Windsor Soap
Glycerine Cold Cream
Pure Glycerine Soap
SOAPS Marshmallow Soap
Elder Flower Soap
Carbolic Acid and Glycerine
Soap
SMedieval Perfume
EXTRACTS FOR THE J Jockey Club Bouquet
HANDKERCHIEF ] Extract of Ylangilang
Ess. Boquet, &c., &c.
Marrow Oil
POMADES Crystal Cream
Exquisite Pomade, &c., z,..
Saponaceous Tooth Powder, Violet Powder,
Rosemary and Cantherides lair Wash,
Toilet Vinegar, and every description of Toilet
and Perfumery
Manufactory,
23 & 33, Ri LIon ROAD, HOLBORN, LONDON.
Depot-PARIs.

For Uent,

JL /
In -he Township, lately occupied hy Assistant
Commissary General SATrcHWeLL. Immediate
possess on given.
Apply at the Office of the R,ya! Gazette."
December 5,1876.


Printing & S1ationery.

Royal Gazette Office,
Corner of Reid and Burnaby Streets, lHam-
ilton,
WhIERE ALL KINDS OF
3B0D WO7R
Is Executed with Neatness and Despatch.

At. the Stationery Store adjoining the above
Office
Always on hand, every variety of Articles in
that line.
Also, Cricketing GEA R, c., cc.
Nov. 14, 1876.
Full Sets i\HOOCtHES and EAR RINGS,
BRACELETS, Neck CHAINS, CROSSES
Ladies' and Gents' Watch CHAINS, at
CHlILD'S.

J. & E. Atkinson's

PER FU MNE1RY',
celebrated for nearly a century past, is of the very
bhst English inan fiicture. For its purity ant) d grea
excellence it has ohta;npd the following
EXHIBITION PRIZE MEDALS,
LONDON, 1862. PARIS 1867. COBDOVA, 1872.
LIMA, 1872. VIEXNA, 1873.

Atkinsonis Choice Perfumes for

White Rose, Frangipannre, Ylang Ylang, Stephano-
tis, Opopanax, Jockey Club, Ess. Bouquet,
Trevol, ilagnolia, Janmin, Wood Vio-
let.
And all other odours, of the finest quality only.

ATKINSON'S
Celebrated Eaui de Cologne
is strongly recommended, being more lasting and
fragrant than the Germin kinds.

ATK INSON S
OLD BROWN WINDSOR SOAP
celebrated for so many years, continues to be made
as heretofore. It is strongly Perfumed, and will)
onnd very durable in use.
ATKINSON'S BE\RS' GREASE, COLD
CREAM, SACHET POWDERS, TRANAPAR.
ENT GLYCERINE SOAP, ROsE TOILET
PO\\ DER, TOILET VINEGAR, VELOUTINE,
WHITE ROSE TOOTlH PASTE,
and otier specialties and general articles of Perfu-
mery may be obtained of all dealers throughout the
World, and of the AManufacturers,
,. & 3. A.TrZI: O N c
24, OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, W.

PRICE LIST FREE ON APPLICATION.
CAUTION.--Messrs. J. & E. ATKINSON manu-
facture their articles of one and the best quality
only. Purchasers are cautioned to avoid counter-
feits by observing that each article is labelled with
the Firm's Trade Mark, a White Rose on a
Golden Lyrea;" printed in seven colours.
ESTABLISHED 1799.
April 11, 1876-12m If


Nt,.


'Its


BRONZE MEDAL AT THE
Universal Exhibition of Paris 1855,
Bronze Modal at tho Exhibition of Trieste, 1871,
Silv, r Medal at the Exbibition of Havre, 18681
Silver Medal at 'hie Exhibition of Paris, 1872,
Gold Medal at the Exhibition of Lyons, i87-2,
Diploma of honor at the maritimee Exhibition, Pa-
ris, 1875,
RIGOLLO T'S
SIUS1TA RD PAPER
FOR SINAPISMS OR PLASTERS,
Adopted by the Hospitals of Pars, Field
and Military Hospital, by the
English Royal Navy and
the French National
Navy, &c.

To retain the whole of the properties of Mustard
in its powdered state and to obtain easily in a few
moments a decided result with the smallest possible
quantity of the remedy, are the problems which IM.
Rigollot has solved in the most conclusive and sa-
tisfactory manner. Rigollot's Sinapism in leaves
will, therefore, be found in every family, for the
prompt action obtained by it in many cases ofemer-
geney readers it an invaluable remedy for various
disorders.
(Signed) A. BOUCHARDAT
Annuaire therapentique ann6e 1~6., p. 204.
IMPORTANT NOTICE.
The precious quality of Rigollot's Paper in cases
of great gravity, is that of acting very rapidly. It is
an important Healing Agent. To children, weak
and nervous, persons, I strongly recommend the fol-
lo.wing method of graduating the action of the plas-
ter according to the will or condition of the patient,
viz., to put one, two, or three leaves of ,wet blot-
ting paper between the Sinapism and the ,skin.
An old piece of fine linen may also be employed
instead of blotting paper.
Beware oflmitation. .
MANUFACTORY AS D WAREHOUSE, AVENUE VICTORIA.
24 PARIs,-and by all respectable Chemists.

GORHAM'S Manufactory of Solid SILVER
WARE. Fancy Pieces in Cases for Pre-
sents-warranted 90-1000 fine, at CHILD'S.

3LMAWACK-FEBRUARY, ian7.


Sun,.

ris. sets. N

6 54 5 34'23
6 54 5 34,24
6 53 5 35 25
6 52 5 36:26
6 52 5 38 27
6 51 5 39 28
6 49 5 39 29


Tide,


REMARKS.


[Shrove Sunday
Quinquagesima-


New Moon, 13 day, 6h 40m AM.

TUi BERMUDA ROYAL GAZETTE is published
every Tuesday by DON&LD M'PHEE LEE,
Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent
Majesty,
AT HIS OiFFIC.',
North-west Corner of Reid and Burnaby Streets,
Hamilton,
where Blanks, Hand-bills, &c., will be
printed at the shortest notice.-Agent
at St. Georges for the Royal Gazelle,
JAMES TIIHES, Esqr., Post Mlaster General.


I'iTi'S CH IOICE PERFUMiE.'Y patron-
S ised by all the worhi!.
RINMEL'S IHLAX G THLANO. VANDA, HENNA, JOCKFY
CLUo, FRANGIPANE and other Perfumes of exquisite
fragrance.
RIMMEL'S LAVENDER \VATMR distilled from Mit-
cham Flowers.
RIMMEL'S TOILET VINEGAR, celebrated for its
useful and sanitary properties.
RIMMEL'S EXTRACT OF LIME JUICE AND GLYCE-
RINE, the best preparation for the Hair especially
in warm climates.
RIMMEL'S DUGONO OIL SOAP, perfumed with Aus.
tralian Educatusly
RIMMEL'S GLYCERINE HONEY, WINDSOR, and
other Toilet Soaps.
RIMMEL'S ROSE WATER, COSTUME AND FLORAL
CRACKERS, very amusing for Balls and Parties.
RIMMEL'S VIOLET, ROSE LEAF, RICE, and other
Toilet Powders.
A Liberal allowance to Shippers.
EUGENE RIMMEL,Perfumer to HRH the Prin-
cess of Wales, 96 Strand ; 128 Regent
Street, and 24, Cornhill, London; 16
Boulevard des Italiens, Paris, and 27
King's Road, Brighton.
Sold by all Perfuiiery Venders.

Whetby Jet and Vulcanite Jewelry
Consisting of
WVATCIHES for Ladies, Watches for Gen-,
tiemen, Watches for Boys, in gold or
silver cases, at prices to suit all, at CHILD'S.




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