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Group Title: Strawberry field day.
Title: Strawberry field day. February 4, 1981.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076494/00004
 Material Information
Title: Strawberry field day. February 4, 1981.
Series Title: Strawberry field day.
Alternate Title: Research report - Dover, Florida Agricultural Research Center ; SV81-1
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Agricultural Research Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: 1981
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076494
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 143121533

Table of Contents
    Program
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Field map
        Page 12
Full Text



\Dover ARC Resedrch Report SV81-1 February 1981

ME LIBRARY
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER FEJ 0 1981
Dover, Florida
OF THE ni. of Florida
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
STRAWBERRY FIELb DAY
Wednesday, February 4, 1981
~~~m ~ k~~lkWIrl~k~~w-Jw~~wkk


P.M.
2:30
3:00
3:05
3:20
3:35
3:50
4:05
4:15


PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS
W. E. Waters, Director (AREC-Bradenton)
A. J. Overman, Nematologist (AREC-Bradenton)
J. F. Price, Assistant Entomologist (AREC-Bradenton)
J. W. Prevatt, Area Extension Economist (AREC-Bradenton)
Lindley Gibbs, Extension Agent I, Hillsborough County
C. M. Howard, Plant Pathologist (ARC-Dover)
E. E. Albregts, Soil Chemist (ARC-Dover)


Lindley Gibbs, Hillsborough County Extension Agent I Moderator


Assembly and Registration
Dr. W. E. Waters, Welcome
Mrs. A. J. Overman Nematode Research
Mr. J. W. Prevatt Strawberry Production Costs
Dr. J. F. Price Insects on Strawberries
Dr. C. M. Howard Strawberry Varieties and Diseases
Dr. E. E. Albregts Strawberry Nutrition and Culture
Tour of Strawberry Research Plots


Soft Drinks Courtesy of Shore Fertilizer Company, Plant City, Florida


*.. A..... .. A .. A A*****~k~~~***'**"*********W












STRAWBERRY PRODUCTION COSTS
J. W. Prevatt
The total area planted to strawberries in Florida has doubled during
the last five years. In addition, the yield per acre has also increased
approximately thirty percent. Therefore, due to increased yield per acre
and more acres of production, the total number of flats produced has in-
creased around 130 percent over the last five years. Furthermore, the
average value per flat has significantly idnreased, which has resulted in
strawberry sales moving from an eight million dollar level to 22 million
dollars in just five years.
Fortunately, strawberry production costs have not outpaced production
and product prices. Table 1 reveals the estimated breakeven prices to cover
operating and ownership costs for strawberry production during 1980-81.
These breakeven prices were computed by dividing the appropriate costs by
the estimated saleable yield.
The estimated operating aid odWnhrhip cbts per acre for strawberry
production in west central Florida during 1980-81 are reported, as shown
in Table 2. These costs were developed with the assistance of partici-
pating growers, extension specialists and researchers.


Table 1. Estimated breakeven prices to cover operating and ownership costs
for strawberry production, west central Florida, 1980-81.

Operating costs Total
Saleable Harvest & operating Ownership Total
yield/A Preharvest marketing costs costs costs
Flats ----------------------$ per flat-------------------------
1400 2.14 2.70 4.20 0.89 5.73
1600 1.88 2.70 4.60 0.78 5.38
1800 1.67 2.70 4.37 0.69 5.08
2000 1.50 2.70 4.20 0.62 4.82

A flat is 12 pints (10.25 lbs)





Table 2. Estimated operating and ownership costs
west central Florida, 1980-81.


per acre for strawberry production,


I mPRICET/UNIT PRICE/
ITEM MONTH UNIT QUANTITY OF MATERIAL GROSS ACRE
OF MATERIAL GROSS ACRE


Pre-harvest


Dolomite
Disk
Plant
Sorghum seed
Rctovate
Lay off rows
Press beds
Fertilizer
6-3-8
Fumi gate
Fumigant (MC-33)
Plastics (44 inch)
Labor
Sec plants
Ti a-nsplants
Labor
Cultivate
Spray
Crptan (36 appl.)
GBn1ate (16 appl.)
Dibroan (6 appl.)
?Pictran (6 appl.)
Phosdrin (12 appl.)
Rc-imve plastic (labor)
Irrigation (elec.)
Interest


May
May
June
June
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
sept.
Sept.
Sept.

Oct
Oct.
Nov.-May
Oct.-Apr.




May
Oct.-Apr.
May-Apr.


Ton
Acre
Acre

Acre

Ton
Acre
Pound
Thou. feet
Hour

Thousand
Hour
Acre
Acre
Pound
Pobnd
Gallon
Pound
Gallon
Hour
Acre
Dollar


Harvest


Picking labor
l.abcr nefits
Containers
Pckingr shed labor
Super.-vi.si on
Transport

Matreting

Marketing charge

[I. Cmnership Costs/A2


Dec.-Apr.








Jan.-Apr.


lMarkeiting charge is
the r!l'.ket price.


based on handling cost per flat which was approximately 10% of


2Ownership costs include depreciation, in
and iluipment for strawberry production.


surance, repairs, taxes and interest on land


,0.33
2.00
1.00

2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

1.50
1.00
175.00
11.00
4.00

23.00
40.00
:3.00
36.00
216.00
16.00
1.25
12.00
1.50
3.00
1.00
2,679.42


$23.00
9.89
2.90
0.55
9.89
5.80
5.80
5.80
143.80
11.60
0.96
19.50
3.50

35.00
3.50
6.81
3.59
1.59
11.15
29.50
15.75
18.85
3.50
65.00
0.12

$/Flat

$1.15
0.15
0.60
0.10
0.10
0.10
$2.20

$/Flat

$0.50
O.50


$ 7.59
19.78
2.90
27.50
19.78
5.80
5.80
5.80
215.70
11.60
168.00
214.50
14.00

805.00
140.00
17.43
129.24
3r3.44
178.40
36.88
189.00
28.28
28.00
65.00
321.53
3,000.95


$1,247.00


'/ ''


I. Operating Costs






-4-


CONTROL OF TWOSPOTTED SPIDER MITES IN FRUITING STRAWBERRIES
J. F. Price

Field 13

The twospotted spider mite is a major pest of fruiting strawberries in Florida.
Miticides are often applied routinely during February through April in the Plant City
area for the control of this pest.

Mite control practices are being evaluated in the 1980-81 season in the north-
west area of the ARC-Dover property. Treatments in this test include: Plictran,
Kelthaneo, Carzolo (not registered for strawberries), Lannate (a non-miticide not
registered for strawberries), and a beneficial predatory mite.
An additional component of the test is designed to determine at which density
(number of mites per leaf sampled) of twospotted spider mites, miticides should be
applied to produce the highest yield at the lowest Cost. The approach to this is to
apply Plictran when numbers of mites reach 25, 50, 75, or 100 mites (including their
eggs) per leaf. Total numbers of sprays applied and strawberry yield for each treat-
ment will be recorded.
---- ----- ----- *-- --------**-rr -----


STRAWPBRRY BREEDING

C. M. Howard

Objectives: To develop new strawberry varieties that are specifically adapted to
Florida growing conditions.

First ye?.r (Field 1): Crosses are made.in the greenhouse during the winter and seeds
are sow in 1flats in late March or early April. Seedlings are transplanted into
individual peit pots in May or early June and set in the nursery in late June where
they form runners. In October, clones are selected from the nursery on the basis
of runner production and resistance to anthracnose, leaf spot and leaf blight. Four
plants of each selection are transplanted into the fruiting field where records are
kept on fruit yield and other characteristics. Specific clones are selected primar-
ily on the basis of appearance and ripening characteristics. Some clones are selec-
ted for specific characteristics such as long fruit stems or concentrated ripening
in an effort to develop lines that may be useful for mechanical harvesting.

Second .year (Field 2): The clones that have been selected are transplanted into the
surrimer r'irr, 'where they are again observed:for runner production and resistance to
anthracnose. In October, selections are made from this group and transplanted into
10-plant observation plots. In this trial, the clones are compared with currently
grown varieties and the fruit and plants are observed more closely for any defects
such as poor color or soft fruit. Specific clones are selected on the basis of
plant type, early and total fruit yield, fruit firmness, color, size, ripening char-
acteristics and general appearance. These clones are transplanted into the nursery
in April where they are again observed for runner production and resistance to dis-
eases (especially anthracnose).








Third year (Field 12): The most promising clones from the second year observational
trials are placed in replicated trials where they can be thoroughly compared with
varieties currently being grown in Florida. After a clone has shown sufficient
promise for at least two years in replicated trials, a variety release committee may
be formed. If the committee, after reviewing all the accumulated data, agrees that
the specific clone should be an improvement over currently grown varieties, then. it
can be named and released as a new variety.. Hopefully, more extenSive grower testing
of varietal candidates .will be done in the future even though manpower and time limi-
tations make it very difficult for us to grow the large nulhbers of plants that are
required for these tests.
---------------------f ---l---

STRAWBERRY VARIETY TRIAL
E. E. Albregts and C. M. Howard


Objectives (Field 4):


To evaluate all promising breeding lines and out-of-state
varieties for earliness, yield, fruit size, ripening charac-
teristici; and plant growth characteristics.


Table 1. Fruit yields


in 1979-80 trials.


Variety -
or Yeld (fl1at/A) Avg. fruit
line January Februdt March April Seasonal wt (g/fruit)
74-6 319 33 1549 176 2477 14.7
77-163EY 744 611 1181 166 2761 15.8
77-169EY 800 710 1256 167 2933 16.0
77-537 575 568 1584 97 2823 12.4
77-327E 24 805 1786 117 2952 14.9
76-624EY 611 885 809 211 2515 14.8
76-796 764 ?25 1074 238 2801 16.1
76-840E 987 704 560 317 2568 12.1
Vista 70 27 574 406 1076 14.6
Douglas 89 192 564 265 1109 16.4
Tioga 36 681 1361 323 2732 12.6
Tufts 424 485 1685 508 3102 15.0
Dover 709 478 2538 153 3877 15.2


2A flat is 12 pihts (16.25 lbs)
All lines except 74-5, 77.537
All lines can be seen in teld
can be seen in Field 12.


76-624, 76-796, 76-840E and Tioga are in Field 4.
1 and all except 77-537, 76-796, 76-840E, and Vista






-6-


STRAWBEiRY DISEASES1
C. M. Howard

Objectives: Control of strawberry diseasess;and to determine the cause and
importance of new diseases.
Colletotrichum fruit rot: Round, dark spots which are firm and sunken. Very
severe in some fields during warm peiods. This fungus also causes anthracnose
and wilt.
Dendrophoma fruit rot: Round, light pink or gray spots which are soft and not
sunken. Small black fruiting bodies often form in these lesions. Very severe
in some fields during some periods. This fungus also causes leaf blight.
Pestalotia fruit rot: Lesions variable. The most typical lesion has a round,
light tan central area which is slightly sunken below the original fruit surface
and a surrounding band of soft tissue which is definitely sunken. Rarely serious
in commercial fields.
Alternaria fruit rot: Lesions round or irregular in shape and light green to nearly
black depending on the stage of development. Rarely serious in commercial fields.
Gray mold: Lesions irregular in shape, soft, and light tan at first, changing to
darker brown, then gray as many fungus spores form on the lesion. Infected fruit
eventually become covered by the gray, dusty spores and mummified.
Control of Fruit Rots: Captan and Benlate remain the standard treatments for con-
trol of strawberry fruit rots. If rebglar spray schedules' f twice per week are
maintained and good coverage is achieved, Captan willU;sually give good control of
all these fruit rots, but during periods of Severe disease incidence, Benlate usual-
ly gives better control of the Collet6triHBum and Dndrophoma rots. Three new
fungicides have recently been registered for use on strawberries. These are Rovral,
Ronilan, and Topsin M. All are reported t6 give good dontrol,of gray mold. Rovral
and Ronilan have given excellent control of gray mold in our trials but poor control
of Dendrophoma and Colletotrichum rots. Topsin has not been tested here.
Anthracnose: In the nursery causes dark, sunken lesions first on ruriners, then on
leaf petioles, then invades the crown and causes wilting and death of the entire
plant (and sometimes entire nursery). Infected plants set in the fruiting field
wilt suddenly and die at any time during the fall, winter, or spring. A new type
anthracnose fungus has generally been found in the North Carolina plants for the
past 3 years.


1These diseases may or may not be present in our fields at present.






FUNGICIDE TRIAL

C. M, Howard


Objective (Field 3):


Treatments:


To determine the potential of new fungicides for control of
strawberry fruit rots and foliar diseases.


Four replications, sprayed twice per week.


Table 1. 1979-80 fungicide trial for control of fruit rots.

Marketable, 1
Treatment and fruit yield Flats/acre infected by
rate per acre (flats/acre), Botrytis Alternaria

Captan SOW 6 lbs 2554 a 48 b 24 a
Difolatan 4F 2 qts 2529 a 45 b 10 bcd
Captan 50W 1 lb
+ Benlate 50W 1 lb b396 ab 42 b 13 bcd
Benlate 50W 1 lb 2380 ab 51 b 16 abc
Plictran 50W 1.5 lb 2333 abc 134 a 4 d
Rovral 50W 0.75 lb 2305 abc 54 b 3 d
Top-Cop S (F) 2 qts 2152 bc 37 b 12 bcd
Check 2121 bc 128 a 5 cd
That 52F 2 qts
+ Benlate 50W 0.5 lb 2103 bc 120 a 17 ab
That 52F 2 qts 2045 c 135 a 7 bcd


Average of 4 replications.
Values followed by the same
level according to Duncan's


letter are not significantly
New Multiple Range Test.


different at the 0.05


Control of Anthracnose: Set highly susceptible varieties (most California varie-
ties) in mid to late June, use very little fertilizer through August, and spray
with fungicide at least every other day throughout the summer until the weather
becomes dryer and cooler in mid September. Then spray at least twice per week
until digging starts. Spray should be continued on any part of the nursery that
will not be dug within a few days. There is no known control for anthracnose wilt
in the fruiting field,
Key to Treatments in 1980-81 Fungicide Trial


Treatment


Check
Captan
Benlate
Topsin
Topsin M (Flow)
Rovral
Top Cop S (Flow)
Plictran
Difolatan (Flow)


Rate/A


6 lbs
1 lb
1 lb
22 oz
0.75 lbs
2 qts
1.5 lbs
2 qts


All fungicides applied twice per week.


Pint nn_


PI nt r nn Treatme-- n .








ABSORBENTS AT TRANSPLANTING
E. E. Albregts


Purpose (Field 5):


To evaluate effect of applying a water absorbing material to
roots or whole plant on the ability of the plant to become
established.


Treatments:


1. Plant dug from nursery, roots dipped into absorbent, transplanted imme-
diately.
2. Plants dug from nursery, whole plant dipped into absorbent, transplanted
immediately. v
3. Plants dug from nursery, plant washed, and transplanted immediately.
4. As #2 but stored overnight before transplanting.
5. As #4 but dipped just prior to transplanting and not before storage.
6. As #3 but stored overnight before transplanting.
7. As #2 but stored for one week before transplanting.
8. As #3 but stored for one week before transplanting.
Operation:
Plants of the Dover cUltivar Were Used and given standard fertilizer
Sand culture conditions,
Results: The #7 treatment displayed foliage burn and loss when set into the
fruiting field. Greenhouse tests were also conducted and showed no growth or
root effects because of treatments at time plants became established.


BORON ON FLOWERING AND FRUITING
E. E. Albregts


Purpose (Field 6):


To determine if applications of Boron in soil or applied as a
spray will affect flower set and fruit formation.


Treatments:


Soil applied 2oron 1 lb Boron/acre
Spray applied Boron .1 lb Boron/acre for 5 sprays
Unsprayed check


Operation:
Standard fertilizer and cultural practices were used with the
Dover cultivar.


Results: No results yet.










FERTILITY AND PLANT STORAGE ON GROWTH AND FRUITING

E. E. Albregts


Purpose (Field 7):


To evaluate effect of fertility level in the soil and storage
of plants in cooler on plant growth and fruiting.


Treatments:


High fertility and one week storage.
Normal fertility and one week storage.
High fertility and planted direct from nursery.
Normal fertility and planted direct from nursery.


2 cultivars, Dover and Florida Belle


Operation:


The high fertility treatment
potassium/acre mixed in bed,
acre banded in bed center 2"
potassium/acre from Osmocote
fertility treatment received
acre banded ih bed tentet 2"
potassium/acre from Osmocote


received 140 1bs nitrogen and 84 Ibs
200 Ibs of nitrogen ahd 250 lbs potassium/
deep plus 60 lbs nitrogen and 50 bs
placed in planting hole. The normal
167 Ibs nitrogen and 168 Ibs potassium/
dedp and 30 Ibs nitrogen and 24 lbs
placed in plaHtinM hold.


Summary: No results yet,


SPRAYING STRAWBERRY FRUITING PLANTS WITH PFERtILZER
L E Alb e ts


Purpose (Field 8):

Treatments:


No fertilizer
No fertilizer
No fertilizer
1000 Ibs/acre
1000 lbs/acre
1000 Ibs/acre
2000 Ibs/acre
2000 Ibs/acre
2000 lbs/acre


To determine if sprayihg fertilizer on strawberries throughout
the growing and harvest sedsoh will ehhahce the plants fruiting
response.


bed no.fertilizer sprayed.
bed 5 1bs/acre of 20-20-20 applied weekly.
bed 10 lbs/acre of 20-20-20 applied weekly.
a 10-10-10 in bed no fertilizer sprayed.
a 10-10-10 in bed 5 Ibs/acre of 20-20-20 applied weekly.
a 10-10-10 in bed 10 Ibs/acre of 20-20-20 applied weekly.
a 10-10-10 in bed no fertilizer sprayed.
a 10-10-10 in bed 5 Ibs/acre of 20-20-20 applied weekly.
a 10-10-10 in bed 10 Ibs/acre of 20-20-20 applied weekly.


Operation:
Dover cultivar set on October 3, 1980. Fertilizer sprayed as noted above start-
ing on October 23, 1980.
Summary: Results of a trial in 1979-80 with the same treatments as 1, 2, 3, 7, 8,
and 9. Treatments 2 and 3 gave greater yields than treatment 1 but only about one-





-10-


SLOW RELEASE FERTILIZERS AS STARTER FERTILIZERS FOR STRAWBERRIES
E. E. Albregts
Purpose (Field 9): To evaluate slow release fertilizers with respect to plant
growth and fruiting.
Treatments:
1. Osmocote 16-5-16 at 30 lbs N/acre banded under plant row.
2. Osmocote 16-5-16 at 60 lbs N/acre banded under plant row.
3. Osmocote 16-5-16 at 150 lbs N/acre banded under plant row.
4. IBDU at 30 lbs N/acre banded under plant row.
5. IBDU at 60 lbs N/acre banded under plant row.
6. Sulfur coated urea at 30 lbs N/acre banded under plant row.
7. Sulfur coated urea at 60 lbs N/acre banded under plant row.
Operation:
All treatments received 200 lbs of N and KO0 and 47 lbs/acre of P 0, per
acre except the #3 treatment which receives fertilizer as listed 8bove.
Fertilizer not banded under plants was banded in bed center 2" deep.
Dover plants were set on October 3, 1980.
Summary: In 1979-80 experiment, the higher rates of slow release fertilizer gave
greater fruit yields than the lower rates. Highest yields were from the Osmocote 150
treatment followed by other Osmocote treatments, than IBDU with sulfur-coated urea
giving lowest yields.


STRAWBERRY IRRIGATION AND FERTILIZER STUDY
E. E. Albregts
Purpose (Field 10): To evaluate 3 fertilizer N sources applied at 3 rates to two
cultivars, with either drip or overhead sprinkler irrigation,
and two and four row beds.
Treatments:
1. Osmocote at 65, 130, and 195 lbs N/acre.
2. IBDU at 65, 130, and 195 lbs N/acre.
3. Sulfur coated urea at 65, 130, and 195 lbs N/acre.
A. Overhead sprinkler irrigation.
B. Drip irrigation.
Operation:
All Osmocote and 65 lbs N/acre from IBDU and sulfur coated urea applied under
plant row. All other fertilizer banded in bed center 2" deep. Potassium and
phosphorus were applied at 165 and 40 lbs/acre of K and P. Four row beds re-
ceived 1/3 more fertilizer than the above rates for the 2-row beds. Dover and
Tufts cultivars are used this season. Also have plots of organiform, nitroform,
sludge and combination of sludge and nitroform.
Summary (of the 1979-80 season)
Two-row beds Overhead irrigation; The Dover cultivar gave highest yields
ith 195 1b rate of Osmocote and 130 lbs of IBDU and sulfur-coated urea.
Tioga gave no differences.


Two-row beds Drip irrigation: Results same as above.






-11-


Four-row beds Overhead irrigation: Dover cultivar gave highest yields with
highest rate of Osmocote. IBDU and sulfur-coated urea rates had little effect
on yields. Tioga cultivar yielded best with highest rates of all 3 fertilizers.

Four-row beds Drip irrigation: Dover cultivar gave highest yields with middle
rate of 3 fertilizers. Tioga cultivar gave highest yields with highest rates of
Osmocote and IBDU but middle rate of sulfur-coated urea.

Plants in the 2-row beds gave higher yields than those in the 4-row beds with
both cultivars. Fruit size was about one gram less in the 4-row beds. Osmocote
usually gave greater fruit yields than IBDU or sulfur-coated urea. Dover gave
yields about 1/3 greater than Tioga.

Soil samples taken in late April, 1980 showed that Osmocote treated plots had
the largest amount of nitrogen in the soil with IBDU a close second and sulfur-
coated urea third. January soil sample data showed sulfur-coated urea was in
slightly greater concentration in the soil than was IBDU.
----- ---------------------------------


PRE-TRANSPLANT TREATMENT ON FRUITING RESPONSE
E. E. Albregts

Purpose (Field 11): To determine the effect of short term transplant storage in a
cooler and the wilting of freshly dug transplants in the nur-
sery on strawberry transplant growth and fruiting.

Treatments:

1. Dig plants and wash immediately, store in cooler overnight.
2. Dig plants and leave ro6ts and foliage'in sun for 21 hours.
3. Dig plants and leave roots and foliage in sun for 5 hours.
4. Dig plants day of planting and set immediately.
5. As #2, but roots buried in dry soil for 21 hours.
6. As #2, but roots buried in wet soil for 2i hours.
7. As #1, but leaves partially frozen.

Used two cultivars: Dover and Florida Belle. Set transplants on Oct. 3, 1980.

Results: During the previous season, 1979-80, plants were set on October 24. The
#3 treatment with both cultivars gave reduced January and seasonal yields. Yields
with the #5 treatment were also adversely affected with both cultivars. With the
Dover cultivar all other treatments gave similar seasonal yields except #4 which
gave yields about 5000 Ibs/acre greater than other treatments. Except for 3 and 5,
all other Florida Belle plants gave similar seasonal yields regardless of treatment.
Through 12/13/79 best plant growth and least plant size variation occurred with
treatments 1 and 4. After 12/13/79, the #4 treatment generally had the largest
plants. There was less plant size variation in the Florida Belle plants than in
the Dover.


-----------------------rr-r----------r









-12-


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