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Group Title: 1990 Florida cotton production guidelines
Title: Florida cotton production guidelines, 1990
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076461/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida cotton production guidelines, 1990
Series Title: Florida cotton production guidelines
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Sprenkel, Richard K. ( Author, Primary )
Publisher: University of Florida, Insititute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, North Florida Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 1990
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Bibliographic ID: UF00076461
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 132706098

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    Acknowledgement
        Page ii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text









TABLE OF CONTENTS


Acknowledgements................................

Cotton Production in Florida....................

Economics of Cotton Production...................

Land Preparation................................

Fertilization...............................

Nematode Management..........................

Cotton Varieties................................

Planting Cotton.................................

The Development of a Cotton Plant................

Growing Degree-Days..............................

Water Requirements..............................


Weed Control..


............................ ............................. 15


Insect Control........................

Florida Cotton Pest Hotline............

Defoliation and Dessication............

Highlights of Cotton Program for 1990..

Boll Weevil Eradication Program........

Locations of Gins.....................


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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


Information in this 1990 Cotton Production Guide for Florida was provided by
the following:

Barry Brecke, Research Weed Scientist, AREC, Jay, FL

Danny Colvin, Extension Weed Scientist, University of Florida

Johnny L. Crawford, Extension Agronomist, University of Georgia

M.C. Donahoe, Extension Director, Santa Rosa County, FL

R.A. Dunn, Extension Nematologist, University of Florida

Steve Ford, Extension Farm Management Economist, University of Florida

Tim Hewitt, Extension Economist, AREC, Marianna, FL

Robert Hinkle, Extension Agent, Jackson County, FL

Freddie Johnson, Extension Entomologist, University of Florida

H.A. Peacock, Research Agronomist, AREC, Jay, FL

E.B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist, University of Florida

David L. Wright, Extension Agronomist, NFREC, Quincy, FL










Prepared by: R.K. Sprenkel, Extension IPM Specialist

For additional copies, contact:

Dr. R.K. Sprenkel
NFREC
Rt. 3 Box 4370
Quincy, FL 32351
(904) 627-9236 or 392-5230



Use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing
specific information. It is not a guarantee or warranty of products named and
does not signify approval to the exclusion of others of suitable composition.









COTTON PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA


At one time, cotton was a major crop in Florida. Acreage has declined
over the last 50 years, but this has not been a steady decline because acreage
has responded-to price fluctuations. In the last twelve years (Table 1),
there has been an increase in cotton acreage and yield in Florida. This yield
increase is probably due to several factors including better varieties and
better insect control. Because of the current favorable price situation, many
Florida farmers plan to increase their cotton acreage or resume cotton pro-
duction. Gins are being opened or reopened in south Alabama and south Georgia
in response to the anticipated acreage increase.


Table 1. Cotton acres harvested and yield in Florida, 1978-1989.



Year Acres Harvested Yield (pounds)

1978 3,600 506
1979 3,400 565
1980 5,900 610
1981 17,000 601
1982 15,000 627
1983 12,000 608
1984 17,000 847
1985 22,500 693
1986 19,000 707
1987 29,000 646
1988 29,000 566
1989 29,000 574


There are several factors a farmer must consider in deciding whether to
grow cotton or increase his acreage. First of all is the predicted price of
cotton. Because prices may fluctuate during the year and estimated prices may
change, it would be best for a grower to know current prices. He should also
keep in mind the cost of production. According to estimates of the University
of Florida, the total cost of growing cotton (cash expenses and fixed costs)
would be about $550 per acre in 1990 (see page 4). Naturally, a farmer should
estimate production costs for his farm. Also, yield potential should be esti-
mated for each farm. The yields given above represent production capabilities
of some of Florida's better loamy sands and sandy loams of the upper pan-
handle, where practically all of Florida's cotton is grown. As growers plant
on sandier soils that have less water and nutrient holding capacity, lower
yields may occur under stress conditions.

Consideration must be given to the distance to a gin (see page 28).
Growers should know which gins will be operated during the harvest season and
then determine whether or not it would be economical for them to haul cotton
to that gin. Also, the availability of harvesting equipment is important.
Growers who have been planting cotton may have harvesting equipment to meet
their needs, but others would have to arrange for custom harvesting. Growers
that expect to grow cotton indefinitely may want to consider buying new
equipment.









Insect control will require considerable input. Fields should be scouted
for insects and, when treatment is warranted, equipment should be available
that can meet the needs for insect control. Growers should be prepared to
make 10 to 15 chemical applications for insect and mite control. There may be
other pest problems (nematode or weed) on a farm which could influence the
decision to plant cotton.









ECONOMICS OF COTTON PRODUCTION


Table 2. Estimated Costs of Producing One Acre of Cotton,- North Florida,
1990. (Prepared by Tim Hewitt, Extension Economist)



Item Unit Quantity Price Value

Cash expenses:
Seed lb. 14.00 .60 8.40
Fertilizer:
Nitrogen (N) lb. 80.00 .24 19.20
Phosphate (P 0 ) lb. 60.00 .23 13.80
Potash (K 0) lb. 80.00 .15 12.00
Lime ton .50 22.00 11.00
Herbicide acre 1.00 27.50 27.50
Insecticide appl. 13.00 7.10 92.30
Defoliant acre 1.00 5.75 5.75
Scouting fee acre 1.00 6.00 6.00
Boll Weevil Eradication' acre 1.00 <12.50 <12.50
Spraying (air) appl. 7.00 4.00 28.00
Tractor (135 hp) hr. 2.75 8.10 22.28
Tractor (55 hp) hr. 2.25 3.10 6.98
Truck, pickup mi. 50.00 .13 6.50
Other machinery hr. 5.00 2.40 12.00
Custom harvest acre 1.00 55.00 55.00
Hired labor hr. 2.50 4.50 11.25'
Land Rent acre 1.00 20.00 20.00
Ginning lb 700.00 .09 63.00
Warehousing lb. <700.00 .02 <14.00
Interest on cash expenses2 $ 447.46 .065 29.08
Total Cash expenses 476.54
Fixed costs:
Tractor (135 hp) hr. 2.75 11.10 30.53
Tractor (50 hp) hr. 2.25 5.70 12.83
Truck, pickup mi. 50.00 .16 8.00
Other machinery hr. 5.00 4.92 24.60
Total fixed costs 75.96
Total costs 552.50


'Fees for 1990 are currently $25/acre. This budget assumes that one-half of
this assessment will be paid from general revenue of the State of Florida.
Please note, at the time of publication of these Guidelines, plans were
underway to hold a grower referendum to increase the boll weevil eradication
assessment by $10 per acre for the next five years. To obtain an accurate
up to date figure for budgeting for the eradication, growers should check
with their County Extension Office.
13% for 6 months.









Table 3. Break-Even Cotton Prices at Various Yields.


Yield (lb/acre) Price for cash (costs ($/lb) Price for total costs ($/lb)

400 1.19 1.38
450 1.06 1.23
500 .95 1.10
550 .87 1.00
600 .79 .92
650 .73 .85
700 .68 .79









LAND PREPARATION


Preparation for cotton should begin with row subsoiling and bedding 4 to 6
weeks ahead of planting. Check to be sure hard pans are being broken by the
subsoiling operation and if necessary, run subsoilers deeper. On some of the
heavier soils, it may not be necessary to subsoil, but bedding is encouraged.
By bedding ahead of planting, it will be possible to plant into a moist seed
bed and also one with higher temperatures than when not bedding.

Fertilization

In many cases, cotton is over fertilized with nitrogen which results in
rank growth leading to boll rot and poor insect control. Therefore, close
control is needed on the amount of nitrogen applied to cotton. In general, 60
pounds of nitrogen per acre is recommended. If the cotton is planted on soil
where rank stalks can be expected, the total nitrogen should be reduced to
around 40 to 50 pounds per acre. If the cotton is to be planted on soils
following soybeans, peanuts or heavily fertilized corn, it may not be neces-
sary to apply any nitrogen prior to planting; a sidedressing application of
about 30 pounds of nitrogen should be made after squaring. Additional nitro-
gen can be applied based on a leaf petiole monitoring program that will be
discussed later. Variations in these nitrogen recommendations can be made
depending on the soil type. If cotton is to be planted on a soil that will
produce normal growth, about 20 pounds of nitrogen could be applied prior to
planting. Then, after squaring, a sidedress application of 40 pounds of N per
acre could be made. The leaf petiole monitoring program would begin a week
prior to bloom and additional nitrogen applied if needed. If the cotton plant
develops a pale green color, indicating N deficiency, the sidedressed N could
be applied at first square. There may be sandy soils in Florida that would
respond to more than 60 pounds of nitrogen. If grown on deep sands with
considerable rainfall, nitrogen may be leached below the root zone. In such
situations it may be necessary to apply more than the amount of nitrogen
indicated above.

The leaf petiole monitoring test, used successfully by many growers in
recent years, shows whether the cotton would benefit from extra nitrogen.
There are private laboratories, as well as public agencies in other states,
that operate petiole monitoring programs (this program is not available
through the State of Florida). If a grower is interested he should contact
one of these labs for details. In general, a farmer would begin sampling his
field one week prior to bloom and continue sampling for about 8 weeks. Based
on the results of the tests, the laboratory advises whether or not to apply
additional nitrogen. This system has worked very well in many locations.

Phosphorus and potassium fertilization should be based on soil tests.

Nematode Management

Southern root-knot (Meloidogyne incognita), sting (Belonolaims longi-
caudatus, and reniform (Rotylenchulus reniformis) nematodes can be important
pests of cotton in Florida. Root-knot nematodes are distributed in all soil
types throughout the state, but sting nematodes are limited to very sandy
soils (generally greater then 85% sand content) with low organic matter, and
reniform nematodes are found most often in fine-textured soils and wet areas.








Nematodes can reduce cotton yields noticeably by themselves, but are more
important for their role in increasing incidence and severity of Fusarium
wilt. However, one race of M. incognita in west Florida is capable of causing
direct damage to cotton. Nevertheless, nematode management is critical to
managing Fusarium wilt. Crop rotation can help keep nematode populations
down. According to Georgia and Auburn tests, the best cotton yields were
obtained after fallowing. When following small grains, higher yields normally
occur after wheat than after rye, ryegrass or oats. Peanuts also may precede
cotton with good results in most fields. Crop destruction after harvest and
the planting of winter cover crops also help to reduce nematode populations.

Table 4. Nematode/Fusarium wilt resistance of selected cotton varieties.



Most Resistant Moderately Resistant Least Resistant

Deltapine 90 Coker 208 Deltapine 61 Stoneville 825
KC 380 Coker 304 DES 119
McNair 220 Coker 310 Stoneville 453
McNair 235 Coker 315 Stoneville 506
Deltapine 41 Tifcot 56
Deltapine 50


Nematicides can be used to reduce nematode populations just before or at
planting. Products registered for nematode control for cotton are listed in
Table 5. However, their use is not always economically justified; the grower
must compare the cost of treatment with the dollar value of the anticipated-
yield improvement. The fumigant nematicide, Telone II, has been more con-
sistent for control of root-knot nematodes than the non-fumigants. The non-
fumigant products should provide adequate control when used in low to moderate
levels of infestation, always in combination with resistant varieties.

Table 5. Nematicides for use on cotton.



Application Rate/1000 ft Rate/Acre with
Nematicide Pattern of Row Rows 36" Apart

Telone II 1 chisel/row 61 82 fl oz 6.9 9.3 gal
Nemacur 15G 6-12 inch band 8 18 oz 7.3 16.3 lb
Nemacur 3 6-12 inch band 3.3 7.1 fl oz 0.37 0.8 gal
Temik 15G* 4-6 inch band 4.5 12 oz 4 10.9 lb


* SPECIAL TEMIK REGULATIONS: The Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services requires that a report of intended application of Temik
shall be made to them on their Form N. IN-120 at least 30 days prior to appli-
cation. Temik cannot be applied closer than 300 feet from a drinking water
well, and any wells within 300 ft of or in a treated area shall be posted to
be unfit for human consumption. Fields to be treated with Temik shall be so
posted conspicuously at least 24 hours before application and for a minimum of
30 days afterward. See label for further restrictions.









COTTON VARIETIES


Table 6. Summary of cotton cultivar tests 1985-1989, AREC Jay, Florida.


lbs lint/Ac
3
Year
Avg.
Cultivar 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 87-89


Coker
Coker
Coker
Coker
Coker


304
315
139
118-6903
130-6905


690
635
607
745


745

690


Coker 613-4610
Coker N84-828
Coker 208
DES 119
DES 442


Deltapine
Deltapine
Deltapine
Deltapine
Deltapine


Deltapine X79114
Deltapine 79114-051
Dunn D325
Dunn DH1325
McNair KNX125

McNair 235
McNair 220
McNair KNX409
Northrup King KC380
Northrup King KC311


Stoneville
Stoneville
Stoneville
Stoneville
Stoneville


825
506
453
112
7905


828

690
635
661



745
690
745
661


1066
857
1022
958
745

1051

877
772
745

944
929
1037
921
1022

1206
1205


973

894
979
857



1037
1124
987
1016


Stoneville 7908
Tifcot


1045
1307
1045
900
1162

1016
1249

1510
1016

1104
1307
1365
1278
1278

1452
1452
1278
1278
1220

1104
1104
1016
1307
1452

1249
1452
1307
1307
1394

1336


610
798
719
705
733


770
668
654


697
719
842

821

770

596
770


705
654

886
828

893
740
879
755
610

740


663


552
652
652

783

741
618
618



513
573

783
722

636
644
557




565


942


784
893
953'

953

988
830
830



773
777

992
1001

926
946
888









Table 7. 1988 performance of cotton varieties, Brewton, AL and Headland, AL.




3 yr Avg.
lb. lint/AC % Lint lb. lint/Ac
Variety Br Hd Br Hd Br Hd

Arkot 518 419 796 39 42 840 632
Coker 130 584 896 41 42
Coker 139 570 834 38 40 995 624
Coker 208 722 864 39 40 1080 675
Coker 315 602 816 40 42 1018 593
Coker 320 614 721 39 41 -
Coker 84-828 604 929 40 42 --
Delcot 311 532 592 37 39 904 547
Delcot 344 607 710 39 41 967 593
Delcot 390 560 924 39 41 915 614
Deltapine 20 524 809 38 41 894 627
Deltapine 41 506 719 40 42 857 594
Deltapine 50 622 863 37 39 896 647
Deltapine 50-469 725 775 40 40
Deltapine 90 695 1105 37 40 938 711
DES 119 664 842 37 41 993 613
GAT 225 598 767 38 40 982 598
HS 46 725 875 40 42
KC 380 646 1191 41 41 1064 798
McNair 220 522 790 38 40 912 610
McNair 235 503 767 39 39 904 597
PD 3 584 871 40 41
Stoneville 112 505 854 37 40 815 638
Stoneville 453 510 881 40 45
Stoneville 506 472 842 36 42 838 681
Stoneville 825 499 783 39 42 914 660
Stoneville BR 110 714 762 39 41 1080
Terra C 30 599 755 36 39
Terra C 40 511 701 38 41 -
Tifcot 56 548 818 38 40 979 664

Br=Brewton, Alabama; Hd=Headland, Alabama









Recommended Varieties


The following cotton varieties are recommended for planting in Florida
based on their performance in trials conducted over several years at Jay AREC
(Red Bay sandy loam soil).

Coker 304 McNair 235
Coker 310 McNair 220
Coker 315 Northrup King KC380
Deltapine 41 Northrup King KC311**
Deltapine 50 Stonveville 506
Deltapine 61 Stoneville 825
Deltapine 90* Tifcot 56**

*To get the best performance from Deltapine 90, care must be taken to prevent
excessive growth. A common error is to over fertilize. On the heavier soils
in Florida, nitrogen application must not exceed 50 lbs per acre, otherwise,
excessive plant growth and poor fruiting will result.

**Northrup King KC311 and Tifcot 56 have been in the Florida Cotton Variety
test for only 3 and 1 years, respectively. Nevertheless, they have performed
well in these tests and in commercial fields and are therefore included in the
"Recommended Variety" list.

DES 119 has performed well in variety tests and several growers have
planted it for several years with good results. However, for the present, it
is not included on the "Recommended Variety" list. If additional experience
with the variety is favorable, it will probably be added to the list in the
future.









PLANTING COTTON


The desired cotton plant population is 4 plants per foot of row. To get
this population, plant about 5 seeds per foot of row. If-the seed quality is
poor, increase the seeding rate. If stands are thick, disease and insect
problems will be increased. When planting, knock the beds off and plant in
the center of the smooth bed. Use depth bands to closely control the seeding
depth. Plant the seed 1/2 to 1 inch deep. Do not plant too deep as poor
stands could result.

Plant when there is good soil moisture and when the over-night lows are
expected to be in the 62 to 65 degree range for 5 days following planting.
When planted at this time, seedlings should emerge in 5 to 7 days and a stand
established in 8 to 11 days. Therefore, growers can decide whether or not a
stand is adequate within 2 weeks after planting. If a poor stand is obtained,
it would be advisable to replant.

Skip row planting has been used to good advantage on fields where rank
growth occurs. This condition, which occurs in many of Florida's cotton
producing areas, tends to result in problems with boll rot. It has been
estimated that planting 2 rows and leaving 1 out has resulted in a 25% in-
crease in yield, and where 2 rows were planted and 2 rows left out, yields
have been as high as 40% greater than solid planting. However, keep in mind
that a greater land requirement will be necessary if a skip row planting is
used. Also, the advantage of skip row planting would be less on soils that
tend to produce excessive stalk growth than on other types of soils.

Some publicity has been given to tests that have double-cropped cotton and
wheat. It is too early to know all problems, benefits, and techniques of this
system, but farmers should keep themselves informed of the latest develop-
ments. Naturally, irrigation is a requirement for successful double-cropping
of cotton with wheat.









THE DEVELOPMENT OF A COTTON PLANT


The cotton plant is a perennial in many parts of the tropics and sub-
tropics where it may reach a height of 15 to 20 feet. In Florida, cotton is
grown as an annual and attains a plant height of 2 to 5 feet, or more if
moisture and plant nutrients (primarily nitrogen) are in excess. Air tempera-
tures in the 90 to 95 degree range are considered near optimum for growth.
Very little growth takes place below 60 degrees, and temperatures above 100
degrees for several days can be unfavorable, especially if soil moisture is
low. However, cotton is usually considered drought tolerant because of its
extensive root system. An average daily growth rate for the roots of 1/2 inch
for the growing season is not uncommon.

Approximately 4 to 10 days after planting, cotyledonary or seed leaves are
fully expanded (Table 8). These leaves are on node #1 and are borne on oppo-
site sides of the main stem. The nodes above the seed leaves occur in a
spiral arrangement around the stem and bear a single true leaf. At the base
of each main stem leaf, in the angle between the leaf and the stem, there are
two and sometimes three buds. These buds (called axillary buds) give rise to
vegetative branches on the lower nodes (nodes 2 through 5 or 6). At nodes 6
or 7 and above, they give rise to fruiting branches which bear the floral buds
or cotton squares on nodes located on the lateral branches. If a cotton plant
does not produce squares by node 9, a problem exists and its causes) should
be determined and corrected if possible.

Table 8. Typical growth and development of a cotton plant.



Event Time Required (Days)

Planting to emergence 4-10
Planting to 1st square 40-50
Planting to 1st bloom 60-70
Pinhead square to white flower 23
White flower to pink flower 1
Pink flower to open boll 55


The time required for development from a pinhead square to a creamy-white,
open bloom is approximately 23 days (Table 8). Fertilization occurs on the
first day the flowers are open (white bloom stage). The flowers turn pink (or
red) the day following pollination. The interval between corresponding nodes
on successive fruiting branches (vertical flowering interval) is 2 to 3 days.
For example, under optimum conditions a cotton plant having a white flower on
the first lateral node of a fruiting branch will produce another white flower
on the first lateral node of the next higher branch 2 to 3 days later. The
interval between successive flowers on the same fruiting branch (horizontal
fruiting interval) is 5 to 6 days. Following fertilization, the hollow fibers
begin to lengthen and will reach their final staple length. in approximately 3
weeks. For the next several weeks, the walls of the fibers thicken through
the deposition of successive layers of cellulose.









Varieties grown in Florida are indeterminant, that is, flowering will
continue until stopped by frost, drought, insect attack or some other cause.
Shedding of squares, flowers or young bolls is common. Under good conditions
only 35 to 40% of the squares normally produce mature bolls. Once bolls are
12 days old or older, they usually will not shed unless the plant suffers
severe stress (temperature, moisture, insects or disease). The time required
for development from the pink flower stage to the open boll stage is approxi-
mately 55 days. Cloudy weather and below-optimum temperatures increase the
boll maturation period. Late in the growing season, 65-70 days are required
for development from the pink flower to open boll stage.

Normally, 65 to 90 bolls are required to produce a pound of seed cotton.
However, varieties that produce relatively small bolls may require 100 bolls
or more to produce a pound of seed cotton. Also, bolls developing later in
the season are smaller and therefore more are required to produce a pound of
cotton lint.

There are several reasons to set a crop of cotton as quickly as possible
and avoid relying on a late or top crop. These reasons include:

1. A cotton plant has a greater number of blooms during the initial weeks
of flowering than later in the fruiting period (Table 9).

Table 9. Development of fruiting in cotton.



Week of % of Total % Blooms % of
Blooming Blooms Set Crop -

1 8 94 21
2 24 78 43
3 29 43 24
4 27 21 9
5 10 13 2
6 2 11 1


2. A cotton plant also sets a higher percent of blooms during the first
weeks of flowering (Table 9). When taken together, these two factors
result in a potential of 88% of the crop being made in the first three
weeks of flowering.

3. Bolls set during the first 3 weeks of fruiting usually are the largest
and contain the highest quality fiber. Late set bolls are frequently
smaller and may contain finer and less mature fiber.

4. A delay in setting fruit encourages plants to grow taller. This may
lead to lodging and makes pest control more difficult.

5. Pest populations tend to increase as the season progresses. Pro-
tecting squares and young bolls late in the growing season is more
difficult (and expensive) than protecting an early crop.









GROWING DEGREE-DAYS


One of the key ingredients that enables a cotton plant to grow and develop
is temperature. Without a temperature that is sufficient for physiological
processes to take place, adequate light, nutrients and water would be of
little use to a cotton plant. Efforts by a number of scientists have shown
that the cotton plant develops on an orderly schedule that is controlled
largely by temperature and that the minimum temperature at which a cotton
plant grows is approximately 60 F. From this knowledge came the concept of
DD-60's or growing degree-day summations. Degree-days for cotton are
calculated as follows:

Daily high temperature + Daily low temperature 600 2 = degree-days

Although the growing degree-day concept is applicable to most situations,
some factors such as cultivar or geographic location may cause poor approxi-
mations of actual plant growth. Likewise, problems may be encountered if
plants are under water or nutrient stress or have been damaged by insects,
weather or chemicals.

The following are generally accepted as growing degree-days applicable for
the southeast.

Growing degree-days (base 600) required for several phenological stages in
cotton.

Event Total growing degree-days
required from planting

Emergence (stand establishment) 45-130
Appearance of first square 480-530
Appearance of first flowers 740-1150
Peak blooming 850-1625
First open boll 1690-2050
Defoliation 2550-4600








WATER REQUIREMENTS FOR COTTON


Cotton is an excellent candidate for irrigated land, particularly in areas
that frequently have drought periods during July 1 August 20 and when grown
on coarse textured, sandy land. During peak blooming, cotton will use about
0.3 to 0.4 inch of water per day. Irrigated cotton yields have been from 0 to
more than 800 lbs/A greater than non-irrigated yields with the most frequently
reported increases being in the 200 to 400 lbs/A range. The following pro-
cedure is suggested for 900 to 1100 lbs/A yields: Prior to first bloom,
irrigate with 0.75 1.00 inch of water whenever wilting of plants is observed
by midday. After first bloom, irrigate as needed to supply the quantities of
water listed below. Rain gauges should be used to measure the water received
from rain and the amount supplied by irrigation.

Period Inches/Week Inches/Day

wk. beginning at 1st bloom 1.0 0.15
2nd wk. after 1st bloom 1.5 0.22
3rd wk. after 1st bloom 2.0 0.30
4th wk. after 1st bloom 2.0 0.30
5th wk. after 1st bloom 1.5 0.22
6th wk. after 1st bloom 1.5 0.22
7th wk. after 1st bloom 1.0 0.15


Examine the crop during the 7th week to determine if irrigation should be
continued.

Irrigation intervals can be determined by dividing the quantity/day into
50 to 66% of the available moisture holding capacity of the upper two feet of
soil in fields. For example, if the available moisture capacity of the soil
is 0.7 inch per foot and the quantity/day is 0.3 inch, the interval between
irrigations of following rain that brings soil moisture to field capacity
would be 66% x 2 ft. x 0.7 inch/ft. divided by 0.3 inch/day=3.08 or 3 days.

Intervals for most of the season will be 3-4 days for coarse textured
sand, 4-6 days for more productive loamy sand and sandy loam, and 5-8 days for
fine textured sandy loam or "clay." A 4-6 day interval will fit a large
majority of the situations.











WEED CONTROL IN COTTON



Successful weed control is essential for economical cotton production in
Florida. Weeds compete with cotton for moisture, nutrients and light. The
greatest competition usually occurs early in the growing season. Late season
weeds, while not as competitive as early season weeds, may interfere with
insecticide applications, may cause harvesting difficulties, and reduce the
grade of cotton through addition of trash and staining of lint.


Herbicide Recommendations


Aoplication Stage


Herbicide


Broadcast Rate/Acre
Rate/Acre


trifluralin
(Treflan)


pendimethalin
(Prowl)





plus
norflurazon
(Zorail Rapid 80)


PREEMERGENCE


fluometuron
(Cotoran 80WP or
Cotoran 4L)


1.0-1.5 pts.



1.0-1.5 pts.


1.25-2.5 Ibs.


0.5-0.75



0.5-0.75


1-2 Ibs.


1-1.6


1.25-2.0 Ibs. or
2.0-3.2 pts.


diuron 0.75-2.0 lbs. 0.6-0.8
(Karmex 80WP)


norflurazon 1.25-2.5 Ibs. 1-2
(Zorial Rapid 80)





norflurazon (split) 0.625 lb. 0.5
(Zorial Rapid 80)


Good control of annual grasses and
certain broadleaf weeds. Poor
control of Cocklebur, sicklepod
(coffeeweed), morningglory and
ragweed. Incorporate thoroughly
according to label directions.
The spectrum of weeds controlled
is similar for each of these
herbicides.
May be applied tank mixed with
Treflan or Prowl and can give good
to excellent control of prickly
sida with enhanced control of deep
germinating weeds such as
cocklebur or morningglory.
Control may be superior to PRE
applications when applied PPI if
dry conditions predominate. If
used PPI, do not exceed 2.5 Ibs.
of Zorial total per season in
both PPI and PRE applications.
Apply after planting and before
emergence of the crop or weeds
Good control of annual grass and
broadleaf weeds. Use low rate on
sandy soils.
Similar to fluometuron above but
less effective on large-seeded
broadleaf weeds.
Apply after planting and before
emergence of crop or weeds. Good
control of annual grasses and many
broadleaf weeds. May suppress
nutsedge.
Application at this rate pre-


emergence must be proceeded by a
ppi application of Zorial Rapid 80
at 0.625 lbs/acre.


PREPLANT


Ibs AI/Acre


Remarks


L











Herbicide Recommendations


Broadcast Rate/Acre
Rate /Ae- -


POSTEMERGENCE


DIRECTED
POSTEMERGENCE


fluazifop-butyl
(Fusilade 2000)
or
sethoxidym
(Poast)
or
fenoxaprop
(Whip)


fluometuron
(Cotoran 80WP or
Cotoran 4L)
plus
MSMA


1-1.5 pts.



1-2.5 pts.



13-26 ozs.


0.19-0.25



0.19-0.48



0.06-0.12


1.2


1.5 lbs.
2.4 pts.


several
formulations


prometryn 0.6
(Caparol 80WP or 0.75 lb.
Caparol 4L) 1.2 pts.
plus
MSMA several 2.0
formulations


cyanazine 0.6-1.0
(Bladex 80WP or 0.75-1.25 Ibs.
Bladex 4L) 0.6-1 qt.
plus
MSMA several 2.0
formulations




methazole 0.67-1.33 lbs. 0.5-1.0


(Probe 75W)
plus
MSMA


several
formulations


Annual and Perennial Grasses.
Refer to the label for grass
species, growth stage and rate.
Add a crop oil concentrate or
nonionic surfactant as indicated
on the label. Apply to actively
growing plants. Do not apply to
plants under stress. Do not mix
with other pesticides. Perennial
grass (Johnsongrass and Bermuda-
grass) control will be improved by
thoroughly cutting rhizomes into
small segments with preplant till-
age. A repeat application may be
needed.
Apply as a directed spray after
cotton is 3-4" tall. Add a sur-
surfactant if not included in
MSMA formulation. Controls a
broad spectrum of weeds. Do not
apply over-the-top of cotton. Do
not apply after blooming begins.
Apply this tank mix as a directed
spray after cotton is 6" tall.
Add a surfactant if not included
in MSMA formulation. Broad spec-
trum weed control. Do not apply
over-the-top of cotton. Do not
apply after blooming begins.
Apply this tank mixture as a
directed spray after cotton is 6"
tall. Add a surfactant if not
included in MSMA formulation.
Broad spectrum control. Do not
apply over-the top of cotton. Do
not apply after cotton begins
blooming.
Apply this tank mixture to cotton
plants that are 3 or more inches
tall. Add a surfactant if not
included in MSMA formulations.
Controls many of the same weeds
as previous but is more active on
prickly sida and spurge. Repeat
applications may be made. Bladex
may also be included in the tank
mix to enhance overall control.


Remarks


lbs AI/Acre


bi*-, idJ.


Application Stage r e lb IAr eak












INSECT CONTROL



Effective and economical cotton insect control involves the integration of
many control techniques. These techniques include using beneficial insects
and diseases and cultural practices to the fullest. Chemical insecticides are
still the most important suppression tool but they should be used selectively
and at the proper rate and time.


INSECT RECOMMENDATIONS


INSECT


INSECTICIDE


Beet Armyworms


Boll Weevil
(In-Season)


LBS AI/AC


Bolstar 6E (sulprofos)
Curacron 6E (profenofos)
Dimilin (diflubenzuron)
Larvin 3.2E (thiodicarb)
Lannate 1.8E (methomyl)
Nudrin (methomyl)
Baythroid 2E (cyfluthrin)
Guthion 2E (azinphos-methyl)
EPN + Methyl parathion 3-3E
Malathion 5E (malathion)
Methyl parathion 4E(methyl parathion)
Penncap-M 2E (methyl parathion)


0.75-1.5
0.5-1.0
0.0625-0.125
0.6-0.9
0.45-0.675
0.45-0.675
0.025-0.05
0.25-0.5
+0.25-0.5
1.25-2.5
0.25-0.5
0.25-0.5


FORMUIT.ATTOn /ArT


1-2 pts
2/3-1 1/3 pts
4-8 ozs
1 1/2-2 1/4 pts
2-3 pts
2-3 pts
1.6-3.2 oz
1-2 pts
2/3-1 1/3 pts
2-4 pts
1/2-1 pt
1-2 pts


WHEN TO TREAT: Treat after first bloom, make 4 applications 4-5 days apart when
square damage exceeds 10%. Under heavy weevil pressure, increase insecticide
dosage and shorten the interval between sprays to 3-4 days.


NOTE: The pyrethroids (Ambush, Ammo, Asana, Capture, Cymbush, Karate, Pounce,
Pydrin and Scout) will control light to moderate infestations of weevils but you
may have to close spray intervals to 3-5 days or come in with phosphate insecti-
cides between their applications.
Diapausing Guthion 2E (azinphos-methyl) 0.25 1 pt
Boll Weevils Malathion 5E (malathion) 1.2 1 qt
Methyl parathion 4E (methyl parathion) 0.5 1 pt


WHEN TO TREAT: Apply insecticides at 10 to 14 day intervals after regular season
treatments until stalks are cut or a killing frost occurs.


DESTROY STALKS IMMEDIATELY AFTER HARVEST!
Bollworms Ambush 2E (permethrin) 0.1-0.2 0.4-0.8 pts


Tobacco Budworms


Ammo 2.5E (cypermethrin)
Asana 1.9E (esfenvalerate)
Asana XL 0.66E (esfenvalerate)
Baythroid 2E (cyfluthrin)
Bolstar 6E (sulprofos)
Capture (bifenthrin)
Curacron 6E (profenofos)
Cymbush 3E (cypermethrin)
EPN + Methyl parathion 3-3E
Karate 1E (cyhalothrin)
Lannate 1.8L (methomyl)


0.04-0.08
0.03-0.05
0.02-0.05
0.025-0.05
0.75-1.5
0.04-0.1
0.75-1.0
0.04-0.08
+0.5-1.0
0.025-0.04
0.125


2-4 ozs
2-2 1/3 ozs
3.9-9.7 oz
1.6-3.2 oz
1-2 pts
2.6-6.4 ozs
1-1 1/3 pts
1.7-3.4 ozs
1 1/3-2 2/3 pts
3.20-5.12 ozs
1/2 pt


LBS AI/A FORMULAION/ACR











INSECT RECOMMENDATIONS


T.BR AT /AC


FORMULATION/ACRE


Mavrik 2E (fluvalinate)
Nudrin 1.8L (methomyl)
Orthene 75SP (acephate)
Pounce 3.2E (permethrin)
Pydrin 2.4E (fenvalerate)
Scout 0.3E (tralomethrin)
Scout X-TRA 0.9E (tralomethrin)
Lorsban 4E at 0.5 lb. (lpt) per
rate of a pyrethroid used alone


0.055-0.10 3.6-6.4 ozs
0.45-0.67 2-3 pts
1.0 1 1/3 Ibs
0.1-0.2 4-8 ozs
0.1-0.2 5 1/3-10 2/3 ozs
0.015-0.019 6.4-8.0 ozs
0.018-0.024 2.5-3.4 ozs
acre used in combination with 1/2 the standard
has given satisfactory results in most cases.


WHEN TO TREAT: In previously untreated fields apply a recommended insecticide
when an average of 10 small larvae per 100 plants are present. In previously
treated fields apply a recommended insecticide when an average of 5 small larvae
per 100 plants are present. NOTE: Read all labels carefully before applica-
tion.


OVICIDE
Lannate 1.8L, Nudrin 1.8L (methomyl) 0.125 1/2 pt
Larvin 3.2F (thiodicarb) 0.125 5 ozs
Cotton Aphids Bidrin 8E (dicrotophos) 0.2 3.2 ozs
Capture 2EC (bifenthrin) 0.04-0.1 2.6-6.4 ozs
Cygon 4E (dimethoate) 0.2 2/5 pt
Lorsban 4E (chlorpyrifos) 0.5-1.25 1/2-1 pt
Malathion 5E (malathion) 0.5-1.25 4/5-2 pts
Parathion 4E (ethyl parathion) 0.25 1/2 pt
Swat 8EC (phosphamidon) 0.1875 3 oz (early)
0.25 4 oz (late)
Metasystox R 2E (demeton) 0.125-0.25 1/2-1 pt


WHEN TO TREAT: Apply controls when leaves appear sticky and heavy infestation
develops. Make one application and repeat when necessary.
Cutworms Ammo 2.5E (cypermethrin) 0.04-0.10 2.0-5.0 ozs
Asana 1.9E (esfenvalerate) 0.1-0.2 5 1/3-10 2/3 ozs
Asana XL 0.66 (esfenvalerate) 0.02-0.05 3.9-9.7 ozs
Cymbush 3E (cypermethrin) 0.06-0.10 2.56-4.27 ozs
Lorsban 4E (chlorpyrifos) 1.0 2 pts


WHEN TO TREAT: Control when worms are found destroying a stand. Cover plants
and surface of ground along rows with insecticide.
Fall Armyworms Bolstar 6E (sulprofos) 0.75-1.5 1-2 pts
Curacron 6E (profenofos) 0.75-1.0 1-1 1/3 pts
Lannate 1.8L (methomyl) 0.3-0.45 1 1/3-2 pts
Larvin 3.2F (thiodicarb) 0.6-0.9 1 1/2-2 1/4 pts
Lorsban 4E (chlorpyrifos) 0.7-1.0 1 2/5-2 pts
Nudrin 1.8L (methomyl) 0.3-0.45 1 1/3-2 pts
Orthene 75SP (acephate) 1.0 1 1/3 lbs


WHEN TO TREAT: Treat when 5 or more larvae per 100 stalks are found.


INSECTICIDE


Bollworms
Tobacco Budworms


INSECT FRUAIN CE


'~""~m












INSECT RECOMMENDATIONS


INSECTICIDE


Bidrin 8E (dicrotophos)
Cygon 4E (dimethoate)
Dylox 80SP (trichlorfon) (plant bugs)
Dylox 80SP (trichlorfon) (fleahoppers)
Lorsban 4E (chlorpyrifos)
Orthene 75 SP (acephate)
Proxol 80 SP (trichlorfon) (plant bugs)
Proxol 80 SP (trichlorfon) (fleahoppers)


LBS AI/AC


0.1-0.2
0.125-0.25
1.0-1.5
0.25-0.1
0.2-0.5
0.37
1.0-1.5
0.25-0.1


FORMULATION/ACRE


1.6-3.2 ozs
1/4-1/2 pt
20-30 ozs
5-20 ozs
2/5-1 pt
1/2 lb
20-30 ozs
5-20 ozs


WHEN TO TREAT: Make 1 or more applications when 1 adult or nymph is found per
row foot before bloom. If pinhead square set is less than 75%, treat when 1
adult nymph is found per 2 row feet. After first bloom, cotton that is not
squaring normally should be treated if 30 or more are found per 100 terminals.
Loopers Ambush 2E (permethrin) 0.1-0.2 0.4-0.8 pt
Dipel ES, Javlin and others See individual labels for rate.
(bacillus thuringiensis)
Larvin 3.2F (thiodicarb) 0.6-0.9 1 1/2- 2 1/4 pts
Monitor 4E (methamidophos) 0.5-1.0 1-2 pts
Orthene 75SP (acephate) 1.0 1 1/3 lbs
Pounce 3.2E (permethrin) 0.1-0.2 4-8 ozs


WHEN TO TREAT: Economic damage seldom occurs; however if chemical control is
necessary, loopers could be controlled when they are small. Follow label
directions.
Spider Mites Capture 2EC (bifenthrin) 0.06-0.1 3.8-6.4 ozs
Comite 6.5E (propargite) 1.0-1.6 1 1/5-2 pts
Curacron 6E (profenophos) 0.5-0.75 2/3-1 pt
Kelthane MF 4E (dicofol) 1.0-1.5 2-3 pts
Lorsban 4E (chlorpyrifos) 0.5-1.0 1-2 pts
Monitor 4E (methamidophos) 0.5-1.0 1-2 pts
Supracide 2E (methadithion) 1.0 2 qts


WHEN TO TREAT: Foliar treatment: Treat around field edges when mites first
appear, may prevent heavy infestation later. Treat entire field when leaves be-
gin to redden and medium infestation occurs. Two or more applications at 5 to 7
day intervals may be needed.


Di-Syston 15G (disulfoton) 0.6-0.75 4-5 lbs
Temik 15G (aldicarb) 0.6 4 Ibs
Thimet 20G (phorate) 0.5-0.75 2 1/2-3 3/4 lbs


WHEN TO TREAT: Systemic granular insecticides may be applied in soil at plant-
ing. Caution: Thimet and Di-Syston applied with Karmex or Cotoran may interact
and cause serious injury to young cotton.


INSECT


Fleahoppers
Plant Bugs











INSECT RECOMMENDATIONS


INSECT INSECTICIDE LBS AI/AC FORMULATION/ACRE
Thrips Bidrin 8E (dicrotophos) 0.2 1/5 pt
Cygon 4E (dimethoate) 0.2 2/5 pt
Orthene 75SP (acephate) 0.1875 1/4 lb


WHEN TO TREAT: Apply spray when 1 or more thrips per plant are present when
cotton comes to a stand. Repeat treatment in 7-10 days if needed.


Di-Syston 15G (disulfoton) 0.6-0.75 4-5 lbs
Temik 15G (aldicarb) 0.3-0.52 2-3 lbs
Thimet 20G (phorate) 0.5-0.75 2 1/2-3 3/4 lbs


WHEN TO TREAT: Systemic granular insecticides may be applied in soil at plant-
ing. CAUTION: Thimet or Di-Syston applied with Karmex or Cotoran may interact
and cause serious injury to young cotton.
Whiteflies Monitor 4E (methamidophos) 0.25-0.5 1/2-1 pt
Orthene 75SP (acephate) 0.5-1.0 2/3-1 1/3 lbs
Supracide 2E (methadithion) 0.25-0.5 1-2 pts


WHEN TO TREAT: For active growing cotton: Treat when 50% or more of the plant
terminals have clusters of whiteflies on them. Two or three applications at 5-
day intervals are usually needed to bring an infestation under control. For
mature or stressed cotton: Make 2 applications 5 days apart when honeydew is
accumulating and sooty mold appears on leaves.
E = Emulsifiable concentrate; F = Flowable; G = Granules; L = Liquid; SP = Soluble Powder


CAUTION: Methomyl (Lannate and Nudrin) may be phytotoxic to cotton under stress. Use in late season and
do not exceed 3 applications, applied a minimum of 10 days apart.


To calculate the number of acres that 1 gallon or pound of material will cover, divide pounds of active
ingredient (AI) per gallon or pound of material by the pounds of AI desired per acre. (Example. 1 gallon
of methyl parathion 4E applied at 0.5 Ibs. active per acre = 4 divided by 0.5 = 8 acres per gallon). For
cost per acre, divide your cost per gallon or pound of material by acres covered.


THE USE OF TRADE NAMES IS SOLELY FOR THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING SPECIFIC INFORMATION. IT IS NOT A
GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY OF PRODUCTS NAMED AND DOES NOT SIGNIFY THAT THEY ARE APPROVED TO THE EXCLUSION OF
OTHERS OF SUITABLE COMPOSITION.









FLORIDA COTTON PEST HOTLINE


Like the weather, cotton insect pest problems cannot be accurately
predicted more than a few days to a week in the future. For this reason,
cotton farmers in Florida need to keep up to date with current pest conditions
throughout the panhandle and with management practices that are economical and
effective. Nor-Am Chemical Company through the Cotton Foundation is funding
the Florida Cotton Pest Hotline. The Hotline is a two-minute tape that is
updated twice weekly from mid-April through the end of September. It is
available toll-free to anyone in Florida and has information on pheromone trap
catches, insect pest field reports, pest problems in southeastern states,
updates on boll weevil eradication progress, new chemical registrations/
cancellations, upcoming cotton meetings, etc. To call the Cotton Pest Hotline
dial:









*



1-800-654-8488



*








DEFOLIATION AND DESSICATION OF COTTON


Defoliant (Formulation)

Def 6 (6 lb/gal EC)


Def 6 (6 Ib/gal EC) +
Dropp 50WP (50%)

Dropp 50WP (50%)


Dropp 50WP (50%) +
Def 6 (6 lb/gal EC)

Dropp 50WP (50%) +
Prep (6 lb/gal EC)

Folex (6 lb/gal EC)


Folex (6 lb/gal EC) +
Dropp 50WP (50%)

Folex (6 Ib/gal EC) +
Prep (6 lb/gal EC)

Harvade 5F (4.9 lb/gal F)



Harvade 5F (4.9 lb/gal F)
+
Prep (6 lb/gal EC)

Prep (6 lb/gal EC)


Sodium Chlorate
(18-28%)


Rate/Acre


1 1/3-2 pts


1-1 1/3 pts +
0.066-0.1 lb

0.2-0.4 Ibs


0.1-0.2 lbs +
0.5-1.0 pt

0.1-0.2 lbs +
1 1/3-2 2/3 qts

1 1/2-2 pts


1-1 1/2 pts +
0.1-0.2 lbs

1 1/2-2 pts +
1 1/3-2 2/3 qts

6 1/2-8 ozs



6 1/2-8 ozs +

1 /3-2 2/3 qts

1 1/3-2 2/3 qts


1-2 gal


Comments


Apply in 5-10 gal/ac (air) or
15-25 gal/ac (ground).

Apply in 5-10 gal/ac (air) or
15-25 gal/ac (ground).

Apply in 2-10 gal/ac (air) or
10-25 gal/ac (ground).

Apply in 3-10 gal/ac (air) or
10-25 gal/ac (ground).

Apply in 3-10 gal/ac (air) or
10-50 gal/ac (ground).

Apply in 5-10 gal/ac (air) or
15-30 gal/ac (ground).

Apply in 5-10 gal/ac (air) or
15-25 gal/ac (ground).

Apply in 5-10 gal/ac (air) or
15-25 gal/ac (ground)

Apply in 5 or more gal/ac (air)
or 10-20 gal/ac (ground). Add
1 pt/ac of oil-based surfactant.

Apply in 5 or more gal/ac (air)
or 10-20 gal/ac (ground). Add
1 pt/ac of oil-based surfactant.

Apply in 2-5 gal/ac (air) or
15-50 gal/ac (ground).

Apply in 5-10 gal/ac (air) or
15-25 gal/ac (ground).


When a Crop is Ready


There are a variety of factors which affect the rate at which a cotton
crop matures. Therefore, each cotton crop and, in fact, each field must be
evaluated individually to determine the optimum time for defoliating the crop
in preparation for harvest. Apply the boll opening agent Prep and the defoli-
ant only after at least 60-75% of the bolls you are planning to harvest are
open. Harvestable bolls: a) are hard, not easily cut with a knife; b) have
lint that strings out (does not cut cleanly) when cut with a knife; c) have
seeds that are beginning to loose their jelly-like consistency. The seed
coats also show signs of darkening.









HIGHLIGHTS OF COTTON PROGRAM FOR 1990


* The 1990 target price will be 72.9 cents, down from 73.4 cents in 1989.

* The effective loan rate after discretionary reductions will be 50.27
cents, up slightly from 50.0 cents in 1989.

* The expected deficiency payment will be 10.5 cents, down from 24.1 cents
in 1989. The advanced deficiency payment for upland cotton has been
announced as 3.6334 cents per pound in 1990.

* The 50/92 option is still available.

* In 1989 there was a total U.S. Production of 12.2 million bales with
domestic use at 8.2 million bales and exports at 7.5 million bales.
Carryover into 1990 is estimated at 3.75 million bales.

* For 1990, production is projected to be 15.2 million bales and domestic
consumption and exports at 7.8 and 6.7 million bales, respectively.
Taking into consideration the carryover from 1989 of 3.75 million bales,
this would leave a carryover of 4.85 million bales at the end of 1990.

* In 1990, U.S. cotton acreage is projected to increase by 18.6% over 1989.
The increase to 12.1 million acres is due to several factors: the
setaside is 12.5% (down from 25% in 1989), price of grain crops is down,
and easier financing when compared to grain crops. For Florida, planted
cotton acreage in 1990 is estimated at 31,500 acres.








BOLL WEEVIL ERADICATION PROGRAM IN FLORIDA


The Boll Weevil Eradication Program (BWEP) will begin its third full
season in Florida in 1990. The first phase of the program, begun in September
1987, concentrated on wide area diapause control through the use of multiple
applications of an organophosphate insecticide (Guthion). During this phase,
337,000 acres of cotton in Alabama, Georgia and Florida were treated with an
average of 8.4 chemical applications.

The 1988 program began approximately April 1, when pheromone traps were
placed on the perimeters of cotton fields at the rate of 1 trap per acre. As
cotton fields were planted for the 1988 season, the pheromone traps were
relocated to these fields (1 trap per acre), with special emphasis on the
borders of cotton fields facing likely overwintering trap catches of 0.1 or
more weevils per trap per week were treated with Cythion (malathion) ULV at 1
pt/Ac.

In 1988, application was modified from that used in 1987. An altitude of
10, versus 15 feet and a swath width of 60 feet (versus 100 feet used in 1987)
was used. These changes allowed for more thorough coverage of the cotton.

In 1988, an average of fifteen boll weevils per acre were trapped during
the period from mid-July through November (Alabama, Florida, Georgia).
Diapause treatments in the fall of 1988 were applied to approximately 40% of
the cotton acreage in the Southeast Boll Weevil Eradication Program.

The 1989 program was conducted in a similar way to that in 1988. That is,
pheromone traps will be used to identify overwintering populations of boll
weevils. Pinhead square applications of Cythion ULV will be made where infes-
tations are detected. Similarly, infestations detected during the growing
season will be treated as necessary. During the 1990 season, the program will
be conducted as in 1989 with minor adjustments.

In 1990, Florida cotton farmers share of the program costs will be $25 per
acre. The Florida legislature appropriated one-half ($17.50) of the farmers
cost for the 1988 and 1989 seasons and $10 of the $35 assessment in 1989.
Although there is no firm commitment for financial support from the Florida
legislature in 1990, it is anticipated that this year state support will
represent at least one-half of the total grower assessment.









AREA GIN FACILITIES AVAILABLE TO FLORIDA COTTON GROWERS


Florida Gin Locations:

Burkhead Gin
P.O. Box 96
Jay, FL 3565
904-675-4636

Alabama Gin Locations:

Brannon Stand Gin Co.
P.O. Box 190
Dothan, AL 36301

Brooks Cotton Co.
P.O. Box 190
Samson, AL 36477
205-898-2692

C & B Gin Co.
Rt. 2; P.O. Box 113
Eufaula, AL 36027

Carpenter Gin Co.
P.O. Box 343
Luverne, AL 36049


Georgia Gin Locations:

Arlington Manufacturing Co.
Arlington, GA 31766

B & J Company, Inc.
P.O. Box 45
Meigs, GA 31675

BCT Gin Co.
Rt. 1 Box 219
Quitman, GA 31640

Berlin Gin Co.
P.O. Box 158
Berling, GA 31722

Clover Leaf Gin
Donaldsonville, GA 31745


Ed Golden Gin
Rt. 1
Jay, FL 32565
904-675-4159



Covington County Gin
Rt. 5 Box 155B
Andalusia, AL 36420

Frank Currie Gin Co.
P.O. Box 127
McCullough, AL 36552

Grant & Johnson Gin
P.O. Box 119
Dozier, AL 36028

Dale Moseley Cotton Gin
Rt. 2 Box 375
Abbeville, AL 36310





Irwinville Gin & Warehouse
P.O. Box 237
Irwinville, GA 31760

Lewis Gin
Moultrie, GA 31763

Lowndes Ginning Co.
P.O. Box 1851
Valdosta, GA 31694

Mobley Gin Co.
P.O. Box 460
Doerun, GA 31744

Morven Gin Co.
P.O. Box-218
Morven, GA 31638








Coastal Plains Gin Co.
P.O. Box 488
Omega, GA 31775

Decatur Gin Co.
P.O. Box 68
Bainbridge, GA 31766

Dickey Gin Co.
P.O. Box 197
Morgan, GA 31766

Funston Gin Co.
P.O. Box 70
Funston, GA 31753


Norman Park & Warehouse
Norman, GA 31771

Omega Farm Supply
P.O. Box 86
Omega, GA 31775

Pinecliff Gin Inc.
Rt. 3 Box 86
Camilla, GA 31730

Taylor's Gin & Warehouse
Doerun, GA 31744


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