Title: Field day
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Title: Field day
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Publisher: Agricultural Research Center, University of Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00076410
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. FIELD DAY


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER


FT. LAUDERDALE


presented by the


University of Florida
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences


PUBL,. FL-78-3
AGRIC, RESEARCH CENTER
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FT, LAUDERDALE, TFLORIDA
MAY 4, 1978






WELCOME


Welcome to the Fort.Lauderdale Agricultural Research
Center. We are pleased to acquaint you with a number
of projects designed to improve the ornamental and
turfgrass industries in Florida. Research areas that
you may see on your visit cover turfgrass management,
woody ornamental plants, selection of new plants for
the nursery industry, control of terrestrial and aqua-
tic weeds, insect and disease control and integrated.
pest management. These reflecti"the concern by the
Research Center for enhancement and preservation of
our unique environment.

As one of the few such Centers in the world devoted to
research on most phases of urban agriculture, we con-
sider our job very important. One-third of the resi-
dents of Florida live in the three-county area surround-
ing the Fort Lauderdale ARC. This is a rapidly growing
area with many diverse and complex problems that require
a multidisciplinary approach-to their solution. Our
efforts are designed to respond to the needs of the
ornamentals industry and the urban population of this
area.

One important aspect of our work is to provide research
information for dissemination by County Extension Units.
The need for better production systems, safer pesticides,
and newplant cultivars are carried to us by County
Extension Units, industry related organizations, state
and federal regulatory and action agencies, and others.
We hope your visit will acquaint you with some of our
efforts in carrying out our responsibilities. We-invite
you to walk the turf plots, visit theshade houses, and
ask many questions. Have a nice day!




W. B. Ennis, Jr.
Center Director





PROGRAMS AT THE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER


High priority is given by the Fort Lauderdale Agricul-,
tural Research Center to five research areas: (1) Orna-
mental plants; (2) Turfgrasses; (3) Lethal yellowing
disease of palms; (4) Citrus blackfly; and (5) Aquatic
weeds. These programs are concentrating on problems of
critical importance to the citizens of Florida as well
as to people elsewhere in this country and many sub-
tropical regions of the world.

Ornamentals

Research on ornamental plants is concerned with develop-
ing technologies and information on the production,
protection and management of ornamental plants grown in
South'Florida. The information developed from this
research is used by nurserymen, homeowners, and pest
control operators. The program involves cooperative
efforts by scientists trained in Horticulture, Entomol-
ogy, Plant Pathology, Weed Science and Soil Science.,
The production, sales, and utilization of ornamental'
plants is a multi-million dollar business in Florida.


Turfgrasses'

The turfgrass industry in Florida ranks second only to
citrus in its agricultural value. The research program
at the ARC is directed towards improved production,
protection, and management technologies. The research
findings of a plant breeder, a soils scientist, a weed
scientist, an entomologist and a plant pathologist are
used by groups such as golf course superintendents,
parks personnel, sod producers, equipment manufacturers,
homeowners, lawn maintenance personnel, and highway
departments.




Lethal Yellowing

Lethal yellowing is a serious mycoplasmal disease of
coconut, date, and other palms. To solve this problem
the Fort Lauderdale ARC has a six-scientist team
representing the disciplines of Physiology, Plant
Pathology, Electron Microscopy, Entomology and'Horti-
culture. An injection technique has been developed by
them to control lethal yellowing in the coconut and
pritchardia palms. Overall 21 palm species are known
tobe affected by lethal yellowing. The research at
Fort Lauderdale gains wide recognition because of the
importance of the coconut palm as a food and industrial
crop in many tropical areas of the world.

Citrus Blackfly

Research was initiated on the citrus blackfly at the
ARC in the spring of 1976 when this important insect
was discovered in the Fort Lauderdale area. Research
would not normally be conducted on citrus at this Cen-
ter, but because the pest was placed under quarantine,
the University of Florida's research efforts on this
insect pest were centered here. Research is conducted
here by five entomologists and one horticulturist
towards developing chemical and biological control
methods for the management and eventual eradication of
the pest. It involves environmental assessments of the
control technologies applied towards eradication.

Aquatic Weeds

The uncontrolled growth of aquatic weeds in ponds,
lakes, reservoirs, and canals poses serious threats to
the multiple use of our water resources. Plants such
as:hydrilla and waterhyacinth threaten the availability
of water to Florida for use in agriculture, recreation,
industry and private households. Research at the ARC
is;cooperative with the USDA-FR and involves herbicides
as well as.biological control by insects, fish, and
other organisms, and the integration of control tech-
nologies into a management system.




TOUR


ARC FORT LAUDERDALE

FOR

FLORIDA WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY

MAY. 4, 1978

8:45 A.M. to 12:00 Noon


RESPONSIBLE FACULTY

W. B. Ennis, Jr.

E. 0. Burt


TIME

8:45 A.M.

9:00 A.M.


DESCRIPTION

Welcome

Control of weeds in
newly sprigged and
newly sodded'St.
Augustinegrass.:

Dense turf is the
key to a good wee.
control program.

Creeping beggarweed
control in St.
Augustinegrass.

Tolerance ofSt.
Augustinegrass cul-
tivars to postemer-
gence herbicides.

Herbicides for con-
trol of weeds, in.
Bermudagrass. turf.

Soil fertility aids
inweed control.

Tolerance of Bermu-
dagrass cultivars
to herbicides.
















RESPONSIBLE FACULTY


10:00 A.M.



10:10 A.M.



10:25 A.M.


T. D. Center


D. L. Sutton



K. K. Steward.


Weeds can be con-
trolled.

A common weed equa-
tion: mole crickets
plus nematodes
equals weedy turf.

More on tolerance
of Bermudagrass to
herbicides.

Biological control
of waterhyacinths -
Sameodes colony.

Closed system for
grass carp culture;
Spawning Facility
for grass carp.

Laboratory and
greenhouse facili-
ties and procedures
for evaluating
chemicals for aqua-
tic weed control.

Field application
equipment for aqua-
tic chemicals.


DESCRIPTION


TIME






10:45 A.M.






11:00 A.M.




.11:30 A.M.





11:45 A.M.


TIME


RESPONSIBLE FACULTY

D. L. Sutton






K. K. Steward




H. M. Donselman





H. M. Donselman


E. 0. Burt



D. L. Sutton


Grass carp holding
tanks; culture of
desirable aquatic
plants; plant
competition
studies.


Outside aquaria
for aquatic plant
culture and chemi-
cals evaluation.


New plant'intro-
ductions; weed
problems in con-
tainer grown
ornamentals.


Evaluation of
palms for 'resis-
tance to Lethal
Yellowing.


Life history
studies of
sedges.


Cattail and duck-
weed mulch as a
growth media for
container grown
ornamentals.


DESCRIPTION






RESEARCH FACULTY


RAY ATILANO, Ph.D., University.of California-Riverside
Plant Pathologist (Ornamentals & Turf)


I. GRANT BASHAM, Ph.D., Cornell University
Plant Disease Physiologist (Lethal, Yellowing)


VERT 0. BURT, Ph.D., Ohio State University
Turfgrass Management & Weed Scientist


HILIP BUSEY, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Turfgrass Breeder & Geneticist


ED;CENTER, Ph.D., University of Florida,
Entomologist, USDA-FR'(Aquatic Weeds)


ONALD H. CHERRY, Ph.D., University of Illinois
Entomologist (Citrus Blackfly Research)


ENRY M. DONSELMAN, Ph.D., Purdue University
Ornamental Horticulture Extension (Lethal Yellowing)


OBERT V. DOWELL, Ph.D., Ohio State University
Entomologist (Citrus Blackfly Research)


B. ENNIS, JR., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
Center Director


EORGE E. FITZPATRICK, Ph.D., Rutgers University
Entomologist (Citrus Blackfly Research)









FORREST W. HOWARD, Ph.D., Louisiana State University
Entomologist (Lethal Yellowing)


RANDOLPH E. McCOY, Ph.D., Cornell University
Plant Pathologist (Lethal Yellowing).


JAMES A. REINERT, Ph.D., Clemson University
Entomologist (Pest Management of Ornamentals, Turf,
and Citrus Blackfly)

GEORGE H. SNYDER, Ph.D., Ohio State University
Soil Scientist (Turfgrasses)


KERRY K. STEWARD, Ph.D., University of Connecticut
Plant Physiologist,' USDA-FR (Aquatic Weeds)


DAVID L. SUTTON, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Inst.
Agronomist (Aquatic Weeds)


DARRYL L. THOMAS, Ph.D., University of California
Plant Pathologist & Electron Microscopist
(Lethal Yellowing)


JAMES H. TSAI, Ph.D., Michigan State University
Entomologist (Lethal Yellowing)

VERNON V. VANDIVER, Ph.D., North Carolina State Univ.
Agronomist & Extension Aquatic Weeds Specialist











EXT=Broward County
Extension 7
3245 SW70th Ave
3051-581-8010 .




A .RC=Ft.Lauderdale ARC \
3205 SW.70th Ave.
S 3051-584-6990 A




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