Title: Drew Field echoes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076231/00064
 Material Information
Title: Drew Field echoes
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Post Exchange
Place of Publication: Tampa Fla
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida -- Tampa   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Drew Field Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa -- Drew Army Airfield
Coordinates: 27.975556 x -82.533333 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Published each Friday in the interest of the officers and enlisted men of Drew Field."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 39 (Dec. 2, 1943).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076231
Volume ID: VID00064
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24622561
lccn - sn 93063705

Full Text




THE~IT~:h


X-A


V O ise in h Ite t P o o De F Fid J 1

VOL. 2, NO. 13 Published Exlusively in the Interest of the Personnel of Drew Field Friday, June 4, 1943


Airplane Mechanic. Now at Drew

Has Served In Two Wars
By PVT. VICTOR M. BERNARD
He is one of the heroes of the Army Air Forces, in the service
since 1911. Sure, he's no kid anymore, and he doesn't fly, but he sees
to it that our fighting ships do. Sometimes the jobs run anywhere
froni'24 to 48 hours at a stretch, but he knows the job must be done-
the dawn flight must go out. Valiant men, these chaps like M/Sgt.
Albert J. Snodgrass, who keep
'em flying and forget to think of "They were in the water like
themselves in the process. schools of fish," the sergeant said,
Sgt. Snodgrass, now assistant then added, "until we went to
-- chief of the 84th Bombard- work on them. There seemed to
At Group, has been in foreign be no question that well-laid plans
rvice in both the World War and preparations for war with us
and the present global conflict. had long since been formulated
In 1917-18 he went through the and only awaited the starting gun
Meuse, Argonne and St. Mihiel before being put into execution.
campaigns, and also soldiered in But we hadn't been napping, and
defense of the Ypres line in Bel- their plan to enter the Panama
gium. In the Argonne, he was Canal Zone, which they thought
scratched by shrapnel from a would be an easy matter, was an
bursting shell, but not seriously abysmal failure. Enemy subma-
wounded. rine losses must have amazed
In April, 1919, several months them, as their consensus had been
after he Armistice, he wasthat we were totally unprepared.
broughtback to tistcountry and They found differently. It's a
brought back to this country and military secret," he smiled,"a^nd
honorably discharged. Gravitat- military secret," he smiled, and
ing to the Louisiana oil fields, he I can't tell you about it, but we
becg e oil wor a t have a method of sub detect on
became an oil worker, a trade he that will render hem much less
assiduously followed for dight that will render hem much less
years. B it had never quite sat- formidable than they were in the
years. But it had never quite sat- last war!"
isfied him. He missed Army life- Snodrass' nxt st was
its camaraderie- even its rigid Sgt. Snodgrass' next stop was
its camaraderie even its rigid in the Netherlands West Indies
regulations which had become a where the anti-sub patrolling
habit. So in 1927 he re-enlistedc whtie. e anti-sub patrolling
and in the ensuing years, was sta- continued. He kept the big ships
tioned successively atSelfridge in the air and the successes of
Field, Mich., Luke Field, Hawaii, bombardiers and pilots were as
and Langley Field, Virginia. pleasurable to him as to them.
and Langley field, They compensated for long hours
On Oct. 25, 1940, when war of work through the sultry, tropi-
seemed imminent, he embarked cal nights that merged into sweat-
for Puerto Rico with a submarine ing days under a blistering, equa-
patrol squadron. Until Nov. 6, trial sun. But the patrols went
1941, he worked there diligently regularly on their courses over the
on the 27 two-engined medium blue-green Caribbean.
bombers that made up the unit. "There were two villages on the
Then orders came for the squad- island wheres3ve were" based," he
ron to move to the Virgin Islands. said, "and we could fill practically
He was there when the vicious all of our needs in them. We were
attack was made on Pearl Harbor. welcomed and well treated by the
population which was made up
Then the routine patrol flights principally of Dutch, Spanish and
became very serious missions. (Continued on Page 2)


The Old and the New


March in Drew


Memorial Revue


r ---**-- -, -- ,: .....


More than 10,000 soldiers ob-
served Memorial Day by taking
part in Tampa's biggest military
parade of the war.
. Battalion after battalion of of-
ficers and men, including army
nurses and medical units, paraded
past the stand where command-
ing officers reviewed them. They
were dressed smartly in khaki
shirts and slacks, garrison caps,
ties and service shoes.
The ceremony opened with in-
spection of troops by Col. Melvin
B. Asp, air base area commander,
and his staff. Martial airs were
then played by the 69th Army
Air Forces band and the Aircraft
Warning Unit Training corps
band.
Shortly before the ceremony
was scheduled to begin, rain
drenched the field. The rain had
ended, however, when the troops
reported at 4:15 o'clock, and the
services were held in bright sun-
shine, with a soft breeze that
stirred the flags and company
colors.
Col. Asp Speaks
"These are busy days for all of


Drew Swi mers

Complete(ourse

In Waier Safety
An instructor's course on Water
Safety has just been completed
Sby the American Red Cross by
a group of men of Drew who
were selected to take this course
and in turn will teach the non-
swimmers of their organization
functional swimming.
A group of 39 men passed the
instructors course under the di-
rection of Mr. Moran of the Red
Cross and Harry Canning, expert
Water Safety Instructor, for this
district.


The instruction course consisted
.of the use of the barrack bag
inflated by holding it open over
the head while jumping in the
f" water, inflation of the pants
S' legs, shedding clothes in water
S. use of the life raft and belt.
The list of men who passed the
course are: Warren Stanley An-
V person, Elwyn Merle Batchelor,
SJack Baumgarten, Adclph Joseph
Bernadou, Alfred James Brill,
Henry Brooks, Edwatrd Girard
Brown, George Arnold Bruens,
Glenn Earl Clark, James William
Cole, William Francis Costa. Wm.
Derkacz, Lt. George Vincent
Dlugos, Elmer Sharpless Finne-
gan, Raymond Craig Greening,
John Paul Hartnett, Robert Lewis
Hodgscn, Charles Hubert Horrell,
Walier Price Kane, Arnold Paul
Kadon, Clarence John Kretchmer,
George Blue Langley, John H.
Larsen, Eugene John Lombardi,
Ralph Joseph Macauley, Robert
Walter MacDuff, Wesley Glen
us," Col. Asp said in his brief McFarlane, Everett Dale Maddox,
address which was carried to the William Plymire Moots, Andrew.
crowd over an amplifying system. Preslopsky, William James Rig-
"In training to become fighting ney, Thomas Hubert Rooney,
men, we have little time for Peter Rossi, Andrew John San-
ceremonies or speech-making. But torelli, John Schurr, John Shesko,
wars are not won by action and Robert Irving Sonfag, Frederick
steel alone-strong feeling in the Elwood Taylor, Robert Fielding
heart and high resolve in the Waldon, Edwin Joseph Williams.
mind also have their places.
"Accordingly, we pause in our
work for a brief program to honor AVIATION CADETS NEEDED
the men and women who have In a teletype message ad-
given their lives to make us, and dressed to this command, Gen-
keep us, the great nation we are. eral St. Clair Streett, Com-
'Memorial day this year has a handing General of the Third
personal meaning to most of us. Air Force, said, "The Army
I venture to say that nearly every Air Corps has the best air-
man here already has lost a rela-
tive or friend on some battlefield, planes in the wide blue yonder.
tive or friend on some battlefield, Keep-'em-flying volunteers for,
air route or sea lane of this war. aviation cadet training are ur-
There are Drew Field dead among gently and immediately need-
them and there will be many ed.
more. for the price of victory will Officers and enlisted person-
be high. nel between ages of 18 and 26
"These dead, yours and mine, inclusive are urged to volunteer
we honor today and tomorrow.
It is not for us today andespond with for flying training. For further
poems of praise or tributes of particulars, contact the Base
flowers. We who follow must Schocl Office.
(Continued on Page 2)


Drew Civilian Employees Buy War Bonds"


Left to right, Capt. Harry M. Doster, of Prattville, Alabama, is
shown wishing the best' of luck to his successor as Base Public
Relations Officer, Maj. Daniel O. Todd, 41-year-old Arkansan.
Capt. Doster, Prattville, Ala., newspaper publisher, was as-
signed to other duties. He had held the post of Drew Field's Public
Relations Officer for about 18 months.
Prior to his assignment to Drew Field, Major Todd was Public
Relations Officer at Barksdale Field, La., a post that he held from
the time that he was called to active duty from the reserves in
July, 1941.
Before going into the Army, the major was connected with the
U. S. Forestry Service, serving as a surveyor, forest ranger and
consituction man during his eight years of service. Before enter-
ing the Forestry Service, he taught English and journalism at a
military academy and college in Arkansas.
A graduate of Iowa State University, he also attended the Uni-
versity of Chicago and Northwestern.
Now residing at Clearwater Beach, Major Todd plans to bring
his wife and their three-year-old daughter to Tampa. His family
is living in Arkansas.


Seen in the above picture are
Drew Field civilian employees
gathered in front of the flag pole
on the lawn fronting the Base
Headquarters. They look on as
Col. Melvin B. Asp, Air Base Area
Commander, delivers a war bond
bought on the pay reservation
plan to Mr. Charles Foos, super-
intendent of the Post Engineers.
To the right of Col. Asp is his
secretary, Miss Hilda Sweat, and
to the left of Mr. Foos is Lt. Ed-


ward B. Dailey, War Bond Officer.
One hundred and twenty-six ci-
vilians received their war bonds
upon this occasion.
Lt. Dailey has mapped out plans
for increasing the purchase of war
bonds by the civilian personnel.
The goal established, the lieuten-
ant pointed out, is to be at least
90 per cent participation and 10
per cent pay deductions.
To date, the only section on
Drew Field to achieve the goal


has been the Medical Depart-
ment with 90.38 per cent. Five
other sections have accomplished
25 per cent or more, with the
Headquarters of the Third Fight-
er Command achieving 70 per
cent; Civilian Personnel, 43.75
per cent; Post Exchange, 29.47 per
cent. Post Engineers, 26.62 per
cent; and the Finance Office, 25
per cent. On the negative side of
the ledger, three sections have
failed to buy a single bond.


arte Thoucsand


i -I
l.
'






Page 2 T H E E C H 0 ES June 4, 1943


I their work. All of them are will.-
Ten Thousand Soldiers March in s odansnxis ouso essro.venev-
er nad a bit of trouble with any
of them! o
8 While the sergeant uses his
tmia ay re ools infrequently now, a line
chief's job is no sinecure. He is re-
'pnncihble for all the planes in his
...I:' .id in addition must be
S..i.. .i!: of a witch doctor too,
'i!' i. I:ng out the Gremlins that
,!. I .:,rane planes, defying the
.:! I-i.- .-.i the best mechanics.
.' ,.: ver lost a plane in the
C. ,I ,'.' he said with pardon.
.1 I. .-I.e, "and we certainly
I. them whip us on our
"-. ', :, lot! You fly 'em-we'll
S' l-!.-.-I 51 years of age, and a
S : .i.' who is attending school
:-1 Virginia, the roar of a
'. *. airplane engine talks to
I ''' 1 fascinating language. On
S. f .i-. : lie likes to go down and
'" '. 't '1. .i into the bay where it
'.'-" .. i_. I-. gulf, and a faraway look
I .:.r-: I!lo his eyes. Who can
.' I !. Ii.' A? After all, he has sol-
'g .? .i ,i..:,,:,:l :.: long, long time.


Army nurses step by briskly.


(Continued from Page 1)
carry on to victory that they shall Airplane Mechanic
not have died in vain. That is the
only tribute within our power to, (Continued from Page 1)
give which fits their sacrifice. It
requires our complete devotion Negroes. If a man got into trou-
to the one great purpose of win- ble, it was his own fault. Prices
ning this war. on the things we bought were
"Many of us will soon move on about the same as in the States-
to active theaters of operations in some cases lower. Our greatest
where hardships are constant and d a t t w i
death is everywhere. But they difficulty at tat time was in get-
will be sustained by the spirit ting parts for the planes. Any
born of action and the confidence time we heard news over the ra-
that they are trained. and equip- dio of an impending strike back
ped to do their job. home, in some industry that might
"Some will continue our chores affect our efforts, we wondered
here at Drew Field until the call if the people were so blinded by
comes. If you grow tred of serv- their own interests that they
comes. If you grow tired of serv- couldn't see the danger threaten-
ice or training duties and fret ing them. We would have been
you have been overlooked in the much happier if we could have
grand plan for victory, let me felt that all of our people were
assure you that every man in his solidly behind us."
work functions like an essential It was only last March that Sgt.
cog in a great machine. We all Snodgrass was ordered home.
owe each other our best and we The return trip took him to Trin-
take our inspiration from our idad, off the Venezuelan coast,
brothers and our friends who where he spent a few days before
have shown the way. We will not his embarkation for Miami. Ar-
fail them." driving there, he was assigned first
Gunner Reads Poem to Plant Park, where he remained
Sgt. Joseph Roy, a gunner re- a short time before coming to
cehtly returned from action, read Drew.
the poem, "In Flanders Field," In his career the sergeant has
followed by the volley and taps. worked on nearly every type of
After retreat and the national plane in the Air Forces, from the
anthem, the troops passed in re- first pursuit ships to the big fly-
view before the reviewing offi- ing Fortresses. He can catch flaws
cers, staff officers, military per- in an engine's operation as easily
sonnel and civilian guests near as the average person detects vo-
the reviewing stand. cal inflections. His work now, of
Even during the ceremony, course, is, as he phrases it:
planes roared into the air from "Checking the man who has been
the runways nearby, training men checked."
for battle and looking toward "The aircraft mechanics we're
more significant Memorial Days getting are young and well
to come. trained," he said proudly. "Some
---=--ass(s of them have worked previously
MONEY LOANED 'in civilian\ airports, in aircraft
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THE ECHO E,S


June 4, 1943


Page 2


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June 4, 1943

Columbus lirive In Drew

Closed to Public Travel
Columbus Drive within the lim-
its of Drew Field will be closed
to public travel, effective Satur-
day, June 5, Col. Melvin B. Asp,
Air Base Area Commander, an-
nounced today.
Closing of this section of the
drive is due to extension of facili-
ties of this area of the field, he
said.
Most of Columbus Drive be- '-
tween Lincoln Avenue and Me-
morial Drive will be affected.
Traffic going west on the drive
can detour south to Cypress
Street.


THE ECHOES Paste 3


Post Engineers Give avndRifle






.. S


Pocket-Size Books
For Men Overseas
35,000,000 pocket'-size editions
of currently popular American
books will be shipped to
men overseas during tne coming
year, according-to the plan re-
cently announced by the Council
on Books in Wartme. The new
format will be called Armed Serv-
ice Editions; books will be paper-
bound, have two columns to a
paige and special, easy-to-read
type.
From twenty-five to fifty titles
will be released each month, and
will include both fiction and non-
fiction--but no educational or
technical manuals; the accent's
on entertainment!
---


Enlisted Men Call
Colonel All Night
FORT RILEY, Kan.-Lt. Col.
John L. Gaylord, executive offi-
cer at this Army post was satis-
fied with his telephone number
326-until the WAACs arrived.
Then enlisted men began call-
ing him at all hours of the night,
seeking dates with the WAACs
whose number was 226.
Col. Gaylord made a strategic
withdrawal-to a new number.
-------------
Blitzkrieg Biology
The story goes that during a
heavy air blitz on London an ex-
cited air raid warden stuck his
head into a dark public shelter
and yelled,
"Are there any expectant moth-
ers down there?"
After a pause a cool feminine
voice replied, "Well after all,
Mister, we've only been down
here a few minutes."


"I've tried to be Red, White and
Blue
To the boys at MacDill and Drew.
When your work is done, and you
want some fun
THIS is the place for you.

M. MILLER'S BAR
1111 FLORIDA AVE., Ph. M7215
BEERS -- WINES
I D----S- -


1.
do
oldE
best
riag
2.
is sr
bea
wiv
3.
colo
sum
4.
cent
pota
5
are
kind
6.
bon
so i
umr
7.
8.


Civilian personnel arid officers
S--,-. in charge of the Post Engineers
A 6 l KW 'Ia this week presented their second
A h W I l contribution to the "Give a Gar-
-. and Rifle" campaign which origi-
'Bynated at the Drew Field Public
OB A r Relations Office when the War
BOB HAWK Department Bureau of Public Re-
Quimaster lations released the story of E. E.
T"HAN,, .. Cunningham, Albans, W. Va., who
STHANKS had given a Garand rifle.
TO THE YANKS" a. Miss Pearl Foster, who repre-
S-.';.- ... ,- 'B sented Drew Field in the contest
Saturday, C B for the selection of Miss Air
IForce, acted as chairman-treas-
According to psychologists, I urer for the 500 employees who
husbands who are three years donated 100 per cent. Employed
er than their wives have the as file and mail clerk in the En-
t chances for a happy mar- gineer's offices, Miss Foster has a
ge? personal interest in the rifle cam-
paign because of her brother, Cpl.
A bluenose is somebody who Alfred A. Foster, in the Army
nobbish or puritanical. A blue- Air Forces at Kerns, Utah.
rd is a man who murders his The donations were made at
es. What is a bluestocking? the suggestion of the employees
Why is butter lighter in and enough money was aucu.
Why is butter lighter in ammunition for the rifle
or in the winter than in the buy ammunition for the rifle
r the winter than in the The Engineer Corps is noted a
mer the post for contributions to th(
per- war effort. Records show tha
Which has the highest per- bonds and stamps are pur
stage of starch-corn, rice or chased regularly.
atoes? Major Guy B. Lynes, recently
.Kangaroos and opposums promoted from captain, was con
both marsupial animals. What nected with Public Utilities, At
d of an animal is that? lanta, Georeia, before entprin
Does a child have more the Army. Major and Mrs. Lynes
es, the same number or not and son, Dan, live at 4215 San
nany bones in its spinal col- Pedro Avenue.
n as an adult? Miss Foster is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Foster, 3113
Do oysters lay eggs? Horatio Street.
I am going to give you the


beginning of the last sentence of
the Gettysburg Address and you
finish it: "It is rather for us to
be here dedicated to the great
task remaining before us; that
from these honored dead we take
increased devotion to that cause
for which they gave the last full
measure of devotion; that we
here highly resolve that these
dead shall not have died in
vain "
9. Can a case be argued more
than once in the Supreme Court
of the United States?
10. Did George Washington
have any brothers or sisters?
(Answers on Page 7)


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--Emmmm


THE ECHOES


Page 3







Page4 TH ECHES Jne 4 194


ECHOES


GLENN R. ROSS, Publisher
TAMPA ARMY NEWSPAPERS
Business Office:
1113 FLORIDA AVENUE
P. O. Box 522 TAMPA, FLORIDA ', Phone 2177
All advertisements contained in this newspaper are also contained
in the Fly Leaf, published in the interest of the personnel of MacDill
Field. Minimum joint circulation, 10,000 copies.
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON REQUEST
A newspaper published exclusively for the personnel of Drew
Field and devoted to military interests and the United Nations
Victory.
Opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of the individual
writers and under no circumstances are they to be considered those
of the United States Army. Advertisements in this publication do
not constitute an endorsement by the War Department or its per-
sonnel of the products advertised.


THE


Announce Reason for Delay In Issuing

War Ration Book 3 to Military Personnel
Drew Field soldiers need be
\ puzzled no longer as to why they
\ are excluded from making appli-
Scation for War Ration Book 3 at
S 7 this time.
In reply to numerous inquiries
regarding reasons for not includ-
O ing members of the armed forces
in making application for War
Ration Book 3 now, Paul M.
SO'Leary, OPA Deputy Adminis-
trator in Charge of Rationing,
has stated that there is no inten-
tion of withholding it from mem-
A a bers of the armed forces station-
r ed in the United States when
By S/Sgt. John F. Suszynski the. next ration book is actually
Aseound ie put. into use.
A splbound auence pac ked However, since it'is anticipated
the RBlNo. 1 beyond capacity for that many members of these
the 69th AAF Band's Cncert last forces now in the United States
Thursday. The Band playedin. its will be stationed elsewhere when
usuaL "superlative" manner, and the book is needed to buy ra-
the WAACs were there in full tioned commodities, it seemed
force... 'T/Sgt. Ellie Eaton singled simpler to postpone issuance of
mt. one of the WAACs, "Lucky" the book to this group until the
Julie (an old friend from Syra- date of its use has been deter-
tuse-?ie says) to sing a couple mined.
Df Irih love songs to. Could it be This restriction does not apply
hat the real attraction that night to members of families of men in
WAS the WAAC..,They do make the armed forces. They, like all
i grand audience, and we hope other civilians, should make out
hey all come back again ; Please. their applications for Ration Book
*Now' it's Cp. Mike Galdino, 3 and mail them to the designated
he BAnd's exclusive barber (and mailing centers between Jiue 1
ts best ball player), who has been and June 10.
:mitten with the urge to retire .


from the realm of private enter-
prise. Mike's artistry isn't a sim-
ple matter of hair-cutting; a blend
of mhood, inspiration, and aesthe-
tic factors gives him a monopoly
on the tonsorial trade besides,
the fellows don't have to sweat
out a line; and if the customer
is embarrassed financially, there
is the very handy item of "credit"
which Mike puts into play. We'll
miss your work, Mike, but don't
worry about breaking our hearts
-at YOUR age, you deserve a
rest besides, the fellows may
learn to cut their own hair, just
as they have learned to do their
own laundering since the Nailor-
Lamb, Ltd., combine was dis-
solved by the Retirement Route.
Ain't Success sweet?
Things were pretty quiet around
the Band barracks after a couple
of cadres were dispatched from
our unit:.However, with the re-
turn of Sgt. Estes, Pfc. Spector,
and Pvt. Nailor from furloughs,
the joint is jumpin' again it's
hard to tell which one is respon-
:sible for the noise. We may have
to try a bit of falconry to ferret
*out the culprit the sleep-
talking situationris beginning to
be acute again.
The 69'ers and the AWUTC
Band both took part in the Me-
morial Day Services held on the
Base last Saturday. Col. Asp and
a visiting Allied Powers' Officer
reviewed the troops in the very
touching ceremony. Monday found


Granted Rights of
90-Day Divorce Law
TALLAHASSEE (AP) The
legislature voted on May 31 to
permit service men and women
assigned to military and naval
stations in the state to take ad-
vantage of its 90-day divorce
law.
The senate passed, 21 to 11, a
house approved bill providing
that 90 days spent in the state
on official assignment will consti-
tute legal residence for divorce
purposes the same as 90 days ci-
vilian residence. The bill now
goes to the governor.
"Often a soldier marries a girl,
assigns her his $50 allotment, and
then can't find her on his day
off," said Senator Sheldon, of
Tampa. "This bill is aimed at that
sort of thing."

our Band privileged to partici-
pate in similar exercises, spon-
sored by the American Legion, at
Sarasota. Lido Beach proved to
be a very popular romping ground
after the formalities of the day
were concluded. Cpl. Krewson
almost missed this trip-ask him
about it.
I'll bet there was'a lot of thun-
der stirred up when 6 ft. 4 inch
Pvt. Lightnin' Boldt ran into that
i"door knob" and nicked the side
iof his race.


Top Kick Parade


PVT. ROBERT W. MONTANA
One of the most envied men at
Drew Field is Pvt. Robert W.
Montana of the Signal Hq. & Hq.,
XV F. C. Bob, as he prefers to be
called, is an artist, or cartoonist,
if you prefer and is at present
working out in the WAAC area
decorating the WAAC Post Ex-
change, Beauty Parlor and Mess
Hall.
Bob, who hails from 46 out of
the 48 states and calls New York
City his home, has been drawing
for about 20 of his 22 years, hav-
ing started early in life. He re-
ceived his final training at the
Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the
Exeter Art School, Boston, and
Phoenix Art Institute, New York.
After completing his training,
Bob, armed with pen and brush,
went out to amaze the critics.
They were ... and so was Bob...
when the rejections came rolling
in. Finally he "hit his stride"
with King Features and MLJ
Magazines, Inc., where he illus-
trated and wrote scenario for
comic books. He then entered the
commercial art field, working in
the art department of Newell Enm-
mit Advertisers, Sherwin-Wil-
liams, and Hall Laboratories,
Boston. Mass.
Pvt. Montana began his mili-
tary career at Fort Dix, N. J.,
where he became a Khaki Klad
Kutie on the morning of Nov. 18,
1942. Ten days later her was in
Atlantic City ror nis basic train-
ing. Transferring to Camp Crowd-
er Jan. 6, 1943, he became a plot-
ter specialist. He arrived at Drew
Field March 15, 1943, and was as-
signed to the 501st SAW Regt.
and in turn was transferred
through the 719th SAW Bn. into
the XV Fighter Command, where
he is at present.
Though he is on the XVth F.
C. baseball team, he helps his
outfit best by advertising its ac-
tivities as reporter for the Echoes,
does all the art work for the unit
as well as all sign painting.
With this record of the past,
how can Montana keep from go-
ing ahead? The WAACs are for
him, the fellows like him and he
likes them. What could.be a.finer
bit of cooperation?
Censor Please Note
Rookie: "When are you leaving
;o take a crack at the Japs?"
Pal: "The first."
Rookie: "You shouldn't tell me
the date, it's a military secret."
Pal: "That's no date. I meant
he first chance I get."


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S,..-


F. Sgt. Marion E. Junod
TWO WAACS, A SOLDIER...
AND WOW!
That's no pun to WAAC First
Sergeant Marion E. Junod, 756th
WAAC Post Headquarters Com-
pany; formerly a beauty operator
at Detroit, Michigan.
Sgt. Junod's sister, Afe. Margery
Junod, is a member of the WAAC
Motor Transport Section at Camp.
Polk, Louisiana; Pfe. Win. H.
Junod, USA Inf., a brother, is
stationed at Camp Van Dorn,
Mississippi, while her mother,
Mrs. Mary Junod, is a member of
the WOWs (Women's Ordnance
Workers) at Fort Wayne, Indiana.
Sgt. Junod vas educated at
Detroit and in Canada and is a
graduate of the City College of
Beauty, Detroit. After finishing
the course, she worked as a beau-
ty operator before joining the
WAAC.
The sergeant received her basic
training at Des Moines, Iowa, and
was transferred to the 2nd WAAC
Training Center, Daytona Beach,
Florida, where she attended the
Non-Commisioned Officers'
school and was appointed a cor-
poral December 4, 1942. Two pro-
motions followed in Febiuary-
first to buck sergeant and on
February 18 the coveted first-
sergeant's diamond, after which
she was placed in charge of a
company in the Reception and
Staging Battalion before coming
to Drew Field on May 16.
Sgt. Junod, unlike most WAACs
receiving first-sergeant's stripes,
does not aspire to Officer's Can-
didate School. She is, she says,
satisfied with stripes and hopes
to see overseas duty and be allow-
ed to continue with the post-war
rehabilitation program in which
she feels the WAAC will play an
important part.
Sgt. Junod is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Junod, 5543
Lakepoint Avenue, Detroit, Michi-
gan.


From Soldier to

Interior Decorator









"", .




.
w^ ^iy '^


8:00 AM-Mass in Chapel 2.
9:00 AM-Mass m ':Chapel 2,
RB No. 2 and Theater 3. .
6:30 PM-Mass in Chapel 2.
PROTESTANT (Sundays)
10:30 AM-General services in
:all chapels.
S7:30 PM-General evening serv-
ices in Chapel 4.
JEWISH
8:30 PM Friday evening in
Chapel 3.
8:00 AM-Saturday in 'Chapel 3.
7:15 PM-Wednesday hi- Chapel
3. .

Meet WAAC

Plane Mechanic
Betty Jane Berggrenr, 2, Seat-
tle, Washington, is perhaps more
at home at an air base than any
other WAAC stationed at Drew
Field. Betty worked oh airplanes
at Boeing Aircraft Company at
Seattle before entering the WAAC
February 20th.
Completing grammar school,
Auxiliary Berggren attended the
Miller Vocational Trade School
in Minneapolis, Minnesota. A
course in airplane mechanics at
the Seattle NYA School was fol-
lowed by placement at the Boeing
plant. Saws, drills, templates and
blueprints are as familiar'to Aux-
iliary Berggren as egg beaters and
mixing bowls are to most women.
When asked why she chose that
particular. field, Auxiliary Berg-
gren admitted that model planes
has been her hobby for years.
The favorite model is an amphi-
bian with a 22-inch wing. spread.
"It. flies too," Miss Berggren
boasts.
Auxiliary Berggren', want to
:work in plane maintenance .
would like overseas service,
ferably in Australia where' ier
fiance, Pfc. Richard Auvinen,
Minneapolis, Minn., is stationed.


Through the courtesy of the,
Board of Trustees of the Tifereth'
Israel Congregation of Cleveland,
Ohio, the Jewish men at Drew
Field have been granted the use
of a Torah (scroll of the law) for
the duration of -ne emergency.
On the second evening.of S e-
vuth, the day which comr n p-
cates the giving of the Ten', -
mandments to the Hebrew, tat
Mount Sinai, Wednesday, June 9
at 8:30 p.m., the Torah will be
formally presented to Chaplain
Fierman by Rabbi David Zielonka
of Tampa, who will represent the
Cleveland Temple.
Yizkor, memorial service for
the departed will also be recited -
at the service.

CATHOLIC (Sundays)
6:15 AM-Mass in Chapel 2 and


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Page 4


THE ECHOES


June 4, 1943








June 4, 1943 THE ECHOES Page 5


DRW FICLD

PRCSEITS

BROADCASTS
WFLA DWAE
Mon.-Sat., 7:05 WFLA-Drew
Field Revielle.
Thursday, 10:30 WFLA Drew
Field Star Parade.
Mo- 8:30 WDAE-The Right
Ai : r or Else.
Tu' fsday, 6:30 WFLA- Squad-
ronaires.
Thursday, 9:30 WDAE-Rookie
Roy's Scrap Book.
Rookie Roy and His Musical
Scrapbook The time? .
Every Thursday evening at 9:30.
Rookie Roy can be seen if you'll
just drop over to Recreation
Building Number Ono. On K
and First street .. or if you
like, tune the program in over
station WFLA Its a full half.
hour of music, comedy and song.
Music on the program is supplied
by the ever popular Deep Sleep
Eleven and their tunes run from
the latest jive numbers to sock
arrangements... Rookie Roy bet-
ter known as PFC Harry Evans,
.(it's Cpl. Evans, now ,tho) steals
the show with his usual brand
of comedy. His cohort in comedy
crime is none other than Sgt. O.
Z. Whitehead whose particular
type of comedy makes him out-
standing in the show. .- And for
further value, it boasts of a pop-
ular mystifying songstress who
graces the stage each and every
broadcast, to make your hearts
flutter with the Dinah Shore type
blues. Yes, fellas, a rollicking
time is had by all who attend
this mad-merry mirthquake of
fun and frolic. So make it a
point to be on hand for ROOKIE
ROY AND HIS MUSICAL
SCRAPBOOK this and every
Th,.r;.Jy niight at Recreation
EBii;l.:;nc Number One. The
plai:'- %h.ih:re there is something
cld:oing cery night. *

WANT TO LIVE?

Here's How!
STo do, your job in the Army
effectively, -you must know
thoroughly the proper methods
, by which you can conceal your-
self from enemy observation, and
protect- ,yourself from hostile
Sweapbns..-War today puts a higher
premium than ever before on in-
dividual -initiative' and thought-
fulness.
This column is published for
the purpose of spreading the gos-
Spel of camouflage to you, so that.
as. individuals you may know
how to protect yourselves. This
war is ciffetr i. from World War
I, due to the tremendous air
p( .over men on the ground.
'i ouflage is work done to
provrde protective concealment
for troops'; materiel and military
works, form'enemy observation.
Worft dcne: What does this
mean?
Camoiiflage has been before
the public eye for some time. It
has been used for commercial
advertising, as material for comic
strips ,ir cartoons, and for the
subject of magical deception. But
to the soldier it means protection
-another wVeapon of protection.
The soldier may know how to
use his .rifle, but what good is
This if he does not know how to
conceal himself and his equip-
ment from the enemy? He is
taught to shoot. Camouflage
teaches him.how not to get shot,
so he will live to accomplish his
mission.. .
In the-.coinbat zone .there will
be no instructor to coach him.
He will be expected to know how
to conceal himself, by himself. It

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Scene From Sherwood's "Abe Lincoln in Illinois"
To Be -Shown -in Recreation Building No. 1
--


On the N Spot
RECREATION BUILDING
NUMBER ONE
Friday, June 4, 8:15 5p.m.--
Variety Show: Lucy Sinclair.
Saturday, June 5, 8:15 p.m.-
Play: Abe Lincoln. Variety Show:
Mrs. Evans.
Sunday, June 6, 8:15 p.m.--
Film: World of Sport. Play: Abe
Lincoln.
Monday, June 7. 8:00 p.m. -
The Right Answer or Else. 8:30
p.m.-Broadcast of "The Right
Answer or Else." 9:00 p.m.--
Play: Abe Lincoln.
Tuesday, June 8, 8:15 p.m.-
Barney Rapp's Band. USO Camp
Show.
Wednesday, June 9, 8:00 p. m.-
Variety Show: Norman Kirkcon-
nel and his all girl revue.
Thursday, June 10, 8:00 p. m.-
Concert by 69th AAF Band. 8:30
p. m.-Broadcast of Concert. 9:30
p. m.-Broadcast, "Rookie Roy's
Scrap Book."'
AT THE SERVICE CLUB
Friday, June 4, 8:15 5p.m.--
Dance.
Saturday, June 5, 8:15 p.m.-
Bingo.
Sunday, June 6- To be. an-
nounced.
Monday, June 7, 8:00 p.m.--
Dance.
Tuesday, June 8. 8:0 Op.m.--
Concert of Recorded Symphonic
Music.
Wednesday, June 9 To be an-
nounced.
Thursday, June 10--To be an-
nounced.

is hard work, but everyone in
uniform is required to under-
stand the technique of camou-
flage.
Let us think of ourselves in the
combat zone. What is the first job
to be done? Hide our equipment!
We are tired, but can we rest?
No!- Not until'the equipment and
supplies are concealed and hidden
from the enemy. We have a short
time to do this, but it must be
dcne. It is hard work. Remember
the slogan "Fatigue Leads To
Carelessness.", -We cannot relax.
We must use our brains, and
above all, our common sense,
throughout this work.
The good soldier knows camou-
flage.--Therefore, letus start think-
ing.about it here in Atlantic City,
and when we get into the theater
of operations, it will be second
nature to us.
Do I Worry?
ve.been in uniform for many
months
And nothing wrong do I find;
The only worry pressing me
Is the Girl'I left behind!


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811 Tampa St. Phone M 1094
O. E. BOGART, Manager


Next Saturday, -Sunday and
Monday evening in Recreation
Building Number One, as our
second experiment in the per-
formance of scenes from serious
plays we will present the school-
room scene from Robert Emmet
Sherwood's celebrated "Abe Lin-
coln in Illinois." With Pvt. Geo.
Blackwood, as Abe Lincoln and
Pvt. John Mader, as Mentor, his
teacher. The scene is brilliantly
written with many of its best
passages taken from historical
documents and speeches.
We hope that the soldier audi-
ence for the Drew Field Parade
on Thursday evening at half past
ten is increasing for these rea-
sons: First, Lt. George Kluge
gives it expert production, Pvt.
Alfred Panetz writes a distingu-
.ished script. The cast to play in it
usually including Eleanor Roger,
Pfc. Harry Evans and Pvt. Geo-
Blackwood, is always well chosen.
These broadcasts have an interest
beyond that of most. They are
serious of intention without being
heavy. They contain both mo-
ments of pathos and humor.
These broadcasts aim to be a sin-
cere reflection of life.
Most of you probably realize
that there is a show in Recreation
Building Number One. We do not
expect you to like all of them
equally well, but we have reason
to think that you will not be
bored by many.
We should like to say here
that we never have enough vol-
unteer soldier entertainers. If
anyone wishes to apply for audi-
tion, they can do so by giving
their names and addresses to
Sgt. Whitehead after any of the
shows in Recreation Building No.
One.


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GASPARILLA TAVERN
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WE SERVE THE FINEST OF
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E. A. CLAY, Manager
120 West Lafayette Street
East Side of Bride
Phone M 5588 Tampa, Fla.


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WELCOME TO

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FROM THE SPECIAL SERVICES OFFICE


~U:H~U:t:H:U:UtU


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bll~a~e~a~lc ~BI~b~e~L ~L~


T HE E CHO E


Page 5


June 4, 1943


it









In Memorial Day Parade lIeI


An intensive campaign started
this week to enroll WAACs in
the area surrounding Clearwater,
IFlorida, according to a news
squib, Lt. Dorothy L. Wood, head
of the Tampa recruiting area an-
nounced that approximately 100,-
-00 new WAACs have been re-
'quested by the Army. A number
of Clearwater women have al-
ready donned sun-tans and indi-
cations are that many more will
sign up during this drive for
recruits.
The girls from the 756th WAAC
,Post Headquarters Company have
Found a new use for G.I. foot
lockers. You might ask them
about it ... wishful thinking, we
think.


The A.W.U.T.C. Band plays a martial air.


MADISON DRUG COMPANY
FRANKLIN AND MADISON STREET
%Where the Men of ihe Armed Service Shop and Eat
We Are Anxious to Be of Service


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The new mess hall at Rocky
'Point opened for breakfast this
morning. Company officers expect
that the 756th wilJ have to draw
extra rations to supply the chow
for all the visitors that have been
invited to "come out and see us
sometime." Never let it be said
that the 756th isn't hospitable ..
so long as the chow holds out.
Work on the interior decoration
in the new Beauty Parlor and
'Post change at Rocky Point is
almost completed. Both opened
officially yesterday (Thursday).
Pvt. Ed Solomon, Art Editor,
Drew Echoes, and I vt. Bob Mon-
tana, 15th Fighter Command art-
ist, did the decorations.

The Rocky Point mess hall was
officially opened for breakfast
Thursday morning for the mem-
bers of the 756th WAAC Post
Headquarters Company, under
the direction of Third Officer
Dorothy Ann Porter, New York,
N. Y. Lt. Porter received her basic
training at Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga.,
and graduated from OCS. Ft. Des
Moines, Iowa. May 23. This is her
first assignment.
The WAAC mess staff members
include: Mess Sgt. Mabel Hutchi,
son, Asheville, North Carolina:
Antoinette Falanga. Oswego, New
York; Amelia Barone, Mt. Ver-
non, New York; Julia Welch.
Syracuse, New York; Mary Ped-
ron, Liberty, Texas, and Beryl
Toole, Crossword, Pa.
Lt. Porter, as well as the other
company officers, express their
appreciation to the Mess Officer,
Lt. Bostwick, 314th Base Hq. &
Air Base Sq., and members of
his staff for the courtesy shown
the members of the 756th since
coming to Drew Field, also to Lt.
Francis Mentzinger, Commanding
Officer, Company F, 561st, who
loaned members of his personnel
to aid in the establishment of the
Rocky Point mess hall. Sgt. Floyd
Conklin, Eugene, Oregon, is par-
ticularly commended for his aid.

We understand that a couple
of girdles are issued to every
WAAC. If their basic training
course is anything like ours they
will need more than a two-way
stretch.
What's in a name?
While taking a physical, a pros-
pect was asked by the doctor if
he could read the fourth line on
the chart.
"Read it," exclaimed the pros-
pect. "Why, I know the guy per-
sonally. He played football at
Fordham last fall."
-Polar Tech.
The sergeant was griping. "My
wife is untidy, nagging all the
time, extravagant and she doesn't
understand me. I tell you it's
hell."
"When," asked the corporal,
"did you meet this other woman?"

The regiment was trekking
through the desert. It was arid,
parched; there wasn't a drop of
water to be found.
One recruit sat sadly on a stone,
his head in his hands.
"What's the matter with him?"
asked the sergeant.
"Homesickness," said Private
Smith.
"We've all got that."
"Yeah, but his is worse. His
father owns the biggest barroom
in Brooklyn."


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Page 6


THE E CHO E


June 4, 1943


i







June 4, 1943 THE ECHOES Page 7


Pin-Up Girl


Joan Barclay, shapely RKO Ra-
dio adorment, plays a magician's
aide in "Bombardier," and this is
what she wears. Pat O'Brien and
Randolph Scott are starred.


Answers lt'
BOB HAWK'S1
i YANKWWIZ
1. No.
2. A bluestocking is a literary
woman who is pedantic and un-
domestic.
3. Because the cows eat grain
in the winter and green grass in
the summer. Grass gives the but-
ter a higher color.
4. Rice about 75% starch;
corn about 20% starch (corn on
cob); potatoes about 20% starch.
5. One which carries its young
in a pouch.
6. More-child: 33 adult: 26.
7. Yes.
8. "that this nation under God
shall have a new birth of free-
dom; and that government of the
people, by the people, and for
the people, shall not perish from
the earth."
9. Yes.
10. Yes. He had three sisters
and six brothers.
This is the story of an East Side
New York mama who had two
sons. One was a brilliant guy and
the other always seemed to have
a knack of getting low marks.
The bright boy went to OCS, the
other joined the Air Force and
soon was overseas. One day mama
was sitting' on the steps reading
a letter from the flying son when
a neighbor came along and asked
how everything was going. To
which Mrs. Hussbaum replied
with resignation in her voice:
"With Henry avertink is fine. He
jost gredu-weighted from Officer's
Candidate School But dat
dope, Louie! He writes me he has
jost got three zeros-again!"
Rookie Joe: "So you say the
water that you get in your bar-
racks is unsafe."
Rookie Sam: "Yeah."
Joe: "Well, tell me, what pre-
cautions do you take against it?"
Sam: "First we filter it."
Joseph: "Then we boil it."
Joey: "Yes."
Sammy: "Then we add chemi-
cals to it."
J.: "Yes."
Sam: "Then we drink beer."


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THE E CHO E


Page 7


June 4, 1943


do



o An


90 IN AM
"%Mok


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at







* June 4, 1945


T E '


22nd Bomb. Tr. Wing
By S/Sgt. Charlie Crews
VENGEANCE IS OURS!!! In
Slast week's issue of the ECHOES
*the 624th Sq. columnist, who very
Wisely chooses to remain anony-
mous, had some very nasty re-
:marks to make about our softball
team. The same day the column
appeared, that same Wing team
:orced 'said writer to eat his
' words, without benefit of salt,
]pepper or sugar. Johnny Kroll
stopped the vaunted power of the
"Commandos" with a grand total
of six hits, at least two of them
of the "fluke" variety, and the
:most they could accumulate was
3 runs, while we were collecting
a total of 6. Yes, that was the
score: 6-3. It was a good ball
game, regardless of who won, but
ifet it serve as a criterion of the
wrath of a ridiculed Wing. Tread
lightly my friends, for we do not
:ike to have aspersions' cast upon
us. We are still interested in play-
.:ng the 624th some more games,
and all they. have to do is to say
the word. That also applies to any
tlher teams around these parts.
As a parting bit of advice to the
"Commandos," may we say, in
the !words of their own columnist,
"Build up your club, get a repu-
tation, and then contact us again."
It was a three-ply adios in this
H-eqdquarters during the past
week. T/Sgt. Balch became "Mr."
:3alh through the medium of his
transferr to the enlisted reserves,
and2 S/Sgts. Freas and Hicks de-
parted to cooler climate. Au re-
voii. fellows, and good luck.
Major Bender has returned from
his leave of absence, and it cer-
: taily is nice to have his cheery
,disposition around again. Wel-
come home, Major.
As an added thought, I wonder
if the 624th esteemed reported
has. the nerve to make his iden-
tity' known to the public. I doubt
it very much. He probably does
:iot! dare, now that he has had
his bwn words crammed down his
throat. Sissy!!

The Eighty-Fourth
With the return of the AAFSAT
gang, the .situation seems to be
gradually getting back to normal.
y ; all reports,, they all. had a
grand tine, and the lectures and
practical training was well worth
the:time spent..
M/Sgt. Traylor returned from
furlough, after having. seen his
:Laverite ballteam (Syracuse) play.
Recent transfers to the 339th
Bomb Gp. included S/Sgt. Irving
Goldberg (The Great), Cpl. Stah-
oviak, Pfc's Healy and Silva and
)fvts. Bell, Barr, Parker, Allen,
Perrill and Ruth. Looks like a
good haul for the 339th, and 'all
men will be missed.
Favorite expression of T/Sgt.
)Mak (The Sheriff) 'Hoegh is
"Where are my guards and rifle
platoon?" The Sheriff plants' his
guards. daily, and expects a
bumper crop.
Question of the week is, "Who
placed the bulletin on the Officers
Call Board concernirki Captain
:'ale, Group Executive Officer,
and had the audacity to nick-
name him 'Bumble-Puppy'?"

301st Bomb. Sq.
By Pvt. Ralph H. Jansen
This week Cpl. Leo P. Cza-
plinski returns from his furlough.
it will be good to see him again.
:Hoping for a furlough soon is
Pvt. Gene Gilbert, who wants to
get back to Cleveland, Ohio, for
uome reason or other. Rumor has
it that he is "infanticipating."
We hear Pvt. Joe Seller of
Brooklyn, N.Y., has a soft bunk
these days. Wonder how he rates?
We certainly like the stories Cpl.
Ralph 'Campbell's wife writes in
her letters. Little things like that
keep soldiers happy.
.-Pfc. Robert Madigan, former
Chicago photographer, who seems
to think that there is only one
girl in the world, talks all night.
Verna, won't you please marry
him so we can sleep nights?
Pfc. Frank DeZutter, the mail
orderly with the pleasant smile
who tries to keep us happy with
a letter from home every day, is
enjoying a furlough in Boston.
Cpl. Louis Manus, the medic, is
bubbling with happiness these
days; he's giving his buddies shots
in the arm.
,Pvt. Seymour Schonberger has
many pressing engagements; he
owns the only iron in the bar-
racks. That talented artist from.


Boston, Pvt. Murray Miller, will
soon enter camouflage school.
The fellows in the 301st now
have a pleasant spot to write let-
ters and even shoot a game of
pool. Orchids to the Service Unit
for our new day room.

302nd Bomb. Sq.
By AL GORMAN
Slipping into the baseball
world, we find that the 302nd
"B" Soft Ball team won its sec-
ond game of the league season
last night by defeating the 304th
8 to 2. There were no errors in
the field by either team. High-
lights of the game were a home
run by Williams of the 304th, and
a double by our Garai, who hit
the longest drive of the game.
In ordnance Cpl. Kowsky is
gaining a little weight, although
he doesn't come up to the Mali-
nowsky record of 11 sandwiches
at the clay pits. "Two-beer" Cox
is off for the homelands, and Cpl.
Jones came back from Wisconsin.
Blessed events occurred to De-
Vries and Treiber. The former is
back from cooing at his 6'2 lb.
baby girl, and the latter is exult-
ing in the fact that he has 8/ lb.
baby boy. Cpl. Hanna is back
from the hospital; the nurses are
divine.
Sgt. Davis, Radio, can be heard
telling of his 1,000 batting aver-
age. Cpl. Cohen from the Chan-
ute Field control tower school,
and Cpl. Fusilier from the Signal
Corps, have joined the boys in
the sparks shack. I. C. Ward, one
of the ,old standbys, is leaving.
Pvt. Zitner is from Brooklyn-
need we say more.
Kovach, from engineering, and
Jackson, the immortal corporal
from Intelligence, as well as
Rocky Rockwell are pulling up
stkes. Neely comes back today,
and is probably waiting until it's
too late to parade. Kohlbacher,
Murphy, and Gorman are still
sulphurized from Sulphur Springs.
Poor Kohlbacher is much upset
about the dance that didn't come
off Friday night. He washed his
face, too.

303rd Bomb. Sq.
Cpl. Large is yelling for a "sys-
tem" to make life easier for him.
We don't -know what he wants it
for, .but he -claims it has no con-
nection, with his failure with the
women.
T/Sgt. Bailey has been trying
to get mnore working space for his
activities Is it that he's swelling
up with his own importance?
The .squadron is still waiting
for Pvt. Sachs to go to the rifle
range to qualify.- However, here's
a part on the back for sending
First Sergeant Skelton to the
range.
SThe boys.in the Orderly Room
have been talking about some
comparatively new officer in the
section who is making life parti-
culai-ly miserable for them. They
want some changes made. Major
alterations in the personnel have
brought the versatile Cpl. Ford
to the position of Personnel Ser-
geant- Major. Among his new
aides :is Pfc. Lupo..Pfc. Herron
continues to determine the for-
tunes of our pay. Pvt. Reilly is
on furlough, complains chronically
of the incompetency of an ex-first
sergeant.
A telegraph set has been set up
between the Intelligence Section
and the gunner's tent. Sgts. Je-
rome Rosoff and Snell have been
practicing Morse code on it.
Pvt. Collins is due back from
furlough this week. The gunners
have all been pressing Sgt. Massei
for furloughs and are wondering
what effect the appointment of
S/Sgt. Brinker as acting first
sergeant will have on their
chances.
4
304th Bomb. Sq.
At last, our dayroom is com-
pleted and from all appearances
is one swell place to spend an
evening. It will be interesting to
see how many "pool sharpies" we
have. Now we can answer our
-fan mail in solitude without the
local barracks' clown heckling us.
Have you seen the new stripes
added lately? Congratulations
S/Sgts. Hnzman, Thorsen, Walker,
Heiman, Hoeflich and Kopp; Sgts.
Gressman, Larimore, Hamilton
and Seid; and Cpls. G. E. Smith,
Powell, Kandy, MacPhee and
Schork. Nice going, fellows; keep
up the good work.
These calisthenics periods are
really putting 'a tan on most of
the boys. Just think, fellows, how


a WIN TIPS


those lovely maidens will swoon
and tell you how lucky you are
to be basking in the lovely Flor-
ida sunshine.
Hearty welcome to Lt. N. E.
Scherstrom, who has recently
joined the Intelligence Depart-
ment. We are sorry to see Cpl.
.Frank Schork and so many others
leaving for various units. Our
best wishes follow each and every
one of them.
-4'
The Three Thirty-Ninth
Hello, Men! Make way for the
339th Bombardment Group. You
skeptics who believe that all we
have out here is sand and scrub
are definitely wrong. We have' a
very good PX. We have free out-
of-doors movies every other nite,
plus plenty'of' "natural" sun-rays
every day. Each Squadron has a
soft-ball team and with inter-
squadron competition, plenty of
good-natured rivalry is displayed.
More about the individual of our
teams will be given out in a later
column. With the added talent of
the newly acquired 84th Bomb
Gp personnel, the 339th hopes to
really blossom forth with an A-1
.rating. With the fine leadership

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Gossip and News From
The Four Eighty-Two's
Sgt. Ben Kern receives three a
day from that lovely gal in Penn-
sylvania Pfc. Goldberg, a
radio mechanic, has the whole
squadron in a tumult and panic.
His antics have given us many a
laugh and all of our telling won't
even be half. Each day he is on
Sick Call. Its really appalling. He
is due very soon for a major over-
hauling.
Pfc. Kasber:g's in love, does his
darndest to win her. Each eve-
ning he carries his Dear WAAC
her dinner: six sandwiches, candy,
two milks in half quarts. Of late
our pal Kasberg's in the grandest
of sorts. Our "Bane," Sgt. Rosen-
berg, is the female go--getter. His
folks keep on pleading that he
write them a letter, but he is too
busy to do letter writing; that
(Continued cn Next Page)

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THE ECHOES


Page 8a


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~~T9~9~TT~~~~-'L~ T~*"*~*~*")"*~'*~)~)~~*~iT~i")~)~*~i~'*~







June 4. 1943 THE ECHOES


(Continued from Preceding Page)
Cleaning Store gal is far more
inviting.
Sgt. Whitley is back, and feel-
ing much finer. Naturally, a very
grand furlough in North Carolina.
And here is a hot flash! There
is really much to it: Sgt. Sidney
Kass, soon may say "I dood it."
Sgt. Gorman spends his time
while off line and duty, in read-
ing his Bible, enjoying ts beauty.
Our squadron Commander awards
every week a plaque, to the bar-
racks that's the neatest and most
slick (ouch!) In order to win it,
and get all the praise, a barracks
must be tops. Each day in all
ways. Last week 'twas the Clerks
who won the Grand Plaque. Each
of them earned it and a pat on
the back. Competition is keen.
Why shouldn't it be? It shows
that in cleanliness the .boys hit
high "C". Into each life a rain-
drop must fall. It hits everybody,
the big and the small. We all do
our best in helping each other;
we grieve with Sgt. Koch in the
loss of his father. We hope that
he will never again know such
sorrow, and wish him much sun-
shine and blue skies, tomorrow.
--Thus ends the report from the
/AUR-EIGHT-TWO, To all of
-ee G.I.'s on the grand field
called Drew: We are doing our
best as we go along, to make all
our legions more active, more
strong. We are strivng, our ban-
ners fly high, in helping to keep
us "The Queen of the Sky." We're
all on the right path, we banish
all wrongs, in bringing the vic-
tory where it belongs.

485th Bomb. Sq.
We of the 485th are proud to
say that we now have a softball
team that will top the best. We
are always ready to match a game
with anyone, especially a good
team because we like competi-
tion. So if your team isn't up to
par, you don't want to fool with
us. (Call 68).
The boys of the entire Group
must be animal lovers. First, it
was dogs and now it looks as if
the affection has switched to
monkeys. We just have one mon-
key, of course, but he gets around
more than all the dogs. Anyone
knows that an Army Camp is a
paradise for an animal because
the Kitchen always has plenty of
scraps. It looks like we are really
going to have a good pop party.
The boys dug into those pants
deep yesterday-pay day.
Our friend and comrade-in-
arms, Sgt. Theriot, has a grin
from ear to ear these days and
everybody was wondering why,
until we found out he is getting
married this week. Good luck to
you, Sgt. and may it be a life-
long tie. Pfc. Anderson returned
from Oklahoma this week with a
lariat in one hand and baby steer
in the other. Anderson has been
on furlough. He even has that
furlough curl in his hair ... and,
what is more, he has a love-knot
in his lariat. Even better than
that, he sent home for another
lariat. One is not enough. If
you care to take a peek at An-
derson's steer, call by the 485th
any day. He is in the market for
a pink cloud, too. You had better
come soon though, next week the
bull goes on KP.
Pvt. Rosenbluth has suggested
that the 339th have a swimming
pool something to cool off in.
A conservative little tile affair;
using Miami Beach's Roni-Plaza
as a model. Rosie, as we call him,
has a model, a blueprint now
ell he needs is someone with the
,rough. Any guy with an extra
nnd or two see Private Rosen-
tth in the 4855th Orderly room.
To those of you who do not
already know, our friend and
Adjutant, Lt. James H. Hayden,
is away on leave.

The Four-Oh-Fifth
The 405th, activated March 1,
1943, and still operating at cadre
strength, is carrying on with the
zest of a full fledged Bombard-
ment Group.
The Air Echelon started out
with a bang. Fifteen days after
activation, many planes were sent
to Nashville, Tennessee, to parti-
cipate in a demonstration. The
Group's first bid for fame was
successfully carried out under the
direct control of our commander.
Lt. Col. Marvin S. Zipp.
Belatedly, according to plans,
two weeks were spent with the
AFSAT at Orlando by the air
echelon and three weeks by the
ground echelon. Followed by 2V2
weeks, respectively, at Alachua
AAB, Gainesville. During the two
weeks at Alachua, practically all
our pilots qualified as "double-
breasted airplane drivers" being
checked-out in'twin-motor jobs.
On the field here at Drew, we


set up for business way down on
the line, and were successfully
un-set until the operations build-
ing was relocated. Then more re-
cently we set-up our own tent
city along a taxi-way just north
of Columbus Drive, which has to-
date been deviously dubbed "Zipp
Village"-"Petit New Guinea"-
"Guadalcanal" and others. A bit
cramped for room, the unit is off
to itself with our own messing
facilities and plenty of wide open
spaces, and as yet we haven't
heard of anyone else wanting the
area.
In the midst of the move to our'
new area, part of the air echelon
constituting 19 pilots and planes
plus crew chiefs, communications
men, operations and intelligence,
were ordered to maneuvers with
an airborne Infantry Division in
North Carolina.
In the. period, May 20-27, these
pilots and ships flew over 100
missions. On the 28th, thanks to
a hard working line crew, all fly-
ing ships were in commission and
returned to Drew. This is an ac-
complishment hard to equal by a
full strength crew. The total fly-
ing time for this maneuver was
626 hours.
During the first quarter of our
short history, Capt. E. R. Thomas
was promoted to Major. Lts.
Woods and Weiner were promoted
to. captains.
Major Hook heads our list of
Officers Pistol Range scores, with
the score of "expert." Following
close behind him we find Lt. Col.
Zipp, Lts. Bock, Garrett, and
Warrant Officer Duke, with the
rating of "marksmanship." The
other headquarter Officers, well,
we just won't mention now. May-
be a little later we will give them
due ovation.

624th Bomb. Sq.
Sgt. Harper is strictly abiding
by all the rules and regulations
of this Base in regards to motor
vehicles; Sgt. Brown is still look-
ing for that elusive "day off";
and Sgts. Duff, Tankersley, Dursh
and Schott are still looking for
the four WAACs.
M/Sgts. T. R. Smith and Frank
Rigby are homeward bound for
15 days. The mosquitoes are going
to miss T. R. He has been quite
a friend to the winged creatures.
One night last week, we were all
awakened by quite a commotion
in our barracks. We were amazed
to see T. R. being carried out
the door by a horde of his beloved
skeeterss." Machine-Gun Lafferty
came to his boss's rescue when
he pulled out his faithful shotgun
and destroyed the enemy.
We imagine the Wing is going
around with their chest stuck out
after beating us at softball. I
guess we might just as well let
them know now we let them
beat us, Sgt. Hite, for the
good of the Service.
The volley ball feud is still
raging. The headquarters outfit,
in an effort to. strenghten their
team, have acquired the services
of Cpl. Chizek. We know now we
will get a bit more competition.
We wonder if Sgt., Hite and
Cpl. Chizek are still as anxious
as ever to become pilots. They
went riding last week and the
results were not too good. Sgt.
Smith, our parachute specialist,
took one look at the chutes and
went gunning for the boys. Inci-
dentally, Sgt. Smith has acquired
a taste for "Zombies." He likes
the lingering effect they have on
him.

625th Bomb. Sq.
Sgt. Trank is back from his fur-
lough. He says that he would have
enjoyed it much more had the
darn trains not taken up so much
of his time.
Cpl. Hunt has a solution to
most of our problems. He claims
we would all be happy if we
could get two three-day passes
a week and then take our regular
day off on Sunday. We will all
have to agree that it is a good
'idea.
T/Sgt. Yelverton was on a
shopping tour about a week ago.
He is now sporting a new sum-
mer suit. No, not a Zoot suit, but
an all wool tan model. Could it
be possible that he has a line
on some beautiful Drew Field
WAAC? 7'
We were very sorry to learn
that Cpl. Grant, one of our trans-
portation boys, was transferred
to another base. He was a typical
Alabama cotton picker. It is said
that he gave his girl friend to
Sgt. Bear.
To the fellows who feel their
leisure time is being wasted, we
suggest that they visit the hobby
shop on B Street. They have a
wonderful set of tools to work
with, etc. There are opportunities
for woodworking, carving, art,


craft work, etc. Why don't you
try it, fellows?
Our squadron took part in'the
retreat parade last Saturday. It
is estimated that over 10,000 Of-
ficers and Enlisted Men took part.
A parade of this type really
shows the people what Drew
Field is doing for them.
It seems as though there is a
wedding for some lucky fellow
every time a bunch of furloughs
are given out. T/Sgt. Newborn
was the lucky guy out of the last
bunch. Just a hint. Perhaps he
will have cigars to pass out since
it is so near to payday.
Sgt. Redington, one of our crack
radio men, just returned from a
furlough. I guess he will be ready
for another one in five or six
months. The girls back home just
adore his red hair.
We are just beginning to realize
how warm the weather is here
in Florida. Perhaps there.will be'
an order out, stating that we may
wear shorts, beginning the first
of July. We hope so.
-_-__---<-------
-I.
626th Bomb. Sq.
By S/Sgt. Murphy
"THE WORLD'S MOST
UNREAD COLUM"
Now that the officers and men
are back from the wars up North
Carolina way, things will begin
to get on a full-time basis.
Yours truly is at long last learn-
ing something. useful for civilian
life. After a week's guard duty,
I'm almost a full fledged flat-
foot.
Why is it Corp. Peters shirks
back, hisses at you, and gets a
wide and wild stare in his eyes
when you approach him for con-
versation? Could it be that a
three-striper is laying the whip a'
little too hard? Corp. Peters was
born with a wheel in his hand,
so he should have nothing to
worry about.
SThe reason Sgt. Schmetter is
:walking on air these days is be-
'cause he is expecting Frances
'down Tampa way during July.
(Continued on Next Page)


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Phone Y 1219 17th St. & Oth Ave

EAT
HENDERSON
BAKING CO.' S

BREAD
2702 FLORIDA AVE.


Max's Liquor Bar
WINES LIQUORS CIGARS
FREE DELIVERY SERVICE
1601 E. COLUMBUS DRIVE
PHON Y-1281
-- KEEP 'EM FLYING


LOANS MONEY TO LEND
Diamonds Watches Jewelry
Silverware
Diamonds at a Big Saving-
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409 Tampa Street


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They are spendable like cash everywhere. But if lost or stolen uncounter-
signed, they are refunded to you promptly. No identification required
except your signature.
Issued in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100. Cost 750 for each
$100. Minimum cost 400 for $10 to $50. For sale at Banks, Railway Express
offices, at principal railroad ticket offices and at many camps and bases.

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1210 FRANKLIN ST.

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Open .9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
Closed Sundays
514 TAMPA STREET


I
_ _


June 4. 1943


THE ECHOES







TCageH E


(Continued from Preceding Page) III F. C., HQ. & HQ. SQ.
Is she as nice as you say, Schmet- SEA BREEZES
ter?
Our cooks really reserve a hand. By Cpl. Alvin M. Amsier
They are cooking more like our
mothers every day. A hand also Lucky guys, aren't we, of the
for Lt. Quenin for the fine work A.G. Section? Daily morning in-
he has done in getting our mess sections finds us the first pla-
hall in the fine shape it's in.
Isn't S/Sgt. Downey's haircut toon, so we get to see the passing
a Lulu? Well, the tiny cashier WAACs first and longest. But do
likes it. their uniforms make their best
Our deepest sympathy to S/Sgt. points stick out???
Kress-his girl friend met a 4-F Why does Joe Hresko put a 3c
and now he's only a 1-A in the stamp on the envelopes of letters
Army. to a certain somebody (?) in
T/Sgt. Garich is about to help Newark? No return address
the housing shortage by sharing shown either? She'll get your let-
his apartment after a certain ters just as fast with free mail,
T/Sgt. returns from furlough. boy.
Could this be duty? Or does he
know of the soon-to-be-bride. Looked like the III FC took
What happened to that big deal Lake Carroll last Sunday. Seen
that was to happen up in Pat- swimmfig and sunning them-
tersoh, N.J., when M/Sgt. Frank selves included "Big" Smith, Con-
went home on furlough? Did nolly, Reifsnyder, Harvey, Hum-
Evelyn do him wrong? Read next phries, and Giel. Who drove the
week's column for the lowdown B-3 Bus?
on this fading romance. M Hot Dots
____ More adieus: Lincoln Karches
627th Bomb. Sq. now at AC OCS, Miami. Ray Jof-
.frion moved to DeRidder (La.)
All seems to be in a bustle AAB Lt. (ex-Cpl.) Otto Komo-
around the Engineering section rous still at Aberdeen and a re-
of the 627th Bomb Squadron since cent poppa Guercio is "sweat-
the 'dashing Connecticut Yankee,' ing out" poppa.
Lt. Rockwell (Rocky to his' broth- Capt. David C. Smith is the
er officers), has returned. Yes,
you could see the men hustle and W EAA
bustle, especially when Lt. Rock-
well was seen "tottin" his Colt
45 slung like an old Westerner.
We wonder if the Lt. is as good
as the old cowboys? He did look
pretty tough. a
The 627th can boast that it has
an ace. Gunner DeCecca shot
down an enemy plane at Martin
Field. No, boys, it wasn't a Jap
nor a German. 'Twas only a red
plane, you know; one of those
vers for you, boys.
Aha! Finally the most abhorred
branch of the service is coming
to the fore-CWS. To many these .
letters are a puzzle, even to Air S Y outlS
Force Officers. Questions are ite col
asked these poor unfortunate men 1 i li I
from what he is doing in the t as '. t hI S.
squadron to "are you an AM or I l a is a
Armament Man." Oh, yes, the ea e"s s e wrea in
gold braid always gets them, too. mi o1 ,
Everyone refers to us as being O;, 1 00 O
"Gas happy" or a "stinker." Our I s1 S itess i
duties, when we can get men, O 0 iiiaraSce.
makes everyone envious. Even i es into "1 a' Of
the Officers are mystified at this I s oap a I. O
mysterious gas throwing perform- EasY oto n s a
ance. Some of these Air Force EoSY u t V a sta's
Officers love to smell that gas quick as a ....aio s .ng
with odor of Geraniums techni- as. l' s l OS O 14
ally called Lewisite. cra, C, s
M/Sgt. Hutchins just came back BEFORE -I E ,
from a dashing furlough. Sgt.
tell the boys about that brunette;
better still, show them that beau-
tiful picture. Anyway, congrats.
A sad event took place the last
day or so; the transferring of Sgt. .
Nicholas Gimben, one of the
original 3 0 4 th transportation
drivers. We still have Sgt. Car- -
penter, who from his experiences FRANK RUTTA, CHEI
as "ice man" in Savannah "makes Formerly chef at Montros
a rough and tough combat driver Formerladway and 48th, New Yorkos
down here--That's all, folks. Broadway and 48th, New York
down here-Thats all, folks. ida, got sand in his shoes
XVth Fighter Command opened his own place at
XVth Fighter Command 4 W. Lafayette
By Pvt. Bob Monana 418 W. Lafayette
S By Pvt. Bob Montana Specializing in Spaghetti
On "ersatz" furlough in Georgia WE ALSO SERVE BEER A
is Sgt. Stone who will return soon
to eilighten us on the art of
camouflage, as seen from a pup
tent.
With "Ro.ring Snoring" Pvt.
Fernnani also on furlough the
boys of the 15th are enjoying 15
nights of peaceful, silent slumber.
But let no one say they were
asleep on the ball diamond last
week. The 15 won two games in
one night! No double-header, but
one forfeit and one hard-fought
victory over the 704th. Pvt. Mc-
A 1 ~


ia has Gang mace 11 fits, 6
runs-and errors-! Big Boy
Swain knocked in five of the six
runs. Pvts. Maurice and Murzic
split the pitching honors with
Pvts. Ackerly C. Moses on the
initial sack, Keen on second,
Swain on the "hot corner," Cpl.
Corrano, short-stop, Sgt. Amsler
in R.F., and Pvts. Gasprini and
Trevers in C.F. and L.L. respec-
tively.
Pay Day the Team tied the
723rd with a 9-9 score, with the
game called on account of dark-
ness The boys made 18 hits to
their opponents 12.
And that's all for now, except
that if you have hot dogs in your
shoes- besides your messkits -
see Cpl. "Doc" Gross. He does
some fancier footwork than Tony
Galento did.
----X----
Military Play
(In four acts)
Act. 1. Soldier and his pay.
Act. 2. Soldier and his pay
and his girl.
Act. 3. Soldier and his girl.
Act. 4. Soldier.


new officer in our Chemical Sec-
tion and a welcome to Lt.
Colley, the Physical Training Of-
ficer and to Lt Rittmayer in
A-3 and to Mr. Owens, the
new WO in the Orderly Room.
Stan Dubowski thinks that
rulers make swell backcratchers.
The list of qualified arms men
is too long for publication. Tough
. Riddick and Guercia have
their troubles-watching the gals
who pass their mimeo shop .
Vankuren guarantees painless
shots at the Dispensary...
Park tried to get all his sun-
burn in one day. .Duncan and
Burke are true to their pal
"Rastus" Williams--they won't
give this writer any inside info
on the "great" photographer's
iLove Life.
---- -------.
"How did you find the ladies
at the dance?"
"Opened the door marked
'Ladies' and there they were."

GULP LUMBER CO.
'Everything to Build Anything'
Millwork Made to Order
500 PACKWOOD
Phone H 162 TAMPA


F-
e Restaurant,
, came to Flor-
and now has

Street
and Ravioli
AND WINES


d- s-- ~-Wil~~-~-r~-- -~-r-i.~


TERRA CEIA ISLAND FARMS, Inc.




Growers and Shippers of

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SIDNEY R. PERRY, Secretary
TELEPHONE 31-507

TERRA CEIA, FLORIDA






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Specialty: PEPPERS, TOMATOES





MRS. MARTIN HAMMER, Secretary & Treasurer

PHONE 27-976

BRADENTON, FLORIDA

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Planing Mill.

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BAY VIEW HOTEL
FIREPROOF COFFEE SHOP IN CONNECTION
W. B. SHULER, Manager
208 JACKSON ST., Between FRANKLIN & TAMPA
TAMPA, FLORIDA PHONE M 5537






SRANE P4IARMAC 'S
PHONE 4
H 3712 2//S-GRAVND CENTRAL AVE.


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Palmetto, Florida


I


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June 4, 194


THE E CHOE S


Paep I P


i






June 4, 1943 THE ECHOES Page l~.


MargaretReinhold, Champion Diver,

Visits L .(olley Before Joining waves


Base Apministralive

I Inspector's Office
By Pfc. Samuel Borrow, Jr.
The hand of time continues to
turn, and with it moves the Ad-
ministrafive Inspector's Office.
The WAACs have arrived in all
third dignified glory and we en-
listcd men are packing our bar-
racks bags, awaiting the next
call of "All aboard for Tokyo,
Rome and Berlin.'
Auxiliaries Janet Sheldon of
M'lillis. Mass, and Hazel Molgard
of Omaha. Neb., have been assign-
ed to this office and have taken
to their new duties as would vet-
eran soldiers. Our hand of wel-
come goes out to you ladies, and
wth it our best wishes for a suc-
ccssful sojourn in your new home.
S/Sgt. Harry L. Reid, one of
the old timers in this section, has
left us and gone out in search. of
new worlds to conquer. He is now
at Miami Beach undergoing train-
ing in the Air Force Administra-
tion Officers Candidate School.
This makes a total of three men
from this section to go out of
this office to train for officers
within the last month. Hats off to
Major Ziska and his staff for the
excellent training passed on to
these men that enabled them to
make this change and do a bigger.
job toward restoring peace. and
unity to the world.


Before taking up her duties as tire if she gets too busy with her A Home Away From Home
a WAVE in New York, Margaret work.
Reinhold, curly-headed diving She enlisted in the WAVES SERVICE MEN
champion, visited Lt. Arthur J. May 19 and is expected to be as- SER E
Colley, Physical Training Officer signed to duties later as a swim- ATUS T
,of the Third Fighter Command, ming instructor. ALBERTUS HOTEL
to say goodbye. Lt. Colley Her coach, Lt. Colley, of Phila-
coached Miss Reinhold to a na- delphia, Pa., was graduated from 956 Twiggs M 1339
tional diving championship last Temple University in 1936 with a
year. degree in Physical Education. He
The sun-bronzed, 25-year-old was physical training, teacher at
Floridian, much more fidgety Glen-Nor High School. He came Welcome Soldiersl
than when atop the 33-foot plat- to Drew Field in August, 1943,
form from which she won the and was the Base Physical Train- M NL
Senior National Amateur Athletic ing Officer from then until May. TAMPA S ONLY
Union diving championship last 8, 1943, when he was transferred
August, told Lt. Colley that she to the Third Fighter Command, MUSICAL BAR"
would give up her title and re- with headquarters at Drew Field.
D Hear Your Favorite Songs


Orlando AAF School of Appled Taics cs ESTE FIELD AR
Drew Signal baseball team lost their second game of the season CASS & TAMPA STREETS
to the Army Air Force School of Applied Tactics of Orlando, 3-2,
Friday night in Orlando before a large crowd.
All five runs were unearned off the offerings of Vito Tamulis,
ex-Dodger and Yankee for the Drew idam, and Charlie Rushe, former SEMINOLE
Pittsburgh Pirate pitcher, now SOUVENIR & JEWELRY CO.
tossing them for the Air Force lando sent two runs across the LIVE ALLIGATORS
School. Both pitchers allowed one platter without the aid of a hit. CUR D O S -- G F T S
hit to the outfield. Tamulis gave Drew committed a total of seven
ht to te o cs gve errors that led directly to their WRAPPED FOR MAILING
up three in the infield and his downfall. 107 E. Lafayette Street-
pitching partner, Rushe handed The Orlando nine defeated
out two of the infield variety. Drew, 2-1, several weeks ago in
Tamulis, pitching at his best, 14 innings on an error for the ELITE CIGAR STORES
struck out a dozen men and se- ;- 's only other loss of the 'The Spor Headquarters of Tampa'
cured the only hit that went season. PreLviolis to this game, lhe sport Headquar.ers of Tampa
through to the outfield for the Drew had won nine and tied one. WINE BEER CIGARS
Signalmen, while Rushe got 15 400 Zack Phone M 62-072
on the last strike. Score by innings:" -on 31
Error by third baseman Coul- Drew Signal .._.200 000 000-2 07 Tiggs Phone M-1236
ter on Benkowski's grounder and AAFSAT .. 000 102 00x-3


*a walk to Thomas put two men ~.,.. 7--
aboard in the first. Harriman
dropped a bunt in front of the
plate and beat it out, with Ben-
kowski scoring. Thomas moved to
third and came home on Bentz's
fly to deep right to put Drew in
front 2-0.
Orlando surged back with a
single tally in the fourth qn er-
rors by Thomas and Benkowski
Long with two hits to produce a
run.
In the sixth inning, the whole
Drew infield fell apart and Or-


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pmasashoauadBe a Part of Your DailyDiew-t-r
.a _v ', i


June 4, 1943


THE ECHOES


Page 11






Page 12 THE ECHOES .Tune4, 1943


_ idah, ih ABa B
___ I"AL iP I
~s ~ ~ _~ gp
~ a


Drew Field Boxing

Team Scores 4 to 2

Win at Forl Myers
Drew Field's boxing team
pounded out a 4 to 2 decision at
Fort Myers Wednesday night over
the Buckingham Air Base in a
six-bout, All-Army card.
The Drew team won four bouts
by decision. While losing one on a
technical knockout and one by
the decision route.
The feature bout was between
Pvt. Bleta of Drew and Pvt. Gart-
man of Buckingham who stood
toe to toe and slugged it out, with
Gartman getting the better end
of the deal in the torrid three
rounds.
Pvt. Ellison of Buckingham
turned in the only knockout,
stopping Pvt. McGovern of Drew
in the third round.
Hard-hitting Paul Gastelmen of
Drew floored his man for a count
of nine in the third round after
pounding him with lefts and
rights in the first two rounds to
win the decision over Cpl. Sny-
der by a wide margin.
Two Drew soldiers, Sgt. Rossi
and Cpl. Bobboles, met in a
grudge fight with the match be-
ing called a draw.
A large crowd witnessed the
bouts.
Other results:
Pvt. Santorelli, 130, Drew, de-
cisioned Pvt. McCarthy, 130.
Pfc. Adragna, 150, Drew deci-
sioned Pvt. Chesnut, 150.
Pvt. Tenborg, 160, Buckingham,
decisioned Pvt. Davis, 156, Drew.

Signalmen Sweep

Two Games Sunday
In winning their 10th and llth
games of the season, the Drew
Signal baseball nine swept a
double header with two army
teams on the Drew diamond last
Sunday. Drew romped on Camp
Sorenson, 11-0, in the first game
and defeated Sarasota Air Base,
5-0, in the nightcap.
Southpaw Knott threw a one-
hitter in the opener against the
Camp Sorenson nine to win his
first game of the season.
Lt. Chet Thomas and Out-
fielder Petitti led the attack at
the plate with three hits each.
Al Bentz,, the tough luck pitch-
er on the Drew team, finally came
through with a win after pitching
26 1-3 innings before receiving
ei'edit for a victory. In two prev-
ious games he pitched 14 1-3 in-
nings before being relieved and
the next time out pitched a 1-1
tie, 12 innings. In winning his
second game of the season, he
limited the Flyers from Sarasota
to five hits for a shutout.
Merod and Thomas secured two
bingles each in the nightcap for
the Signal nine.

WAACs Ipvade
Base Headquarters
The WAACs invaded Base
Headquarters 'this week when'
thirty-four khaki clad girls pre-
pared to learn jobs in order to
release soldiers for active duty
in the field.
Almost every type of head-
quarters work will be done by
WAACs after a training period of
supervision by the soldiers now
filling the positions. The majority
have been assigned to clerical
work in the various Staff offices.
WAACs have been assigned to
the Special Service and Public
Relations offices. A photographer
has been assigned to the Base
Photo Laboratory.
Dental assistants, airplane me-
chanics, telephone operators and
Chaplains' aides have already
been placed by the Classification
Section. Other positions will be
filled by WAACs upon their grad-
uation from specialists schools
throughout the nation.

McAskill Music Stores
Radios and Repairing
Sound and Inler-Communicating
Systems
Authorized Capehart and Scott
Radio Service
1116 Grand Central
Phone H-3787


Drew Golden Gloves Winners

To Box in Army Boxing Show














.*1

















Rafael Baez, hard-hitting 1 fft e Puerto Rican, will match
punches with Cpl. Joe Vandermeer of the Orlando Air Base on
June 9th in the All-Army fight card in the Municipal Auditorium.
He was a former professional before entering the service.
By PFC. DELWYN BAGGETT
The regular monthly Army boxing show will be held at the Mu-
nicipal Auditorium June 9th at 8:15 p.m. The show will consist of
10 or more three-two-minute-round bouts.
Winners of the Drew Field Golden Gloves will meet the cham-
pions of the MacDill tournament on the all-soldiet card as an added


attraction to the regular bouts.
The Drew Field Band will lend
the martial airs with a concert Price of tickets are 55 cents gen-
beginning at 7:45 and will play at eral admission, $1.10 reserved and
intermissions during the bouts. $1.65 for ringside.
One of the feature bouts of the
night will bring the hard-hitting '- *"-"-"'
125-pounder, Rafael Baez, of i
Drew, and Cpl: Joe Vandermeer, CONVERSATIONAL
of the Orlando Army Air Force
School of Applied Tactics, togeth- SPANISH
er in what promises to be one of
the best fights ever staged in
.Tampa. EXPERIENCED TEACHER
The hard-punching Baez is a
-former professional from New REASONABLE RATES
York and Pennsylvania, but has
,fought little due to the fact that
*there has been no opponent will- ROB ERT LA D 0
ing to fight him. Vandermeer has
had the same trouble at the Or- 2742 Main St. Ph. H 28-802 I
lando base ih securing an oppo-
nent to fight....... ....
Vandermeer is two-time Golden ,-e*
Gloves champion from Washing-
ton and has fought professionally Fie
on the West Coast where he is I
rated very highly. In his last ap-
vpearance he knocked out the
highly touted Red Wilson in two Walc. Repairing
rounds of a scheduled six-round-
er on the Galento-Katz card. 25 Years in Tampa
Other fighters to be matched
from Drew are Popeye Holland, SPECIAL ATTENTION
.Whobury, and others with fighters TO MILITARY PERSONNEL
from MacDill and Headquarters,
Third Air Force. RUFUS W. GARDEN
Tickets are on sale at the Physi- Member of Auxiliary Police
cal Training Office, 5th and E. 205 TWIGGS
Street; S-3, A.W.U.T.C. Head- Next to Elite Cafe
quarters, Officers' Club, Main PX. -..-..- :I-



BROWN CANNING COMPANY
MILES A. BROWN, Owner.



Canners of

TOMATOES, BEANS AND PEAS

*

Canneries Located in Palmetto, Fla., Camilla, Ga., Clio, S. C.
MAIN OFFICE: P. O. BOX 398


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Leesburg --- Bushnell



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS"


PALMETTO, FLORIDA


S3une* 4, 1943-


THE ECHOES


- Page 12 -


I


~ _u!




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