Title: Drew Field echoes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076231/00060
 Material Information
Title: Drew Field echoes
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Post Exchange
Place of Publication: Tampa Fla
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida -- Tampa   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Drew Field Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa -- Drew Army Airfield
Coordinates: 27.975556 x -82.533333 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Published each Friday in the interest of the officers and enlisted men of Drew Field."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 39 (Dec. 2, 1943).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076231
Volume ID: VID00060
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24622561
lccn - sn 93063705

Full Text





THEW


VOL. 2, NO. 9 Published Exlusively in the Interest of the Personnel of Drew Field Friday, May 7, 1943
~c I -I --I I iii ~


Drive for Rifles

oes Over Top

At Lake Alfred

A $2,300 donation for 28 rapid-
shooting rifles for Uncle Sam was
the result of America's first town
meeting in a "Buy a Garand"
r-' ement staged by residents of
( little community of Lake Al-
1.-j.
Checks for the rifles' came from
the mayor, the postmaster, em-
ployees of the fruit packing
houses, farm hands, small busi-
nessmen-in short, from Mr. Av-
erage Citizen who wanted to do
his bit.
Spark- plugging the homespun
campaign was J. G. Arbuthnot,
79-year-old farmer, who asserted
persons on the home front were
intending to sacrifice, too, and
said he hoped other communities
would follow Lake Alfred's ex-
ample.
Lt. A. G. Thompson, Assistant
Public Relations Officer of Drew
Field, representing Col..Melvin B.
Asp, Commanding Officer, out-
lined the history of "give a
Garand."
Pfe. Harold R. Bradley, of the
Public Relations Office, demon-
strated to the audience wha'
America's fastest firing rifle looks
like.


Drew to Play Orlando
S The Drew Signal Corps base-
ball nine will play two games
over the week-end when they
meet the Orlando Air Base
there and the Food Machinery
nine c.f Lakeland in Lakeland
on Sunday.
Vito Tamulis will pitch the
Saturday game in Orlando and
Bronson the Sunday game.
Tamulis has a record of four
wins and no defeats in his four
starts of the season. He has
compiled a record of 46 strike-
outs in the four games.


6olng Up
Major Rex. W. LeFevre, Com-
marn-.ng Officer of the 551st
S.A.W. Battalion, has just been
promoted to lieutenant colonel.
For years Assistant Chief of Con-
struction for the city of Atlanta,
Gecrgia, Colonel LeFevre has
been in active service since Jan-
uary 24, 1941. He has been active
in Georgia National Guard circles
since 1909. in the Field Artillery.


lHo plywood Technicians Build Arlificial Palm trees


Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer technicians, working from a big circus tent set up cn Drew Field, are
shown here making artificial palms for the film, "A Guy Named Joe." They are made out of 2,000
painted fronds, imported from California and nailed to cypress logs. R. A. Burks, construction fore-
man, was careful to explain that this was no reflection on the variety of palm trees grown in Florida,
but that they're not the type growing in New Guinea, and that's where the scene is laid.
Actual shooting of the film should get underway in about a week or two.

0ove Experts Fight in Amy Boxing Show


By PFC. DELWYN BAGGETT ers. But the MacDill soldier won
Another big Army boxing show the unanimous decision of the
was reeled off before a large judges.
crowd in Municipal Auditorium Also sharing the spotlight on
Monday night that saw the best the ring card was Pvt. Luis Vera
Army amateurs in this section in of Drew, who stopped the stout-
action. punching southpaw, Joe Kassab,
Pvt. Joey Smithers, rugged of the 21st Bomb Group, MacDill.
MacDill Field middleweight, won Vera, in his last appearance
the Army's Tampa area cham- knocked out the hard-punching
pionship by beating Pvt. Bob Red Wilson in five rounds on the
Boles, of Drew Field, in one of professional card in Tampa.
the feature bouts on the pro- Drew's classy little feather-
gram. weight, Pvt. Rafael Baez, and the
Smithers left-jabbed his way to veteran Mike (Popeye) Holland
a three-round decision over Boles put on a crowd pleaser with their
to win the championship belt do- antics in the ring, the fight being
nated by Sportsman Larry Ford. called a draw. Popeye, as usual,
Smithers fought for the belt once entered the ring wearing his sailor
before, but the best he could get cap and puffing hard on his corn-
was a draw with Pvt. Al Sayre cob pipe.
of Drew, who has changed sta- The only knockout of the nieht
tions since, came when Pvt. Corky (The Lit-
Bcles, after taking a beating tie Flower) Dalgaria, 21st Bomb
for two rounds, came back in the Group, kayoed Pvt. Pat O'Day, of
third to carry the attack to Smith- Drew in the second round.


Meet Lt. Whang


radio school at Fort Monmouth.
New Jersey. He entered the Signal


"I expect to return, if possible, Corps O.C.S. on September 1,
to Hawaii after 'he war is over," 1942, and received his commission
said 2nd Lt. James H. S. Whang. on November 30. From there he
"It is beautiful and has a wonder- was sent to Drew Field where he
ful climate." was assigned to the 571st Bat-
s -. Born in Hawaii, the 25-year-old talion of the A.W.U.T.C.
...i lieutenant came' to the states -_
. >. ^'-. .% when 12 years old. He has been Tamna U. Professor
'e called Chinese so often that he no p U. re r
longer bothers to refute it. Actual- To Lecture on Wagner
ly, however, his father and moth-
LT. COL. REX W. LEFEVRE er, Mr. and Mrs. Sung Kook
Whang, came to this country from Drew Soldiers interested in
He was stationed at Camp Korea. The hatred of their Japa- music are cordially invited to at-
Blanding, as Commander of the! rese oppressors is of long stand- tend a lecture on Wagner by
2nd Battalion, 179th Field Artil- ing, and Lt. Whang did not need Professor Harry Dobson of the
lery; until December 19. 1941. He the present conflict to set fire to University of Tampa Music De-
has been at Drew Field since that his animosity towards the Nips. par ment. The lecture will be heo'
time. He was a member of the Lt. Whang, before coming into at 3:15 p. m. Sunday at the Fed-
Exchange Council, and the Offi- the Army, lived with his parents rated Clubs Building 809 Hora-
cr-' Candidate Board. He is now at 9907 Wilmington Ave., Los tio Street, and sponsored by the
Chairman of the Board of Gov- Angeles, California. He attended Gamma and Delta chapters of the
erncrs of the Officers' Club. the University of Calif., L. A., Delphian society.
He has seen service on the where he majored in mechanical Professor Dobson has studied
Mexican Border, and in World and aeronautical engineering, and taught music in New York
War I, in the Field Artillery. He On February 27, 1942, he en- City for fifteen years, with two
was an instructor in gunnery at tered the army at' Fort Mac- years in Europe. His course at the
Camp Taylor, Ken'ucky. He is a Arthur, Calif., and from there Universit- "tsistcry and Appre-
graduate of Alabaa Polytechnic was sent to Camp Crowder, Mis- ciation'of Music" is famous.
aduate of Alabama Poltechn souri, on March 2, 1942. After a'- All soldiers, and m;mn;-ers of
Institute, a three-letter man. in tending the clerk's school there, cultural and civic groups are in-
football, baseball and basketball. on April 16 he was sent to the vited to attend.


In other bouts, Pvt. William
Miller, 132, 21st Bomb Group, de-
feated Pvt. John Davis, 138, Drew;
,Pvt. Jim Smith, heavyweight
21st Bomb Gr., won over Pvt
Elmer Schoff, MacDill; Pvt. Henry
Mendoza, 145, Drew, was given
the nod over Staff Sgt. Pat Lucas
144, MacDill; Pvt. Leon Brown
152, 21st Bomb Gr., beat Pvt. Jim
Hood, 145, MacDill; and Sgt. Sam
Isaac, MacDill lightweight, won
over Cpl. Cletus Knight, 21st
Bomb Group.
In a special bout that was not
carded on the program, Lt. E. P
Dee, coach of the Drew Field
boxing team took on one of the
Russian visitors in an exhibition
match who were guests at the
fights.
The MacDill band played a 30-
minute concert before the fights
and entertain during the 15-mn-
ute intermission under the direc-
tion of Warrant Officer Frederick

Sub-Depot to Get
First Aid Cou rses
From Rid Cross

Undcr !he general direction oi
Mr. Harry Kenning, nationally
known Life Saving and irsl Aid
Sxpert of the American Red
Cross, an Instructor's Course ir
First Aid will be given ojr aboui
40 selected employees of the 26th
Sub--DIeot.
According to Lt. Col. A. L
Hu chcson, this First Aid Course
vill be in connection with the
-Yth Sub-Depot Caf(-y Program
under the direction o,: Mr. Emil
noth, Safety Dir:,:r.,:. Col. Hut-
he :.n, Lt. G i.M. !..'k av:, and
Chaplain -11. L. F cr :! in e.'d to
iake the course' .
The initial course ,..~ill be for
Instructors only, and will last
eight days, with 'li hcu.rs of
ccnccntra'ed work cach day.
When these people have beer
thoroughly trained, .hey will be
capable of training other em-
ployees in First Aid.


Sweeping Changes

In ASTP Wipe Out

Previous Rulings

A sweeping change in the Army
Specialized Training Program has
eliminated all previous regula-
tions. It is the object of the Army
to enroll all men possible in this
training. An entire new program
has just been prepared to put this
into effect.
Any enlisted man desiring this
training is not required to take
an examination as heretofore. Ac-
cording to plans prepared for
handling the program on this
base, he need not make any appli-
cation, as he will be reported au-
tomatically to the Base Classifi-
cation Office for interview if he
is qualified.
SQualified men will be sent to
a "star" unit which is a reception
center for ASTP applicants. At
this unit, men will be housed,
processed and interviewed and
then assigned to various types of
training either at the "star" unit
or other colleges' designated for
this training.
QUiTWrca-icons for Selection By
ASTP Field Selection Boards
ASTP field selection boards
will recommend for training un-
der the ASTP. enlisted men of
any grade who possess the follow-
ing qualifications:
a.-General requirements:
(1) A score of 115 or better on
the 'Army General Classification
Test.
(2) Evidence that the best in-
terests of the Army would be
served by further training in the
ASTP.
b.-Candidates who have not
passed their 22nd birthday on the
date of recommendation by the
ASTP field selection board, must'
be high school graduates or the
equivalent, but must not have had
more than two years of college
work unless-
(1) Their college work has in-
cluded one year of physics at col-
Slege level, or
(2) Their college work has in-
Iluded one year of mathematics
at college level, or
(3) Their college work has in-
cluded at least three courses in
psychology, or
(4) They have a ready speaking
(Coninued on Page 2)
--------

toin Up
Captain Kenne'h Baker, Base
S-4, has recently been promoted
to major. A veteran of the last
war, Major Baker has been con-
nected with the Army for many
years in the Indiana National
Guard. He is j resident of Indi-
ariapolis, where he worked as a
sales and electrical engineer.




M:
4 T.


MA-C R K. G. :AKER
As Base S-4,I Mailer Baker is
responsible for Base and Sub-
Base construction: f::r fiscal prob-
lems pertaining to the base and
general handling of funds allotted
to the base: for the equipping and
movement of troops both in and
out of the base: and for drafting
work in connection with building
construction here.


: i
)







THE ECHOES


$2300 for Garand Rifles


.--




BUY GRAND RIFLES FOR ARMY-Charles Wesley Tilford,
Jr., Li the audience, sights one of the rifles at the Lake Alfred
lown meeting.

(Continued from Page 1)
knowl-edge of at least one modern 3 German Students
foreign language. Executed For Writing
(c)-Candidates who have passed
their 22nd birthday on the date Anti- Nazi TractS
of recommendation by the ASTP
field selection board must- In February a story leaked out
(1) Have had at least one year of Germany telling of three Mu-
of work in a college (junior or nich University students sen-
teacher's' college, university, tech- tenced to die for writing anti-
nicai, or normal school), with one Hitler tracts. Since then additional
year of mathematics at college information has been printed in
level, a Swedish weekly magazine.
(t2) -Have not had more than -The three-one a girl and the
three years of college work ol their two soldiers-were guillo-
graduated firom college unless tined. One of the soldiers was a
their college work has included at survivor of the. siege of Stalin-
least tbree couises in psychology, survivor of the siege of Stalin-
eglearad and had been decorated with
(3) Have a ready speaking two Iron crosses.
khowledge of at least one modern Trouble Begins After
foreig- language. Gauleiter's Speech
h .d-'- no clase will eulised men At a university festival, Gau-
with I.e folnowinr qualifications leier Gieseler denounced women
be recommended for training un- students for using studies as a
der the ASTP:
(1) lnter officer candidates pretext for avoiding war service.
(var. 2 ), AR 625-5) unless they .If they did not want to work in
(parn. iC(6), AR 625o5) unless they munition factories, he said, they
sign w-_rvers of their rights to re- ought at least to bear children-
quest re-lief from active duty. without marriage
(2) Selected officer candidates without marriage.
(par. 2h-(4), AR 625-5). The women students 'jeered
(3) Accepted officer candidate him. Infuriated, he ordered the
(par. 2:.(3), AR 625-5) unless they police to charge. Men students de-
have expressed a preference for fended the girls, and a riot en-
the ASTP after acceptance for an sued.
office-r candidate school. The next day, Munich house
(4) Men in uhits alerted for walls bore the inscription, "We
overseas. want our liberty back." And the
S(5) Men destined for immediate university's student body issued
shipment as overseas replace- a anti-Nazi tract.
nents. an anti-Nazi
(6) Men who have qualified for The police swooped down, and
aviation cadet training, the. two- men were arrested for
distributing the tracts. At the
Qew Pro Station trial, the sergeant who had been
at Stalingrad told the judge:
You won't have to hunt for it "You will soon stand where I
Vow. Acco rinq to TIt. Arthur
Vp;iQsmc;mn Assistant V D C O a stand now."


new Pro Station (white) has been
opened in the Air Line Bus Bldg.
at Tampa and Cass streets.
PRO STATIONS IN TAMPA
(White)
1. AiJline Bus Bldg., at Tampa
and C..ss streets (New station).
2. Ecoms 201-203, Bus Station
at Ma'i-n and Twiggs streets.
(Colcred)
1. 10iG Central Ave. (at Cass
streie).
Place : this notice in your bill-
fold- KNOW WHERE THESE
PRO STATIONS ARE LOCATED.


'I've fried to be Red, White and
Blue
ro the boys at MacDill and Drew
THIS IS SURELY THE PLACE
FOR YOU!"

M. MILLER' BAR
.111 FLORIDA AVE. Ph. M 7215

BEERS -- WINES
._ i


Perfect Fitting



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OPEN TUESDAY AND
THURSDAY EVENINGS


CLO F ESR FOR ME
J916 FRANKLIN STREET


"Musical Supper"
Is Held by 314th
Captain John A. Schneider sur-
prised the gang Wednesday, April
28th, by introducing a musical
"late supper." Supper was served
at 1930 (7:30 P.M., civilian lan-
guage).
At the entrance every nmn was
given a full package of cigarettes
and a very good quality cigar.
Farther down, each man was giv-
en a paper plate filled with "very
good" chow. Last, but not least,
a can full of excellent draft beer.
The Special Services Depart-
ment, under the personal direc-
tion of Pfc. Evans, the mimic who
needs no introduction to Drew
Field soldiers, presented a floor
show that included some beauti-
ful girls, and they entertained the
boys with songs and novelty
dances.
There were plenty of seconds
on the beer. The house was
packed, with not a vacant seat in
the house. A good time was had
by all.
One of the reasons for the suc-
cess of this "late supper" was the
absence of Pvt. "G. I. Messkit."
Captain Schneider, how about
some more "late suppers"?


Wedding of the Week
Miss Margaret K. Smoke, civil-
ian employee of the Signal Office,
III Fighter Command, became the
bride of Cpl. Henry Niesiobedzki
of the 11th Fighter Wing. Chap-
lain F. L. Auer conducted the
wedding at Chapel 1 on Saturday
afternoon, May 1. Appropriate
wedding music was played by
S/Sgt. Herman Bartels on the
chapel organ.
Mrs. Niesiobedzki, dressed in a
navy and white suit and wearing
a gardenia corsage, was given in
marriage by Lt. Col. James F.
Garber, Jr., acting Adjutant Gen-


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Phone 3003-9c, 22c
Saturday and Sunday
'Mountain Rhythm'
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FEATURE NO. 2

'Mummy's Tomb'
Dick Foran
John Hubbard
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8 till 11
EXCEPT MONDAY

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LEAVING GRANT'S CORNER
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7:15 -- 7:45 -- 8:15


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Good Food Reasonable Prices
Try Our Sunday Roast Turkey Dinner
Served From 11 A.M. to 9 P.M.
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CHATTERBOX
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707 S. HOWARD AVENUE
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For All Your Printing and Stationery Needs ...

CALL


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GLENN R. ROSS, Owner


Publishers of Tampa Army Newspapers


1113-15 FLORIDA AVE.


PHONES: 2126 and 2177


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B--~ssrmf----~- h-~s~14 Id~sf-~4r--_ I


i


May 7, 1943

eral, III Fighlter Command. The
attendants included Mrs. Doris
Fogarty, sister of the bride, ma-
tron of honor, and Miss Agnes
Forsyth, also of the Signal Office,
bridesmaid. Best man was S/Sgt.
Howard White, and Sgt. Robert
Keefe was usher. Both are of the
11th Fighter Wing.
Mrs. Gladys Smoke of Braden-
ton, mother of the bride, was pres-
ent, as were many officers of the
Headquarters. Mr. and Mrs. Wal-
ter Niesiobedzki, of Terryville,
Conn., are the parents of the
groom. A wedding dinner fol-
lowed at the Tampa Terrace
Hotel.





THE ECHOES


Mr.. 7 1cQA


FROM THE. SPECIAL SERVICES OFFICE


Character Sketch

















Two weeks ago, last Tuesday,
Sgt. Robert Hilgartner played the
piano at one of our soldier shows
for the first time. The audience
in Recreation Building Number
One received his brilliant per-
formance of both classical and
popular pieces with tremendous
enthusiasm. The second time that
he played, his reception was the
same. The soldiers indicated
plainly that they wished to hear
him soon again and more than
9nce.
Some of you who have heard
him might.be interested in know-
ing a few facts about this talented
pianist. To begin with, he says
that he was born in Baltimore,
Maryland, went to high school
there, and studied music there
under John Rohr. "During my
last two years in high school,"
Sgt. Hilgartner says, "I began to
give concerts at clubs, hotels, and
private houses, so before I left
school, I was pretty well known
as a pianist in Baltimore."
As he grew older, Bob became
more and more intent upon de-
voting his life to music. Studying
with his teacher, John Rohr, in-
spired him. As his reputation
spread, Bob began to receive of-
fers to play on the radio. He also
became interested in composition.
Orchestras in Baltimore are now
playing several of his pieces quite
regularly.
"Yes," said Bob, "They play
stuff that I've written and people
seem to like it, but I don't get
much money for it. I could cer-
tainly use of that money now.
When the war's over, I hope to
make music my profession."
Those who have heard him play
hope that he will realize this
ambition.

Soldiers Always Welcome

EL BOULEVARD
RESTAURANT
FINEST SPANISH FOODS BES7
OF LIQUORS 2001 Nebraska
4. 4
PILLOW TOPS
I Mother, Sister, Pal, Grand-
_'mother, Dad; Mother and Dad;
unt, Wife, Remember Me and
Many other. 50 Different to
ijselect from. At shop in the
1Air Base Bus Terminal
906 TAMPA STRErET
V


On the N Spot
RECREATION BUILDING
NO. 1
Friday, May 7, 8:00 p.m.--
To be announced.
Saturday, May 8, 8:00 p.m.--
"Ghosts."
Sunday, May 9, 8:00 p.m.--
Old Fashioned Silent Film.
Moriday, May 10, 8:00 p.m. -
"The Right Answer or Else."
Tuesday, May 11. 8:00 p.m.--
Variety Show (Norman Kirkcon-
nell).
Wednesday, May 12, 8:00 p. m.-
(Anzi-Skating Act).
Thursday, May 13, 8:00 p.m.-
Concert by 69th AAF Band. 8:30
p. m.-Broadcast of Concert.
ENLISTED M~p'S SERVICE
CLUB
Friday, May 7, 8:00 p.m.--
Dance.
Saturday, May 8, 8:00 p.m. -
Group Sing.
Sunday, May 9, 8:00 p.m.--
To be announced.
Monday, May 10, 8:00 p.m.--
Dance.
Tuesday, May 11, 8:00 p.m.--
Concert of Recorded Symphonic
Music.
Wednesday, May 12, 8:00 p. m.-
Variety Show.
Thursday, May 13, 8:00 p. m.-
Bingo.
BROADCASTS
"Drew Field Revielle" Monday
thru Saturday, WFLA, 7:05 to
7:30 a. m.
"Drew Field Presents" Thurs-
day, WFLA, 10:30 to 11:00 p.m.
"The Right Answer or Else,"
Monday, WDAE, 8:30 to 8:53 pm.
"Squadronaires" Tues., WDAE,
8:30 to 9:00 p. m.
"Rookie Roy and His Scrap-i
book," Thursday, WDAE, 9:30 to i
10.00 p. m.


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917 Franklin St. (2 stores 1401 7th Ave. Yoi~NC
917~I Frankli St.R C nTa


Open Monday, TueSday,
Wednesday and Thurs-
day Evenings.


Jewish
There will be a Mother's Day
service for service men of the
Jewish faith on Sunday, May 9,
at 9 A.M. in Chapel Number 3.
Four mothers, whose sons are in
the service of our country, will
be special guests for the occasion.
"Since we will not be able to
be with our mothers," said Chap-
lain Fierman, "this service in hon-
or of them will be helpful to them
in the bettering of ourselves."
LARAMIE, Wyo.-Chain letters
are being used by the local Ki-
wanis, Rotary and Lions clubs to
boost the sale of war bonds. The
receiver of the letter is urged to
buy enough stamps to complete
any unfilled "albums' he may
have as well as to buy bonds di-
LOS ANGELES.--Mr. H. F.
Berry, restaurant owner, keeps an
ant eater to control the ants in
his establishment. The beast,
named Oscar, refused to eat more
than enough to satisfy his appe-
tite. Mr. Berry hired an exter-
minator and that made Oscar
angry. The ant eater bit the ant
exterminator.
* 4
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"Where Your Fun Is Our Fun"

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Formerly "The Wonder Bar"
1210 FRANKLIN ST.


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for a drink, a chat and fine maidc."
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Open From 8 A.M. to 12 NM.
*


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THE ECHOES


THE


ECHOES


GLENN R. ROSS, Publisher
TAMPA ARMY NEWSPAPERS
Business Office:
1113 FLORIDA AVENUE
P. O. Box 522 TAMPA, FLORIDA Phone 2177


All advertisements contained in this newspaper are also contained
in the Fly Leaf, published in the interest of the personnel of MacDill
Field. Minimum joint circulation, 10,000 copies.
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON REQUEST
A newspaper published exclusively for the personnel of Drew
Field and devoted to military interests and the United Nations
Victory.
Opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of the individual
writers and under no circumstances are they to be considered those
of the United States Army. Advertisements in this publication do
not constitute an endorsement by the War Department or its per-
sonnel of the products advertised.
6


Post Exchange Profits Given to Drew Field Soldiers
Post Exchanges are operated for the convenience of Drew Field
soldiers, are operated to sell at the lowest possible price the things
that we need, including food, drinks, clothing, and almost every-
thing else for which there is a reasonably large demand. Prices are
lower than they would be on corresponding articles in outside stores,
Because the PX is interested in earning only a very small profit.
And what profit there is, reverts back to the soldiers themselves,
through, the Exchange Fund.
The Exchanges are governed by a Council, composed of officers
who thoroughly understand problems of operation on this field.
The members are unpaid. They are: Lt. Col. Henry C. Floyd: Major
John K. Coughlan; Major Alfred B. Strickler; Captain Hamilton A.
Long; Captain John A. Schneider; and Captain James M. Lynch.
The Exchange Council sets' up the basic policies under which
the Post Exchanges are operated. The actual administration of the
PX's is done by Captain Edwin P. Jones, Exchange Officer, who
in civilian life was an auditor and manager of large commercial
concerns. He is assisted by Captain Donald S. Evans, and Captain
Morris I. Porter, Assistant Exchange Officers, both graduates of
the Army Exchange School, and both formerly engaged in mercan-
tile business. Each of these officers receives only his regular army
pay as Captain-they receive no commissions, profit percentages,
or extra earnings from the PX.
Soldiers working in Post Exchanges during their off-duty hours
receive extra pay from the Post Exchange, amounting to one-half
their regular base pay. But most of the help in the PX's is civilian,
paid for on a comparable basis with similar work in Tampa.
Periodically, at the discretion of the Exchange Council, profits
are allocated to the various organizations on the post, which have
been here since the last previous distribution of funds. This money
is figured on the basis of the number of men in the organization-
in other words, a large organization will get a bigger share of the
profits than a small outfit. All money received by the PX through
concessions is turned into Exchange Funds for distribution in the
same way.
Profits from the PX's goes into the various squadron or company
funds, and is spent for the benefit and welfare of the individuals
in that organization, at the discretion of the officers controlling
that company fund. Generally, it is used to buy things needed by
the men-such as magazine subscriptions, furniture for the day
rooms, books, athletic equipment, occasional "feeds" or parties, and
musical equipment.
The Post Exchange books are audited every month by an auditor
authorized by the Base Commander. Once every three months, the
PX is audited by the Fourth Service Command. At all times, it is
meant to be only a service and convenience to the soldiers of Drew
Field.


Radio-Code Machine
Down at the Enid, Oklahoma,
Flying School they have a new
automatic radio- code machine
that can transmit six different
messages at different speeds
among 220 students, all at the
same time.
The machine, which is really a
combination of six separate trans-
mitters set up on an elaborate
rack, was provided by radio sta-
tion KCRC of Enid. It was ob-
tained through the efforts of In-
structors Lieutenant Chester E.
Goddard and Mr. William B.
Teitzel, former radio engineer at
KCRC.
When the machine is in opera-
tion, the code is imprinted on a
tape by a printing stylus in much
the same manner as a barograph
recorder. The type passes over a
photo-electric cell directly be-
neath a focused be'm of light. As
the light passes through that por-
tion of the tape on which the
code is printed (a long space of
light is a dash; a short space a
dot) into the photo-electric cell,
a small amount of current is
generated-sufficient to energize


the mechanical sender to transmit
the code to 220 pairs of earphones.
Since the new machine was
installed, students at Enid have
increased their reception speed
from six to between seven and
eight words per minute.

Chemists Develop
"Soapless Soap'"
If it's water, you can wash. It
can be hard, soft, alkaline, or
acid water, or even salt water,
but it won't faze the new "soap-
less soap" which makes water
wetter.
Soldiers overseas must do their
laundry whenever the opportuni-
ty permits, and must use whatever
is available. Sailors use sea water.
It was desirable to find a cleans-
ing material that could be em-
ployed under all circumstances.
The result was "soapless soap,"
developed by the chemical indus-
try, working with the Army, Navy
and War ProductionBoard.
A toilet soap has also been de-
veloped which may be used by
service men regardless of the
type of water in which he has to
clean himself.


r


I


The men of Drew Field are


By S/Sgt. John F. Suszynski
Furloughs are a grand diver-
sion, but has anyone got an anti-
dote for the AFTER affects? Ask
Pfc. Sam Schiavone about it -
he's got the same symptoms,
Brooklyn version, as your Pitts-
burgh Band Noter.
Cpl. Will Krewson, your col-
umnist during the past couple of
weeks certainly did a bang-up
job (THANKS., Will). However,
he set the very bad precedent of
submitting his copy to the Echoes
Editor, Sgt. Jess Zimmerman,
ahead of dead-line (NO THANKS,
Will-what excuses can the BN'er
make now?)
Pity poor Cpl. "Mahoney" Cos-
tello and Pvt. Frank Zechino -
their furloughs started last Tues-
day. .. Pfc. Harry C. Williams of
St. Paul, Minn., the Band's newest
member, formerly with a Latin-
American Band booked by MCA,
will be sharing part of the her-
culean burden shouldered by the
heretofore only string-bassman in
the Band, Pfc. "Herby" Richman.
Maybe vitamin tablets can build
up your resistance for the details
ahead of you, Harry.
A new BAND MYSTERY-the
strong, silent T/Sgt. Ellie Eaton-
more about this later (if the BN
spies operate in their usual ef-
ficient manner) Pvt. Wally
Bettman is the Band's Zoot-Suit
Kid-Can it be that the firm of
Lamb & Nailor Ltd., Launderers
Extraordinary, have a corner on
the Tailoring market now?
Those aren't professional bath-
ing beauties strutting their wares
in the vicinity of the Band bar-
racks lately-they are Sgt. Bud
Estes, and Cpls. Ralph Sudjian
and Jerry Sedlak, slightly broiled
(or "boiled"), after a session at
Clearwater Beach last Sunday.
Welcome Home to Pfc's Bob
Ludwig and "Jim" Crow, erst-
while sojourners (wonder if Crow
still has his mess kit with him?)
-or, would an expression of
sympathy be more in order?

Allotment Problems
Bring Surprises

The Army is doing all it can to
expedite answers to applications
for dependency allotments, but
occasionally it runs into difficul-
ties.
Excerpts from letters from
wives, mothers, and service men
sent to the Army's allowance and
allotment branch headquarters
were exhibited by Senator Down-
ing, of Illinois. They included:
"Please send my elopement, as
I have a 4-month-old baby and
he is my only support and I need
all I can get every day to buy
food and keep him in close."
"Please send my wife's form to
fill out."
"Please send me a letter and
tell me if my husband made ap-
plication for a wife and baby."
"Sir, I am forwarding my mar-
riage certificate and my two chil-
dren. One is a mistake, as you can
see."
"Please find out if my husband
is dead for certain, as the man
I am living with won't eat or any-
thing until he nose for sure."
"You changed my little girl to
a bov. Does this make any differ-
ence?"


Church Call


CATHOLIC
6:15 A. M.-Mass' in Chapels 2
and 3.
8:00 A. M.-Mass in Chapel 3.
9 A.M.-Masses on Sunday will
now be held in the follow'-"
places: )
Chapel No. 2.
Recreation Building No. 2, on
M between 1st and 2nd streets.
Theatre No. 3, at K and 2nd
street.
PROTESTANT (Sundays)
10:30 A. M.-General service in
all Chapels.
7:30 P. M. General evening
service in Chapel 4.
JEWISH
7:15 P. M. Wednesday in
Chapel 3.
8:30 P.M.-Fridays in Chapel 3.
8:30 A. M.-Saturdays in Chapel


-Drew Field Chaplains 3.


SHE RATES ACES!


*m..'


Jessie Draper, one-half of the sophisticated comedy song an -
dance duo, Vernon and Draper, in USO-Camp Shows' music
revue, "SOUP TO NUTS." The rest of the cast is also big-time.-
with plenty of pulchritude! "Soup to Nuts" will play at Drew
Field's RB No. 1 on May 14. 8 P.M.


( WHAT I'.IT YOUV
WANNA GFTrZ
PLACE EL 2

AN:Io .<'o
- GOSOM


Page 4


May 7, 1943


1


urged to remember their Mothers
this coming Sunday. This is a day
recognized throughout the Chris-
tian World in which our thoughts
turn to those who gave us the
breath of life.
It is not necessary to spend a
great amount of money to show
our love for those we call Mother.
Mother will think a great deal
more of a few words expressing
in each man's own way his ap-
preciation of her.
To those men whose Mothers
have passed to their reward, it
would be a fine expression of de-
votion to thank God for the one
who has done so much for you.
We are looking forward to a
large attendance at all Services
this Sunday by all men expressing
to God their appreciation of the
Holy life of their Mother.


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May 7, 1943 THE ECHOES


-W I NJG TJ I P S


22nd Bomb Wing
HEADQUARTERS DET.
By S/SGT. CHARLIE CREWS
Greetings from the new location
of the 22nd Wing. Since last week,
we have moved-from our old
location to our new office here
at 8th and C. The new larger
office is just what was needed.
Lots of new faces around the
place. Newcomers are M/Sgt.
Moore, T/Sgt. McDonald, Sgts.
Pauchek, O'Mara and Marchesi,
Cpl. LaGrange and Pvt. Miles.
Sgt. Pauchek and Cpl. LaGrange
have been around for some time
now, but the others are brand-
new additions to our ."happy
family." Welcome, fellows.
Lt. O'Donnell was the recipient
of congratulations recently. It
seems as though ol' man Stork
dive-bombed the O'Donnell domi-
cile and deposited a "bundle
from Heaven" on his doorstep.
Winchell would call it a "Blessed
,Te-vent,' 'since the newcomer
s a little general. To you, lieu-
.--enant, from all of us-CONGRA-
TULATIONS!!!
Our ball team is still raring to
go. At this writing, we have one
scalp dangling from our belts,
against no defeats, and we are
still looking for opponents. Are
there enough teams interested in
working up a league to play, say,
two afternoons a week? If inter-
ested, just call 463, and ask for
Sgt. Crews.
I'm running out of room, so the
rest will have to wait. See you
next week, but, for now, "So
long-and thirty.

THE EIGHTY-FOURTH

302nd Bomb. Sq.
CHIT-CHAT
By AL GORMAN
The fighting 302nd took to the
field Wednesday morning, invad-
ing a Tampa Bay beach. Truck
after truck of our seasoned troops
poured out through the gates on
their -way to occupy this vital
strip of land. By noon of the same
day, tents had erected and chow
was being served.
Thursday dawned as a perfect
day and, after calisthenics, anti-
aircraft defenses were set up. This
proved to be a wise precaution,
as the area was subjected to an
aerial gas attack in the afternoon.
Response to the alarm was rapid,
and our guns drove off the enemy
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ALWAYS WELCOME

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Tony Italiano, Prop. -
WINES BEER
SOFT DRINKS
717 Grand Central
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planes. There were no casualties.
Friday, we had a waterfront
demonstration on shipwreck tac-
tics. The gorgeous rustle of cur-
rency was heard all afternoon as
the squadron was paid. This, im-
mediately, created a run on the
PX, and beer flowed freely.
Fish, both in the bay and in
the Gulf, persisted in flinging
themselves on the hooks of our
eager anglers, and plans were
discussed for the formation of a
cannery. Some of the more am-
bitious fishermen set sail in a
makeshift raft to capture a mants
ray. They annoyed the poor fish
for hours, but the ray wouldn't
play.
We have had a taste of life in
the field, and had a letup from
the routine of the Air Base at the
same time. Next week, we will
resume our ordinary duties with
zest, and this. maneuver will be
remembered for a long time to
come.

303rd Bomb. Sq.
Under the direction of Lt. Pet-
toruto, Intelligence Officer, a
Situation Map of the Tunisian
Campaign has been drawing com-
ments from all who see it..Using
the pin-point system; one is able
to note the daily progress of the
battle.
Sgt. Massey has gone back to-
day dreaming since his wife
went home after a short visit.
From what we gather he now
wants a furlough..
We would like to know if Pfc.
Emanuel Gordon is planning to
apply for General's Stars.
Pfc. William Hunt, is that
"flame" in Tampa a red head?
Pvt. Elmer J. Prebee, "100
Octain Kid," seems to be out of
a job on the line as long as there
is a- gasoline shortage.
We didn't know when we sat
down to dinner. That we were
eating last year's Derby-Winner.
T/Sgt. Bynum would like to be
seen on the "line" rather than
going fishing and getting little
sleep at night.

THE THREE THIRTY-NINTH
482nd Bomb. Sq.
A squadron rumor has Pvt.
Adler posing for the squadron
insignia. With no harmful bearing
of the said person, we wish to
announce to the personnel that
the insignia has a definite bear-
ing and resemblance to a bear.
With 'Commando's' Sgt. Craiger
and Sgt. Halstead on D. S. to
school, Sgt. Koch and Sgt. Clair
are the replacements for Sgt.
Craiger, and from ye supply
room Cpl. Marshall takes over
the duties of Sgt. Halstead. It
won't be very long until the men
will be back, so our willingness
to aid in the matters is by giving
our cooperation.
"Silver Threads Among the
Gold" is now the theme song of
Lt. Glover. On the 29th of April,
he received his First Lt's rank.


SHANGRI-LA
is at 1212 Grand Central Ave.
Dine and Dance in the Open
"Selected Food for Those Who
Know Good Food"
OPEN 12 NOON TO 2 P.M.
Dinners and Short Orders
at All Times


"A GOOD PLACE TO EAT"
POST OFFICE CAFE
C. D. Kavakos, Prop. Dinners,
Plate Lunches, Beer, Wines &
Cold Drinks, Pies and Pastries.
406 Zack Street Tampa, Fla.



CRENSHAW'S
(Wholesale)
FRUITS :-: VEGETABLES
Phone 2623


Service Men Always Welcome
La Gloria Restaurant
Fine Spanish Food and
Sandwiches
3103 Armenia Ave.
Phone H 33-521


Our congrats, etc., to him. By the
way, those cigars were pretty
good, too.
We wish to quote this famous
slogan that originated uninten-
lionally with this squadron, "A
Blade a Day Keeps the Shadows
away." With the warm season
coming on, there is a great ten-
dency to slacken up on those
close trims. Even here in our own
Shangri-La, we must keep those
stubbles and fuzz at a minimum.
With drill and reviews at a
new high here, we must show our
good leaders how we soldiers can
march. Keep up the good work,
but next time let's make the ranks
expand and have less vacancies.
C
483rd Bomb. Sq.
Sgt. Mayse has been on one of
his fishing trips again. His catch
consisted of a terrible sunburn
while rowing a boat. Mayse is
advertising his fishing equipment
for sale.
The squadron extends congra-
tulations to all of the men who
made ratings this month. Due to
the shortage of men, Sgt. Pharo
has been meeting all men return-
ing from furlough, at the station
for K.P. and guard duty. What
clerk thinks he is a grease mon-
key or at least wants to be
one so darn bad that he is will-
ing to forsake all else to do so?
Pfc. Abadessa hit the jackpot
attending the supply school.
Seems to be plenty of gals there.
Wonder if he is going to th.e right
place?
At the moment this correspond-
ent is wondering if M/Sgt. Hardee
found a boat big enough for his
new outboard motor? .. We
checked the airplanes and all
motors are present and accounted
for.

484th Bomb. Sq.
Our First Sergeant, James F.
Murchison, is now on furlough.
S/Sgt. Jack Pohl has taken over
his duties, and is really doing a
nice job.
Some of the men in this organ-
ization are once again passing out
cigars due to promotions. T/Sgt.
Briggs was first on the list as
he was promoted to M/Sgt, He
really is in smiles these last few
days, but who wouldn't be. Oh
well, more income tax and more
worries, not mentioning the in-
crease in pay.
Sgt. Haush, the demon of the
wheels, recently grounded due to
excess speeding, now has found
himself after the return of his
license, as a very happy man.
Our one and only medical man,
Pfc. Joseph Mansfield, has now
two hours of flying time to his
credit. It takes a lot of courage
for a man who is always taking
care of sick call.

485th Bomb. Sq.
This correspondent is happy to
see promotion lists come out in
the 495th. Cigars' were pretty
freely distributed with the latest
one. The topkick'certainly got his'
share. It looks like it was a lucky
break for him. He was going to



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1301 Grand Central Ave.


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WINES & LIQUORS


play a certain party a game of
checkers to see who would buy
tobacco, but he didn't appear any
too enthusiastic or confident.
There is a strong smell of lini-
ment around the barracks lately.
Wonder if this could have any-
thing to do with our new calisthe-
nics program? We are certainly a
sight for sore eyes, especially
when we are taking terrific cuts
at the ozone with that little soft
ball bat.
The boys are all deeply sym-
pathetic with F/O Lane and Pfc.
Traylor, and one and all are pull-
ing for both of them to make a
speedy recovery and get out of
the hospital as soon as possible.
It certainly would be a big help
to the fellows in the 339th Group
if we had some public telephone
booths out here. We wonder why
some of the other squadrons don't
take up the cry in their columns.
This writer knows of quite a few
instances when men have express-
ed a desire for this convenience,
but no one ever seems to do or
try to do anything worthwhile
about it. It would be especially
convenient the beginning of the
month when men can't get into
town once for the first three days
-it would, at least, give them
some contact with their friends
there.

The Four-Oh-Fifth
HEADQUARTERS
This headquarters has gotten
back to normal with the return
of our commanding officer, Lt.
Col. M. S. Zipp, along with our
executive officer, Major Hook,
and all the rest of our "long lost"
cadre. We've heard varied and
sundry tales of a weird aspect
whispered about... What about
it, Lt. Lepski?
Lt. Engdahl has been sharpen-
ing his "physical wit" as it were,
and awaiting eagerly the hour
when he can find out just how
much exercise his fellow officers
have been getting while away at
Orlando. I'll wager he will find
out.
We are awaiting anxiously the
return of our illustrious T/Sgt.
Duff from his land of dreams
(Kansas). Get ready, boys, for
those "tall tales" from the "short
grass" country. Really, we have
missed Duff, and a mighty fine
fellow he is, too.
Ask Sgt. Schott and M/Sgt.
Rankin about those "purty pitch-
ers" on the wall decorating their
place of "habitat" during the day.
Couldn't be reminders-, could they,
boys? At least they do have an
eye for beauty! Oh, well, why de-
prive them of all the more beau-
tiful things of life?
Rumors to the effect that our
new postal system in the group
is one of quality. One that is un-
equaled, so say the "powers that
be" that recently inspected it. But
why not? The system is operated
by "potential sergeant" Malley of
84th fame.
Just room for "Sleepy" Orin-
ger's only comment of the day-
"Isn'it it time for chow yet?"

THE FOUR-OH-FIFTH
624th Bomb. Sq.
That very popular stepchild of
our national pastime, softball,
holds the spotlight this week. In-
terest centered around the state-
ment of the 22nd Wing that they
had a softball team. If the Wing
has the. courage to meet the "Com-
mandos," we will prove to them
that they have been only dream-
ing. We have a new softball dia-
mond where a very nice Wing
clipping job could be taken care
of.
Those men who have to do with
building up morale, might take
a lesson or two from our Sergeant
White. Last week, Sgts. Hite, Mot-
ley and Glasser went fishing and
returned to the barracks with
quite a collection. Sgt. Hite pro-
ceeded to have a fish-fry in the
squadron area. Aided by the ex-
pert advice of our Mess Sgt.


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Phone 4475


May 7, 1943


THE ECHOES


Page 5

Raines. Hite arranged quite a
feast. As we watched the gather-
ing, we couldn't help but think
just how little it takes to please
a gang of fellows providing they
are left to do things themselves.
Speaking of food. we want to
compliment the personnel of Mess
Hall number 6 on the very swell
food they served up this week.
We all welcomed the return of
"Sir Spud."
Once in awhile something hap-
pens to amaze everyone. The
boys were struck dumb this week
when Sgts. Friend and Gardner
nonchalantly remarked they were
going golfing. To appreciate this
statement, one has to know what
it means to these two to leave
their bunks. There's no question,
but that the men in this squadron
are becoming more courageous as
the days go by.
The barracks area has taken on
a new appearance during the
,week. This is due to the fine work
on the part of our Physical Of-
ficer, Lt. Engedahl, who is really
on the ball. We now have a fine
volley ball court, horse shoe pits,-
a softball diamond and a tennis
court. Sgts. Lafferty and Harper,
who were the construction fore-
man also deserve a word of praise
for the fine way they handled
the job. Because of his effort. Lt.
Engledahl has presented the 624th
with a fine recreation areas.

625th Bomb. Sq.
We, the 625th, are all set for
some tough grueling as soon as
the boys from Orlando get back.
We understand that they are
packed with numerous combat
tricks. Oh, those sore muscles. my
back, and my legs. By all means
be careful with those eyes. Beef
steak is now being rationed and
can no longer be used as a first
aid treatment for black eyes.
S/Sgt. Roland Hall finally got
off for the Cadet training at
Keesler Field. We wish him the
best of luck, and we feel quite
sure that he will make good.
S/Sgt. Saunders has been hav-
ing a heck of a time with the
telephone. "Hello," "I am sorry
I must have the wrong number."
This is the land of sunshine.
If you don't believe it, just take
a look at our boys. They have
been spending their spare time
out in the lawn partly in. the
nude. It was ok, fellows, after all
one must think of his personal
appearance. There is nothing like
a good healthy brown skin.
April 30 was a big day for us.
Pay day was the cause of it. By
gosh that three-day ruling was
a sticker for most of us. N'- over
night passes for three days. Well
perhaps it is a good thing. New
money can get a fellow into
trouble.
Just one other'thing before we
go to press. Many of ou: boys
have been wondering when we
will get our car load of WAACs.
S/Sgt. Griffin seems to think it
won't be longer than a week.
George Cox has already asked
permission from the first Se'geant
to meet the train, when they ar-
rive.
---- + -- --
626th Bomb. Sq.
Well, our vacation days are
over. All the officers and wheels
returned from school this week,
and that so-called "on the ball"
look was easily noticeable in their
eyes. Their pale and somn-what
drawn faces really indicated that
the studying that they dic must
have been terriic. Anyway. glad
to see you all back. Once more
we are one big happy family.
Yes, sir, with our foremost rebel,
1st Sgt. Sibley around what
chance have the northerneui?
What more gruesome twv.some
than S/Sgt. Jones and T/Sgt.
Garich in a little informal chatter
about other days. Two :,rmer
undertakers.
Then there are those -.hose
first cry into the chill m:,rning
air is, "Not me, this is my- day
off."
While returning from tlh rifle
range last Friday, a walRk- con-
taining quite a large sum o moon-
ey was lost by S/Sgt. Hendrix.
If found, the owner will give a
reward.
We hope T/Sgt. "Tenn." Todd
go; home in time for his bi:thday-
party, and that he found th-e Corn
Squeezin's as good as ece:
Before parting: What about
some of our star athletes go.ting
together a softball tean. Seems
that thee aire plenty of ter-n.s to


627th Bomb. Sq.
By CPL. JAMES E. HANNON
Last Monday morning .::': the
New Deal ushered into tin U;27th.
The Orlando contingent -:;:i r(e-
turned and speculation \vws rife
(Continued on Page 6)






May .7, 1843


6271h BOMB SQ.
(Continued from Page 5)
as to the future program. So at
the first crack of dawn (or there-
abouts) the lads jumped out of
their cots and out of the barracks
in one big hop. An unbelievable
sight. But then, we always knew
we had it in us. Yes sir!
Sgt. Pappy Pappalardo, out of
the hospital and looking as sleek
as ever, is sporting a brand new
pencil-line mustache. Quite, quite
debonair.
SPuzzling: One of the boys re-
turned from town with a shady
left eye. And he didn't get it from.
the storied door in the dark. But
how in the name of all combat
tactics did his assailant (?) get
past our man's nose-a Maginot
line on Florida soil.
Bullseyes
We expeditioned out to the rifle
range last week. Cpl. Bill Der-
kacz was high man with a score
of 161. There he stood, .legs apart,
just beating hell out of the target.
And alongside him Cpl. Hannon
stood quite forlorn as his sadistic
scorer kept waving "Maggie's
Drawers" at him. He says that he
never wants to see red lingerie.
A fixation psychosis.
SSgt. Frank Schaeffer, the cozy
one, rang up nine bullseyes in the
rapid fire-with a very able as-
sist from the gentleman alongside
him who obligingly fired at
Frank's target. Of course Sgt. F.
didn't count the assistance on his
final score. No, of course not.
PROTESTANT AND CATHO-
LIC clergy interned in the no-
torious Nazi concentration camp
at Dachau are systematically be-
ing starved to death, according
to a repd-t appearing in the
Apolojetics Journal of Zurich.
(Philadelphia Record.)


Tips On Forced
Landing In The
Southwest Pacific
Chances of surviving a forced
landing in the Southwest Pacific
theater of operations are en-
hanced if you know as much as
possible about the geography of
the many islands, the rainfall,
winds, ocean currents, plants, ani-
mals and the characteristics of
the people.
When forced to bail out at night,
don't start looking for an "out"
from your predicament as soon
as you have your feet on the
ground. Wait until morning and
travel in the direction of the
coast; walk downstream or down-
hill. If you .reach a river you
may be able to build a raft of
logs and float to the sea.
Observe jungle birds and ani-
mals to determine edible roots
and herbs. What they eat is usual-
ly safe for you. Protect yourself
from exposure and insects by
utilizing all clothing available,
including your parachute. Rest
frequently. Dry your clothes when
they become wet. Seek out 'dry
places to sleep. Motor oil may be
used as an insect repellent and
as a fuel.
Travel on the up-wind side of
swamps and rivers. Part of your
'chute may be used to collect
rainwater, which is preferable to
ground water if you have no
means of purification.
After reaching the coast, if you
do not know your approximate
location and are becoming ex-
hausted, improvise a signal device
and await rescue, rather than ex-
pend, your failing strength by at-
tempting to travel.


How the "Underground"


operates inside Germany

* A daring anti-Nazi group is risking death to smuggle
war secrets across the border. Two who escaped ex-
plain why their conspirators never write down ad-
dresses or burn incriminating reports.in -fireplaces; -'
and the part microphotography, memory and iron
self-control play in their grim activities under Ges- I
tapo noses. A vivid report in this month's Digest- ,j.
"Dead Men on Leave."
* Warning to Parents of Teen-Age Daughters. A shocking
account of the wartime rise in venereal disease and
delinquency among girls whose parents are too busy r
or indifferent to keep them out of trouble. What every "
individual-and every town-can do to stem this
threat to America's moral and physical health. Read -
"Trouble on the Street Corners." .-
* Battle Story of "Flying Forts"... 38-page condensation
from"QueensDieProudly,"Part II.Also"AMidgetat
Bat"by James Thurber, and "Secret Mission to North
Africa" in this issue... with 24 other articles of last-
ing interest, condensed for quick, enjoyable reading.
NOW 150 TO SERVICE MEN 25 TO EVERYONE ELSE

GET THE MAY READER'S DIGEST
AT YOUR PX OR CANTEEN
*N


- -


Max's Liquor Bar
WINES LIQUORS CIGARS
FREE DELIVERY SERVICE
1601 E. COLUMBUS DR.
PHONE Y-1281
-Keep 'fm Flying-

McAskill Music Stores
Radios and Repairing
Sound and Inter Communlcatlng
Systems
Authorized Capehart and Scott
Radio Service
1110 Grand Central
Phone H-3787

SEMINOLE
SOUVENIR & JEWELRY CO.
LIVE ALLIGATORS
CURIOS--GIFTS
WRAPPED FOR MAILING
107 E. Lafayette Street


EAT
HENDERSON
BAKING 0 O.' S

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2702 FLORIDA AVE.


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Berger & Rachelson
INC.
WHOLESALE GROCERS
HOTEL, RESTAURANT AND
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Service Men Welcome

GILBERT HOTEL
811 Tampa St. Phone M 1094
O. E. BOGART, Manager


A Home' Away From Home
SERVICE MEN

ALBERTUS HOTEL
956 Twiggs M 1339


III F. C., HO. & HO. SO.

SEA BREEZES
By PFC. ALVIN M. AMSTER
Suggestions: Rod Munroe sug-
gests that the new bandshell
would be an excellent spot for
outdoor movies. We're still sug-
gesting soap dishes in the shower
rooms.
Time marches on! Sancton,
Mellott, Woods (the Cook), Rid-
dick, Bob Smith, Stanley, Taylor,
and Carlin passed their second
year as GIs in April. Long, Har-
mon, and Hartes passed their first
milestone last week.
Best-Sayink-Of-The-Week Dept.
Berny Schmittke, almost nightly,
savs, "Sorry, fellows, I've got to
get my laundry in town again
tonight."
Hot Dots
A welcome to Col. Larew, our
new Signal Officer. That Adj.
Sec. Sgt. is once again bucking
S. Mendozo looked good at the
fights, but poor Whobrey has to
wait until the next ones for an
opponent. "Wah Wah" Celardo
looks so angelic when he types.
Congratulations galore to
Margaret Smoke upon her mar-
riave in site of Lazenbv spilling
all that rice ... to Al Shaw an-
other new Shackman... but-Pete
Washe never told us about his
conjugal status and we're
wondering why "Rastus" Williams
vehemently denies his pending
marriage.
Something New Has
Been Added
Meaning Flight Surgeon James
S. Fisackerly and A-l's A. C.
Strecker are now wearing silver
leaves.
Miss Newman continues to turn
out knitted wearing apparel. .
Campilii and Cahill prefer to be
called "Mess Attendants."
Bookwalter and Janes also
joined the Happy Shackpappies
recently. Holz and Castetter
seem to be having a bean and
matchstick feud. Hats off to
Joe Corry who did that excellent
typing job on the Classification
Report for Lt. Oestreich. .. See
you at the party next week.


S


UNITED OPTICAL DISPENSARY
Manufacturing and Dispensing Opticians
205 ZACK STREET PHONE M 5783
COURTESY DISCOUNT 20 PERCENT
Prescriptions Filled-Lenses Duplicated


Hotel Hillsboro Flor
MARTIN C. McNIEL, Manager


GASPARILLA TAVERN
COLONIAL GRILL


Rex Billiard Parlor
Daniel S. Bagley

1012 FRANKLIN
TAMPA FLORIDA


T. W. RAMSEY
LUMBER COMPANY
We Specialize In
Mill Work & Cabinets
We can furnish material for
Repairs and F. H. A. Loans
Phone Y 1219 17th St. & 6th Ave


ida Avenue at
Twiggs St.


Service Men Welcome


ELITE CIGAR STORES
'The Sport Headquarters of Tampa'
WINE BEER CIGARS
400 Zack Phone AI 62-072
207 Twiggs Phone M-1236


Learn to Dance Correctly
BY ONE WHO KNOWS
MAKES ONE GRACEFUL
PRIVATE LESSONS
Selma Brooks 7 Tp \
TEL. H 32-654 207 PARKER ST.


Lafayette Hotel
E. A. CLAY, Manager
120 West Lafayette Street
East Side of Bride
Phone M 5588 Tampa, Fla.


CENTRAL OIL
COMPANY, IN:1

Tampa, Florida


I BOBS OPEN EVENINGS



I Army Store X
SComplete Line Military Supplies For The Needs Of
SERVICE MEN
EXPERT TAILORING
S207 E. Lafayette Street Tampa


TME TA 2nd Floor Knight & Wall Bldg.
I E S A Cor. Lafayette & Tampa Streets.
COOL, CLEAN, COMFORTABLE BED, and Shower Bath, $1.00
You Are Invited to Usei Our Reading, Smoking and Wash
Rooms All Day Without Charge.




MADISON DRUG COMPANYY
FRANKLIN AND MADISON STREET
Where the Men of the Armed Service Shop and Eat
We Are Anxious to Be of Service


ONE-DAY SERVICE .f TT 9
EXPERT WATCH REPAIRING PA U L'
Watches Diamonds Jewelry Novelties
Our Motto: "Service Men First"
214 E. LAFAYETTE, NEXT TO MANHATTAN CAFE
OPEN EVERY NIGHT 'TIL 10 P. M.


- -- I -- --


Page 6


THE ECHOES








May 7. 1943 THE ECHOES Page 7


A Night In A Radio Station

With A Unit In Bivouac


"Good evening, everyone. To
night the Drew.Field Star Parade
presents a special broadcast pre
pared by the men of a signal air-
craft warning unit battalion un
dergoing training in the field."
Thus began one of the 11 reg
ular radio broadcasts sponsored
by the Drew Field Special Serv-
ices Office under the direction o:
Lt. A. Kluge, a former radio 7an
nouncer from Chicago, who made
the foregoing announcement.
In readying an army for the
battlefront, two factors present
a problem which must be solve
to insure satisfactory results. The
primary one is the proper military
training program which equips
raw recruits to carry out their
various duties. Our armed forces
are accomplishing this to a mark-
ed degree, demonstrating its suc-
cess in brilliant exploits' in dif-
ferent theatres of this global war
1The second factor, Morale, sim-
S defined, is nothing other than
confidence, and the fighting ef-
fectiveness of any army is re-
flected by the confidence of the
men in its ranks.
The morale of Drew Field mili-
tary personnel is looked after by
the Special Services Office, under
Capt. Chester K. Delano. Through
the medium of the special services
office, entertainment and recrea-
tion of a high caliber is offered
to Drew soldiers to aid in creat-
ing this confidence and an esprit
du corps.
All Talent Utilized
Every Army unit -small or
large-has a Special Service Of-
ficer. His duty is to make certain
that all talent within his parti-
cular organization will be used for
the fulfillment of entertainment
for his troops, and they must be
organized so that they can provide
their own entertainment and re-
laxatibn whenever the opportu-
nity for such exists.
JLet us go on wILh the produc-
tion and see how this is aone on
the air.
Lt. J. Brown, Special Service
Officer of the bivouaced unit,
steps to the rhike and the show
begins. It is called "A Night In
The Field." After a few intro-
ductory-remarks by the lieute-
nant ,Pvt. George Wells takes over
as the narrator.
Who is Pvt. Wells? He is a
former newspaper editor from
Massachusetts. The 32-year-old
private has led a nomadic jour-
nalistic existence, working in turn
with the Baltimore Post, me Pitts-
burg Post-Gazette, and also as
editor of the Worcester (Mass.)
Herald as well as the Providence
(R. I.) Examiner. During his on-
duty hours he works in the unit's
Message Center, and when off he
utilizes his talents for radio -
which he developed as a news-
caster with a broadcasting station
in New York and Worcester-for
entertaining his buddies.
S"Strong, and daily growing
stronger," says Wells, narrator,
"is this great American army.
From every part of the nation,
from every walk of life, men of
all races and of all creeds are
being welded together into the
greatest striking force the world
has ever seen, a force striking
with the sole aim of freeing all
of the peoples of the earth who
are bound today with the Axis-
forged chains of slavery."
Thus Wells draws his radio au-
d ~e into the story-a story of
aLBical battalion made up of
m!r gathered from every point




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We Carry a Complete Line of
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Open Till 11 P.M.
805 Gr. Central, Ph. H 29-842


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612 Bell Phones 4205 4204
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I MONEY LOANED
ON ANYTHING OF VALUE
TAMPA LOAN CO.
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on the compass within our 4'8
- sates--men of the arts and
e sciences, men of the forges and
Factories, men of the cities and
farms, men of the hills, men of
the allies, all fused together into
a typical fighting unit of Amer-
-ican fighting men so they could
1 go back to their jobs and live in
- security.
f The story involves a typical day
- in bivouac, from early morning
e when the bugler arouses the men
abruptly from. heavy slumber by
e sounding reveille, to night fall-
t proceeding through roll call,
i chow, drill, details, hikes, ma-
Sneuvers, and evening songfests
y when the soldier relaxes. Soldiers
s from the outfit play the roles
About themselves as the narrative
; unfolds.
After the story is told, Wells
takes over the mike again and
speaks into it. "The American
Soldier marches daily," he begins.
"It is all a part of the vast train-
Sing program that is making him
fit for the struggle that lies ahead
and giving himri the endurance
That will enable him to carry
through to ultimate victory. In an
army as big as ours; every type
of feet is hidden in the G.I. shoes
that soldiers wear. Few of these
feet wore G.I. shoes before-
least of all, the feet of a dancer.
Feet such as those of Pvt. Johnny
Fatcher... "
Pvt. John Fatcher, a former
master of ceremonies in Phila-
delphia and New York night
clubs, where he entertained with
;comic and tap dancing, stepped
'up to the microphone and amazed
:the audience by tapping out a
'tune with his teeth to duplicate
:the rhythm of his feet which he
had demonstrated a moment be-
fore.
Stars of stage and screen give
freely of their talents in their
visits to army camps. But in the
field where the battalion was
bivouacked, no stars can come.
However, when the boys gathered
in the evening, they always called
upon Pvt. Jules Getlin who left
the stage and radio of Chicago
for a greater sponsor-Uncle Sam.
Getlin, next on the program,-
responded with'-some able imper-
sonations of Ronald Colman,
Charles Laughton and Winston

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409 Tampa Street

T OWNSEND
Sash Door
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LUMBER & MILLWORK, ROOFINld
AND PAINT- FHA LOANS
PHONE H4891
N. Rome and Fuller Streel


HENRY HOWKEE CO.
Chinese Hand Laundry

Satisfaction Guaranteed
504 Tyler St. 'tampa Fla.

All Service Men Are Welcome
Barcelona Cafe
SPANISH RESTAURANT
WINES AND LIQUORS
Phone S 2142 Open All Night
4714 Nebraska and Osborne

ALWAYS SAY...

HOLSUM BREAD

EXTRA FRESH


Special Invitations to All
Service Men

GLEN'S BILLIARDS
Now In Its New Location
805 TAMPA ST.




BEER WINES
1324 Franklin Ph. 1-7240
BILL BAILEY, Prop.
Member V.F.W. & Am. Legion


Churchill."He spoke lines convinc-
ingly which many of the audience
had heard his subjects speak on
the radio and in the movies.
Getlin, before entering the army,
appeared in the Theater Guild
production of "The Verdict" with
Jacob Ben-Ami. He gained his
acting experience with the Actor's
Company of Chicago for ten years.
Wells, back at the mike, intro-
duces a violinist. "This afternoon,"
he said, "the grim fingers of a
soldier firmly gripped the stocks
of an army rifle and he peered
down its barrel. Tonight those
same fingers grip tenderly the
slender stock of a violin. For the
man on the field, the soldier, Cpl.
Sam Gruzin, a former first violin-
ist. of the Baltimore Symphony
Orchestra. becomes a musician
again.. "
The youthful virtuoso, only 21
years old, played a Hungarian
rhapsody. An admirer of Jascha
Heifitz, he is level headed enough
despite his youth, and he doesn't
pretend to aspire to be another
Heifitz, but wants to be the best
Gruzin possible.
Pvt. Wells again. "There is no
singing in the lands the Axis has
conquered. No singing in -the
ranks of the Axis armies. But in
this army there is singing-the
singing of free men. And the songs
they sing in this war will still
be written. One is "This Is Worth
Fighting For"-and you know it's
worth fighting for. There are
other songs too numerous to men-
tion, but one expresses that day
toward which we are all striving
-that day when, in truth, we can
all sing, 'When the Lights Come
On Again All Over The World'...
and this we pledge to you-when
the lights come on this time, they
will never be dimmed again."

Lost
A book, "Thoroughfare," by
Christopher Morley. Finder
please return to Base Library,
located in Service Club, 6th and
D Street.

"Soldlerm 'avorlte Eating Place'
STEAKS AND CHOPS
& SPECIALTY
EL ITE
RESTAURANT
TAMPA AND TWIGGS STS.


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on Hillsborough Bay
Try the Best in Food
FINEST LIQUORS
DANCING EVERY NITE
22nd Street Causeway
Phone Y1715
PRIVATE DINING ROOMS



AIR BASE BUS


LINES,


Inc.


BUS STATION
Corner Tampa & Cass Streets



30-Minute Service to Both
Fields at All Hours


15-Minute Service

During Rush Hours



For Further Information

CALL 4243


ASK THE


STOKER


~-w,. welcomed by workers. If you had to
S." stand up to a hot furnace, you'd see
the word refreshment in a new light.
And as for refreshment, that's what
ice-cold Coca-Cola is. No wonder
everybody agrees that the only thing
Like Coca-Cola is Coca-Cola, itself."

BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY i

TAMPA COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY


BAY VIEW HOTEL
FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION-EVERY ROOM WITH BATH
COFFEE SHOP IN CONNECTION
W. B. SHULER, Manager
208 JACKSON ST., Between FRANKLIN & TAMPA
TAMPA, FLORIDA PHONE M 5537


FRANK RUTTA, CHEF-- -. -
Formerly chef at Montrose Restaurant,
Broadway and 48th, New York, came to Flbr-
Sida, got sand in his shoes and now has
opened his own place at
418 W. Lafayette Street *
Specializing in Spaghetti and Ravioli
WE ALSO SERVE BEER AND WINES


CRANGPRMACY



PHONE 7 i'S 4 2
H-3712 2/S- GRAND CENTRAL AVE.


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H. 0. LEWIS, Mgr.


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* Expert Barbers
* Manicurists


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P"


Miay 7, 1943


.THE ECHOED


Pag' 7







Page 8


>( e k lf t, MI-Id

8WAS" v
IM A'~ a


Baseball Team

Deafeats Tampa U.

By 4-2 Score
Drew Field Signal Corps base-
ball team extended its winning
st' eak to six straight games by
defeating Tampa U., 4-2, Monday
in the first game of the Tampa
twilight league at Cuscaden Park.
Al.Bentz, from the Georgia-
Alibama league, pitched six-hit
ball for the Signaleers in win-
ning his first start of the season.
Jumping out in front with two
runs, Drew led 2-0 going into the
sixth inning, when Paul Straub
of Tampa U. hit a -home run with
oni on to tie up proceedings.
Drew came back in their half
o f he seventh to score two runs
alo tne ball game. Drew collected
seven hits off John Clements of
T.,nmpa U.
Lt. Thomas led the hitting for
the Drew team with three hits.


*Iy 3u ou-


But, Mrs. Mulcahey, is this putting
all your efforts towards winning
,the war?

Flashes From the
Base Administrative
Inspector's Office
By M/SGT. ROBERT ROSS
The wheel of fortune goes
'round and 'round. Whare it stops,
nobody knows.
Two men in this office have
struck "pay dirt.'.' Sgts. Hardick
and Traister have departed for
OCS. Lots of luck, potential Lieu-
tenants Hardick and Traister.
This office salutes both of you.
Here are some more changes in
personnel: Pvts. Lewellan and
Schwartz departed destination
unknown. Lots of luck and happy
landings. We will be seeing you
all in "Shangri La." Pfc. Reed
comes .to us from Hq. Co., 501st
Signal AW Regiment. Welcome to
our family circle.
Civilian Personnel. Miss- Hood
(Eisie tu ner friends). the Miss
who needs no introduction, trans-
ferred to Base Classification Of-
fice. Watch the "IQ" of that of-
fice now. Lots ofluck, Elsie. Miss
Crawford comes to us from the
Base sergeant major's office. A
very charming young lady. We
are happy to have her with us.
Miss Buti is another newcomer to
our office.


SERVICE MEN-
Your


Is Located At
801 Florida Ave.
Sears, Roebuck & Company
Tampa, Florida


Hard Puncher

Pvt. Bob Boles, one of
Drew's leading fight-
ers, lost a decision to
MacDill's sharp-
punching Joey Smith-
ers' on the big Army
boxing show last
Monday in the Munici-
pal Auditorium. It
was the second meet-
ing for the two boys,
with Smithers win-
ing a close decision in
the first bout.


A Challenge
Sgt. Morrison, Base Hospital,
has a softball team that would
lik eto compete with other
teams on the field.

Drew Beats Sarasota, 6-3


Drew Field Signal Corps base-
ball extended its winning streak
to five games by coming from
behind in the ninth inning to
score five runs and defeat the
Sarasota Air Base, 6 to 3. at
Sarasota Sunday.
The Drew nine was on the short
end of a 3-1 score going into the
ninth, but with the aid of three
hits, mixed with three walks and
an error, five runs crossed the
plate and sent Thrascher to the
showers. Sharpe finished the
game for' Sarasota.
The former major league pitch-
ing star, Vito Tamulis, slammed
out two hits to aid his pitching
performance for the Signal nine
in winning his fourth straight
victory of the 'season. He increased
his strikeout total for four games
to 46.
Toomin secured three for five,
to lead the Drew Signalmen with
the willow. Wolf and McAtee
swatted out three apiece for.Sara-
sota.

WELCOME E
TO THE
AIR BASE GRILL
Where The Busses Stop
4 .

CAMPBELL
BARBER and BEAUTY SHOP
S308 Twiggs Ph. M 54-572
Featuring
IRENE GORDON, Lady Barber


HORN E'S PHARMACY
Complete Drug Store T)
Service jLjk
Phones H 1925-H 3141
SODAS-SUNDRIES
2709 MacDill Ave., Tampa, Fla.
r~sE~~i~---.x- na~
Mother's Day Flowers
ORDER EARLY
Wired Anywhere in the U. S. A.


15 I~
1%ETai


THE ECHOES


BRITISH MAKE
PRACTICE RUNS
While the British plan doesn't
permit the dropping of the mis-
siles into a rain barrel from 30,000
feet, as many American bombers
claim to be able to do, night
bombing is not an inaccurate hit-
and miss affair. The British planes
follow the unvarying plan of mak-
ing a dummy run over the target
to align sights and correct the
drift. Frequently the big bombers
circle three of four times before
the bomb-aimer is satisfied and
ready for the final run, when he
releases the bombs.-Arthur Hale,-
MBS.
DOWN 558 PLANES IN, PACIFIC
The War Department has just
given out some figures on the
record of the Army Air Forces.
Six Army bombardment groups
in hundreds of destructive raids
in Europe and the Southwest Pa-
cific have shot down 558 Axis
planes. Three of the group in the
Southwest Pacific destroyed a to-
tal of 323 Japanese planes. The
record of three other groups over
Europe is 235 German and Italian"
planes shot down.


Year Without Injury
The. chances are better than 20
to 1 that if you're a pilot or a
member of the flight crew, you'll
go through the next 12 months
without an airplane accident of
any kind-not even a sprained
ankle or barked shin.
This prediction is based on fig-
ures prepared by Colonel Sam R.
Harris, commanding officer of the
Flight Control Command, after
an exhaustive survey of AAF ac-
cidents and their causes, during

"SLIP-EEZ"
gfci lah ii
CANVAS
LOCKER 59
SANDALS c
To Wear Under the Shower
STo Prevent Athlete's Foot
SFor Use in Barracks-They
Store Easily in a Knapsack.
A. S. BECK
Shoes For Men
508 FRANKLIN STREET
___ ----~ii


The


Commercial


Printers

Complete
Printing Service
*

Phone 2126

1115 Florida Aveue


WHITE ROSE BAR
Paul Webber, Prop.
LIQUORS, WINES, BEER
AND CIGARS
Cor. Cass and Marion Sts.
Phone 4502

ssaa~mm==01


..and EVERY DAY


Next to you she wants your
P-ICTURE MOST!


Portraits

of military personnel is our specialty

STUDIO OPEN 'TIL 3 P. M.
TUESDAY, THURSDAY, SATURDAY


Bryi-Alan Studios


502 Tampa Street


Phone M 1439


_J


EVERYTHING

FOR THE'


MILITARY


JUST INSIDE

OUR

FRANKLIN ST.

ENTRANCE


WELCOME TO

HOTEL KNOX
TOM BRYSON, Manager
Lafayette & Jefferson Streets


CULP LUMBER CO.
'Everything to Build Anything'
Millwork Made to Order
500 PACKWOOD
Phone H 1862 -:- TAMPA

-- ~ II--
"Flowers Telegraphed Back
Home Under Bonded Service"

NELSON
"THE FLORIST"
Open 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
Closed Sundays
514 TAMPA STREET

TELEPHONE H 25-692 ,
THE C R I C K
TEA ROOM
241 HYDE PARK AVE.

Groceries Tobacco Candy,
Notions

Adams Kennedy
Whiting and Jefferson Streets
TAMPA. FLORIDA


The Tavern Bar & Grill
HOT AND COLD LUNCHES
Spaghetti a Specialty
311 Franklin St. Phone 3940
LIQUORS-BEER-WINES


VALENCIA GARDEN
Restaurant
WE SERVE THE FINEST OF
SPANISH FOODS
811 Grand Central Ph. H 3773


A ~flynf'V ~'nlnWanSflr l.


SSE VI(EME I- LOANS!
AVAILABLE NEXT TO
AIR BASE BUS TERMINAL
MONEY LOANED ON ANYTHING OF VALUE
We Feature a Complete Line of Distinctive Jewelry and Gifts
914 Tampa Street -:- Open Until Midnight
4-P 4-ft "~*"~~~98~~


May 7, 1943

MAAS


BROTHERS


OFFICIAL ARMY

EXCHANGE

SERVICE


~,~Y""'4~f~ ; ~:


~et;8


MOYHER'S DAY .




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